load charts

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Comments (10)

Cosme Perez in Lake Jackson, Texas

54 months ago

Read the whole load chart from top to bottom. When I took cco the part on wire I wrote it out two times by hand and it stuck. sometimes the question will ask for gross cap. and sometimes for net. cap. the more you read it the clearer it becomes. Good luck

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crane guy in East Meadow, New York

54 months ago

make sure that you account for all of your deductions including parts of line if it calls for it they can get tricky on you

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kenny kiff {kyfho} in Lafayette, Louisiana

54 months ago

ben, a load chart is easy, just know your boom size, what angle your at, and how many tons your picking up, and match them up. get some1 to get you a load chart and let them show you how to read it. it's really easy bro. in school they have the chart in front of you. dude not to be a ashole about it but if you can't read a load chart you don't need to be in the crane by your self until you can!!!!!!!!!!! be safe

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Half A Bubble Out in A Little Glass Box, Washington

53 months ago

The load chart part is easy, but the parts of line thing is not. Say they describe a crane with 4 parts of line, but you have enough line pull to make the pick with 2 parts...then they expect you to deduct the weight of the 2 extra parts of line since they are technically unnecessary. They always give the weight of the load line in lb/ft. Download charts for TMS750, LS218, whichever you missed, and read the lifting notes carefully. I know it's stupid, but that's how the questions go. Also, a STOWED jib is on the side of the boom and counts as a deduction... a STORED jib is sitting in the yard, and does not. It's a trick question. Hope this helps.

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A Crandall

53 months ago

Hey Ben, Sorry to say this but you are the problem. You are no different than the contractors out there cutting corners. If you aren't willing to pay the price to learn this trade and feel the need to get a three minute chat lesson is substancial enough for you to be justified to sit in the seat, then who ultimately will pay the price for your learning curve? The families of those that are hurt for those cost you want to aviod now. You may have a dream, take the time and do it right. I am a Union operator and Iam not telling you to join the union to learn ,but spend as much money as needed to be proficent with the basics and trust me the charts are the unflinching part of this job, They don't lie and are not misleading. If you get in the habit now of short cuts, then your a contractors dream and the jobs nightmare. Please for everyones sake spend the $$ and effort to become a proffessional and not just a joystick jockey.

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crane guy in East Meadow, New York

53 months ago

A Crandall said: spoken like a true operator union or not and its the truth learn it right or get F**K OUT

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Yi Siang in Singapore, Singapore

53 months ago

i feel is not that hard. just like math. spend your half day look n understand. the fly jib part must be more careful.

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Half A Bubble Out in A Little Glass Box, Washington

53 months ago

Ben I came up through union apprenticeship, and consider it the best way to learn the ropes. But I understand that because of where you live or other circumstances, that may not be the best option for you. The guy that sponsored me into Local 3 (Bay Area) made me read "The Mobile Crane Manual" from Ontario Construction Safety. It's been almost 20 years since I read it, but I remember a ton of theory, rigging, charts, geometry etc. Book costs like $65, but it's money well spent. You'll still have a lot to learn, but armed with that knowledge, and a clear CDL, you'll be useful to someone somewhere. No book can teach common sense, or grow you a backbone, but if you can rig, signal, chuck dunnage, and haul counterweight without tearing anything up, people will notice. The cream tends to rise, and you'll get seat time. Check Amazon for Mobile Crane Manual by D. Dickie

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Ben in Brooklyn, New York

53 months ago

that is really helpful. I appreciate this.

Half A Bubble Out in A Little Glass Box, Washington said: The load chart part is easy, but the parts of line thing is not. Say they describe a crane with 4 parts of line, but you have enough line pull to make the pick with 2 parts...then they expect you to deduct the weight of the 2 extra parts of line since they are technically unnecessary. They always give the weight of the load line in lb/ft. Download charts for TMS750, LS218, whichever you missed, and read the lifting notes carefully. I know it's stupid, but that's how the questions go. Also, a STOWED jib is on the side of the boom and counts as a deduction... a STORED jib is sitting in the yard, and does not. It's a trick question. Hope this helps.

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Ben in Brooklyn, New York

53 months ago

thanks for your comment. This really helps.

Half A Bubble Out in A Little Glass Box, Washington said: Ben I came up through union apprenticeship, and consider it the best way to learn the ropes. But I understand that because of where you live or other circumstances, that may not be the best option for you. The guy that sponsored me into Local 3 (Bay Area) made me read "The Mobile Crane Manual" from Ontario Construction Safety. It's been almost 20 years since I read it, but I remember a ton of theory, rigging, charts, geometry etc. Book costs like $65, but it's money well spent. You'll still have a lot to learn, but armed with that knowledge, and a clear CDL, you'll be useful to someone somewhere. No book can teach common sense, or grow you a backbone, but if you can rig, signal, chuck dunnage, and haul counterweight without tearing anything up, people will notice. The cream tends to rise, and you'll get seat time. Check Amazon for Mobile Crane Manual by D. Dickie

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