What are typical dietician salaries?

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LGG in Astoria, New York

45 months ago

It is not just about "following your passion" > caring about money. Working as a dietitian, we have alot of responsibility especially in the long term setting, yet we are not COMPENSATED for what we do. It is not that we do not get paid better than other professions but the point is we do not get paid what we deserve based on the work we actually do.

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ExperiencedRd in Lewisville, Texas

40 months ago

Mel in Lebanon, Pennsylvania said: To the comment of nurses feel they can do what a dietitian does, the older nurses can for sure. I am one of those retired nurses who had to do all of that before dietitians came to be. We got the same training and also we did all our respiratory treatments as well.

unfortunately older nurses think they learned how to do everything.the older nurses were superficially trained to take care of all aspects of the patient. This is why there are separate deficit lines to take care of the whole patient. Older nurses can't even tell the difference between a j tube and a g tube and I have to educate them on how to unclog it- come to think of it the newer nurses can't either. I'd like to see them wean a patient from the vent if they can do what respiratory does. Now I have worked with some great nurses and have learned a lot- as they have from me. We all have to remember that as RDs we have much to contribute- its tough I know but it can be done. the pay, however, is a different story....

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GRDjersey in Bergen County, New Jersey

38 months ago

I'm an RD working in long term care-I have 15 years of experience in the field. It seems NJ may offer higher salary for RDs at least in long term care, since part-time or per-diem non-benefitted positions usually pay between $35-40/hr and full time pays 65k-75k (and the cost of living is probably higher) I was able to negotiate for more because they were sort of desperate for an RD. RNs have asked me for info on becoming an RD because, according to them, our work seems less physically demanding, our daily routine is more flexible, and we have less headaches which I somewhat agree with. Many RNs I know hate their job and it shows on their face and in their attitude. Having witnessed what they have to deal with everyday, I don't think I'll ever pursue nursing. In terms of respect, I feel we are respected and valued as part of multidisciplinary team.
Our profession is not perfect and I do wish there was more money, but I am content and proud to say I'm an RD.

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Dee in New York, New York

37 months ago

I just read this entire thread and at first I freaked out because there were so many negative comments about ring an RD. I currently work as a pharmacy tech at Walgreens and I must say that I would not want to be a pharmacist. They're always on their feet and they are put under constant pressure to get prescriptions finished in a short amount of time. Yes, they do get paid extremely well, especially if you are a pharmacy manager, but I would not be able to handle that much stress EVERY DAY. Some people are just not made for it (me included). What I do like about a clinical field like pharmacist/doctor/nurse/etc is that they are so knowledgable about diseases and how they are able to consult with a patient and tell them what they can do to improve their health. That's what I want to do. That's why I have chosen to go into dietetics even though I already have a bachelors degree In health science. Im going back to school in the fall to take the DPD requirements and then go onto the required internship and then pass my RD exam. I know it will be tough, and I know I won't get a 90k+ salary like pharmD's get, but I will be happy knowing that I can still be an influence on the healthcare field. I am also bilingual in English and Spanish so I know that I can help the under served population as well (and hopefully have jon options when I'm done with my credentials). So, I say that the benefits of being an RD, someone who specializes in preventative medicine (which we desperately need in America right now) outweighs the conparatively low salary that I will be getting. Of not, then I will just have to win the lottery.

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Jane Doe 2013 in Indiana

37 months ago

As a recently credentialed Registered Dietitian, I would like to share my thoughts on the future of this field and salary prospects. In terms of salary, right out of my internship, I was offered a job making just shy of $30,000 a year. After a few months working there, I managed to get a new job for $37,000. My friend skipped the internship and managed to get a job at WIC making $35,000 a year. Now she makes about $40,000 a year.
If you have to take out more than $20,000 in loans do not continue in this field because you will spend the rest of your life crippled by unmanageable debt. This is a very low paying field.
In terms of future of the field, I feel it is very bleak. Being a “nutrition expert” is not a career path. Many health educator jobs would like a nurse rather than dietitian. This is especially apparent in Medicare’s recent decision to exclude dietitians from obesity counseling. This means that physicians, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialist, and/or physician assistant can receive reimbursement for obesity counseling but dietitians cannot.
If someone has an interest in nutrition, I would strongly recommend food science with a minor in nutrition. One of my peers switched from dietetics to food science and she got a summer internship making good money ($16/hr) with housing provided. When I search “dietitian” in my school’s job search engine, 1 job comes up. When I search “food science”, 28 jobs come up. Originally I picked dietetics over food science because I didn’t want to help produce processed, sugary foods that contribute to the obesity epidemic, but food science is so much more than just that. It also doesn’t require an expensive, competitive, unpaid internship.
If you want to help people, nursing is the way to go. Much more flexibility in working hours and in demand then dietitians. At my current job, they just posted openings for five new nurses.
I would strongly discourage anyone from pursing the field of dietetics.

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k in San Diego, California

36 months ago

Jane Doe 2013 in Indiana said: As a recently credentialed Registered Dietitian , I would like to share my thoughts on the future of this field and salary prospects. In terms of salary, right out of my internship , I was offered a job making just shy of $30,000 a year. After a few months working there, I managed to get a new job for $37,000. My friend skipped the internship and managed to get a job at WIC making $35,000 a year. Now she makes about $40,000 a year.
If you have to take out more than $20,000 in loans do not continue in this field because you will spend the rest of your life crippled by unmanageable debt. This is a very low paying field.
In terms of future of the field, I feel it is very bleak. Being a “nutrition expert” is not a career path. Many health educator jobs would like a nurse rather than dietitian. This is especially apparent in Medicare’s recent decision to exclude dietitians from obesity counseling . This means that physicians, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialist, and/or physician assistant can receive reimbursement for obesity counseling but dietitians cannot.

This is very useful information. I have been back and forth between Physical Therapist Assistant and RD. My passion lies with nutrition, however, the lengthy unpaid internship is a bit of a deterrent since I'm in my early 30's and need to work part-time to pay my bills. I would love more information on the career path of your friend that has a "Food Science" degree, and what job opportunities are available for someone that goes that route instead of RD. Is her degree a BS in Foods and Nutrition? SDSU offers that degree, along with the RD program.

Thanks for your time!!

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studyhard in Atlanta, Georgia

34 months ago

I find it beyond absurd some people in here are comparing their salaries as an RD to an RN...
RNs don't exactly sit behind a desk all day long and tell people what to eat.

Just saying.

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RD01 in Minnesota

34 months ago

studyhard in Atlanta, Georgia said: I find it beyond absurd some people in here are comparing their salaries as an RD to an RN...
RNs don't exactly sit behind a desk all day long and tell people what to eat.

Just saying.

Apparently you don't know what dietitians do... Proof that dietitians are undervalued!

Just saying.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

emily in College Station, Texas said: It does not matter whether you have a master's degree or not..in order to become a licensed registered dietitian , you need to complete an ADA approved dietetic internship . i am currently going through my rotations and whoever said it was invaluable is crazy. you spend between 6 months to a year (depending on the program) rotating between foodservice, clinical, and community nutrition sites and hospitals. after you complete the internship you can sit to take the RD exam. Without the internship, you can not take the exam and can only obtain jobs as a nutritionist (which are rare to come by) or a foodservice employee. You can find available ADA internships on the website. the whole process is rather difficult but definitely worth it in the end. As someone has already previously stated, internships are hard to obtain. This year, 4,600 students applied, and only 2,000 positions were available. Get as much experience and "resume building" done as you can: volunteer hours, foodservice job, etc. Hope this helps.

What about dietary manager? Can't folks that obtain a nutrition education without the RD work in Dietary Management? I wonder why this doesn't seem to come up to be an option. Seeing people must eat, have special nutrition needs, we're seeing a growing baby boom population, it seems like this could be a good job.

Thoughts...?

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania said: What about dietary manager? Can't folks that obtain a nutrition education without the RD work in Dietary Management? I wonder why this doesn't seem to come up to be an option. Seeing people must eat, have special nutrition needs, we're seeing a growing baby boom population, it seems like this could be a good job.

Thoughts...?

I like many made the mistake of spending wayyy too much for an education in nutrition. I did well, enjoyed the material, see the value to society, etc, I even initially was on the path to complete an internship.

Like many said,the internships are competitive (which I was competitive). They are also costly. I decided not to pursue it. For a bit, I did what many said.. Started pursuing other allied health options. For two years I spent taking prereqs for entrance into a Doctor of Physical Therapy program. I applied to a couple programs. Yes PTs make decent money currently but keep in mind many of the programs cost around 30k/year (not including living expenses) for a 2.5-3 year program. I was trying to justify spending around 150k (on top of my current undergrad debt) to obtain a PT license. Take this in an environment of Medicare cuts (rehab is getting hit). Take this reality along with the fact that private payers traditionally have followed Medicare as a payment guideline. So contrary to public perception, the pressure on salaries in therapy look to go DOWN not up despite their clinical "doctorate". So the story goes much deeper than the salary posted on the bls with their "projection". Demand for services dictate TRUE value. Medicare cuts don't look good when patients on social funding currently complain about the copays. Hypothetically, if Medicare wasn't there, how much would YOU pay for PT? $200 just for the evaluation? (Like it is in some hospitals)..I don't think so. Not with a target population struggling with $20 copays. Food or therapy?

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

...so instead of digging a hole of debt that would be unreasonable, I've decided to cut my losses in that direction. I've turned back to nutrition. Instead of going for the RD however, I've been looking at Dietary Management. I recently obtained the CDM from AARP and am looking for work as a diet tech (not a long-term solution for the 60k debt I'm already in for this nutrition education - went to Penn State.). I'm hoping to get some experience making the transition to healthcare food service Dietary Management. So any advice is greatly appreciated., I would like to someday have a family and be able to provide. I have both the knowledge (still learning) and skills, I just need the experience. At some point, I need to see a check coming in as opposed to a check going out showing empty promises. If I told you how much time and money I've spent to get established you might possibly get fatigued. DON'T go the loooooooong road to get a job. Thing job not career. Or you might end up with a bunch of little titles you can use after your name spending half your paycheck on debt.

So any comments regarding the prospects in Dietary Management. If this doesn't work, I do not know what I'm going to do. It's pretty sad I've tutored PTAs who are out right now with a good job. What a mistake going for the DPT. Wasted money and time. So far my education in nutrition has been empty promises.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

I'm in a posting mood... It is SAD indeed (no pun intended) that Dietitians are not being reimbursed for obesity counseling. I find it also sad that there are not more options for those with a nutrition education at the BS level such as becoming certified as a diabetic educator. The darn thing requires a masters degree without the RD. While this is true, RNs with an associates degree can become certified. Very sad as I would LOVE to help those manage diabetes (a great need) but do not love the kind of money required to get into debt to do so.

It's pretty pathetic actually that with all the knowledge obtained, I have been unable to use it really. Certification tests are there to rest knowledge and competency, so what is the problem? Frustration has loomed in dietetics. Serving a bunch of drunken obnoxious golfers serving in fine dining was not the hope and idea I had in mind when I signed up, but here we are.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

I also find something interesting when looking at job apps for dietary management. Many only REQUIRE a High School DIPLOMA! Of course they would require experience in this situation and possibly the CDM credential (which you DON'T have to have a degree to get). There are four pathways to become eligible to sit for the test and one includes a reference from a Dietary Manager that you've worked under.

I see this and think WOW. I WASTED so much time and money. You could have a good job working in Dietary Management with just dedication with ZERO to no debt making good money after you subtract out what you would have spent at college.

I find this extremely interesting. My education background doesn't even give me an edge up.

So if your thinking working at a good job in nutrition think Dietary Management. Set a plan, look at the requirements to sit for the exam at AARP and get to work.

Don't do what everyone else is doing and getting yourself into a TON of educational debt for really no reason. No outrageous loans for a nutrition degree. No WORRIES whether you will get an internship. No regret that you didn't go on for a PA, PT, whatever which most will admit was never the idea initially but became the idea when they started figuring out how they are going to pay the mortgage size student loans which are becoming all too common.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

Another thing interesting... People many times do not want to hear the nutritional truth. They WANT to believe the fad diets or whatever. So many times THEY are telling YOU about nutrition as THEY are the expert. After all, they heard it on DR. OZ or read it in some magazine. Someone claims to lose 30 lbs in a couple weeks and BAM that's all they want to hear.

There is so much false information out there in nutrition. People selling half truths.. And the public LOVES it! They don't want to hear the truth.

I could completely sell out and sell nutrition products but I'm a Christian and God doesn't like people lying in order to sell stuff. Sadly, this is what a lot of what is going on as people spend millions on things such as Red Bull, etc, it's all about the profits not health sadly.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

There is the option of working in public health in obesity, but you do not need to spend ALL the money and ALL the time on a formal education. You can just give general info such as info on Calories (in=out) as it just a unit of energy. More in = more energy stored =more FAT. That's mostly what people need to hear anyways. This is for working with customers individually.

There are limitations without having the RD so make sure you don't cross that line of scope of practice. Sadly the nutrition industry is very lax it seems in regulation. Everyone and their mom seems to be a "nutritionist". Some titles are protected more than others, but the public sadly does not know the difference.

Do make sure; however, you are no it breaching the scope of practice in nutrition. Don't be claiming to be an RD or do the equivalent if you are not credentialed as this is clearly fraud.

But you have people playing "Dietician" out there I'm sure. Everyone from spa managers to Chiropractors - although I know of none personally... Heard it through the grapevine.

Bottom line.. There seems to be POOR regulation of who exactly can practice nutrition, and of course people are taking advantage of it.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

A good place to start in nutrition is simply working as a Dieypt Technician. High School diploma only required for many positions. Just get some experience and you have your foot in the door, you can work your way into food production, sit for the CDM exam, and start a real career share you can SUPPORT a family. Best of all... No DEBT. Just a head, a determination, and an obtainable plan... Something I didn't really have.

I like many others saw the bls stats and thought hey it'll all work out as I do what I enjoy. I found out too late how the internship thing worked. I assumed a school like Penn State would set up the internship. I didn't learn until too late how it all worked, with only a minority getting internships and at a pretty good cost.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

If anybody's picked up on it, I'm throwing pearls at you. A good solid plan for anyone looking at serving in the nutrition field. Institutional food service to nursing homes, hospitals, prisons, etc is going NOWHERE. The service is INELASTIC in demand. In other words, it does not matter how bad the economy gets, people must EAT. When the finances are tight, people can forfeit their Physical Therapy or Nutrition Therapy session. They cannot forfeit EATING. With the baby boom population about ready to EXPLODE onto the Senior Living scene, they are going to have to be fed. Dietary Management pays pretty good right now, and if you can LIMIT DEBT, you will be in a good position.

Of course the Lord Jesus warns of famine prior to His return. So in this case, it doesn't really matter what you are doing as long as you are repenting toward God and trusting in Him to save the soul.

What you going to do if GOD says there will be famine? I guess just submit and trust. Can't live in a bubble however. Good job prospect here for anyone truly looking.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

My apologies for the typos. This ipad sometimes tries to correct the type automatically.

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ann marie leouw in Brooklyn, New York

34 months ago

Mike--try getting into Morrison Senior Living and getting yourself a job--- they also have an RD program after you have worked 6-9mths with them you can apply. Food service directors make 90 k with out a degree-- we RDs need to be honest--this discipline does not pay. rehab and nursing is more profitable

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ann marie leouw in Brooklyn, New York

34 months ago

GRDjersey in Bergen County, New Jersey said: I'm an RD working in long term care-I have 15 years of experience in the field. It seems NJ may offer higher salary for RDs at least in long term care, since part-time or per-diem non-benefitted positions usually pay between $35-40/ hr and full time pays 65k-75k (and the cost of living is probably higher) I was able to negotiate for more because they were sort of desperate for an RD. RNs have asked me for info on becoming an RD because, according to them, our work seems less physically demanding, our daily routine is more flexible, and we have less headaches which I somewhat agree with. Many RNs I know hate their job and it shows on their face and in their attitude. Having witnessed what they have to deal with everyday, I don't think I'll ever pursue nursing. In terms of respect, I feel we are respected and valued as part of multidisciplinary team.
Our profession is not perfect and I do wish there was more money, but I am content and proud to say I'm an RD.

I hope you are doing the right thing because you are making it sound so much easy-- I hope you are tracking your weight changes, your pressure ulcers--knowing when low albumin= an infection/inflammation vs pumping your res. with too much protein-- giving the appropriate formulas and the correct free water for your tube feeders and monitoring your food and drug interactions and above all updating your care plans and making changes. Something tells me you are clueless when it comes to management-- this work is not easy-- you have to be a major type "a" and extremely organize--you are painting a false picture of what it takes to be a superb RD-- I have been in this business for > 15 yrs, never failed a survey and I know one has to be meticulous and organize and document, document, document.

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Mike in Union City, Pennsylvania

34 months ago

ann marie leouw in Brooklyn, New York said: Mike--try getting into Morrison Senior Living and getting yourself a job--- they also have an RD program after you have worked 6-9mths with them you can apply. Food service directors make 90 k with out a degree-- we RDs need to be honest--this discipline does not pay. rehab and nursing is more profitable

Thank you for the advise. I'll look into that. One thing I need is experience. Book knowledge is good, but I need to make the transition from Hospitality to Healthcare. I've been thinking getting a job as diet tech or in food production, and then with the CDM credential see if I could gradually take on more tasks in line with the scope of practice. Do you think this is a good plan? If not, any other suggestions? I don't have a lot of money for an internship so I'm trying to eliminate that process unless it is a paid position. Thank you.

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

thank you all for your advice/recommendations!

i am greatly greatly confused by all of this supposed low wage info! people only making $20/h? you can end up making that much at hyatt or whole foods after only a few years.

why i am confused is: what actually brought me here and interested in this profession besides my own interest: i was searching for jobs and a nearby school district is hiring "director, child nutrition" 80k-104k salary and they only "desire" you to be a RD!

can someone help me with this? why would seemingly most of you be complaining (and you're damn right, i don't blame you) about only $20/hr when this position above would be literally 6k-7k (and upwards) a month?

is that a once in a lifetime job offer type situation? am i not looking at the right info?

i would love to be able to possibly positively affect the lives of young kids by removing estrogen-laden soy products (removing soy oils, meats from livestock fed soy, soymilks, etc.), introducing lean grass-fed beef type products in place of the typical soy-fed, inhumane cafo-typical beef usually offered, cutting back on refined sugar products and removing the majority of sugar from their diets in general, replacing the pesticide-laden fruits and veggies with organic options, replacing the typical confinement/estrogen pumped dairy products with nut milks, etc.. yet cannot possibly manage to support myself on $20 and hour after 4 years of schooling plus a year of internship. sorry folks, that to me is not doing something you love, that is putting up with mistreatment by a country who will happily pay more to someone who has done less work. there's only so much love and passion to pour into something before you have to get "real"..

anyways, besides my own personal belief ramblings, can someone please help me determine why i was able to find a job desiring an RD paying them so much while all of your are claiming you make so little?

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

hey i also have some more questions please when you have the time.

i was unfortunately in a situation recently where i was admitted into a mental-health-type facility. i experienced what it was like to be in a hospital-setting (as a patient, not an employee) and being fed a "set" meal plan where we could choose some alternative options if we didn't like what was being served. in the negativity of this situation, it opened up a possible career interest.

is an RD what i would be aiming to "get into" to one day be an employee in the above situation and have the chance to actually create my own menu for hospitals? if you work in this setting do you have the "power" to create your own menus and draw on your knowledge and experience to feed patients the way YOU want to feed them? obviously finances come into play and you might not be able to offer say all organic produce, but do you get any type of say in actually possibly changing menus for the better to offer organic options and such?

is it possible to have any say in changing menus in mental hospitals and schools or is this all controlled by big industry (say coca-cola and keeblers) ?
i'm just curious if i will ever be able to be "in charge" of the health of my "patients" or oppositely if i will have to bow down because of "finances" and only offer sodas, factory farmed meats, hormone/pharmaceutical/pesticide ridden tap water, sugary bedtime snacks, etc...

thank you greatly :D

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

sorry to simplify: if i am more interested in "designing" the menus for hospitals, schools, being in charge of where the food is sourced from, etc.. is an RD what I am aiming to become?

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nutritionexpert in Austin, Texas

34 months ago

interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California said: thank you all for your advice/recommendations!

I'd suggest keeping up on the research if you want to go this direction. All that crap you just spewed about soy is just crap. The only barrier left for soy becoming more popular is POLITICS. It is better for you than beef. Just google Phytoestrogens and start with the wikipedia article, which actually is backed by credible sources if you know how to check wikipedia sources. Stay off the beef cattle farming websites. Stay off the pro-soy websites. There's even a few review papers that show soy is all good these days.

Same to the organic person. Organic is just expensive.

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

i first want to say i think to post what you did is a bit counter-productive (argument-inducing); i'm looking for advice about this profession and do not feel it's necessary to get into the soy debate, i really am looking for a different type of reply, but since you've got me started:

it's actually very interesting; plants have defense mechanisms too! i have done all the research i need to. there are many many anecdotal accounts of women drinking soymilk and having their "hormonal systems" go haywire! please look it up, very interesting! now FERMENTED soy, that is supposedly just fine. the ancient Chinese knew about all of this as well supposedly. in their writings on the wall they had i believe the 5 sacred crops. soy was the only one where the drawing indicated it was not a food source, but a crop used for nitrogen fixing in the soil. in other words, they knew it had toxins/anti-nutrients that only fermentation could fix! they used it for making the soil "better".

i am at the point in my life where i don't even question it anymore, it's more of a SAFETY issue for me. if i'm cooking food for a loved one i'm not going to risk it. like i said fermented soy, such as soy sauce i believe is fine. however i've done enough reading about women's hormonal systems being messed with and that is enough for me. as much as anyone wants to argue it, we ARE animals. reading how phytoestrogen-rich clover fed to sheep screws with their systems is also enough for me. i don't believe we are sheep, but i do believe plants have defense mechanisms too, and soy's is one of screwing with our hormones.

like i said, better to be safe than sorry, it's just better not to risk it! if you want to believe it's safe, what you should be believing in is the fact that soy MIGHT act as an estrogen MODULATOR, which you could believe acts in support of the balance of estrogen in your body.

i'm choosing to be safe and just stick with fermented soy.

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

and your organic "comparison" is ridiculous i can't even believe i'm responding to such a statement. please read up on pesticides. there are people now having diseases from pesticide exposure, it's horrible really! i would much rather spend an extra 30$ at the grocery store for my weekly produce just to be safe instead of spending money on cable, the latest cell phone, the newest car, etc...
just my humble opinion, but the pesticide issue is NOT an opinion, it's 100% real and people are being affected. please do your research!

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

and to compare soy and beef is silly as well. one is a meat and one is a fatty vegetable.

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nutritionexpert in Austin, Texas

34 months ago

Well since you can't be bothered to google the wikipedia article on phytoestrogens, you would know that there are higher concentrations in nuts and oilseeds and that phytoestrogens are in higher concentrations in flaxseed than they are in soybeans, but flaxseed is considered healthy popularly.

I agree that for women, soy is more controversial than it is for men if you have had breast cancer. There isn't enough to say whether it is the soy though. For men, soy is completely fine to take in. I've been taking in up to 70g of soybeans (not fermented soy) per day for the last 12 years and have had no issues from it. That's 2-3x the amounts stated for health benefits.

I don't know why you think Soybeans are a fatty vegetable. in 1/4 cup of crushed soybeans there is 1g of fat and 22g of protein (Fearn Soya Granules), with 8g of fiber and 13 carbs. Soy has the same PDCAAS score (protein digestibility corrected amino acid score) as beef at 0.9. So if I eat 22g of soy, I can get 90% of that into my blood stream without increasing my risk of colon cancer as beef does.

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

no i'm aware of the article, i've read it as part of my research! i AM aware of flax as well and avoid it just as strongly as soy! my point was soy is more of an "issue" in todays time; flax isn't as abundantly found in literally every processed food as soy. i'm not arguing with you on that! soy and flax are equal in terms of negative phytoestrogen content to me, yes flax might be a bit higher but they are the only 2 with levels way way higher than anything else!

i was under the belief the phytoestrogens in soy and flax were, for lack of better term since i'm not a scientist, millions times stronger than nuts and oilseeds! my reference is the "mcg" amount, seen here www.totalityofbeing.com/FramelessPages/Articles/estrogeninfoods.html

soy and flax are EXTREME in their phytoestrogen content compared to nuts and oilseeds (actually soy IS an oilseed and so is flax i believe)! whether or not YOU believe it's not definitive that soy is causing those problems for women, i would encourage you to simply read all of those anecdotes of women drinking soy milk and having their periods come earlier, later, etc.. (i have forgotten if it's mainly one or the other, the point to take away is that these women were greatly affected and to me that is not just a "belief"... these women literally had their cycles changed when drinking soy.

i do not agree with you that soy is safe i have done enough research.
and for you to say something like that really does not "do it" for me, just because you feel you've experienced no effects really means nothing. i'm not a scientist or a doctor but with the research ive done i would really recommend you to do some more reading on the subject!

my point about fatty vegetable was soy is an oilseed, it's a vegetable that has a lot of fat compared to others and this is why we use it for oil extraction! not the main point here, the hormone issues are the main point and my other point

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interestedinnutrition in Agoura Hills, California

34 months ago

my other point was it's silly to compare 2 totally different foodstuffs! some people believe meats are IMPERATIVE. i believe our biology dictates that.
to say soy is healthier than beef is nonsensical to me. vegetables are definitely imperative as well to a healthy diet but to compare one to the other and say that you'd rather eat a vegetable than meat for your sustenance i do not agree with at all!!

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Mike in Corry, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

Well for an update.. I did just receive a job working as "Nutrition and Food Service Director" of a 140 bed nursing home facility. The wage is salaried 32 thousand per year with benefits. The offer is much lower than the ANFP published median of around 40-45k, but I am also starting out in my career in this field. With this being said, I think the position was only offering around 32k/year independent of who applied.

This whole process has been very frustrating. 32k/year is barely enough to live off of after you pay for rent, school loans, car, food, gas, etc. I am wondering if I got into a dead-end career.

This is coming from someone that has a BS in Nutrition Science (as well as an AS in Business Administration) and has the Certified Dietary Manager credential. I didn't pursue the RD mainly due to a number of Dietitians that expressed discontent with the position and the cost associated with obtaining the Dietetic Internship. I still don't know if that was a mistake.

Maybe I should be looking at getting back into Physical Therapy school.

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tiffanylola in Weston, Florida

28 months ago

Good day all,

What are the job prospectives for a registered dietician. Are there still many jobs available?

Also if you are a RD, on a scale of 1-10, how much do you love your job?

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CarJus!3 in Plainfield, Illinois

27 months ago

aawt in Montrose, New York said: consisder pharmacist-- starting salary--91K
or Physical or occupational therapist. Starting salary 75K

PT requires a Master's (poss. Doctorate degree) Lots of school debt.....

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dlp88 in Rio Grande Valley, Texas

27 months ago

Hi, I am really confused about the feedback on this feed. For starters, how can you compare salary for PT, OT, or pharmacist which takes SIX years of school to a salary that can be done in 4 or 5. It is also people's personal choices to go to universities that will put them in debt, and lastly, there are lots of degrees that have people making less than 30K or those where people can't find jobs in their profession at all and are making $10-12 hr. I was an RD, LD after 4 years of college (a bachelor's degree) and after 3 years of being an RD, I made 50k this past year,(I work in dialysis). I get to come in at 8:30-9 am, leave at 4:30 if i want and take a relaxed lunch in between. I get benefits and retirement, PTO, etc. I am fortunate, but also on my part time that is once a week, I make $27/hr consulting through a third party at a nursing home. You will be paid as much as YOU value yourself and the field you choose. I will also note that I am in the "poorest area" of the nation. Nurses WORK THEIR ASSES OFF, are always stressed, exhausted, and also "unappreciated" except usually by patients instead of other professionals. They get compensated for working their asses off. I get compensated for leaving my stress at the office, not being totally burnt out when I get off, and working shorter shifts and having more flexibility for my two kids. There are pros and cons to every profession, and I'm very happy I chose to be an RD. Its been a blessing to friends, family, and my patients in my ability to share my knowledge. If you want to make a lot of money, plan on obtaining more than a bachelors degree--DUH, anything that takes 6 years or more years to achieve is going to involve more compensation.

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inkaseofhappiness in Greenville, South Carolina

24 months ago

I just wanted to point out,and forgive me if this has already been said (I stopped reading after the second page),that the majority of people looking up dietitian salaries and come across this forum are people wanting to better their lives, education, and income. They are, in many cases,still only bringing home $400 a week working whatever job pays the bill that month . That is $20,000 a year at full time. I think $55,000 dollars a year average is good pay! That is over 1,000 dollars a week. A thousand dollars a week to do something a person loves!
I am a 27 year old young woman who makes anywhere from $200-500 a week and have been doing that since I started working( many different jobs, whatever pays the rent). I am in my second year of college and I am going to school to not only be more educated and hopefully work doing something I love , but to also make more money. I think everyone can agree that doubling my yearly salary is worth it. Maybe its because I have been poor my whole life , but I just could never look at $55,000 and think that's not good pay. Especially for only four years of school! I was on track to go to veterinarian school, which is eight years of school and the average pay for that field is $75,000. I would be coming out of school with $150,000 dollars of debt (and thats cheap) if i do still pursue that field. I will only have about $20,000 dollars of debt to get my B.S in nutrition.
What I'm trying to say is that if you love this subject and are passionate about it then go for it. I think that we all just consume way to much this day in age.I mean, how many bills does one have for $4,000(before taxes) to not cover it comfortably. Maybe if we focus on going after what we love and making our financial budget fit within means of our passions then we could start to actually see people practice the age old saying, "money doesn't bring you happiness". Therefore they are freed up to find out what does......

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Mike in Erie, Pennsylvania

22 months ago

I have a BS in Nutrition but never went for the RD. I currently am a Certified Dietary Manager and have experience working as a food service director at a long-term care facility.

In my opinion, it is currently not worth the money and time to obtain the RD credential. I've thought about it a number of times. From what I see, these facilities are going more and more to a contract-type of arrangement. I guess they pay more for contract work but when the benefits are calculated in it might not be all that much different. Also with contract RDs the administration can adjust their hours in response to any change or drop in the census. At least this has been my experience.

There is a demand for a good food service director. With this the individual could be an RD, but many places seem to hire someone without the RD credential. In my observation, I don't think there's any way that I could have performed both my duties as a food service director as well as the RDs at the 140 bed facility I worked at even if I was one. The food service director position is already one that requires a high level commitment of one's time. One can throw money at you, but there is a level in which you can't work fast and efficient enough to get the work done. The pay for that facility was a little more than 30k for the food service director, which is kind of a joke considering the amount of responsibility.

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Mike in Erie, Pennsylvania

22 months ago

.. the bottom line is that especially in a health care community focusing on "culture change" honoring the resident's right to refuse the dietary prescription, more and more patients are simply just noncompliant. We can value good nutrition and health all day long, but unless the PATIENT and the HEALTHCARE SYSTEM really embraces the importance of it, the nutrition field will continue to be at the bottom of the barrel in the healthcare circle.

Currently it seems I'm best set up to be a Food Service Director with my education and experience, but the position doesn't require a BS in Nutrition Science or even a CDM in most states (the latter could be changing though). The pay certainly isn't commiserate to the cost of education, and the demands from the position are high. All of the responsibility for the dietary operation for the facility is on this position. So I think the trend is that more nutrition food services are provided by lower skilled/educated workers while the Dietitians are going more to a contract-type arrangement. At least this was the experience I had.

I don't think I'm planning on taking the time, energy, and money to pursue the RD.

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dlp88 in Rio Grande Valley, Texas

22 months ago

I disagree with you Mike. I have a part time job doing clinical RD contract work at a LTC facility and get paid $28 an hr. Yes its contract work, but when you have your RD, and work 5 days a week, whether at other facilities (through working for an employer who hires the RDs and distributes them to the facilities that they have contracts with) or in another setting (hospital, dialysis) it adds up to 50k-60k which is substantially more than 30k. If you had an RD, with your CDM experience, you could run a hospital kitchen (food service director) and make upwards of 80K, or even a director of nutrition for a school district for the same amount or more. You're right, CDMs do have a lot of responsibility and it would suck to get stuck there forever for the pay it is.

The biggest mistake people make is completing a didactic nutrition program, which doesnt include the internships needed to be eligible for RD board exam, instead of a coordinated program, which includes the internship in the curriculum when you earn your degree. Many people who graduate from didactic programs cant afford to not work to complete unpaid internships, so they never do and then are much more limited.

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Mike in Erie, Pennsylvania

22 months ago

a career on it's way out in Seattle, Washington said: I was a Diet Tech for over ten years & I would never recommend it to anyone. I enjoyed the work, but it is not a positon that has very little support from RD's or other members of a healthcare multidisciplinary team (mostly because they don't know what a Diet Tech is or does). I worked very, very hard and for the most part did the job of the RD's I worked with. That was a good thing because if I wouldn't have done the job no one would have. Acquiring my degee required an extensive amount of work including the same amount and types of preceptorships and clinical work RD's do. It is a job that deserve respect but gets very little.

I just applied for a Diet Tech position. Could you inform me about how much I can expect to get paid / negotiate?

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Mike in Erie, Pennsylvania

22 months ago

dlp88 in Rio Grande Valley, Texas said: I disagree with you Mike. I have a part time job doing clinical RD contract work at a LTC facility and get paid $28 an hr . Yes its contract work, but when you have your RD, and work 5 days a week, whether at other facilities (through working for an employer who hires the RDs and distributes them to the facilities that they have contracts with) or in another setting ( hospital , dialysis) it adds up to 50k-60k which is substantially more than 30k. If you had an RD, with your CDM experience, you could run a hospital kitchen ( food service director ) and make upwards of 80K, or even a director of nutrition for a school district for the same amount or more. You're right, CDMs do have a lot of responsibility and it would suck to get stuck there forever for the pay it is.

The biggest mistake people make is completing a didactic nutrition program, which doesnt include the internships needed to be eligible for RD board exam, instead of a coordinated program, which includes the internship in the curriculum when you earn your degree. Many people who graduate from didactic programs cant afford to not work to complete unpaid internships, so they never do and then are much more limited.

I agree it is a mistake and I think it does not help the profession of dietetics that there aren't more coordinated internships with these programs. One area I really messed up on was not fully understanding the internship process prior to starting school or I would have done exactly what you stated.

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JS in Seneca Falls, New York

21 months ago

Lindsey in Seattle, Washington said: In the three months since you posted this, have you found the answer to your question? I have the same degree and the same question. Any advice you've been given will really help me figure out what I'm going to do. Thanks!!

The difference in a Bachelors and a Masters can be big because many companies will not hire without a masters. You can get a bachelors in nutrition for just sitting in 3-6 classes which is not adequate. Also a masters degree looks better on an application.

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Missiewifie in Brooklyn, New York

20 months ago

aaw214 in Brooklyn, New York said: Please get your RN, I am an RD and wish I had gone an gotten an RN liscence.

are you working as rd in nyc?

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Anicole in Yorktown, New York

20 months ago

Hello all. I am 27 yrs old, have an associates in liberal arts and currently work as a bartender/server. Just started back to school, I have been between RD and PT. I am currently at a high stress job that i hate. On my feet all day, no time to sit or eat or even think. I used to love working in such a fast paced environment, but as i have recently been diagnoses with an autoimmune disease, i now cant stand it. I feel that this lifestyle/work environment makes me sicker. I don't think i want to go for PT and be stuck with crazy debt and be in pain the rest of my life, (although i know it is a fantastic career- rewarding financially and emotionally).

I have become SO interested in nutrition through research and experimentation for natural ways to help treat my disease. I think that this may be the right path for me. A little less money but a whole lot more peace of mind. Reading some of these is very discouraging indeed. For those of you who recommend pharmacy, BAH! I suppose it is good for you if you like the idea of sick care rather than health care. Its makes me angry seeing all these people hooked on prescriptions, causing other health problems including addiction.

I live in NY (hour north of the city), so the salary is a little more here, as is cost of living. Anyone have any words for me? Thank you in advance!

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dlp88 in Rio Grande Valley, Texas

20 months ago

You have good reasons for wanting to pursue your RD (particularly sick care vs health care :) From what I read online salary in RD averages around $76000, about 30% more than in other areas. I definitely think PT is going to be too physically demanding for you with your health condition. If you choose a good program (try a coordinated program in dietetics which includes the internship/rotation hours in the degree plan), you will be eligible for exam to be an RD as soon as you graduate. Also RD's are literally employable all over the country; I have looked up positions in different areas when I've entertained idea of moving, and there are always openings in many places. I find it a low stress, rewarding job that allows me to live comfortably.

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dlp88 in Rio Grande Valley, Texas

20 months ago

salaries in NY*, sorry!

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Lisa123 in Yonkers, New York

20 months ago

Sorry I'm in NY and RD salaries are no where near 76,000 so I am not sure where you got that info from. I am assuming the person in Yorktown NY would want to work in clinical the starting entry salary is 50-55,000. I am looking right now and this is what's being offered. Think very carefully I love nutrition and helping people but this career does not pay very well if you do it it's for personal satisfaction not financial security

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anonymous in Austin, Texas

20 months ago

Lisa123 in Yonkers, New York said: Sorry I'm in NY and RD salaries are no where near 76,000 so I am not sure where you got that info from. I am assuming the person in Yorktown NY would want to work in clinical the starting entry salary is 50-55,000. I am looking right now and this is what's being offered. Think very carefully I love nutrition and helping people but this career does not pay very well if you do it it's for personal satisfaction not financial security

I'm not sure where people get this $50k number from. In Austin, clinical dietitian jobs pay $16.50 an hour and you only get 32 hrs a week. That's $27456-$34320 a year. They include health insurance. If you have a master's degree, you won't get a job because they have to pay you more and they'd rather hire people straight out of school since they have a coordinated program here and plenty of older dietitians who want jobs who do not need to make a full living because they are married and are fine with the pay rate (which in turn, screws single people over).

The only way to make money in this field is to not do clinical in this city, go into foodservice management, or private practice/business and do well. Not to mention the clinical job is a joke here.

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dlp88 in Rio Grande Valley, Texas

20 months ago

Hmm..I work in McAllen, Texas and my 32/hr a week job, which could have been 40/hr a week if I wanted, pays $24.50/hr, I was hired 4 years ago at $21/hr. My part time job consulting for a nursing rehab pays $27/hr plus mileage cause I drive 40 miles to and from. We have a low cost of living in my area, not sure why Austin would be paying so little. Sometimes you have to tell people how much you are worth.

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dlp88 in Rio Grande Valley, Texas

20 months ago

To be clear, the $21-$24.50 is in dialysis, which I do realize is a specialized area, and I was hired as a new grad.

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