What do you enjoy most about your director of nursing career?

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What do you enjoy most about being a director of nursing? What do you dislike the most? Is it challenging? Are there many opportunities to learn and advance?

What keeps you at your job?

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Charleyne in Mountain Top, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

Trying to make a differnce in every residents life and seeing a smile when I do

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Rudy Rudy in Union, New Jersey

88 months ago

Let me ask you what you would expect your staff R.N. to do in the following circumstances.Id like to benefit from your experience.

My two concerns as a new employee of a nursing home are:
1.Chest pain.

2.Respiratory distress.

I wonder if anyone out there would like to tackle the following scenarios.

Scenario A.

You are the charge nurse (lpn), at the rehab unit of a nursing home.

You are at he nursing station and the alarm goes of for room 25.You go to the room and the resident says he is experiencing very bad chest pain.

You are alone. What should the LPN do?

Scenario B.

You respond to a resident that says he cannot breathe. The resident is sitting up and gasping for air. He has no order for any respiratory med. There is no order for nebulizer either.

What should the LPN do?

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sam

78 months ago

Rudy Rudy in Union, New Jersey said: Let me ask you what you would expect your staff R.N. to do in the following circumstances.Id like to benefit from your experience.

My two concerns as a new employee of a nursing home are:
1.Chest pain.

2.Respiratory distress.

I wonder if anyone out there would like to tackle the following scenarios.

Scenario A.

You are the charge nurse (lpn), at the rehab unit of a nursing home.

You are at he nursing station and the alarm goes of for room 25.You go to the room and the resident says he is experiencing very bad chest pain.

You are alone. What should the LPN do?

Scenario B.

You respond to a resident that says he cannot breathe. The resident is sitting up and gasping for air. He has no order for any respiratory med. There is no order for nebulizer either.

What should the LPN do?

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Get vital signs...call for an RN supervisor....if not available you have no choice but to transport to the ER.

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Donna in Eureka, California

78 months ago

Rudy Rudy in Union, New Jersey said: Let me ask you what you would expect your staff R.N. to do in the following circumstances.Id like to benefit from your experience.

My two concerns as a new employee of a nursing home are:
1.Chest pain.

2.Respiratory distress.

I wonder if anyone out there would like to tackle the following scenarios.

Scenario A.

You are the charge nurse (lpn), at the rehab unit of a nursing home.

You are at he nursing station and the alarm goes of for room 25.You go to the room and the resident says he is experiencing very bad chest pain.

You are alone. What should the LPN do?

Scenario B.

You respond to a resident that says he cannot breathe. The resident is sitting up and gasping for air. He has no order for any respiratory med. There is no order for nebulizer either.

What should the LPN do?

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In both circumstances get vital signs.....apply oxygen and call RN then call MD STAT. Plan for transport.

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David Crn1969 in Perris, California

67 months ago

sam said: Get vital signs...call for an RN supervisor....if not available you have no choice but to transport to the ER.

ABC's baby!! You are CPR certified, right? First you call for help for someone to bring the crash cart oxygen and apply it while having the victim sit or lie down. Delegate one person to dial 911, while another person finds the RN, and you be prepared to follow through with CPR if indicated. Don't leave the patient alone. Find out their code status(check chart), in case they go into cardiac arrest. don't waste time finding the RN to determine if they should go to the ER or not..just send them...better safe than sorry. I'd rather be fired for calling an ambulance too many times than listening to some bean-counting mgmt type and put my license on the line! Send 'em!! DC

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susan in Toronto, Ontario

37 months ago

sam said: Get vital signs...call for an RN supervisor....if not available you have no choice but to transport to the ER.

You can administer oxygen if available up to 4/lpm without an order. Thats always the first thing to do with cp and resp distress

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experienced rn in Vineland, New Jersey

36 months ago

there are not always RN's in nursing homes after hours. Depends on the size of the nursing home as state regulations for facilities between 120-150 is for an RN for 8 hours on day shift only. You, as the LPN, should be CPR certified. Get an aid to grab the crash cart in both situations, apply oxygen, get vitals and call 911. In the middle of the night, MD's do not always respond promptly. Get 911 there and then notify MD of the emergent situation and that you sent the patient to the hospital.

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JillRN in Greater St. Louis, Missouri

36 months ago

Joe in Irvington, New Jersey....it's always funny to me, Joe, when people like you "try" to sound intelligent ....but fail so miserably. And by the way, there WILL come a time when one of us will have the opportunity to save your life. Just be sure to remind them how you feel about nursing. But even if you do, they will be professional and do their best to help you, despite your bad attitude. Next time, don't comment unless you can answer the question at hand without trying to stir up S&director of nursing!

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Ann in Ville Platte, Louisiana

27 months ago

[The first and most important thing to do is put the patient on oxygen. Get someone to help you and call the ambulance... get someone to take v/s and call the family and emergency room

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Ann in Ville Platte, Louisiana

27 months ago

[The first and most important thing to do is put the patient on oxygen. Get someone to help you and call the ambulance... get someone to take v/s and call the family and emergency room

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Donna in San Francisco, California

27 months ago

David Crn1969 in Perris, California said: ABC's baby!! You are CPR certified, right? First you call for help for someone to bring the crash cart oxygen and apply it while having the victim sit or lie down. Delegate one person to dial 911, while another person finds the RN, and you be prepared to follow through with CPR if indicated. Don't leave the patient alone. Find out their code status(check chart), in case they go into cardiac arrest. don't waste time finding the RN to determine if they should go to the ER or not..just send them...better safe than sorry. I'd rather be fired for calling an ambulance too many times than listening to some bean-counting mgmt type and put my license on the line! Send 'em!! DC

Actually I AM CPR certified...and ACLS certified. Thanks for asking.

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