Is being an Esthetician as bad as everyone is making it sound?

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Connie in Manchester, Tennessee

29 months ago

There are so many different areas to work in as an esthetician. If you're not going about things with a positive I can do this sort of attitude then why bother? The possibilities are endless really and it's up to the person to get out there and strive for it.

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Ellie in Murfreesboro, Tennessee

29 months ago

Really, Connie? How much are you making as an aesthetician?

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hmfab in Fort Worth, Texas

29 months ago

Jules,
Hi! I am also in Fort Worth and looking at schools this week! What school did you attend? Do you recommend it? Where did you get a job at right after graduation?

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hmfab in Fort Worth, Texas

29 months ago

Jules in Fort Worth, Texas said: I think it's a great field to get in to! Depending on location of course. I graduated in February of this year and was hired at a spa within two days of graduating. Yes it does have its slow times, but there are days when it's busy and the potential to make 20-60 bucks an hour is pretty awesome. You just have to let that spa know that you're willing to learn.

Jules,
Hi! I am also in Fort Worth and looking at schools this week! What school did you attend? Do you recommend it? Where did you get a job at right after graduation?

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Sioux in Mount Vernon, New York

28 months ago

Do you think area plays apart in some of it. Troy, NY is far from NYC yet you are doing well what's your best advice for an Esthetician starting out in New York?

KKSkincare in Troy, New York said: I have been an esthetician for almost 10 years, and have grown a great clientelle. It depends on how badly you want it. There are some ups and downs, for example I don't get paid time off, or paid vacations, but on the other hand I have complete control of my schedule. I can take any day off I want, a ton of freedom, and i'm in no debt. I make more than all my friends and am the only one living on my own, so, what does that tell you? AGain, its all about the effort you put into it. I say if you have a passion for it, do it. I love what I do, I make people feel good on the inside and out, its very rewarding. Do what you love!

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littlecros in Pinckney, Michigan

28 months ago

Maybe you're not as successful as you intended because you don't apply yourself enough. To tell someone who is looking to get into this field 'Don't do it' is doing them a dis-service. What if they make a killing in the field? You're jading them by your own negative experiences and that's not fair. I have been an Esthetician for 15 years and have done it in two different states WITHOUT having to retake the state boards...so your statement about having to re-take them is incorrect. All you need to do is meet the requirements of the state you are transferring to and you're good. I now work in a full service salon and our team strives for the best for our clients. We cross promote as often as we can. You are only as successful as you want yourself to be. I may not make 6 figures but I make a pretty comfortable living not to mention supporting my husband when he was in college. I see big things in my future because I am making them happen. This isn't the field for everyone and it sounds like it's not the right one for you but at least you tried.

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Jaycee of Brown & DeLine/littlecros in Pinckney, Michigan

28 months ago

mm in North Arlington, New Jersey said: No don't do it it's not worth it, if you can do something else go that route. At the salon they pay you 10$/ Hr and at the doctor's 20$/Hr but they will only give you part time, do the research and see for yourself . No medical or payed vacations also. I am an esthetician for about 6 years now and I'm always broke :(((( And if you want to work in a different state you have to take the state board again!

Maybe you're not as successful as you intended because you don't apply yourself enough. To tell someone who is looking to get into this field 'Don't do it' is doing them a dis-service. What if they make a killing in the field? You're jading them by your own negative experiences and that's not fair. I have been an Esthetician for 15 years and have done it in two different states WITHOUT having to retake the state boards...so your statement about having to re-take them is incorrect. All you need to do is meet the requirements of the state you are transferring to and you're good. I now work in a full service salon and our team strives for the best for our clients. We cross promote as often as we can. You are only as successful as you want yourself to be. I may not make 6 figures but I make a pretty comfortable living not to mention supporting my husband when he was in college. I see big things in my future because I am making them happen. This isn't the field for everyone and it sounds like it's not the right one for you but at least you tried.

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debbielynn in spartanburg, South Carolina

27 months ago

I wish I was as confident as some of you, I had my business 12 months, in 2008 when the economy went so did my business. As far as the post on so many opportunities as an aesthetician, maybe for you young folks, I am washed up trying to get jobs, if you don't know how to do a Brazilian wax in this area you are out of luck. and as for me I am not into waxing butts. I spent alot of hours and money in this field, and now don't know which way to turn. Doctors won't hire a older woman so the only way to survive as an esty is o=your own business and you better have the bucks.

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Sioux in Bronx, New York

27 months ago

Debbie lynn in spartanburg, South Carolina said: I wish I was as confident as some of you, I had my business 12 months, in 2008 when the economy went so did my business. As far as the post on so many opportunities as an aesthetician, maybe for you young folks, I am washed up trying to get jobs, if you don't know how to do a Brazilian wax in this area you are out of luck. and as for me I am not into waxing butts. I spent alot of hours and money in this field, and now don't know which way to turn. Doctors won't hire a older woman.

It's the refusing to do certain services that messes you up. I see plenty older women in this business. Good work and great reputation takes you far. Could you do a few days at different locations like EWC and Hand & Stone to build a new clientele and generate income? And maybe update your skills, making you more valuable to the current market? Could you teach Esthetics? Think in terms like that. Have a positive outlook. You should be open to new treatments and learning. Get the certification to teach you might have a lot to offer the newer generation of Estheticians. One of the instructors at my school is 70 and she's the best and well loved by students because of her great attitude and knowledge. Good luck best wishes!

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graceriley in Florida

27 months ago

To Debbie Lynn in Spartanburg, SC--I am sad to hear you say that you are "I am washed up trying to get jobs."
Of course, we all understand about the terrible economy, especially back in 2008. I hope you haven't given up on your esthetics career entirely. I don't think age has anything to do with a successful esthetics career. Honestly, I think being older has its advantages: you know what you want; you are likely more mature and professional; and with age comes confidence. A lot of employers hire older estheticians, I should know as I have been hired for every interview I've gone on, even if I didn't take the job. Me being older has not hurt me at all, sure I have to competed with younger, more hip estheticians, but my professionalism and maturity gives me a unique advantage over younger estheticians. Your age is simply a number. However, with that said if you treat your skin poorly, smoke and sit out in the sun frequently ( I hope you don't do this as an esthy) then maybe your appearance isn't giving a healthy appearance needed to work in the field. We are selling health and beauty so we need to look the best we can. That doesn't mean that we have to look like a celebrity, but our appearance should convey wellness.

I agree with the person from the Bronx that a "good attitude" is important. And while you might hate doing Brazilian waxes, it is a good money maker, but I understand because it isn't my favorite either. However, you don't have to do Brazilians to be successful, there are many estheticians who survive working doing skin care exclusively at places like med-spas. I think it is important to carve out your own niche in esthetics.
Grace Riley Esthetics
Author of Jump Start Your Esthetics Career, Spa Divas: A Crazy Place to Hang My Esthetics License, and Spa Business: A Party Plan to Success

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R1305 in Denver, Colorado

27 months ago

Kudos to the last post. Yes, age has many advantages. The demographics are in our favor in terms of our "PEERS" having expendable income. I started my career at 54 and within one year was booked sold 6 months in advance. I maintained that client volume for 10 years until one of my clients bought a resort. Now I am developing a Wellness Center /Integrative Spa concept at that location. It is the most challenging thing I have ever done and I love every minute (however exhausting it is!) If you have something extraordinary to offer, you will be successful. The problem I so often see is that everyone is doing the same thing with little to no results. Step outside the "typical" and create a business that can't be replicated. We don't all need to peel, laser, use the same products, do exactly the same thing. Be bold. Research and develop something unique within the field. It can be done!

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Sioux in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

27 months ago

R1305 in Denver, Colorado said: Kudos to the last post. Yes, age has many advantages. The demographics are in our favor in terms of our "PEERS" having expendable income."

Good for you! I agree, be creative and hard work! Go above and beyond and you'll keep a loyal following.

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sagi1984 in Peoria, Arizona

27 months ago

TB in Fountain Valley, California said: I wouldn't suggest becoming an esthetician . I graduated in 2003 and got my license and applied everywhere. Nobody wants to hire a newly licensed esthetician. It is very competitive out there. Spas pay you a commision per service. It sucks because you will never have a steady paycheck. You will never know how much money you will bring in that month. I aslo heard that most spas have slow seasons. They don't even pay or even offer you benefits. And yes, most spas will require you to work weekends.

I agree. I got my license in 2008, and nobody would give me an interview. I got poor and desperate so I went back to retail. Now I have a license for something I had big dreams on, and am $25 thousand dollars in debt. I only wish I had someone to advise me of the reality of how it is. I still have a license but hardly remember much of what I learned. It feels like such a waste. I only have heard that two former classmates I attended with are successful, but as makeup artists, not as estheticians. Wish I had been made aware of the reality before accruing so much debt. Now I'm stuck in retail hell and am completely uncertain of the future.

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Sioux in Newark, New Jersey

27 months ago

I don't agree I got offer for 65,000 I haven't even graduated yet. Do you do laser, permanent makeup, write, etc.? Hand & Stone hire new grads so does EWC. Hard work, skill and desire determine your success in this game. You got to hustle hard and be hungry for success. I worked before and I will when I finish. With all the beauty lines out there that make millions no way there's no work for an esthetician if she really wants it bad enough.

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Marion Dove in Port Richey, Florida

27 months ago

I've been a skin care Instructor for 12 years, and I've seen hundreds and hundreds of students come and go. Usually by the third of fourth week I KNOW who has their heart in it and will be successful because they have the drive and the passion for it. They will go through any Length to MAKE THINGS HAPPEN one way or the other,whether it means to move to a larger city, taking out a bank loan etc. They start their planning long before they graduate, they go to every Spa conference and attend classes and workshops, they dont let problems at home distract them from their goal. Yesss, you can become very successful in this Profession! If you start out BECAUSE of the money, you will fail because if thats the only thing that drives you, you will soon find out that it takes a lot of hard work, perseverance and dedication. Esthiology is not Rocket Science, anyone can learn it. (thats why there are not THAT many really good ones out there.) You gotta love it because you're up against a bunch of competition (good and bad) and if the love is not there, you will throw in the towel too soon because the passion is not there.

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Sioux in Baltimore, Maryland

27 months ago

My classmates are like that only a few have real passion. When you are motivated and driven nothing can stop you. I agree 100%!

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Shanna in Oregon

27 months ago

margaret nichol in Playa Vista, California said: Keep your full-time job. I have been in the industry for eleven years and its been a struggle.

I have been an Aesthetician and Nail Tech for a little over a decade. I worked as an independent contractor for three years and topped out at 2,000 per month after product/rent costs. I kept it simple but I don't live in a big city where there is a strong upper middle class core. In fact, there is barely a middle class core on the entire coast. There are only few towns where the average income is close to $40,000. I have worked for a resort spa for 6 years and made close to $50,000 in the same region because of wealthy traveling clientele and very few locals. I have worked for a very plush and environmentally sound spa in Corvallis that had a string local clientele but closed down when the 'owner' spent all of the investor'a money and sold $20,000 worth of gift certificates right after holiday and we were booked solid. I made about the same there. I have worked in a small but lush day spa in Manzanita, where I made ok money for summer but the owner takes extra money old each service and so I needed up making less than what I thought. Lastly, I have worked in the smallest little petite retreat that is half local and half tourist and didn't make any money there because the owner refuses to make changes. So, if you consider demographics, price point, clientele base, management, product control and education among other small details, You Can Make Money if you are in an area where people have the extra $ to pay for there skin treatments and Want to feel and look better. If you build trust with your client, and they love your service, they will come back to you. The things I've learned from this biz, is don't get too much product and equipment right away until you have a repeat clientele that is following you.

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Shanna in Oregon

27 months ago

R1305 in Denver, Colorado said: Kudos to the last post. Yes, age has many advantages. The demographics are in our favor in terms of our "PEERS" having expendable income. I started my career at 54 and within one year was booked sold 6 months in advance. I maintained that client volume for 10 years until one of my clients bought a resort. Now I am developing a Wellness Center /Integrative Spa concept at that location. It is the most challenging thing I have ever done and I love every minute (however exhausting it is!) If you have something extraordinary to offer, you will be successful. The problem I so often see is that everyone is doing the same thing with little to no results. Step outside the "typical" and create a business that can't be replicated. We don't all need to peel, laser, use the same products, do exactly the same thing. Be bold. Research and develop something unique within the field. It can be done!

Yes, it can be done! I am 43 and I still get offered jobs at spas and I turn them down. My only issue is really been my hands, neck and arms feeling residual effects of the work on top of not making as much as I used to. I also tried moving around to different areas to see if it made a difference and it does.
Just don't settle for less in this field when you know and feel you are worth more. After being on all sides of the spectrum, if you have the dough to invest in independent work with right demographic, you can crate your own individual practice. Being unique is definitely key in the industry.

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Diane Buccola in San Jose, California

27 months ago

How to be successful in the field of esthetics is my passion. I study it, I lecture about it, and I even recently wrote a book about it. Last week I taught a class to esthetic instructors at the International Congress of Esthetics & Spa convention. And here's what you need to know: As some have mentioned above, esthetics school simply gets you licensed. It's what you do after that that really matters. Esthetics has changed a lot since I've been in the business (15 years). It used to be that having great esthetic skills and good products was all you needed. But not anymore. Now the most important part of this business is about fabulous -- and personal -- customer service, which results in an unbreakable bond with your client. They will come to you for services, they will buy your home care products, and they will tell everyone about you. It won't matter where you work, what city you are in, and probably even what products you use and sell. The client bond is today's magic ingredient. And the best news about that is that this is something you have 100% control of and nobody can take it away from you. The esthetic business is booming and will continue to grow as consumers drift away from aggressive (and expensive) dermatology treatments and are looking for esthetician services. It's a fun and exciting career. See for yourself by attending a trade show. There are classes, networking opportunities, products, equipment and so much more.

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Latinalv@*****.*** in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

Thank you for the helpful tip. I appreciate the positive input.

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beaner4 in Boston, Massachusetts

26 months ago

Hi, I would love to get in touch with you via email. I'm an esthetician in Boston and would love to brainstorm on how you have been successful as well as get advice from the best of the best. I can send you my email as well (but will wait to hear from you to confirm). Thank you.

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R1305 in Denver, Colorado

26 months ago

Yes, please send me your email.

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GiGi in Victoria, Texas

26 months ago

louisa in Des Moines, Iowa said: I've been an esthetician 12 years it better to work for your self if you do this
you will work your butt off for someone else and get paid lower your have to invest in mor education to market your self better, have the latest products if your good at this trade clients will stay with you. don't quit your day job
with benifits do this as a hobby,

In my experience, it is better to be dual licensed. I obtain a cosmetology license encompasses all skin care. However, I know if I wanted to work in a med-spa, employers would likely want to specifically see an esthetics license, so I obtained that separately. I also had some interest in massage therapy, and since most spas offer massage services I invested in getting my massage therapy license. There hasn't been a place I applied that didn't respond to my inquiry, regardless if they were only looking for one or the other trade. I have worked for a spa downtown in my city that paid me 40% on services $15/hr when I had no services. Still no benefits, but you can set a schedule and have some idea of what you will earn. Now I'm switching to a massage therapy position that pays $24/hr to start w/benefits. I have potential earn up to $42/hr, this is all before tips. I rent a space for private practice at $100/wk. there Ivan still offer skincare services and massage therapy. I charge an average of $70-$75 base for each service. I use vista print for my advertisements which is inexpensive and use the amenities of the spa as add on services or complementary for loyal customers. This industry is about a lot of things, being as marketable as possible, having drive and initiative to gain and keep business, staying relevant, being professional, skilled at technique, and knowledgable. It is what you make of it. If you want you can be successful. That is just my experience here in Texas.

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Diane Buccola/SpaBizBoard in San Jose, California

26 months ago

beaner4 in Boston, Massachusetts said: Hi, I would love to get in touch with you via email. I'm an esthetician in Boston and would love to brainstorm on how you have been successful as well as get advice from the best of the best. I can send you my email as well (but will wait to hear from you to confirm). Thank you.

I actually have put all of this into a book that came out last year (The Heart of Esthetics: Creating Loyal Clients and Achieving Financial Success), and I promise everything you need to know is in there! Here is a link to my website that explains the book and has a link to purchase in paperback and Kindle: happyesthetician.com/home/books/

You can also find my articles regularly in Les Nouvelles Esthetiques & Spa magazine and I am a regular speaker at International Congress of Esthetics & Spa (ICES). You might want to "like" my Happy Esthetician Facebook page. We are always discussing current topics there. No fluff, just the important stuff. (Well, okay, once in a while there might be a little fluff, cuz estheticians need a laugh once in a while!)

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Diane Buccola/SpaBizBoard in San Jose, California

26 months ago

GiGi in Victoria, Texas said: In my experience, it is better to be dual licensed. I obtain a cosmetology license encompasses all skin care. However, I know if I wanted to work in a med-spa, employers would likely want to specifically see an esthetics license, so I obtained that separately. I also had some interest in massage therapy, and since most spas offer massage services I invested in getting my massage therapy license. There hasn't been a place I applied that didn't respond to my inquiry, regardless if they were only looking for one or the other trade. I have worked for a spa downtown in my city that paid me 40% on services $15/hr when I had no services. Still no benefits, but you can set a schedule and have some idea of what you will earn. Now I'm switching to a massage therapy position that pays $24/hr to start w/benefits. I have potential earn up to $42/hr, this is all before tips. I rent a space for private practice at $100/wk. there Ivan still offer skincare services and massage therapy. I charge an average of $70-$75 base for each service. I use vista print for my advertisements which is inexpensive and use the amenities of the spa as add on services or complementary for loyal customers. This industry is about a lot of things, being as marketable as possible, having drive and initiative to gain and keep business, staying relevant, being professional, skilled at technique, and knowledgable. It is what you make of it. If you want you can be successful. That is just my experience here in Texas.

I just want to commend you for getting your esthetician license too! These days a cosmetology license is not going to get anybody very far in the esthetics business, but unfortunately cosmo students don't become aware of that until someday when they are looking for an esthetician job. On the other hand, holding an esthetician license AND a massage therapy license can come in handy.

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GiGi in Victoria, Texas

26 months ago

Thank you. Yes I wanted to be as marketable as possible. I went to Houston and got my laser certification as well. Looking forward to getting a Physician's Assistant degree, in time. Just enjoying the journey. It's been great so far.

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Diane Buccola/SpaBizBoard in San Jose, California

26 months ago

I have seen 2 major changes in the field of esthetics since I got my license in 1998. The first one was that the spa-like products (smelled great, beautifully packaged) morphed into the more clinical lines which are more results-oriented and contain active ingredients. So those estheticians who adjusted their businesses accordingly weren't affected at all.

The more recent change is the current trend of our professional skin care products being sold online to the public. These days you can find our products on vendor websites, Amazon and eBay, and even worse...esthetician websites. This is a huge problem because if the general public can buy our products online (sometimes at a discount!!!) without ever having seen an esthetician for a consultation or facial -- guess what? Estheticians are no longer needed, and we then become extinct.

I don't think estheticians who are selling products online to the public realize that they are literally putting themselves -- and all of us -- right out of business.

So once again, things have changed. And we must adjust. We need to be putting more of our focus and efforts on the relationships we have with our clients. If you have an unshakeable bond with your clients, they will not go looking elsewhere for a better deal.

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R1305 in Denver, Colorado

26 months ago

I agree with your commentary, however, even though items are available online you can still develop a loyal following. As an esthetician I believe you are first and foremost an educator. Teaching your clients what to do and what NOT to do at home is as important as your hands and the intensive treatment you offer. Treatment requirements are not static or constantly repeatable nor is a home care regimen. If we teach out clients properly they will not be tempted to purchase online but will trust in our counsel. Customer service and relationship has been and always will be paramount in our industry.

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INSTANT KARMA in Fenelon Falls, Ontario

26 months ago

YOUR SAVING GRACE IN THE U.S. IS THAT YOU ARE LICENSED. THAT ALONE IS VERY EMPOWERING. YOU NEED TO SET STANDARDS OF PRACTICE AND DEMAND TO BE PAYED ACCORDING
TO YOUR EDUCATION. DON"T LET EMPLOYERS TAKE ADVANTAGE OF YOUR INTELLECT. YOUR DOING ALL THE WORK! STOP THE GREED!STOP THE SLAVE LABOUR!TAKE CHARGE GIRLS AND GUYS.
HERE IN CANADA WE HAVE NO LICENSING FOR ESTHETICS EVERYBODY AND ANYBODY THINKS THEY CAN DO MY JOB. THEY ARE DOING THE SERVICES WITHOUT CREDENTIALS. DO YOU HAVE THE SAME
PROBLEM? BE AN ADVOCATE STICK TOGETHER, ENCOURAGE YOUR CLIENTS TO ONLY HAVE SERVICES
FROM LICENSED ESTHETICIANS. THE SKYS THE LIMIT WITH PASSION!

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stephmarie in Providence, Rhode Island

25 months ago

Hi Ered- I'm in the Providence area as well! I'm looking to change my career from corporate and go back to school to be an Esthetician. I want a career that I'll fully enjoy and helping others to feel good about themselves is greatly rewarding. I'd love to talk to you more about your process in this industry. Also, I moved here from NYC too!

Ered in Providence, Rhode Island said: I have been an aesthetician for over 8 years. I love what I do, and I have been extremely successful. I started in NYC in spa's, then to medical spa's, and now I work for one of the top plastic surgeon's in the country. As long as you have a passion for what you do, and continue your education in your field, you will be successful. it's all about your attitude and how good of a people person you are. the skills come with the experience and education. Love what you'll do, and you won't work a day in your life.....except the commute, ha! Good luck!

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The Mud Doctor in Washington, District of Columbia

25 months ago

I am looking for a esthetician who is looking to help people get skin care results. Please email me your resume or message me your resume.

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Diane Buccola in Rancho Cordova, California

24 months ago

I received an email from this site notifying me that someone was requesting a telephone conversation to talk about the spa biz. (I followed the link in the email but I don't see that request) But if that person is reading this, this is for you: There are numerous places to get my insight about the spa biz, if you are interested. (Pretty much all I do is talk about the spa biz! LOL) So here are some links:

My message board: www.SpaBizBoard.com
Facebook biz page: Happy Esthetician
Twitter: SpaBizBoard
Website: www.HappyEsthetician.com
Book (Amazon or my website): The Heart of Esthetics - Creating Loyal Clients and Achieving Financial Success
Next speaking engagement: International Congress of Esthetics & Spa, Long Beach CA (Monday, September 8th)
Articles in Les Nouvelles Esthetiques & Spa magazine: Current issue June, and upcoming August issue.

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Monet Bradley in Baltimore, Maryland

24 months ago

Hi, I'm looking in becoming an Esthetician but i'm having problems in picking a school. I've heard great things about Von Lee international school of aesthetics,but the cost is a problem for me and they don't take financial aid. Do anyone know any other great schools in the baltimore area?

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The Mud Doctor in Baltimore, Maryland

24 months ago

I may be able to help. email me your resume to louisdyoung@gmail.com

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themuddoctor in Waldorf, Maryland

24 months ago

margaret nichol in Playa Vista, California said: Keep your full-time job. I have been in the industry for eleven years and its been a struggle.

I have a product that I would love your professional opinion on. Can I mail you a sample?

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themuddoctor in Waldorf, Maryland

24 months ago

Monet Bradley in Baltimore, Maryland said: Hi, I'm looking in becoming an Esthetician but i'm having problems in picking a school. I've heard great things about Von Lee international school of aesthetics,but the cost is a problem for me and they don't take financial aid. Do anyone know any other great schools in the baltimore area?

I may be able to help! Email me your resume. louisdyoung@gmail.com

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themuddoctor in Waldorf, Maryland

24 months ago

Diane Buccola in Rancho Cordova, California said: I received an email from this site notifying me that someone was requesting a telephone conversation to talk about the spa biz. (I followed the link in the email but I don't see that request) But if that person is reading this, this is for you: There are numerous places to get my insight about the spa biz, if you are interested. (Pretty much all I do is talk about the spa biz! LOL) So here are some links:

My message board: www.SpaBizBoard.com
Facebook biz page: Happy Esthetician
Twitter: SpaBizBoard
Website: www.HappyEsthetician.com
Book (Amazon or my website): The Heart of Esthetics - Creating Loyal Clients and Achieving Financial Success
Next speaking engagement: International Congress of Esthetics & Spa, Long Beach CA (Monday, September 8th)
Articles in Les Nouvelles Esthetiques & Spa magazine: Current issue June, and upcoming August issue.

Diane,
I want to send you the gift of SEACRET™, and introduce you to a truly revolutionary line of skincare products. I’ve become so passionate about these products that I decided to partner with the company and share the love! I would love to send you a sample of a daily skincare regimen that fits perfectly with your skin type. If you enjoy it or are curious to learn more, please contact me at any time. I would love to hear what YOUR experience was with SEACRET™, and tell you more about these amazing products. Please let me know what you skin type is and where to send the samples!

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Diane Buccola in Rancho Cordova, California

24 months ago

Thanks for the offer, The Mud Doctor. But I am a licensed professional Esthetician and therefore I only use and sell professional skin care products. That means no Direct-to-Consumer, Multi-Level-Marketing, mall kiosk, or department store, etc. products. (And I encourage other licensed estheticians do the same.) So I would not be a good customer for you.

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Sbreyers in Washington, District of Columbia

23 months ago

Sioux in Baltimore, Maryland said: My classmates are like that only a few have real passion. When you are motivated and driven nothing can stop you. I agree 100%!

What school do you attend? I am looking to start soon and having difficulty choosing an institute

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jenniferschrupp in San Francisco, California

23 months ago

Hi, as far as I believe one can go places in this field if one has it in him/her. But before choosing this as a career option, you must be aware of the facts about this industry and taking admission into a beauty school. I came across an interesting article about taking admission in a beauty school. You can have a look at it:
studentcaring.com/ask-these-questions-before-in-enrolling-in-beauty-school-in-2014/

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Rachel Dalthorp in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

22 months ago

Hello,
I'm a physician starting a women's health medical practice, (Balancewomenshealth.com) and I would like to have aesthetic services for my patients. I have an interested provider but I don't know how to structure the financial piece.
She would be using my practice space/treatment room/ product display/ advertising and I would be her prescribing physician. She will be bringing in some of her existing clients, and doing her own scheduling and payment collection.
What would be considered a fair percentage? For services and product sales?
Thanks for your input!!!
Rachel

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estheticspro in California

21 months ago

I have 15 years experience and loved being a esthetician but it is very challenging to make a good living anymore. When I first started I went and took every class possible, worked 50 hour a week and gave my all to every client. After the last day spa I worked at closed I decided to become an esthetics instructor. I put the same amount of energy into becoming an instructor: I studied so hard to pass my written and practical test.

The first school I got hired to work at was a major chain who said I was a natural educator with so much knowledge. Their students would leave clinic to do drugs in the parking lot and they were very disrespectful, the school did very little to stop the behavior so I left. The second esthetics school was independent and I was so happy to be hired there until my first day. Again the students were extremely disrespectful with the attitude of entitlement and no appreciation that I left within a month. The pay is much lower for instructors than I originally thought it would be,about $300 a week because you start at around 20 hours then usually full time is only 32 hours. Both schools talked about students earning $50,000 a year or more when even myself with many years experience and training can't earn that.

So now I am unemployed and trying to stay positive as I used up most of my savings working towards becoming an instructor. Good luck to everyone as this really challenging time to be an esthetician.

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rach in Jacksonville, Florida

19 months ago

Hello,

I am currently looking for work in Florida. I am coming from newyork and it seems almost impossible. Most spas pay a little over minimum wage down here 7.90... so finding a job in the field that I love is not what I thought it would be :{ I love this field. I thought people were more receptive to taking care of their skin , but not the case here.. nails are more important than skin shocked especially in Florida where the sun is almost year around. I want to work for myself just figured i would get some experience first. I want to stay positive. I am a hard worker if needed but in this field it isn't hard to me cause I love it but i do need to make a living ... just venting...

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Diane Buccola in Carmichael, California

19 months ago

rach in Jacksonville, Florida said: Hello,

I am currently looking for work in Florida. I am coming from newyork and it seems almost impossible. Most spas pay a little over minimum wage down here 7.90... so finding a job in the field that I love is not what I thought it would be :{ I love this field. I thought people were more receptive to taking care of their skin , but not the case here.. nails are more important than skin shocked especially in Florida where the sun is almost year around. I want to work for myself just figured i would get some experience first. I want to stay positive. I am a hard worker if needed but in this field it isn't hard to me cause I love it but i do need to make a living ... just venting...

Hi Rach,

I am a CA esthetician but I am a regular speaker on the International Congress of Esthetics & Spa trade show circuit which includes Miami. So I have a pretty good sense of how esthetics varies throughout different parts of the country nd Florida stands out as the most extremely different in my experience. The level of training required to practice is low (250 hours, I think?), so esthetics is much less clinical there. And the questions they ask me during and after my class are very different than what happens elsewhere. I have also taught esthetics instructors there and they told me that they have to pay for advanced education out of their own pocket (the schools won't pay).

So it's probably a huge shock to you, coming from NY. However, you could be a real asset and very helpful to Floridians...but your emphasize probably has to start with education. And by that I mean, educating potential new clients about why skin care is important, how the skin works, why they should exfoliate, sun damage, skin cancer and most importantly how estheticians can help, etc.

Good luck!

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rach in Jacksonville, Florida

19 months ago

Hello,
thank you I love to educated so that is right up my alley. :} MY thought was how in the world are they performing any real skin care with only 250... with my 600 I still felt i needed more education... but thank you for the comment.I pray I can find a way down here because this is all I want to do.. I love skin care and the element of helping woman find the beauty they already have..

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Diane Buccola in Rancho Cordova, California

19 months ago

rach in Jacksonville, Florida said: Hello,
thank you I love to educated so that is right up my alley. :} MY thought was how in the world are they performing any real skin care with only 250... with my 600 I still felt i needed more education... but thank you for the comment.I pray I can find a way down here because this is all I want to do.. I love skin care and the element of helping woman find the beauty they already have..

It might be helpful for you to join my business Facebook page (Happy Esthetician). Because it is a public page, we don't give away any professional trade secrets, but I've got 4100+ followers and odds are there's plenty of estheticians from Florida. Maybe they can offer you some helpful advice. Good luck.

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New star in West Chicago, Illinois

15 months ago

frustrated owner in Oakland, California said: Here here! dre517 in Chicago! You are sooo right. I'm not sure why this is the case with estheticians. I am on the prowl for the ones who understand the selling aspect of our job. From reading your post, I think I pay mine waaayy too much. They're unresponsive and lazy and they wonder why they don't get more hours? Hum....I wonder why. You can make nice money in this field but you have to love it, work for it, and work for it.

I am in school now and can't wait to start my career.I have worked in the spa industry for over 15 years and recently decided to become a esthetician.Ingredients is such a big part of skin care knowing what to use on your clients and for retail.You can't sell a product if you don't take the time to learn what it does. I'm making sure I take advantage of learning everything especially ingredients.I remember from my prior salon experience.You can make as much money as you want to make its all up to you and retail is a huge part.You have to do what you love,and love what you do.

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Danie1988 in Charleston, South Carolina

14 months ago

AA in Yorktown Heights, New York said: I came across these comments on Google , and felt that I should offer some feedback. I am one of those rare estheticians who is extremely successful in her career. With that said, I will tell you that I have been working for 10+ years and it took a long time to make real money. My best advice to anyone who wants to be a WORKING esthetician is to tell them to develop excellent waxing skills, above all else. Waxing is perfunctory, so no matter what the economy is doing, your clients will continue waxing. High quality esthetics education can be very hard to come by, but is absolutely necessary, as is continuing education. Lastly, it is essential that you spend a portion of your career working in a very high-end spa, where you are regularly exposed to clients who can afford to make regular visits. Even in a high-end space, you should realistically expect that building a clientele will take a minimum of nine months to one year. I would strongly recommend that you begin your esthetics career in a part-time capacity (you will NOT be able to pay the rent in the beginning). In my experience, only the best of the best, or roughly 10% (a generous estimate) of estheticians are ever able to do esthetics as a full time living. With that said, YES, it is possible to be very, very successful; however, it takes a long time, hard work, a willingness to be as diversified in the treatments that you offer as possible, and the correct working environment. I did it, and I have done extremely well. Currently, I own my own practice and I am booked to near capacity approximately six weeks in advance...BUT it was HARD to do! I hope that this advice from a veteran Esthetician is helpful.

That was awesome advice! Do you have any recommendations on what the best high end markets/locations in the U.S. would be to try to build your clientele?

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Lisa Loflin-Gallegos in Denver, Colorado

13 months ago

I am fairly new to the Denver, Co area and thinking of changing careers to becoming an Esthetician & Laser technician and start my own business. I was wondering if anyone that owns there own business in the Denver area and would be will and has time to meet? I have a TON of questions and figure the best way to get accurate answers is to talk to a business owner in the field. I noticed R1305 has her own business in the Denver area but I don't know if she is still part of the forum. I understand time is precious so I appreciate any help ahead of time ! Thank you very much ~Lisa

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martinal in Westminstet, Maryland

11 months ago

Hi
I'm in the same boat as you. Von lee has been highly recommended but is quite expensive.
I would love to find an apprenticeship under an established esthetician.
Skin is my passion and I will do whatever it takes to " not work a day in my life"

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