Success as an esthetician....it's attainable!

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Comments (13)

src@spabizboard in Sacramento, California

15 months ago

As with any career, those who are struggling will always be the most vocal. But don't necessarily believe all of the naysayers. There are LOTS of estheticians doing very well these days, although you might not find them bragging about their success in public forums.

It is predicted that the career of skin care specialist will increase 34% by 2016 (AOL 9-7-11, Top 10 Recession-proof Careers). The recession actually works in our favor because consumers are downgrading their skin care from pricey dermatologists to more affordable skilled estheticians. The problem is that a lot of estheticians (and esthetic programs and licensing boards) are not keeping up with the times. To be a successful esthetician these days, you need much more than talent in the treatment room and a license. You also need:

1. Expert skin analysis skills, including Glogau and Fitzpatrick scales, Wood's Lamp, etc.
2. Comprehensive understanding of ingredients, even as they change and evolve.
3. Expertise with various esthetic electrical equipment.
4. An understanding and passion for the importance of home care products. (IMO, the most important of all)

And if you have ALL of that, then next you must understand and master the art of marketing and customer service.

So, yeah, those who come out of esthetician school with a license and expect to make big bucks because they can make people feel good for an hour, or expect to make any sort of decent income by way of services only, they will be disappointed. This career is definitely not for everyone, but for those who really are passionate about skin care who seek out further training, networking opportunities, trade magazines, trade shows, message boards where education is offered, they will flourish.

Diane Buccola
NCEA Certified Esthetician

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Bani in Plano, Texas

15 months ago

Hi Diane,i have a question, My friend has just moved to Dallas Tx from another country. She has her native country Esthetician license for 4 years. Can she transfer the license to Dallas Tx?

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Jeff B in Dallas, Texas

15 months ago

The answer is no. Texas will not transfer the license. They may, accept the training, however, she will still be required to pass the state exam. As for whether she would have to re-attend school is a question that she will have to ask the Texas State Board.

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Bani in Plano, Texas

15 months ago

Jeff B in Dallas, Texas said: The answer is no. Texas will not transfer the license. They may, accept the training, however, she will still be required to pass the state exam. As for whether she would have to re-attend school is a question that she will have to ask the Texas State Board.

Thanks! for the reply. Fingers crossed, I hope they accept the training as it will save a lot of time and money. And if they accept the training she can do home study to pass the state exam. Once again Thank you, Jeff B for bringing Ray of Hope.

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src@spabizboard in Mill Valley, California

15 months ago

Bani in Plano, Texas said: Hi Diane,i have a question, My friend has just moved to Dallas Tx from another country. She has her native country Esthetician license for 4 year. Can she transfer the license to Dallas Tx?

It appears that Texas honors out-of-state and "out of territory" licenses in some cases and will issue a Texas license.

At the Texas Board of Cosmo website, it says:

License holders from other states and territories may be eligible for a Texas license if their out-of-state license has substantially equivalent education and examination requirements as Texas.

Here's a link to that page: www.license.state.tx.us/cosmet/cosmetstates.htm

Here is the Texas reciprocity application form and if you scroll down, there is more info:

www.license.state.tx.us/cosmet/forms/007cos.pdf

Hope this helps,

Diane Buccola
NCEA Certified Esthetician

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Bani in Plano, Texas

15 months ago

src@spabizboard in Mill Valley, California said: It appears that Texas honors out-of-state and "out of territory" licenses in some cases and will issue a Texas license.

At the Texas Board of Cosmo website, it says:

License holders from other states and territories may be eligible for a Texas license if their out-of-state license has substantially equivalent education and examination requirements as Texas.

Here's a link to that page: www.license.state.tx.us/cosmet/cosmetstates.htm

Here is the Texas reciprocity application form and if you scroll down, there is more info:

www.license.state.tx.us/cosmet/forms/007cos.pdf

Hope this helps,

Diane Buccola
NCEA Certified Esthetician

Hi Diane, Many thanks for sharing! Have you heard about CIDESCO training. I read in a blog that CIDESCO allows estheticians & beauty therapists to work internationally, regardless of where their training was taken. Does it means if I hold a CIDESCO diploma from another country I can work in Texas as an Esthetician.

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Bani in Plano, Texas

15 months ago

I'm just curious to know which members may possibly hold CIDESCO out of country esthetic/aesthetic licences. Are they allowed to work in Texas as CIDESCO says that CIDESCO Diploma holder can work in any country.I hope some of you share your experience with out of country CIDESCO license.

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Jeff B in Dallas, Texas

15 months ago

Texas does not recognize a CIDESCO Diploma as a license to practice.

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Jeff B in Dallas, Texas

15 months ago

Jeff B in Dallas, Texas said: Texas does not recognize a CIDESCO Diploma as a license to practice.

In order to take full advantage of being a CIDESCO Diplomat you would have to hold at least two state licenses: Cosmetology and Massage therapist. You can also have Esthetician, manicurist and Massage Therapist.

Personally, I feel that this would only be good if you wanted to work cruise ships (which gets old fast).

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Danie1988 in Dunn, North Carolina

15 months ago

Jeff, do you know of anyone that has worked on a Hawaiian cruise ship? It seems like a while back I heard that if you're an American working on a Hawaiian cruise you get paid really well but if you work on the other cruise lines they don't have to obey American labor laws so you get worked really hard for bad pay. Does anyone on here have any knowledge of this? I thought about going back to school for massage therapy to go along with my current Esthetician license so I could work on a cruise ship. I figured it would be a good way to save money for about a year to pay off all my student loans and get out of debt.

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Bani in Plano, Texas

15 months ago

Jeff B in Dallas, Texas said: In order to take full advantage of being a CIDESCO Diplomat you would have to hold at least two state licenses: Cosmetology and Massage therapist. You can also have Esthetician , manicurist and Massage Therapist.

Personally, I feel that this would only be good if you wanted to work cruise ships (which gets old fast).

Thanks Jeff. Is it possible to pass the Texas Esthetician State board exam by doing home study. It seems that the board will accept my out of country training but will require me to pass the State board exam. I don't know where to start from and how to prepare for the written and practical exam. Please help me..

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jenclark1978 in Austin, Texas

12 months ago

Danie1988 in Dunn, North Carolina said: Jeff, do you know of anyone that has worked on a Hawaiian cruise ship? It seems like a while back I heard that if you're an American working on a Hawaiian cruise you get paid really well but if you work on the other cruise lines they don't have to obey American labor laws so you get worked really hard for bad pay. Does anyone on here have any knowledge of this? I thought about going back to school for massage therapy to go along with my current Esthetician license so I could work on a cruise ship. I figured it would be a good way to save money for about a year to pay off all my student loans and get out of debt.

I have personally worked on cruise ships. I started off an an Esthetician on the Hawaiian cruise ships then moved into management and did an international cruise. There is not much of a difference in the amount of commission paid to you if you work national or international routes. If any difference at all now, I worked for Steiner in 2007 and 2008. Back then they accepted American Estheticians. Now you must have a combined Esthetics and Massage Therapy education. That makes you the equivalent of a beauty therapist in Europe.
It will not matter if you are on the American or international lines. You are going to work long hours. When people ask me about my time on the ships I tell them, It was one of the most amazing and defining experiences of my life and the best cultural experience I have ever been given. If you have the opportunity-DO IT! However I follow that with a disclaimer and this is my advice to you as well. All the people I have met that had terrible experiences working onboard ships--either they went into it with the wrong expectations or they were not there for the right reasons or they are lazy. You will work long hours and your primary purpose on the ship is to work. It is your job, not your vacation, but if you make the most of the situation it can be both.

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jenclark1978 in Austin, Texas

12 months ago

jenclark1978 in Austin, Texas said: I have personally worked on cruise ships. I started off an an Esthetician on the Hawaiian cruise ships then moved into management and did an international cruise. There is not much of a difference in the amount of commission paid to you if you work national or international routes. If any difference at all now, I worked for Steiner in 2007 and 2008. Back then they accepted American Estheticians. Now you must have a combined Esthetics and Massage Therapy education. That makes you the equivalent of a beauty therapist in Europe.
It will not matter if you are on the American or international lines. You are going to work long hours. When people ask me about my time on the ships I tell them, It was one of the most amazing and defining experiences of my life and the best cultural experience I have ever been given. If you have the opportunity-DO IT! However I follow that with a disclaimer and this is my advice to you as well. All the people I have met that had terrible experiences working onboard ships--either they went into it with the wrong expectations or they were not there for the right reasons or they are lazy. You will work long hours and your primary purpose on the ship is to work. It is your job, not your vacation, but if you make the most of the situation it can be both.

You will get time off, you can take shore excursions for free, you have above board priveleges (can go in passenger areas), and you will have the time of your life if you want to. The commissions are lower than on land but the services are expensive so it equals out. Retail is a must to keep your job and they will teach you how. It is for sure in the top echelons of money I have ever made but you have to work for it. You will NEVER be denied a job with Steiner on your resume! If you want to know more or have questions let me know ;)

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