What are the best exercise physiologist qualifications and training to get ahead?

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What is the best training for becoming an exercise physiologist? What types of ongoing training or certifications are necessary to be an effective exercise physiologist?

What do non-traditional career paths look like?

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What in Tallmadge, Ohio

69 months ago

Everyone I know in 2008 that I graduated with in Exercise Phys with a M.S has moved on to Nursing or something else to do a lack of jobs in the field. Making 20,000-40,000 with a M.S is stupid and not worth the time and loans.

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What in Akron, Ohio

63 months ago

If you get a GA position and get paid to go for free might as well take it since there is no jobs in this field (I posted here recently and am the same person). I am certified by ACSM-CPT and work within the field. It's stable but not the best pay. ACSMs magazine and Faculty posted they are fighting for the Clinical Exercise Physiologist, but it won't be a while for that. They are phonies doing research on common sense and trying to promote people being certified as well as join a extremely over flooded field. Honestly the Faculty of ACSM are a bunch of liars and crooks trying to promote the field. Even some of their faculty teach at nursing schools.

If you cardiac rehab but you should get it being a RN/BSN and get paid a lot more to do it. At our place the Exercise Phys was the first to be laid off during the recession. The Nurses still did cardiac rehab. I'm getting out of this field, its a plateau in my career and I feel like I am a underachiever. People with no degrees make more than me.

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Huh in Kennewick, Washington

62 months ago

Wow, I thought I was the only one experiencing all of this. I currently work in cardiac rehab and agree that I have reached a plateau. I encourage anyone to RUN from an Exercise degree unless you don't plan on working and just want to learn about the human body. GET A CERTIFICATE in something secure like nursing or PT. Rad techs and EKG tech's make more than I do and I have a Master's degree. Learn from someone like me who has thousands and thousands of dollars in student loans and not a great income to pay them off anytime soon. Choose your career wisely.

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What in Akron, Ohio

62 months ago

Huh in Kennewick, Washington said: Wow, I thought I was the only one experiencing all of this. I currently work in cardiac rehab and agree that I have reached a plateau. I encourage anyone to RUN from an Exercise degree unless you don't plan on working and just want to learn about the human body. GET A CERTIFICATE in something secure like nursing or PT. Rad techs and EKG tech's make more than I do and I have a Master's degree. Learn from someone like me who has thousands and thousands of dollars in student loans and not a great income to pay them off anytime soon. Choose your career wisely.

You can go in accelerated nursing license or get a weekend nursing program. ACSM is a joke and always will be. Are you certified in it? You notice all their professors teach something else. I never knew a college degree would get somebody 12-14 dollars...a garbage guy makes more than us. I'm changing my career and going back next Fall. Don't do PT..it's a waste of school and loans, and chiropractors are a joke field. Making 60k-70k starting and owing 150k plus interest is stupid. It is a very good field but you owe so much. Physican Assistants can do the same thing with Exercise Perscriptions and kinesotherapy just like PT's and they are a Masters. Plus they work under Orthopedic Doctors/MD's. Some specialized RN's after 3 years make that much. Talk to any PT who graduated with a Masters or B.S when it was around and they will tell you they wouldn't go back in the doctoral program. If I were you I would get the Associates of RN and just do cardiac rehab first...it will be a excellent investment then get the BSN.

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amanda16 in Brooklyn, New York

57 months ago

I am currently pursuing my masters in Exercise Science and Rehab. I would like to work in Cardiac Rehab after graduating and getting my ACSM certification in CES and RCEP. However, after reading these posts I am not sure whether or not it was a smart decision to continue with my masters degree in this field. It seems as thought it is very difficult for graduates to obtain jobs in this field and judging from the comments the salary is not quite what it should be. Do many exercise physiologists that work in the field for a couple of years end up returning to school for a different career path? Is it true that RNs can perform the same tasks that an exercise physiologist can do for cardiac rehab patients?

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James in Akron, Ohio

57 months ago

Amanda16 in Brooklyn, New York said: I am currently pursuing my masters in Exercise Science and Rehab. I would like to work in Cardiac Rehab after graduating and getting my ACSM certification in CES and RCEP. However, after reading these posts I am not sure whether or not it was a smart decision to continue with my masters degree in this field. It seems as thought it is very difficult for graduates to obtain jobs in this field and judging from the comments the salary is not quite what it should be. Do many exercise physiologists that work in the field for a couple of years end up returning to school for a different career path? Is it true that RNs can perform the same tasks that an exercise physiologist can do for cardiac rehab patients?

Smart move I made in my career was leaving the field of exercise physiology. You will realize you saved money, have more value, and can bill. Exercise Physiolgists are the first ones to be laid off in a hospital, and RN's and PTA's/PT's are more valueable to do cardiac rehab, and stress tests. I worked full time as a Exercise Physiologist making 30k and decided to leave and become a RN, I make more money and work side by side with a Ex phys and make 15 dollars more and can find a job anywhere. CNP's are now going to possibly phase out Exercise Physiologists in the hospital doing cardiac rehab. Nursing is a field that is growing and will never fall. Don't listen to those dumb professors trying to promote the Masters and PHD. People I graduated with PHD's can't find jobs as professors. Plus you can make more than them as a RN if you move up. Spread the word! Leave the field ASAP!

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Abaco in Hamburg, New York

57 months ago

It truly is sad that the field of exercise physiology has come to this point. I have been an exercise physiologist working in the field for over 23 years now. Back in the early to late 90's and even into the early 2000's I was always able to find work. I have worked in cardiac rehab for a little over 20 years, this is my true love. I was an adjunct prof teaching kinesiology. I have worked as a strength and conditioning coach and also worked in corporate wellness. I have made extra money doing public speaking and freelance writing. Like everyone else in this field I have also made money doing personal training. Suddenly it seamed, around 2007 everything seamed to change. The only work I can find in cardiac rehab is per diem shifts and I have been on unemployment twice. Like so many exercise physiologists I used to work with I'm looking into abandoning my field completely and going back to school, but at the age of 46 I have no idea what else I can do. I have wife and son and I still love the field of exercise physiology. I have a second cousin who is in her early twentys and she just finished her MS in ex phys and asked me for advice, I told her that I wished she asked me that question before she went for her masters becouse I would have told her to study something else!

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Trevor in San Diego, California

53 months ago

This conversation interested me. As someone who is going into the field of Exercise Physiology and Physical Therapy, my experience so far is on par with what is being said here. Our field is not one that leads to success overnight, and I also whole-heartedly agree that one should only go into this field if they are passionate about it and desire to help people, not because you read a news article that said physical therapists make a lot of money. Personally I feel that I my life goals are different from the majority of people who go into this field, I would be content with studying physical therapy for decades if it takes that long to become a professional in this field because it's what I enjoy doing. I am still young (24), and don't expect to have a high paying physical therapy job anytime soon. Some advice that I can give is allow yourself to keep your options open and explore related fields, such as strength training, youth coaching, personal training, caregiver work, anything in the broad spectrum of your field. This might seem misguided, but you'll reach a point where you will have experienced so many job skills, that everyone who interviews you will be blown away.

Stay true to yourself, be good to yourself, keep following that dream, and you'll wake up one day to find it's reality.

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rob in Washington, District of Columbia

53 months ago

Our field of exercise physiology is flooded, has no credentials to bill insurance and a there us weak economy; all spell for less jobs (cut b/c of economy) and lower pay. If you want to do clinical then I would recommend doing BS in nursing and masters in Ex phys (the other way around can work too). I have a great paying job, but most people I know I went to school with or who intern with us are doing something else as stated previously. IF exercise is your passion then be smart and look clinical (RN, PT, RD, Chiro, or MD-sports medicine) and balance it a degree in exercise advance degree or certification. Think how you can be valuable long term.

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trevor in Oatley, Australia

52 months ago

My advice is to leave America if you want to stay in the field, as someone who is in Australia I make 62,421.37 USD (converted from AUS) as a graduate, granted it is case management so mainly paperwork and insurance companies om my back.

You will get less in clinical work as a graduate..anywhere from $42,000 USD and up..but it seems like Australia pays much higher.

May not be an option for a lot of you, guess it depends on how bad you want to stay in the field

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benPeace25 in Douglasville, Georgia

52 months ago

wow Im a junior on my way to getting a b.s. in exercise and health science. All this talk makes me want to change my major. I've had thoughts of just finishing my degree at my university and going back to get a certification being a PTA so I'll at least have a 4 year degree to back me up and make me seem more valuable. Does this sound dumb?

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Haylee in Birmingham, Alabama

51 months ago

Trevor,

How did you go about moving to Australia...did you find a job first or move first? I would definitely be interested in doing something similar but would like to find out more information. I graduated in 2007 and thankfully I have been able to find decent jobs but I do agree with most of these comments about the field of exercise physiology. The pay stinks and jobs are becoming harder to find. It's really sad that an RN with an ASN degree can take the cardiac rehab jobs although someone with a Masters in the field would have much more knowledge of the field.

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trevor smeda in bunbury, Australia

51 months ago

Moved first, getting a work visa in Australia isn't hard, and having qualifications behind you will work in your favour with getting into the country, also being able to show that you have looked into employment within australia will help.

I will warn you though that positions in Australia ARE competitive, but as long as you are flexible with what location you are willing to move to and are willing to move interstate once here you will be able to secure a job, I know people who have taken months to find a job, but I have also known people who secured jobs before they even graduated

I have a couple of friends who graduated last year and have secured full time jobs earning $50,000-$60,000 AUS, some others secured work part time but are younger and live at home so they still arent struggling finacially.

Keep an eye out on the cost of living though as it can get very expensive, Perth for example has the most expensive property market in the western world, and second only to Hong Kong in the entire world.

What i would advise though is checking that you meet the requirements for Australian Exercise Physiologist accreditation, and getting that sorted before you move (if you do) because it can take a few months to be approved, and you may even be required to do further study or hours depending on your situation.

the site below is the body that you need to register with so i would spend some time going through that it detail
www.essa.org.au/

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Haylee in Birmingham, Alabama

51 months ago

Awesome, Thanks Trevor! Sounds like employment for us is much better in Australia. Going to check out the website now.
Take care.

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michelle in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

51 months ago

M.S. in Clinical Exercise Physiology, B.S. in Kinesiology, ACSM RCEP here. I was pre-physical therapy in undergrad, and I took my first Exercise Physiology class, & fell in love :) And the experience I had 6 years as a PT aide was ew, I was so tired of people complaining about their knees. You have got to have a PASSION for exercise physiology to stay in this field. If you've lost it, might as well go back to school. You never EVER do it for the money. I feel like getting into exercise science is like going into social work or being a teacher. It's never about the money.
However, at age 29, I've secured a wonderful job that pays above the US average for exercise physiologists, in OKLAHOMA, where cost of living is low. I've done 2 stints in cardiac rehab, 2 in stress testing, 1 in research, and as an undergrad: while everyone tried to find the easy fitness jobs, I busted my butt helping multiple professors with their research. I also had several other relevant jobs...paid well? yeah right. And what did I do to get my awesome job now? I seeked out a diabetes center and having been closely following them for 3 years, finally found a contact and kept in contact for almost a year. I was DETERMINED. Why? Because I get to build a program similar to cardiac rehab but for diabetes, and because it is at a university, I get to be a part of developing research. I have the best of both worlds, it's awesome! Don't give up if you WANT IT.
I met a dietitian intern who has a M.S. in exercise science. I asked her why she seeked a dietitian degree? She said she really wanted to be a CDE (certified diabetes educator) and said the CDE does not accept those with an exercise background. Um...ta da...CDE has accepted ACSM RCEP and CES within the last few years. In the early 2000s when she checked, she absolutely could not. The field is growing but only go into this field if you like the challenge!

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michelle in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

50 months ago

NORTHPHYS in London, United Kingdom said: Hi there,
I'm an Exercise Physiologist (from a non clinical background). I'm currently recruiting clinical physiologists, and I have had a number of applicants with the ACSM CES accreditation. I understand that this is popular accreditation in the states, and although it is highly recognised in the UK, it is less familiar. Would you know where I could get a sample certificate from? or indeed if you have one yourself would you mind if i viewed it? as it is taking too long to check with ACSM who has a valid accreditation!

What do you mean a sample certificate? that means you are waiting on ACSM to respond to see if their certifications are valid? I'm confused, if they are to lie about their certification number, what would stop them from making up a phony certificate. If you're still waiting, then I'd rather look at their education and get referenes from their clinical background.

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whome in New Westminster, British Columbia

50 months ago

trevor in Oatley, Australia said: My advice is to leave America if you want to stay in the field, as someone who is in Australia I make 62,421.37 USD (converted from AUS) as a graduate, granted it is case management so mainly paperwork and insurance companies om my back.

You will get less in clinical work as a graduate..anywhere from $42,000 USD and up..but it seems like Australia pays much higher.

May not be an option for a lot of you, guess it depends on how bad you want to stay in the field

I agree with Trevor, it depends on where you reside. If you look elsewhere, state or different country, the salary/pay rate will change. I live in Canada and our pay varies by provinces. I work in Cardiac Rehab as a CES and I love my job. It is a very rewarding career---you get to use your knowledge, stay physically active, case manage, and work in a clinical setting. In addition, you are in an environment and position where you know you are making a positive difference in a person's life.

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whome in New Westminster, British Columbia

50 months ago

trevor in Oatley, Australia said: My advice is to leave America if you want to stay in the field, as someone who is in Australia I make 62,421.37 USD (converted from AUS) as a graduate, granted it is case management so mainly paperwork and insurance companies om my back.

You will get less in clinical work as a graduate..anywhere from $42,000 USD and up..but it seems like Australia pays much higher.

May not be an option for a lot of you, guess it depends on how bad you want to stay in the field

I agree with Trevor, it depends on where you reside. If you look elsewhere, state or different country, the salary/pay rate will change. I live in Canada and our pay varies by provinces. I work in Cardiac Rehab as a CES and I love my job. It is a very rewarding career---you get to use your knowledge, stay physically active, case manage, and work in a clinical setting. In addition, you are in an environment and position where you know you are making a positive difference in a person's life.

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Trevor in San Diego, California

47 months ago

Good job Michelle, it's true, stay true to this field, and it will pay off eventually, I like that you mentioned CDE, that's become another great option for us, CDE's make 80-100k in some cases!

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Doc in Bridgeport, Connecticut

45 months ago

I have a BS is Sports & Health Sciences. I start my MS is Sports & Health Sciences in two days, but am also starting a Doctorate of Chiropractic program later this fall. At some point during all this schooling, I want to get the ACSM-RCEP certificate. I was on the acsm-cepa.org site today. They have a page encouraging Exercise Physiologist to apply for a National Provider Identifier (NPI). The NPI should allow exer. phy. to bill for services independently. Has anyone received their NPI or know someone else that has? If so, how has it changed your career? Can you give us some insight on taking this step?

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michelle in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

45 months ago

Anyone can submit a NPI, even with no qualifications. You'd be "cheating" though. Because the NPI is pointless without billing and right now RCEP are not a billable provider. The NPI just started last fall. I did the NPI thing the beginning of this year. It does not do anything for our career AT THIS TIME because it's simply just a number in the national "billing" system. Mainly for the purpose of Medicare. It's just the first "step." We are hopeful in the near future or years even, it will benefit us. RCEP is not a billable provider. We are so early in our "provider creation" stage that billing successes are extremely rare. With the help of state and national licensure, then we may probably bill, at the discretion of medicare and insurances. This is a struggle for cardiac rehab, diabetes, obesity, and cancer clinics that want to hire RCEP but do not want to, because it is difficult for us to bill so they end up hiring nurses or physical therapists. But a smart facility, will take that risk of hiring a RCEP. Ultimately, if you love the chronic disease field, hang onto this RCEP field. If you desire money, see other profitable fields. Also, in my opinion, I can only hope the Affordable Care Act or any future health policies that are created will further encourage chronic disease PREVENTION. For example obesity billing was just approved this year, HUGE step, but even dietitians (or RCEPs) can't even take advantage of it. Mainly primary care doctors. REALLY? Like they really know about obesity prevention and treatment. Anyway, this was more of a rant. You should join a couple of ACSM groups on Linkedin to learn more.

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John in Nashville, Tennessee

45 months ago

Finished my MS in Exercise Science last year with the intent of Exercise Physiology, but didn't realize all of the clinical hours required to merely sit for the exam. Duh, didn't know what I didn't know. Any suggestions on where to gain these hours and maybe even get paid for it?

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Amanda

45 months ago

I received my MS degree in exercise science as well and am having trouble finding a job that will allow me to work with cardiac patients. I wanted to also receive ACSM certification for RCEP but I find it hard to find a place that will hire me without the certification. But I can't take the exam unless I have the hours and I can't get the hours because I don't have the certification. It is just a vicious cycle. Any suggestions on where I might be able to find a job that will allow me to utilize my degree?

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Doc in Bridgeport, Connecticut

45 months ago

michelle in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: Ultimately, if you love the chronic disease field, hang onto this RCEP field. If you desire money, see other profitable fields. Also, in my opinion, I can only hope the Affordable Care Act or any future health policies that are created will further encourage chronic disease PREVENTION. For example obesity billing was just approved this year, HUGE step, but even dietitians (or RCEPs) can't even take advantage of it. Mainly primary care doctors. REALLY? Like they really know about obesity prevention and treatment. Anyway, this was more of a rant. You should join a couple of ACSM groups on Linkedin to learn more.

Thanks Michelle! Even though it was a rant, it was very helpful information. I do love the chronic disease field. And no, medical doctors don't know anything about obesity prevention and treatment. They don't know much about preventing anything. They just aren't trained for prevention. They are trained to prescribe medications. I'm looking at going Nurse Practitioner, plus stay with RCEP. That way I can examine, diagnose, and treat, and I'll have multiple options for treatment. I'll just have to live in a state that gives NPs a good bit of latitude. Thanks for your reply!

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michelle in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

45 months ago

Amanda, John, you should join LinkedIn and join the ACSM groups for additional advice. I'm sorry you didn't get the hours but I found that when I was in school, it was the easiest way for me to get my hours because internships was part of my exercise physiology program. The field is not large enough and finding a paid internship would be near impossible. The only paid internship I can think of is in research, but that won't help the RCEP exam too much unless there is something clinical about it.

Depending where you live, I find it unlikely a job would require you to have a ACSM RCEP, as it is normally only a suggested certification or maybe the CES certification as the minimum. Having a ACSM RCEP just gives you that "bump" in getting hired and maybe better pay.

I would suggest looking at cardiac rehabs, hospitals, diabetes centers, bariatric weight loss clinics to start. You might get an entry level job first, but whatever it takes to move up. I did not want to work for a gym, be a personal trainer, or a group exercise instructor, but I did it because most facilities hiring a clinical exercise professional would prefer they have a general knowledge of that anyway.

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fit50 in Kentucky

44 months ago

I am in a situation similar to many that I've been reading about here. I've been in the exercise phys/fitness field for 15+ years. My passion is prevention through exercise - it works better than any medicine out there. However, I have just returned to school to pursue my BSN. At 50, it's time for me to look at job security and decent pay. I'm grieving in some ways since I'm not doing what I love every day right now, but I'm determined to find some way to meld fitness and nursing into a worthwhile career. (At least I get to work out at the awesome fitness facility here on campus while going to school!) For those of you out there hoping to work at what you love, just realize you will probably enjoy going to work every day but you may not see much in the way of financial compensation at the end of the week. With that said, I believe in the mantra: If you enjoy the work that you do, then you'll never work a day in your life. Problem is, there has to be work available, so back to school for me!

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bns7601 in Fayetteville, North Carolina

38 months ago

Amanda,
You can get experience through being a personal trainer. You may have to get certified first, but with your knowledge, you should be good with the exam. Good luck!

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Kirsten in Australia

35 months ago

Hi everyone,

I am from Australia and currently working as an accredited exercise physiologist. I am moving to California next year and was wondering what accreditation was required to work as an exercise physiologist or cardiac scientist/technician? Is there a difference between an exercise physiologist and physical therapist in America, as in Australia the term is interchangeable. Any advice or feedback would be appreciated!

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Neil80 in Miami, Florida

34 months ago

You are better off pursuing a "professional" healthcare degree like DPT. For all the time and money you have to invest to become an EP (Master's degree, RCEP certification) you're compensated poorly, relatively speaking, and it's hard to find job opening for EP's. Many times registered nurses are assigned these roles, which creates heavy competition for these spots. There's a good article here www.exercise-science-guide.com/blog/what-can-you-do-with-exercise-science-degree/ that explains why becoming an EP may not be the best choice if you're looking for a good healthcare career to go into.

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michelle in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

34 months ago

Kirsten in Australia said: Hi everyone,

I am from Australia and currently working as an accredited exercise physiologist. I am moving to California next year and was wondering what accreditation was required to work as an exercise physiologist or cardiac scientist/technician? Is there a difference between an exercise physiologist and physical therapist in America, as in Australia the term is interchangeable. Any advice or feedback would be appreciated!

EPs is a more recognized profession in Australia than the U.S. The requirements will vary depending on the hospital. I would look into the hospitals you are interested in. Typically an ACSM RCEP and ACLS certification if you want to work in cardiac rehab. A lot of the time, nurses do get those jobs "first" but over time the field has become more welcoming to this new profession. Professions expand all the time.

There is a large difference between an EP and PT as PTs are nationally and state recognized. PTs earn more money as well.

I almost got into PT but decided to go the unpopular route. So it's whatever floats your boat. "Professional" is relative. It is also possible for PTs and EPs work along side each other and complement each other's work.

I will say, if the EP field does not flourish in the healthcare field, I don't feel like I've lost my career. I'd have much mroe joy going back into general personal training than I would as a PT.

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KluvK4eva in Spring, Texas

32 months ago

I recently enrolled in the community college for exercise science transfer to major college. Your saying my best option is to switch to nursing and get out of exercise science.

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gecki12 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

31 months ago

I'm sad to hear most everyone is saying about the ex phys field. If it's your passion, then do it! I do it not for the money, but for the research, for the new studies that are being published. The questions being posed, the fascinating studies being funded and completed. For the fact that it is such a NEW FIELD. There is always room for more research. And we will always need passionate, experienced and intelligent professors. Find your nitch. Run with it. I love what I do, and I wouldn't change it for the world! Not even for more money.

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Jude at Frontera Strategies in Irving, Texas

31 months ago

My company employs Exercise Physiologist in a very unique capacity. Check out www.teamfrontera.com. We are a mobile medical Diagnostics company and our techs are responsible for administering and monitoring 12-lead Cardiopulmonary Diagnostic stress tests and Pulmonary Function exams in a field setting. These tests are done in a Physician family practice/clinic setting. You will drive a company provided van and carry your own cycle and equipment necessary to preform the tests. We require a degree in Exercise Physiology (Masters preferred). We are currently hiring in Oklahoma City, Dallas/FW and Houston.

This is a fun and exciting way to use your degree!

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Crystal in Kissimmee, Florida

15 months ago

gecki12 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida said: I'm sad to hear most everyone is saying about the ex phys field. If it's your passion, then do it! I do it not for the money, but for the research, for the new studies that are being published. The questions being posed, the fascinating studies being funded and completed. For the fact that it is such a NEW FIELD. There is always room for more research. And we will always need passionate, experienced and intelligent professors. Find your nitch. Run with it. I love what I do, and I wouldn't change it for the world! Not even for more money.

Thank you! It was disheartening for me to read these posts. As a MSH candidate and future RCEP, I am filled with passion and drive for my field and career. It has very little to do with money, but rather everything to do with creating a healthier world. I would never give up this career or path for a couple of extra dollars. Visit my health fitness blog at www.TheWellthNut.com. I've launched my own mobile and online personal training and lifestyle coaching business; my services can be found there.

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John in Nashville, Tennessee

15 months ago

I always tell anyone who asks to go the Physical Therapy route because of the better wages and hours. However, outside of academia, if you have a passion for fitness and want to make a good living, you need to understand you must be an entrepreneur as well as a fitness professional or exercise physiologist. This is why so many of us have websites like www.bemovelive.com or www.TheWellthNut.com or any of the other mentioned in these posts. Exercise Science is a new field and to a certain degree we are all still forging the path.

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Kraig in Illinois

13 months ago

Jude at Frontera Strategies in Irving, Texas said: My company employs Exercise Physiologist in a very unique capacity. Check out www.teamfrontera.com . We are a mobile medical Diagnostics company and our techs are responsible for administering and monitoring 12-lead Cardiopulmonary Diagnostic stress tests and Pulmonary Function exams in a field setting. These tests are done in a Physician family practice/clinic setting. You will drive a company provided van and carry your own cycle and equipment necessary to preform the tests. We require a degree in Exercise Physiology (Masters preferred). We are currently hiring in Oklahoma City , Dallas/FW and Houston.

This is a fun and exciting way to use your degree!

Hey Jude,

I am currently talking with the HR lady with Frontera about an Ex Phys position with the company and I feel it is an interesting and intriguing way to use my MS in Ex Phys. I would be interested to talk further with you if possible to get a better understanding of how current exercise physiologists feel about their jobs with Frontera.

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Shane in Osakis, Minnesota

12 months ago

Host said: What is the best training for becoming an exercise physiologist? What types of ongoing training or certifications are necessary to be an effective exercise physiologist?

What do non-traditional career paths look like?

It looks like this thread is nearly 5 years old now but gets gradual comments and I want to share with everyone the American Society of Exercise Physiologists (ASEP). ASEP is trying to turn this depressing situation around! All the comments above describe the general dismay of graduating with an undergrad or graduate degree only to find a lack of viable job opportunities. ASEP is working to do many things, but the two major points are 1) accredit academic exercise physiology programs in order to 2) prepare students/ExSci grads to challenge and pass a board certification exam (EPC) to practice and prescribe exercise medicine in a proactive health model that parallels the medical treatment model in our society.
We must realize this will not immediately resolve the lack of jobs that cause these frustrations, but it is the first steps. ASEP created the first Scope of Practice and Code of Ethics for Exercise Physiologists. This established ASEP as our professional organization. No other certifying organization in America can say it is only of, for, and by Exercise Physiologists. So, as a first step, I encourage all EPs from any degree title under the Exercise Science 'umbrella' to visit www.asep.org to learn more, become a member and become board certified just as other healthcare professionals complete their degree work and then challenge board exams to become board-certified and thus, accepted as proficient professionals in their field.
There is power in being affiliated with your professional organization and having the title whether you are building your own "non-traditional" opportunities or want to stand out in your next job application! Make it yours and own it!

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L. Williams in Tracy, California

10 months ago

@ Shane,
Thank you for this update. Acquiring ASEP membership and certification is one of my future goals.

@ All,
I just wanted to go over a possible plan of mine and see what you guys think about it. I am hoping that a couple of my concerns can be addressed here as well.

I am a former Army medic (mostly outpatient clinical), and civilian registered medical assistant, however I have been working the last several years in Healthcare-IT (basically an IT guy). I want out of it, and I am thinking of going back to the medical side of things. I can't really take the politics and stress associated with IT any longer, plus I am tired of my skills being obsolete every couple years. I would like to do something other than being a medical assistant if possible, and was looking into being an EP in clinical setting. I have a BA in management and Masters degree in Psychology (yes I know an IT guy schooled in psychology wanting to be an EP...sounds silly). I am hoping to make this career change as cheap and as quick as possible. But I have to also do this while working a full-time job.

PLAN
1. Obtain personal training credential and start getting some experience there.
2. Take a EKG program, get certification, and experience with Holter monitor testing...etc.
3. Complete the necessary individual coursework required to sit for the ASEP exam.
4. Find a flexible and cheap degree program in exercise science or related (will be a challenge working full time)
5. Maybe tie my psychology background in by taking sport/exercise psychology courses
6. Apply for a clinical EP job or something similar

Questions:
1. Would I be able to land any work in this field with those credentials?
2. Are employers in California hiring mainly Nurses for these positions?
if so, Would my medical assisting and Army medic background assist in gaining employment?

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Drotski in Brooklyn, New York

6 months ago

i work in cardiopulmonary rehab with a masters in exercise physiology. im making 60k working at a hospital in brooklyn but i also tackled on another position as a sleep technician to make more money. Dont run away from it, do what you love. just have to work harder to find the job you want. im going back to get an associates as a sleep tech to make the full salary and have 2 FT careers. It's not that hard, just have to work for it.

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Ana in New York, New York

3 months ago

NYC area-
Looking for a competent full time Clinical Exercise Physiologist with a Masters Degree to start immediately at our cardiopulmonary rehab program. Prefer some experience in cardiac rehab.
If interested email your résumé to:
Cardiopulmonary.rehabilitation@gmail.com
Thanks

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