B.S. Geology, need job

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CuteKitty in Houston, Texas

44 months ago

h6 in Richmond, Texas said: If there was one word I could use to describe The Mudlogging Co, it would be 'LIARS!' They lied to me about sooooo many things and all the people I worked with in the short time I was with them were fed the same pack of lies I had been. They turned keylogging on all their computers and would call up people and scream at them for applying for other jobs! I witnessed a phone call where they made a 30 year old man cry for watching youtube videos at 3am when they were barely drilling enough to take a sample once every 8 hours and frequently shutting down due to mechanical problems. Just terrible! I wouldn't advise ANYONE to work for those villains.

And this my friends is why the oil/gas industry is not for everyone =P. I Mudlogged for about 3 years (2 of which was with TMC). I knew what I was getting myself into, I did the research. It is a very male dominated role but either way I learned a ton and made a good living doing it. Mudlogging was probably the only way a non-graduate degree individual can become a Geologist with a production company.

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oilpatch in Rockwall, Texas

44 months ago

I must say, Mudlogging is not a sexy job in the O&G industry. You get dirty, you are away in the field for days, weeks, a month or two at a time. Time off is way too short and precious.
I have been doing this since '93, straight out of the military (9yrs. active duty). Started with a small outfit that slowed down in '98. Moved on to another and then another. The current employer (The Mudlogging Company) has done me right.
I preform a job that is looked down upon in the O&G industry. I am the first one the Company man calls to get answers or to chew my ass for my telling a geologist too much drilling information. jack of all trades? yep, that's a mudlogger.
Martin Ridge: Did I have any prior experience? No. Did I have to learn the job on my own? No. It is called OJT. Some in the field of mudlogging train better then others. I was lucky to have had a decent trainer that took the time to explain, or maybe I asked the right questions. I pull down better then 60K/yr. It comes at a very high cost. Many have asked me why I have stayed in the mudlogging field. I would have to say that I like what I do and am damn good at it. But then a mudlogger is only as good as his last successful well.
Martin Ridge: I have trained so many hands I have lost count. If they stay longer then a year, I feel lucky. If they make it a year, there is a good chance they will go two. Many roll out after just a few weeks or months. Did I mention the lifestyle is not for everyone?
I have trained my sister~in~law, my wife, my brother, the wife of a fellow logger to log and am now working to get my daughter to try logging.
I guess what I am trying to say is, Mudlogging is not for everyone. If you try it, stick with it a year to give yourself the best chance of learning the minimum about to job and see if it becomes easier over that time. Otherwise keep looking for something else. I have only a limited amount of time to train my replacement.

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MineRecuiter in Colorado Springs, Colorado

44 months ago

I would like to bring a recruiter's perspective on this subject. The mining industry is an extremely specialized industry. The employers are looking for a specialize skill set. Honestly, there are very few entry level positions. In addition, there isn't an establish overall platform to share information about job opportunities with candidates. I think our overall problem is communication. Most entry level positions are not posted and the companies depend on their internal resources to find talent. In addition, you have to obtain the specialize experience during internship, as well, get experience in an industry that is thriving. It is all about experience. My requisitions require a minimum of 5 years of experience. I have had one entry level position and I just happen to forward the resume to the hiring manager because I thought the candidate had good experience and the department just happen to be looking. It was soley by chance.

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Girl in Lafayette, Louisiana

43 months ago

h6 in Richmond, Texas said: Kristina, as a woman as well as with someone with a BS in geology that I've gotten absolutely no use out of, please know that if you choose to stick with it you are not choosing an easy path and the fact that you are female is an added challenge. My short experience as a mud-logger (which is pretty much all you're going to get with just a BS) showed me that women are NOT welcomed onto rigs with open arms. In fact, they aren't welcome at all.

I completely disagree with everything you have said on this forum, H6. I am a girl and have been working on oil rigs (offshore and land) for over a year. All the men (except for one or two grumps) have been nothing but nice to me, treating me as they would a sister. They look out for you because you are a girl, not in spite of it. I don't love this job (I'm a field engineer by the way, but work alongside mudloggers), but it's because of the lifestyle, not the people I work with. Also, I've never worked out my arms a day in my life, but I've been able handle almost all the lifting that is necessary for the job. And on the rare occasion I can't lift something, I just ask a rig hand for help and they are glad to. Finally, I've gotten more periods on a rig than I can count. Suck it up and move on. It's not pleasant, but when is it ever? Pop a Midol and get to work!

Anyway, I would just hate to think of any girls not going into the oilfield based on the bad experience of one woman with a bad attitude. Rig life isn't perfect, but being a girl has nothing to do with it.

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Sneji in Granada Hills, California

43 months ago

Fred in Visalia, California said: After reading most of these posts you'd think it's miserable to be a Geologist. I believe a lot of the problem with most folks here is a poor attitude. I live in California where the unemployment rate is hovering around 12%. However, look on the SF Bay area CL and you'll find a ton of employers needing geologists ranging from staff to senior level. I'm self employed after graduating in 2003 with a B.S. in Geology. We all have to start at the bottom after graduating, which I did. But I focused on passing the ASBOG and California Supplemental exam, got my PG license, and the work won't stop coming in. My advice is to stick it out and get the initial experience and work toward getting your PG license. Once you have tha PG license, many doors will open. The jobs are out there. Environmental work is booming all over the country. And true, if you want to work as a "Geologist" for an O&G company, an M.S. in Geology is definitely the way to go. However, that being said, there is work out there. I love what I do. It's a great career. The economy stinks but it will get better. It appears that burn out or just plain lack of motivation has gripped some folks on this forum. And don't complain about being a woman or being too old, etc. We all can use our race or gender as a crutch. SUCK IT UP! I know MANY geologist of differing races and gender that are working. Good luck!

Thank you! Your comment is exactly what I needed to read. And I agree with everything you wrote.

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h6 in Sugar Land, Texas

43 months ago

Girl in Lafayette, Louisiana said: I completely disagree with everything you have said on this forum, H6. I am a girl and have been working on oil rigs (offshore and land) for over a year. All the men (except for one or two grumps) have been nothing but nice to me, treating me as they would a sister. They look out for you because you are a girl, not in spite of it. I don't love this job (I'm a field engineer by the way, but work alongside mudloggers), but it's because of the lifestyle, not the people I work with. Also, I've never worked out my arms a day in my life, but I've been able handle almost all the lifting that is necessary for the job. And on the rare occasion I can't lift something, I just ask a rig hand for help and they are glad to. Finally, I've gotten more periods on a rig than I can count. Suck it up and move on. It's not pleasant, but when is it ever? Pop a Midol and get to work!

Anyway, I would just hate to think of any girls not going into the oilfield based on the bad experience of one woman with a bad attitude. Rig life isn't perfect, but being a girl has nothing to do with it.

You're probably right. I had a bad experience. Not everyone will. I've spent a lot of time pissed off at the world over the financial nightmare my experience caused me, as well as the downward spiral of personal problems I've had stemming from it. I'm not super concerned about it anymore. I injured myself while working at a job I got after mudlogging in such a way that I will never be able to work in the geological field again (or anything else that requires lifting more than like 40 lbs). That's my problem. Everyone have fun doing whatever. At the end of the day I suppose the point of this forum is:

Q: wtf do we do with these BS's in Geology that we earned?

A: Whatever the hell you want. It doesn't really matter. I actually don't think I have any friends from college who are actually working in the field they got their BS in anyway.

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Mike in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

43 months ago

Fred in Visalia, California said: After reading most of these posts you'd think it's miserable to be a Geologist. I believe a lot of the problem with most folks here is a poor attitude...My advice is to stick it out and get the initial experience and work toward getting your PG license. Once you have tha PG license, many doors will open. The jobs are out there. Environmental work is booming all over the country. And true, if you want to work as a "Geologist" for an O&G company, an M.S. in Geology is definitely the way to go. However, that being said, there is work out there. I love what I do. It's a great career. The economy stinks but it will get better. It appears that burn out or just plain lack of motivation has gripped some folks on this forum. And don't complain about being a woman or being too old, etc. We all can use our race or gender as a crutch. SUCK IT UP! I know MANY geologist of differing races and gender that are working. Good luck!

If a PG is the golden ticket to get a job, then colleges are doing a lousy job at communicating that to the students. I don't think any of my professors once mentioned a P.G license.

Also, if it is critical to get a Master's to get an entry level job, this also should be explained. It is obvious for a person to expect more opportunities with a master's, but they are telling people a B.S. will be adequate when in reality it is not, at least without a P.G. or experience.

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Fred in Visalia, California

43 months ago

carpediem in Davenport, Iowa said: Just Curious what type of work you did straight out of college? I am really hurting here. I graduated 6 months ago with a BS in geology and I haven't have one phone call yet. I've had two internships with the government during my college years but still that doesn't seem to help me. I've been digging so deep for jobs. I've applied for almost every single job category in the geosciences.

Anyone have any suggestions for good mud logging companies or anything, just anything. Thank you.

Started as an entry level environmental geo. Have you considered moving to another state? You WILL find work in California. Check the bay area or southern Cal CL posts. There's one in Martinez for Entry level posted Feb 14.

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carpediem in Davenport, Iowa

43 months ago

Fred in Visalia, California said: Started as an entry level environmental geo. Have you considered moving to another state? You WILL find work in California. Check the bay area or southern Cal CL posts. There's one in Martinez for Entry level posted Feb 14.

Thank you for the suggestions. I was planning on moving to Utah soon but California has definitely been on my mind as well. I am sure California has many more jobs when compared to Utah.

Edit: While writing this I got a call about an entry level geologist job. Wish me luck!

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Christophicus in Irvine, California

43 months ago

Good luck!!! :)

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Longhorn in Austin, Texas

43 months ago

The reason y'all are having such issues is you have no experience and only a B.S. in Geology. Two options: 1) go back to school and get a master's 2) get experience....

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Geophysics in Austin, Texas

43 months ago

Longhorn in Austin, Texas said: The reason y'all are having such issues is you have no experience and only a B.S. in Geology. Two options: 1) go back to school and get a master's 2) get experience....

hahaha, AGREED!

There are Bachelor's level jobs in Geoscience available. However, more job opportunities and better advancement potential are available to those with at least a Master's degree in Geology or Geophysics. Environmental scientists also require at least a Bachelor's degree in Hydrogeology, Geochemistry or Geology, but employers often prefer candidates with Master's degrees.

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CuteKitty in Houston, Texas

43 months ago

Yes it boils down to getting a Graduate degree or just doing your time in the Field.

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carpediem in Davenport, Iowa

43 months ago

CuteKitty in Houston, Texas said: Yes it boils down to getting a Graduate degree or just doing your time in the Field.

Hi, I see you worked in the mudlogging business. Would it be ok if I gave you an an email? I would like to ask you a couple questions if that is alright with you.

I'll post my e-mail address once you respond. This way my email will be the only one public. It's a junk email anyway I've had it since middle school, lol.

I guess you would have to send the first mail then. Hope this is ok!

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swisler in Stillwater, Oklahoma

43 months ago

I will graduate in Dec of 2011 with my BS in geology at Oklahoma State University. I really wanted to go to grad school and my GPA is over a 3.0, but the financial issue is the most pressing at the moment. I have a husband and a two year old, so obviously extensive 'alone" travel is not what I'm looking for. I love geology which is why I majored in it in the first place. They have always emphasized the need for a MS here. I still don't know what emphasis I want to pursue, environmental or petroleum, or what will be the most conducive to already having a family (though I am still young, turning 25 this April). I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions on what kind of job I will be looking at with a bachelors or a masters in either field. I really love geology, and I want to live comfortably and be able to support my family. I've been really down on myself just feeling like I know nothing, even though I've gotten A's and B's in every geology/math course I've taken for my major requirements. I'm really feeling uncertain about my future, especially reading the above posts. If anyone has any insight/suggestions, I would greatly appreciate it. Supporting my family in a job that won't make me miserable is my only goal, and I will work as hard as I have to... Thanks.

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Geophysicist in Tampa, Florida

42 months ago

swisler in Stillwater, Oklahoma said: I will graduate in Dec of 2011 with my BS in geology at Oklahoma State University. I really wanted to go to grad school and my GPA is over a 3.0, but the financial issue is the most pressing at the moment. I have a husband and a two year old, so obviously extensive 'alone" travel is not what I'm looking for.QUOTE]

Swisler I attended graduate school immediately after obtaining my geology degree. How it works for most universities in America is that more than likely you wont get accepted if they don't have funding; that is, if you get accepted to graduate school in the US 9/10 universities/colleges have the funding to pay for all of your schooling and will also provide a teaching assistantship or research assistantship (talk to your profs about it they should also emphasize this). Try to decide what you want to specialize in and start talking with profs at schools. I kept an open mind and applied all over from Boston, to Hawaii. It is a bit more competative because not only are you trying to get in, but so is the rest of the world because everyone knows the funding is there for this field. Good luck!

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Zhoog in Houten, Netherlands

42 months ago

Interesting discussion here. The job market for graduated geologists is pretty tight right now. I am having the same problems. The thing is to keep trying and there are a lot of companies to apply to. If your mobile this is a great advantage and try to do extra-curricular activities. Don't spend your time waiting, it's better to have a short time job and look from the real one from there. You can also try getting into linked in groups and having your profile and cv updated. Oilcareers.com is also a good one and you might want to sign up to www.epgeology.com as there are a lot of recruiters and professionals there as well. Mingle in the discussions and hope your views and comments are going to get picked up.

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ss in Calgary, Alberta

42 months ago

ehm, how do u get experience in geology?? Evry job posting I looked at need experience!! How am I gonna get exp. if I just graduated?

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oilpatch

42 months ago

"ehm, how do u get experience in geology?? Evry job posting I looked at need experience!! How am I gonna get exp. if I just graduated?"

You take the first job offer that you receive that gives you some experience in the field your looking to work in and you do the best job you can. You ask questions and step up to do more then what is asked of you. When you have the minimum experience required, then you apply for the better jobs.

Of course, if you want to be a bull rider, then you place a handful of marbles in your mouth. Every time you ride a bull, spit one marble out. When you have no more marbles in your head, then You are a Bull rider.

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Texan in Odessa, Texas

42 months ago

swisler in Stillwater, Oklahoma said: I will graduate in Dec of 2011 with my BS in geology at Oklahoma State University. I really wanted to go to grad school and my GPA is over a 3.0, but the financial issue is the most pressing at the moment. I have a husband and a two year old, so obviously extensive 'alone" travel is not what I'm looking for. I love geology which is why I majored in it in the first place. They have always emphasized the need for a MS here. I still don't know what emphasis I want to pursue, environmental or petroleum, or what will be the most conducive to already having a family (though I am still young, turning 25 this April). I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions on what kind of job I will be looking at with a bachelors or a masters in either field. I really love geology, and I want to live comfortably and be able to support my family. I've been really down on myself just feeling like I know nothing, even though I've gotten A's and B's in every geology/math course I've taken for my major requirements. I'm really feeling uncertain about my future, especially reading the above posts. If anyone has any insight/suggestions, I would greatly appreciate it. Supporting my family in a job that won't make me miserable is my only goal, and I will work as hard as I have to... Thanks.

I would avoid environmental consulting if you can. Maybe I just got tired of being laid off, I"m 40 and with a MS in Limnology. I did that for a decade in the Dallas Fort Worth area and even some in your area of Oklahoma. I now do env. compliance for a large company (and love it). Env. consulting has taken a real beating in this economy and the type of work you might do in the pet. industry is real geology in my opinion. But working for an O&G company will involve lots of travel and foreign assignments I would think.

Steven

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telepahn in Colorado Springs, Colorado

42 months ago

Hello Steven,

I am a recruiter in the mining industry. You are still in school, DO AN INTERNSHIP! Companies stategicly market students by attending career fairs and events to spark interests in the study of their business. You have to understand that is where you can gain valuable experience as well as the possiblity of getting a job. Each year about this time companies start posting positions for students who are still in school. For example, I have worked for both Newmont and Kinross who are both Fortune 500 companies and leaders in the gold mining industry. Each company has a robust internship program in which they hire students each year.

I see it time and time again. Students do not complete any internship and when the graduate, they have no experience and no contacts or know any companies that they can work for.

Here is a lead. The Kinross Gold Corporation is seeking a Geology Intern for the summer. No, it isn't a full time job, but you can gain valuable experience and meet people in the industry who could possibly help you obtain full time work in the future.

Send me your resume and I will put you in as a candidate. It is in Round Mountain, NV. A very isolated and remote area. It is only for a few months and it will be good experience.

Send your resume to resumes@miningjobs4u.com

Thank you,

Ronald Hollins
MiningJobs4U

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lc in nv in winnemucca, Nevada

42 months ago

Gary Rogers PG in Greensboro, North Carolina said: I wrote a two part article for AEG News on careers in geology. It has information for you job seekers that will be of use. It's posted on my website at sites.google.com/site/garyrogerspg/
There are jobs out there and many of them are filled before they are posted. So be proactive and go visit everyone who you want to work for.
Good luck and keep applying.

Thank you Gary for your post and website link. If other Geos out there haven't given it a read, I highly suggest it. It is very valuable and thorough. Also I really enjoyed the link to Sarah Andrews writing on how the Geologist thinks.

Btw-Nevada has excellent opportunities for recent Geology grads interested in mining. And you actually would be doing geology..bonus! Applications for summer internships need to be submitted often by January. Entry level positions come up often on infomine.com My suggestions aside from that is to make contacts in the industry either through professional societies or networking with other classmates that enjoy what they are doing, etc.

Cheers Gary and to all!

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Fred in Adelaide, Australia

41 months ago

Do not became a mine geologist FIFO leads to divoice
or you end up living in a hole with no decent women aound. Once you are in the game it is very difficult to leave it and start a new career. Do not became a geologist more money does not mean a better standard of living

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

40 months ago

I'm an unemployed Geologist in Ohio and have been tryin like crazy to find a mudlogger position in Tx but all I get is these places wantin me to pay them to post my resume any suggestions?

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

40 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller. I need help.

I feel your pain I'm in ohio and have been unemployed almost a year now most civil engineering firms here are pretty much done for seems like everyday i wonder wat made me decide a degree in Geology lol anyway have u tried at jus being a field geologist out behind rigs it sucks but its work tho

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oilpatch

40 months ago

G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio said: I'm an unemployed Geologist in Ohio and have been tryin like crazy to find a mudlogger position in Tx but all I get is these places wantin me to pay them to post my resume any suggestions?

The Mudlogging Company USA, LP. Look us up on the web.

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

40 months ago

Thank you!:)

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Kajun-odo in Bakersfield, California

40 months ago

I can definitely relate to most of you guys. After graduating in 2009 with a Bachelors Degree in geology, it took me more than a year before I got my first job. Yes, it is mudlogging job but the company I am working is relatively better than the ones you can read on this forum. They fly us in and out of the location (our contracts are mostly in southern california), even if you are from the east coast or hawaii(?) they will fly you to california. We stay in a motel in a nearby town and they provide us with rental cars. We go back to the town everyday where we can drink beer at the local bar or dine in restaurants. Our company has been hiring over the last 6 months and around 20 new people have been accepted already. I believe the hiring will continue because most of the older loggers here are going back to grad school.

All I can say is work on your resume and make it look as good as possible. That's what I did. You dont need to pay several hundreds of dollars for other "specialist" to make your resume. You can do it yourself. Although I have to read several resume writing articles and ebooks to furnish my long and boring resume.

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

40 months ago

Thats cool! my one prob is I have never performed mud logging. Here in Ohio its mostly drilling for soil samples n classifying it and in some cases we rock core but lol Ohio is either shale limestone or sandstone(boring geology) lol

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

40 months ago

old geologist in Lake Jackson, Texas said: Just heard from a mining company in another country. They said I do not have the skills they desire. Funny, I have done the same job in the past and I found minerals. I wrote the report and calculated the reserves. I even laid out the mine area for the engineers. I do not think these HR people have a clue about just what a Geologist does or how to read a resume. Anyone else have these types of experiences?

Yeah I have lol, Im in Ohio n all I have ever worked with has been civil engineers had one tell me that he doesn't beleive in using Geologists on projects said just a waste of budget said he can describe soil n rock just as well so yeah im in the same boat man.

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Texan in Dallas in Midland, Texas

40 months ago

Yea, my experience is that that some folks have no idea what to look for sometimes when looking at resumes. You can only hope someone who knows the industry looks at your resume. I've also gone on interviews where the guy doing the interview desribes a job that sounds unlike the job posting

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G.Jenk in Newark, Ohio

40 months ago

Yup! hell i even took a day off from work to go to an interview with the Ohio EPA only to be told that the job went to someone internally! missed a whole days pay. I have came to the conclusion I need to get out of Ohio lol

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Mudlogger in Pine Grove, California

39 months ago

I don't know why everyone here has had such bad luck. I graduated in spring of 2011 and EVERY member of my graduating clas in geology was either employed before graduation or within a couple of months. I myself was hired as a mud logger within a month of graduating. You guys looking for jobs need to network with your classmates and professors in order to find a job. Most young geologist I know got jobs because someone knew someone who was hiring. Your professors know geologists in the industry and you need to capitalize on that. They all have friends who are senior geologists or run their own companies. Pick their brains, befriend a professor, see if you can help them with their research. There is more to getting a Geo degree than showing up and turning in your homework. Network within the small Geo community and it will pay off. As far as mud logging I love it. I've work oil and geothermal wells all over the world. This is definitely a job for people that don't mind working long hours or traveling a lot. I also work directly with energy company geologists and already have had a couple ask me to come work for them. I garuntee you if you work hard and look in the right places you will find a Geo job. Their are tons of them out there.I have friends working for environmental, oil, geotech, and engineering companies and they are all hiring right now. Get out there and good luck.

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s.williamson in Muncy, Pennsylvania

39 months ago

Best comment I have ever seen on this forum. This is the attitude you should have, upon embarking on your new career.

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Sneji in Granada Hills, California

39 months ago

s.williamson in Muncy, Pennsylvania said: Best comment I have ever seen on this forum. This is the attitude you should have, upon embarking on your new career.

Easy to say.....

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Ekaterina in Toronto, Ontario

39 months ago

I'm HR consultant looking for geologists,chief geologists, exploration managers and mining professionals for my clients all over the world.
I can't guarantee a job but an additional opportunity to find it. All interested can contact me by e-mail: e.kimaeva@inbox.com
Best regards,
Ekaterina

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McNutty in Massapequa, New York

37 months ago

Ive read some pretty depressing posts on here, Whew- I was hoping someone with some experience in Geology could give a breakdown of what types of jobs catagories there are in Geology. Let me say, Im 32 I have a degree in Business, hated the work, landed a job as a Driller -Stabo work, and I bumped elbows with some geologists. I actually like drilling as sadistic as that seems. I decided to study Geology, and I really want to land a job on an oil rig, or in some remote location somewhere near the corner of the earth getting really dirty, freezing cold, and attacked by bears or something. Can anyone suggest, what path to take in my studies to get me the best chance of landing that sweet job. No joke as funny as it seems. I will do whatever it takes to land a job in some remote mountain region, desert, or ocean!

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jake noneyour in salt lake city, Utah

37 months ago

McNutty in Massapequa, New York said: Ive read some pretty depressing posts on here, Whew- I was hoping someone with some experience in Geology could give a breakdown of what types of jobs catagories there are in Geology. Let me say, Im 32 I have a degree in Business, hated the work, landed a job as a Driller -Stabo work, and I bumped elbows with some geologists. I actually like drilling as sadistic as that seems. I decided to study Geology, and I really want to land a job on an oil rig, or in some remote location somewhere near the corner of the earth getting really dirty, freezing cold, and attacked by bears or something. Can anyone suggest, what path to take in my studies to get me the best chance of landing that sweet job. No joke as funny as it seems. I will do whatever it takes to land a job in some remote mountain region, desert, or ocean!

I work for an oil service company and just got off an offshore rig in the Gulf. I am a mudlogger or "mud logging geologist" to be fancy. I obtained a degree in Geology and didn't specialize in anything specific. It depends what you really want to do, if it's oil go for petroleum engineering, if it's mining go to a school of mining and engineering, Montana has a good one. But really a straight geo degree will do, but it may be a little harder to find a job. It took me about a year. Right now things are booming in the Gulf as the Moratorium situation is dying down. I am new at my job, just 4 months in and I have done so much, traveled to different countries for training, worked along side wellsite geologists, and many more!

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jake noneyour in salt lake city, Utah

37 months ago

McNutty in Massapequa, New York said: Ive read some pretty depressing posts on here, Whew- I was hoping someone with some experience in Geology could give a breakdown of what types of jobs catagories there are in Geology. Let me say, Im 32 I have a degree in Business, hated the work, landed a job as a Driller -Stabo work, and I bumped elbows with some geologists. I actually like drilling as sadistic as that seems. I decided to study Geology, and I really want to land a job on an oil rig, or in some remote location somewhere near the corner of the earth getting really dirty, freezing cold, and attacked by bears or something. Can anyone suggest, what path to take in my studies to get me the best chance of landing that sweet job. No joke as funny as it seems. I will do whatever it takes to land a job in some remote mountain region, desert, or ocean!

So my advice, do internships during your summer breaks, volunteer, become a member of professional societies, oh and study of course. Good Luck! Geology is one of the greatest studies!!

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gf in Muscat, Oman

37 months ago

jake noneyour in salt lake city, Utah said: So my advice, do internships during your summer breaks, volunteer, become a member of professional societies, oh and study of course. Good Luck! Geology is one of the greatest studies!!

does pursuing a bachelors of science in geology involve alot of math coursework or is it just the basics with just alittle of complicated stuff lol

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bubba in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

37 months ago

Come to Canada they are begging for geologists to work here, and you will make more money than most Doctors.

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Geofun in Tuscaloosa, Alabama

36 months ago

I completely agree. Not one person had ever heard of a PG in my class until we started interviewing. My personal belief for professors at our college not mentioning it is they spent minimum time in industry and don't think about telling us this.

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bob curfman in Calgary, Alberta

36 months ago

carpediem in Davenport, Iowa said: Just Curious what type of work you did straight out of college? I am really hurting here. I graduated 6 months ago with a BS in geology and I haven't have one phone call yet. I've had two internships with the government during my college years but still that doesn't seem to help me. I've been digging so deep for jobs. I've applied for almost every single job category in the geosciences.

Anyone have any suggestions for good mud logging companies or anything, just anything. Thank you.

I am looking for geo's work in ohio b-curfman@hotmail.com

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bob curfman in Calgary, Alberta

36 months ago

looking for geo's have work b-curfman@hotmail.com

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bob curfman in Calgary, Alberta

36 months ago

looking for geo's have work b-curfman@hotmail.com

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Mudlogger in San Jose, California

36 months ago

Kajun-odo in Bakersfield, California said: I can definitely relate to most of you guys. After graduating in 2009 with a Bachelors Degree in geology, it took me more than a year before I got my first job. Yes, it is mudlogging job but the company I am working is relatively better than the ones you can read on this forum. They fly us in and out of the location (our contracts are mostly in southern california), even if you are from the east coast or hawaii(?) they will fly you to california. We stay in a motel in a nearby town and they provide us with rental cars. We go back to the town everyday where we can drink beer at the local bar or dine in restaurants. Our company has been hiring over the last 6 months and around 20 new people have been accepted already. I believe the hiring will continue because most of the older loggers here are going back to grad school.

Which mudlogging company do you work for? Looking to maybe switch. Thanks!
All I can say is work on your resume and make it look as good as possible. That's what I did. You dont need to pay several hundreds of dollars for other "specialist" to make your resume. You can do it yourself. Although I have to read several resume writing articles and ebooks to furnish my long and boring resume.

Which mudlogging company do you work for? Currently looking to maybe switch companies. Thanks!

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Rockhead in Carlsbad, New Mexico

36 months ago

For those still in school or wishing to pursue an MS in geology (or other sciences), you may wish to look into the Bureau of Land Management's Student Career Experience Program (SCEP): www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/res/blm_jobs/students_and_recent/scep.html

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SD in Calgary, Alberta

35 months ago

old geologist in Lake Jackson, Texas said: I do not think these HR people have a clue about just what a Geologist does or how to read a resume. Anyone else have these types of experiences?

Older Geophysics MSc student here, you're absolutely right about clueless HR types, the trick has always been to get around these gatekeepers and it's not easy. I'm a recent BSc. grad from the wrong side of the age tracks(40+) and even though I graduated in the top 10% of my class I can barely get an interview(10% hit rate) and I've never gotten even a summer internship in three years of trying.

I see all this happening and then I see women and minorities and minority women get the red carpet rolled out for them by these HR types, even when their GPAs were mediocre at best. I've seen 60% of new grad jobs get staffed by the "protected" classes and the very best students not get a single offer because they not "favored".

I've been informed by a headhunter off the record that I'm "unemployable" because most O&G and resource company HR departments are fixated on youth and will absolutely not entertain the idea of an entry level grad over the age of 45. This when I have almost 20 years of computer experience and a physics BS in addition to a Geophysics(hons) BS degree.

All potential geoscience students need to realize that the information put out by O&G companies and their service companies are 99% propaganda and hype. The so called demographic hiring crisis when the Boomers retire is all hot air, what a lot of these companies have done is offshore the jobs like other companies in other sectors.

The only reason they keep broadcasting this propaganda is to collect resumes and select only the most perfect candidates, ie 4.0 GPA, the right pedigree in terms of clubs, community organizations etc.
In effect less then 5% of new grads will be picked up by the super majors and I think only about 25% of new grads of any year will be hired, if they're lucky.

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Mine Recruiter in Colorado Springs, Colorado

35 months ago

When an individual is immerse in generalities and prejudices, their perspective is skewed and the individual no longer has an accurate viewpoint or understands the issue. In every profession there are good people who are skilled professionals and there are bad people who for one reason or another are in a position in which they should leave immediately. However, we work in an industry to which we have no room for people who are not productive. No room for unproductive people in HR as well as in Geology.

As a candidate, you have to meet the criteria of the position. I find that older Geologists do not know the current mining software applications. Mining employers are not training people. You have to have the specific experience and you have to be able to present this in your resume. A lot of people have also hurt themselves by being unproductive on their previous job or not being able to work with other people. It's a small world and it doesn't take but a couple calls to find out that a candidate is a bad apple.

You can complain about HR, the government, the man, whatever or you can be realistic. Don't apply for a job that you are not qualified for. How do you know that the Geology team knows you are a buttock hole and they have told HR to throw your resume in the trash. Stop making assumptions and be realistic. Pointing fingers and blaming people does nothing for no one.

Take a realistic analysis of your skill set. Go after opportunities that closely match your experience. Do your homework. Everyone wants to work for the big players in the industry versus working for a junior mining company.

It takes work. I think you are partially right. You need to contact people in the industry to see if there are opportunities out there that meet your skill set. Don't burn bridges. If you make a bad name for yourself, people are not going to hire you.

I sincerely wish you the best.

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rock doc

35 months ago

I gave up looking for a job during 2008 after a headhunter told me I am unemployable because my degree is too old. I recently took the ASBOG FG exam and passed it the first time I took it. I guess I did well because I have been teaching geology courses as an adjunt during the last couple of years.

I still have headhunter calling me, but all they want is for me to explain technical terms to them. They keep asking,"What does that word mean?" or "What should I be looking for on a Geologist resume/cv?"

As an old geologist who is unemployable, I have found the various software packages used in mining, as well as o&g, to be easy to use. I go to the companies site and down-load the demos and play with their example data base. I construct cross sections from e-logs and seismic sections for o&g or cuttings and cores for mining.
The software companies have demos and training resources of their sites, but they are expensive.

That is just my experience, during the last three years as I spend time in my cardboard box under one of the I-45 overpasses in Texas, after a headhunter told me I am unemployable because I have a bad reputation or poor grades or lack experience or I am just too freaking old.

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