B.S. Geology, need job

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Dawn in Sydney, Australia

71 months ago

Move to Australia! There are tons of jobs for geologists especially in the booming mine industry. Ive had no problem getting 2 engineering geology jobs here with only a bs in earth sciences and a few engineering classes.

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o in Pleasantville, New Jersey

71 months ago

So, I'm in the same boat as most of you here. I'm looking for an entry level geologist job but haven't gotten any responses back. I thought that getting HAZWOPER certification might help, but so far my situation hasn't changed. I think what's holding me back is my lack of job experience in the field. I'm stuck in the circle: I can't get a job because I don't have experience and I don't have experience because I can't get a job. So I'm wondering if anybody here knows of any internships/apprenticeships/opportunities out there where I can get the experience I need? Even if it's unpaid? I'll travel anywhere to do it. I really want to join this field so desperately. The responsiveness from potential employers has been really disheartening. I just don't wanna feel like my time at college has been a complete waste. Please help?

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jenny in Houston, Texas

71 months ago

Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: I agree with what the other poster (BN97201) said. Geology is one of those professions where a Master's makes a world of a difference. I would also recommend investigating the many sub-disciplines of Geology (if you haven't already!) and perhaps Google "What types of jobs can a _____ get." There's the fantasy of Geology - working in the field and making decent money, going to exotic locales, being immersed in nature...Then there's (what could be) the reality - working long hours in an unstable energy industry, being in the middle of nowhere in less than favorable weather, being a grunt where "field work" is generally seen as bottom rung of the corporate ladder (if you want to advance you will probably be working in an office).

All of this talk about not being able to get a job with a geology degree is scaring me! I'm already experiencing this with my nutrition degree and would not like to go through this again :( with just a BS in geology, what type of pay would entry level be? and as for mud logging, what type of pay do they receive? I really cannot afford to get a masters, I need to start a career asap.

Another question, would relocating to another country pay better than jobs in the states? Just wondering. Thanks everyone!

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jenny in Houston, Texas

71 months ago

Also, is there anyone out there that has received their BS in geology recently and has a success story to tell?

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Kajun

71 months ago

Too many bad stories here. Let me share you a good one. And a lot are saying that mudlogging really sucks. I guess it depends on the company.

Ive been working on this mudlogging company for almost 2 years now. I got accepted straight out of college. I work 4 weeks on-2 weeks off schedule and we stay in Bakersfield, california for the duration of our work. They fly us in and out for our days off and have a great per diem + separate housing per diem. We make about 60-70k a year which is not bad for an entry level job.

We are planning to hire more people this month due to the number of our people going back to grad school or getting a better paying job.

So my point is, there are still good jobs out there. Try Canrig drilling technology and check out the California division.

Good Luck!

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Brett in Owasso, Oklahoma

71 months ago

I started working as a petroleum geologist in 1981. I worked thirty years for several oil and gas companies, and never lost a job. This included working through the terrible downturn in the 80's when half the oil and gas jobs in the country disappeared. I really hate to tell you guys (and girls) this, but things are a helluva lot better right now.

First of all, if you studied geology in college because you heard the field was paying big money, or you didn't know what else to major in, I really am very sorry for you. Be honest with yourself. If you did not hang around the geology department half the night, beg professors to be the lab assistant, knock out an "A" in geology and a "B" in everything else, there is just not much hope. There is no way you can compete with a person who loves geology, and showed their interest every day at school. You should get into another line ASAP.

If you grew up collecting rocks and reading science books, you have a BS in geology, and you now work for a mud-logging outfit because geology is you, get back in school and get your MS ASAP. A couple of years of mud-logging experience (say, 2-3) is good. But don't keep it up much longer than that. Mud-logging is fine, but not 10 years of mud-logging. It just does not play well. Get back in a MS (not MA) program. Go to the school that will give you a teaching or research assistantship. Go to a school in Oklahoma, Texas, or Louisiana if possible. Once you get there, make sure you keep busy. Act (and be) interested all the time. Find out which professors worked (or now consult) for oil companies, and hang out with them.

If you have a BS and MS degree, and you can't find a job, you might think about moving. Yes, you might have to go to Houston. Yes, you may have to go international.
If you want a job in petroleum geology, you can't stay in Seattle.

That's all I can type, due to word limit. Sorry if I offend.

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OP in Washington, District of Columbia

71 months ago

Geology was interesting until I realized I had to dedicate my time to catching up on math and science from trigonometry upward, along with my electives, and can't spend enough time on geology. If I could have focused on geology it would have been better. Multitasking or not geology took a back seat due to the fact that it was easier to pass geology classes than math and physics. But I never liked rocks as a kid anyway so that must mean it wasn't meant for me.

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Jenny in Houston, Texas

71 months ago

Bret, I've heard all success stories fr those who have graduated over 20 years ago. Do you have any insight for the job market ahead?

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scissorhands in Hamilton, Bermuda

71 months ago

very very helpful and insightful!!

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Brett in Owasso, Oklahoma

71 months ago

Jenny, all is not roses. I can't predict the future. I know plenty of geologists with a MS degree who lost jobs in the eighties. If geology was not for them, they stayed out permanently. But 90% of them came back into what they loved. You could not keep them away.

I don't think there is anything wrong with the current petroleum job market. It's better than it has been in years. I'm afraid expectations among recent graduates are too high. I'm afraid BS applicants are not taken seriously, because they have not taken geology seriously. Mud-logging is one of the few opportunities available to graduates with a BS (in the petroleum field).

If no one ever told you there was a very sharp line between BS applicants and MS applicants, I'm telling you now. It's HUGE.

This industry has always been a boom-bust affair. Dedicated people who loved the job and tried to give the company something for their money have survived through good and bad cycles. Work ethic and attitude are everything. If you don't show those attributes right up front, you are not going to make it in any field.

Sorry if I sound like an old guy, but there are lots of young people here asking for direction. I want to show part of the other side.

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me

71 months ago

I graduated with a BS in Geology during December 1985. Mt GPA was a 2.3. After several years of working for a mining company I was layed off. I floundered around for several years and managed to find a graduate program that was willing to work with me. I graduated with a MS in environmental geology/hydrogeology in May 1993. Mt GPA was 3.25 and I did not let that stop me. I wanted to be a geologist. Time and reality caused me to accept other jobs. Even to this day, my low gpa comes back to haunt me. I had to have a geology job and I am now working as a mud logger. The pay is low, I average a little over $20.80 per hour. I work 12 hour towers until the well is completed. That works out to 84 hours a week, but when the rig moves I am left without a pay day for about 10 days. I wish I had done better in school but I was a young, dumb, and very naive kid when I was in college. Some people took advantage of me and I was left in pieces, trying to graduate. I did the best I could while in graduate school and working full time. I have no regrets during that time. I was notthe sharpest pencil in the box. My message: do what you can and do your best.

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me

71 months ago

Frank in Odessa, Texas said: We need to warn those we care for about this degree and what lies in store. I am talking about fellow classmates and those new to Geology programs. I would like to see many Geology departments close their doors. They simply do not teach skills relevant or necessary to the oil industry. Field Camp with mapping projects and drawing strat columns? Give me a break... Lets teach students more about data processing and program usage. As this is actually relevant. Spread the word about this Forum!!!!!!!!

For years the oil companies have said the same thing. The Universities must teach the basics before they can do the program usage. Most say that it is the oil companies job to teach new hires how to use the programs and data processing. At my old college it is still that way! A lot of the majors use their own programs, which can't be used by all colleges. The cost of common programs, such as KINGDOM Suites and Petra, are very high for the license and computer usage. I doubt most faculty know how to use those packages.

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me

71 months ago

I doubt that will happen. Most of the faculty does not know how to use it. They must teach the basics before the computer usage gets taught. There are a lot of software packages out there, so which ones do they buy? The major oil companies have been asking all the universities to teach data processing and modelling for years! The colleges respond by telling them that they must teach the basics first. It is the oil companies job to teach new hires how to use their, high priced, software applications.

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Frank in Odessa, Texas

71 months ago

If colleges can't produce or adapt and teach skills relevant to the work force of today, then shut the programs down. Lets not milk student's for every last dollar by teaching irrelevant courses on Paleontology or Petrology...

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Brett in Owasso, Oklahoma

71 months ago

"...do what you can and do your best." I surely agree with that. There is certainly nothing wrong with mud logging, core-sampling, tool-pushing, or any other work that goes on in the field.

In the comments above, I noticed a lot of younger folks who seem surprised that an undistinguished undergraduate degree in a field perhaps chosen by chance does not automatically lead to a high-paying job. I know it's hard to listen to old coots when you're young. But this old coot is warning you against screwing around too much while you still have the chance to direct your own future.

Teaching is well-known as a low-paying career, and it is for most, yet thousands of graduates crowd into it every year. Undergraduate degrees in geology generally lead to low-paying jobs, especially at first. It is totally supply and demand. No need to complain when you know that up front.

Colleges and universities have traditionally resisted the idea of making themselves into tech schools. Also, many professors of geology try to distance themselves from the practical world, and the petroleum field in particular. So, you can't always count on them for realistic advice.

I consider my own experience in school as similar to taking a tour of a job fair. That course in optical mineralogy and the following summer of making thin-sections got me interested in plutons. A later semester of petrology made me decide plutons weren't really for me. Exposure to different courses got me interested in micro-paleontology (a Big-Oil subset job for sure), coal geology, and stratigraphy. I never really even thought about petroleum until the end of graduate school.

What would have helped me would have been seminars conducted by people who actually held jobs in the profession. These days, if you are not getting any job guidance at your school, ask a couple questions of some geoscience people on LinkedIn. I bet you'll get some useful answers!

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American... Tried and True in Midland, Texas

71 months ago

Roland,
get bent.

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Garrett in Allentown, Pennsylvania

71 months ago

h6 in Richmond, Texas said: Kristina, as a woman as well as with someone with a BS in geology that I've gotten absolutely no use out of, please know that if you choose to stick with it you are not choosing an easy path and the fact that you are female is an added challenge. My short experience as a mud-logger (which is pretty much all you're going to get with just a BS) showed me that women are NOT welcomed onto rigs with open arms. In fact, they aren't welcome at all. The things I love about geology there are no practical (employable) applications for. I have been out of school for 2 years and the only thing I could get was mudlogging which was awful. If you plan to have a relationship, if you want to have a family, if you want children- you will not be able to go into geology because the jobs rely very heavily on you traveling (and not to anywhere cool) and staying at sites for months at a time. Additionally, those jobs all have physical requirements that you may or may not be able to meet (I can't) like being able to lift and carry very heavy loads. If you want to be employed when you finish school, go into nursing or get a teaching certificate. Schools are really hurting for science and math teachers and there are probably a lot of options there. You can use a BS in geology and go through an alternative certificate program with no problem.
If you're going to get a masters I'd recommend going ahead and getting a PhD while you're at it and becoming a professor.
I love geology so much, but if I could do it over again I would never major in it in a million years because there are just no jobs.

I know a few women grad students that have gotten good jobs directly out of school. The one applied to Hydrogeology jobs on the west coast, specifically burgeoning "green energy" fields, geothermal etc...She got a job making $45,000 a year to start. There are jobs, mostly for those with masters degrees who have a really solid academic record.

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Garrett in Allentown, Pennsylvania

71 months ago

Frank in Odessa, Texas said: If colleges can't produce or adapt and teach skills relevant to the work force of today, then shut the programs down. Lets not milk student's for every last dollar by teaching irrelevant courses on Paleontology or Petrology...

It is frustrating. The thing about most Geo departments is there's a love/hate relationship with "dirty" energy companies. They know that most of their graduates, at least the ones not pursuing an academic career, will be working for these companies, but at the same time they don't want to be affiliated or tied to these companies for that reason. They don't want to have to tailor their programs to the companies they disagree with. It's maybe a bit political considering most college professors are "liberal." Oil jobs were definitely looked down on by the profs. where I went, ignoble, frowned upon.

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South Texas Mudlogger

71 months ago

I graduated with my BS in geology in summer of 2010 and could not find any other job, so i took one as contract(no benefits, insurance, etc.) mudlogger. Working in the field hasn't been the best experience but it has not been the worst either. Much of my time out here is spent trouble shooting chromatographs, stroke counters, gas detectors and anything else under the sun. I get the least respect, least money, and stay out here the longest. Having said that, I have learned A LOT about drilling holes, more than what I would have if i went back for the MS degree. But I know nothing about using geological software(petra, geographix) or prospecting. As a mudlogger, you must accept the fact that if you come out here you will be forced to PAY YOUR DUES. There is no getting around it. The next logical step for a mudlogger is to move onto wellsite geology and geosteering, but most of those jobs are held my much older, more EXPERIENCED people. Case in point, if you have only an BS degree, you will most likely be pidgen holed into field work, but you will learn a lot, and field work will be what you make of it. If you come out to the field, remember all of this and remember that no one out here cares if you carry a degree. All they care about is if you can call out kicks before they turn into blowouts

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WV/PA Mudlogger in Calgary, Alberta

70 months ago

I really don't understand why everyone is complaining in regards to mudlogging. You are making a great amount of money starting out of school. Yes the amount of hours and amount of time spent out on the rig is more than most; however, as the poster above stated, you have to pay your dues. It really is a simple job. You have your good days and bad days out here. While I would not want to do this job for a career, I am fine with putting in my year or 2 before finding an advancement. Just grit your teeth, take deep breaths, and wait for that paycheck every other week.

My question though is I do not understand the difference between mud logger and wellsite geologist. They are pretty much the same from what I gather. I have searched for the difference but have seen the same description. I just have been promoted to geosteer with my company while mud logging. My question is, how do you go about becoming an operational geologist? I believe this would be the next advancement from mud logger pertaining to the degree. I have a bachelors of science in geology and have delayed going to grad school to get experience (and a break from classes). Most of these jobs state to have 5+ years experience of already being an operational geologist. This has been a curious thing for me since I have started last July and have tried asking many company men about it to no avail (most say mud engineer or mwd is what most loggers go too).

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J. Carson in Northampton, Massachusetts

70 months ago

I think a lot of the contention around mudlogging has to do with different personal opinions and standards.

To me, $20 an hour is a lot of money, but then again I'm pretty much a young kid with little experience and no family to support. It's more than any of my friends are making. The company I work for also pays a base monthly salary, not by hour. When I'm on site the only bills I have to pay are my car payment, my cell phone, and food and gas (which my company gives a daily stipend for, not a lot but more than I usually spend). I save up a lot, and it's been great for paying off student loans. I guess I'm just tempermentally suited for the long hours and little time off - it can get boring sometimes, but mostly I'm okay with it. Do I want to do this forever? Probably not. But for now it's a pretty sweet gig.

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Anton in Pretoria, South Africa

70 months ago

It would seem that the problem with finding a decent job isn't only restricted to the US and UK, but is also prominent here in the southern hemisphere... I graduated in 2011 with my BSc in Geology. I applied to a whole bunch of companies (most of them are in the mining industry, of course). I didn't get a single interview with any of them, despite me being at the top of my class. I decided to carry on studying this year, but I'll be specialising in igneous petrology, because I saw a brighter future for myself as an academic. Unfortunately, I have to mention that this situation was, kind of, forced onto me (given the current economic and social climate in my country). So... My question is: Is there any future in the academic field as a young geologist who graduated in South Africa in the international scene? I know that my quetsion is specific, but would appreciate any feedback.

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mle2468 in Westminster, California

69 months ago

Hi all,

I took a break from school and I'm going back for the last quarter to finish up a B.S in geology. I'm applying to jobs/internship now and starting to realize that work usually consist of being in the middle of nowhere--but that's fine, I'm actually getting used to that idea. My main concern is, there's entry level jobs out there but most of them require at least 1 year of experience. I guess this is due to the poor economy making the companies reluctant to train people. After reading comments on this site, I see a trend of advice: start at the bottom. That does make sense but, it's hard to get to live in the middle of nowhere if the internship doesn't pay. So if you've been through this, I would really appreciate it you offer some guidance.

Cheers,
Shelly

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mle2468 in Westminster, California

69 months ago

BN97201 in Portland, Oregon said: It really depends on what field you enter. I'm most familiar with environmental consulting and hydrogeology. As a person having only a Bachelor's degree, you would likely have a harder time being hired than would someone who has a Master's degree with coursework involving several quantitative groundwater courses. Most likely, you might be hired to do field support (soil and groundwater sampling, remedial system operations/optimization, well logging, some simple report writing). From that, you could progress to more responsibility and higher pay (if your skills and performance warrant it), but you'd still be better off with a Master's, in my opinion. You'll be more versatile and valuable to your employer.

I was wondering what an environmental consulting career would consist of.

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jrs71

69 months ago

Hello there, I am currently a mudlogger, and I actually love it. I have been working for the same small firm for 2 years now and i started out at the familiar and basic rate of $150 a day and now that has more than doubled. I am basically fuctioning as a well site geologist. My question for experienced geologists that may be reading this is; do I have any chance of obtaining a mudlogging contract on my own? I have a degree in foresty (I really wish it would have been in geology now). Have you ever heard of an experienced mudlogger working on his own and securing contracts for mudlogging/consulting? This is something I would really like to do in the future. I've thought about going back to school for at least a BS in geology. I'm getting up there in age though at 41. I am very grateful for the opportunity that the company I work for has provided me. I also work two rigs at once on occasion so that original $150 rate is often more than quadrupled. And I'm not complaining at ALL. I love the work and I like who I work for. But I'm the kind of person who is always looking for more and I see myself as a wellsite geologist in the future. Any input is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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Arcadia

69 months ago

sounds like your well on your way. And of course you can get your own contracts!!! Its all about Business Relationships. I have one without a degree because i hired a degreed Geo for degree/name only. Your word and work ethic obviously makes your clients lots of money Now. So take the step and Good Luck!

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Ashley B in Calgary, Alberta

69 months ago

I am currently a geology major at OU and am planning on getting my masters after I get done with my BS. My husband is also a mud logger in Oklahoma and I plan on working during the summer break with him. So many people complain about how little money it is but he made over 90k last year. If you can get experience through mud logging do it. Just being on the rigs with my husband have given me endless contacts. Any experience is better than no experience!

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Sona Turley in Denver, Colorado

68 months ago

Summit in Englewood, Colorado said: I am looking to expand my small company in Denver. I am looking for wellsite geologists to work in North Dakota and Montana. I will be starting the wage at $400 per day up to $600 per day. Included will be a $50 per diem and $1.50 per mile. Samples will be caught by rig crews and the gas detection is provided by Pason.

Dear Sir,

I am a retired petroleum geologist trained by Exxon with extensive wellsite experience onshore and off. In recent years I have done contract work in North Dakota for minerals exploration. I would be happy to supply you with a resume should you wish to pursue this further.

Sincerely,

Sona Turley

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Kevin Watkins in Logan, Utah

68 months ago

I am currently majoring in Geological Engineering from University of Utah. I have to say I am a little nervous after reading a lot of these posts. Is there a big difference between Geoscience, Geology and Geological Engineering? I am minoring in geology and I was going to put an emphasis in petroleum, but wanted to know if I should follow mining or metallurgy? Any information would be great, especially since it's not too late to change my emphasis and major if needed. I have a lot of contacts through BP and Chevron, but have not decided where I really want to end up (mining, metallurgy or petroleum).

Kevin Watkins

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Leah in South Africa

68 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller . I need help.

Geologists are rare speciments but I can't find a job! I'm from South Africa and nothing has happened for me. I have a BSc Geology degree and I am making wine at a wine farm in Stellenbosch!!!!

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Mandy in Beaumont, California

68 months ago

BN97201 in Portland, Oregon said: As a practicing geologist who has struggled over the past decade to find good, well-qualified graduates for hydrogeology positions, reading the overly negative comments in this forum make me concerned for the future of our profession.

I have an undergrad degree in Environmental Science focusing on water quality/ hazardous materials management. What grad schools in hydrogeology do you suggest?

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Larry Boucher in Englewood, Colorado

68 months ago

They are hiring like crazy in North Dakota due to the Bakken play.

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Frank in Calgary, Alberta

68 months ago

Larry Boucher in Englewood, Colorado said: They are hiring like crazy in North Dakota due to the Bakken play.

They might be hiring like crazy, but that doesn't mean they need people with Geology degrees. Unless you want to go work the rigs or drive a semi... Thus defeating the point of getting a degree because non of those jobs require one.

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Frank in Calgary, Alberta

68 months ago

Larry Boucher in Englewood, Colorado said: They are hiring like crazy in North Dakota due to the Bakken play.

Just because they are hiring like crazy in North Dakota.. It doesn't mean they are hiring people with Geology degrees.. Unless you want to go work a rig or drive a semi.

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BN97201 in Portland, Oregon

68 months ago

Mandy in Beaumont, California said:

When I was in graduate school three decades ago, you could count the number of good hydrogeology programs in the U.S. on one hand. Because of the boom in hydrogeology employment spurred by environmental regulations, good programs now are pretty common. The National Ground Water Association has a list of what they consider the strongest programs: www.ngwa.org/information-for/students/Pages/Leading-hydrogeology-programs.aspx. If you are interested in "top" programs, you can't go wrong with schools like Arizona, Stanford, or Waterloo. My recommendation would be to review the list NGWA has prepared, do a little research on schools that interest you to see if the programs are geared more toward undergraduate education rather than graduate students, and begin your inquiry regarding admission given your undergraduate work. If you didn't major in geology as an undergrad, you'll probably have some prerequisites to make up.

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Amitesh in Auckland, New Zealand

68 months ago

Anyone keen to do a geology assignement for a reasonable price?

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Cheeeeeese in Calgary, Alberta

67 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller . I need help.

The problem which you don't forsee, is that you attended Post-Secondary in the united States... Unless you go to an Ivy League school, you are recieving a sub-par education.

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JJ in Houston, Texas

67 months ago

Cheeeeeese in Calgary, Alberta said: The problem which you don't forsee, is that you attended Post-Secondary in the united States... Unless you go to an Ivy League school, you are recieving a sub-par education.

Thank you for the useful response!

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Casey in Fountain, Colorado

66 months ago

I have had two jobs in mining/exploration since graduating in 2009. I still have very little professional experience and I'm looking for another job. My sights are set on Australia. Keep your heads up. You'll find something!

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JJ in Houston, Texas

66 months ago

Id appreciate some current insight into petroleum geology and hydrogeology. I'd appreciate moments on the current nature of the industry.

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bloodyuseless in Vancouver, British Columbia

66 months ago

Why do universities teach useless theories when in the real world job market you need to have technical geological knowledge? Just stop bragging about the high paying jobs in the industry when you can't even get a foot in the industry. This is just ridiculous!

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JJ in Houston, Texas

66 months ago

Could the onus be on the student to seek out internships or organizations where he or she could make connections in order to introduce them to this technical experience they need to have in order to gain eventual employment? Do students expect too much and prepare too little or is there a real lack possibility for them to find what they've been "promised"? I'd love someone with experience to answer this, and by experience I mean someone who has worked or found employment.

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stopyerwhining in Casper, Wyoming

66 months ago

I find all of these posts like this irreprehinsible. My advice to you is to stop touting your degree as some kind of entitlement and go to work...for anyone. If you can hack it. Learn and better yourself in the path that you have chosen. Too good to be a mudlogger? then go sell fries. You have to learn at your craft in the field. It was the same with me in forestry. And now by chance I'm a mudlogger/performing as wellsight geologist. Learn what people show you and expand on it. Your degree is not entitlement to a good paying job. Unless you are related to the bush's or chenney's.

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Bill in Austin, Texas

66 months ago

stopyerwhining in Casper, Wyoming said: I find all of these posts like this irreprehinsible. My advice to you is to stop touting your degree as some kind of entitlement and go to work...for anyone. If you can hack it. Learn and better yourself in the path that you have chosen. Too good to be a mudlogger? then go sell fries. You have to learn at your craft in the field. It was the same with me in forestry. And now by chance I'm a mudlogger/performing as wellsight geologist . Learn what people show you and expand on it. Your degree is not entitlement to a good paying job. Unless you are related to the bush's or chenney's.

I don't think most of us were wanting to be Wellsight Geologist... I think we all had dreams of doing a little field work and mostly being in the office. Some people have the mentality of working long tedious hours. You go home when you can and your own dog doesn't even recognize you.. If I knew I would have to be on a rig dealing with oil field trash I would of majored in something else

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Jenny in Houston, Texas

66 months ago

Bill, do you have a M.S in geology? I am curious because I am in Houston and there is plenty
Of jobs for those that have completed graduate school

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Bill in Austin, Texas

66 months ago

Jenny in Houston, Texas said: Bill, do you have a M.S in geology? I am curious because I am in Houston and there is plenty
Of jobs for those that have completed graduate school

No, I decided against it not wanting to move to Houston. Plus the University I went to disbanded their masters program.

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bferguson in Calgary, Alberta

66 months ago

Summit in Englewood, Colorado said: I am looking to expand my small company in Denver. I am looking for wellsite geologists to work in North Dakota and Montana. I will be starting the wage at $400 per day up to $600 per day. Included will be a $50 per diem and $1.50 per mile. Samples will be caught by rig crews and the gas detection is provided by Pason.

Hahahah....I guess you are looking for inexperience, As an experienced wellsite geologist working in Northern Alberta, I make $1350/day PLUS the extra mileage to get to & from Calgary.

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albrta Oil fan in Edmonton, Alberta

66 months ago

After going through all these discouraging comments, i am really starting to doubt if i made the right decision in going into geology. I am currently finishing my Specialazation in geology program at the University of Alberta, just have 8 more courses to finish to get my BSc. I haven't really found a job yet but thats not to say that there arent anything out there. There are lots of oppurtunities out there but most of these require atleast a year or two of experience. Its really challenging when you have no experience in the field and dont know where to begin. Some of the people that i know at school have either a parent or a relative working in these types of industries and they pretty much have a gueranteed job when they graduate.
I would really appreciate if a felow albertan here with experience/knowledge in the field can provide alittle advice on where to look for any opportunities to get into soft rock.

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Mantzy in Maidstone, United Kingdom

66 months ago

I've read through all of these comments on here, having followed this discussion for the best part of 2 years, and one thing I've noticed is that lots of people don't think they should travel to find work. I just have to ask those people, why did you think geology was a good career for you?

Geology careers tend to take you all over the world, to all sorts of weird (Houston) and wonderful (anywhere but Houston in comparison) places, and that's part of the job and the intrigue that goes along with it. Yes, you may be stuck in a ice-cold field away from anywhere getting coated in mud, or in a baking hot desert analysing rock chips, or up a mountain, hanging precariously while trying to analyse fold lineations but what other career gives such wide ranges of possibilities.

Yeah, some of isn't glamorous, but you already knew that. This is a career that you have to accept travel as a major part of it. It's not (generally, especially at the lower end) an office job. Hell, I'm based in a geologically boring part of England but am moving over to Australia, away from friends and family. Why? Because I have to. Some of you are complaining you'll have to leave your state! You're a geologist! Think global people!

To all those trying to get jobs, keep looking, and then look further afield. Accept the crap to start as it'll still count as experience, and experience is king. It'll not always be easy but that's what will eventually separate the wheat from the chaff. Never give up trying.

Good luck

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JJ in Houston, Texas

66 months ago

Mantzy in Maidstone, United Kingdom said: I've read through all of these comments on here, having followed this discussion for the best part of 2 years, and one thing I've noticed is that lots of people don't think they should travel to find work. I just have to ask those people, why did you think geology was a good career for you?

Geology careers tend to take you all over the world, to all sorts of weird (Houston) and wonderful (anywhere but Houston in comparison) places, and that's part of the job and the intrigue that goes along with it. Yes, you may be stuck in a ice-cold field away from anywhere getting coated in mud, or in a baking hot desert analysing rock chips, or up a mountain, hanging precariously while trying to analyse fold lineations but what other career gives such wide ranges of possibilities.

Yeah, some of isn't glamorous, but you already knew that. This is a career that you have to accept travel as a major part of it. It's not (generally, especially at the lower end) an office job. Hell, I'm based in a geologically boring part of England but am moving over to Australia, away from friends and family. Why? Because I have to. Some of you are complaining you'll have to leave your state! You're a geologist! Think global people!

To all those trying to get jobs, keep looking, and then look further afield. Accept the crap to start as it'll still count as experience, and experience is king. It'll not always be easy but that's what will eventually separate the wheat from the chaff. Never give up trying.

Good luck

Thanks for adding this, awesome!

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