B.S. Geology, need job

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hammer in Elkins, West Virginia

37 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller. I need help.

I understand your situation because I was in the same boat. Get your Masters Degree. I almost started on 2 occassions however marriage, kids and debt kept me from going. You will have a better chance with an advanced degree. GET YOUR MASTERS and you won't be working as a technician.

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Tom in Arlington, Texas

37 months ago

If there is one thing I regret its getting a Geology degree. Was fed countless lies by the University of decent high paying jobs. Really the only thing you can do with this degree is mudlogging. The mudlogging companies are a dime a dozen. You don't need a Geology degree to be a mudlogger.... if 13 dollars a hour 12 hours a day for a month straight sounds good. Then be my guest, but you will kiss off any relationships or friends you have. When I started college the oil companies were CRYING out of a dire shortage of Geologist. I really think its a scam to trap people into being indentured servants for mudlogging companies. If I can save one person from making the mistake of getting a Geology degree then I have done my job. Don't think that getting a masters will open doors for you either... saw plenty of people do the masters scam and get stuck doing mudlogging or installing monitoring wells. Yes it is possible to be a Geologist. However, one has to sacrifice 20 years of life. If you want a family at a young age or to make decent money. Steer clear of Geology!

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Gold Digger in Asheville, North Carolina

37 months ago

I've been following this thread for about 2 years. I struggled finding a gig at first but over the last 14 months I've been working as an exploration geologist in AK. I'm now starting a new gig with an international mining company. I have a B.S. in Geology from a run of the mill state college. I'm getting paid more then most geologist already, although i do travel frequently. I've had several job offers in mining and mudlogging. I have had some interest from environmental firms too. Currently the job market for geologist is pretty good. High oil and gas prices. High base and precious metal prices. Getting that first job seems to take a lot of hard work and patients. You have to be willing to travel, relocate, possibly be underpaid, and not have benefits. Also, Don't think that you will never have to crack another Geo book. I'm still study. I'm more knowledgeable now then when I graduated. But, starting at the bottom and working your way up is how almost any career is. Good Luck

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anonymous in Katy, Texas

36 months ago

Maybe it is because I went to a big name school, but I have to disagree with everyone who is saying geology is a worthless degree. It is a very employable degree that pays well whether you decide to do government, environmental or industry. The value of networking is key is enhancing your career. Most cities have a geological society that meets once a month. That is a great way to network and begin to meet people. Sometimes getting a job takes more than just filling out forms on the internet. Get your name out there. I couldn't find a job, so I googled local geologic-related companies, and I called all one hundred plus of them asking if their were any opportunities available for internships or employment. It felt uncomfortable at first, but after a while I just got used to putting myself out there. Going to conventions like AAPG or the AAPG student expo helps as well. From what I understand, it is fairly unusual to work in oil and gas for an actual oil company without a graduate education. However, try the oil service companies. These companies include Schlumberger and Halliburton, but there are smaller companies as well. Any company that provides a service to a oil company fits into this category. And most of these companies offer extensive training programs. Some careers for a service company would include such duties as imaging (Landmark, Petrel) or geophysical seismic data processing. A lot of times experience is helpful but not necessary. If you feel like you need more experience but that a graduate degree isn't quite the avenue you want to take, consider taking short courses. Some universities offer them as well as organizations such as AAPG. Taking a short course would also help you network and meet people. There are a lot of jobs out there, but I understand there are also a lot of people applying. Put a face to your name and network!! Always have a current resume, and make yourself stand out.

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Summit in Englewood, Colorado

36 months ago

I am looking to expand my small company in Denver. I am looking for wellsite geologists to work in North Dakota and Montana. I will be starting the wage at $400 per day up to $600 per day. Included will be a $50 per diem and $1.50 per mile. Samples will be caught by rig crews and the gas detection is provided by Pason.

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Summit in Englewood, Colorado

36 months ago

The contact info for Summit is summitgeological@comcast.net

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nairobi_fari in Far Rockaway, New York

36 months ago

Hey there,
please let me know if your company is still looking for degreed Geologists.

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Neil Peters in Columbia, Maryland

36 months ago

I am looking for a staff geologist for an environmental consulting firm located in Columbia, Maryland.

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bob curfman in Montgomery, Texas

36 months ago

yes we are looking for hands w/ geology degree

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Tom in Dallas, Texas

36 months ago

bob curfman in Montgomery, Texas said: yes we are looking for hands w/ geology degree

Spoke with Curfmans employer and was not impressed. Wasn't quite sure what he was trying to sell me on for about 15 minutes. Running through the usual rants, making it sound as though the position wasn't a mud logging position.

Well to no surprise it was! 150 day rate and a per diem.
If you worked your life away at this rate, and all the gas and food expense, you would be lucky to clear 40,000. Teachers start out at way more than this, and get to have a life.

Wasn't interested.

He tried to make it sound as though mud loggers become Geologist who make Serious money.
Yeah right...

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bob curfman in Austin, Texas

36 months ago

plenty of work for willing people good luck finding a job starting at the top, you dont sound like someone who belongs in the oilfeild

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me

36 months ago

Do universities teach geology students to use oil and gas and mining software (Petra, kingdowsuites, etc)? The programs are very expensive and I doubt there is enough time to cover the use of computer applications. If mining companies do not train employies to use the software, how do they survive? I know of no university that teaches the use of modeling programs to undergraduate students. There is not enough time to cram it into the course load.

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me

36 months ago

Mine Recruiter in Colorado Springs, Colorado said: When an individual is immerse in generalities and prejudices, their perspective is skewed and the individual no longer has an accurate viewpoint or understands the issue. In every profession there are good people who are skilled professionals and there are bad people who for one reason or another are in a position in which they should leave immediately. However, we work in an industry to which we have no room for people who are not productive. No room for unproductive people in HR as well as in Geology.

As a candidate, you have to meet the criteria of the position. I find that older Geologists do not know the current mining software applications. Mining employers are not training people.

Do you think universities train undsergraduate students to use mining software applications? I have a PhD and I teach geology courses. I can tell you that there is not enough time to introduce all software applications in any course. They are too expensive for an university to buy all of them. Some are of very limited use, and that is is a gentle and kind statement. Which universities teach the use of specific mining software applications to undergraduate students?

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Tom in Texarkana, Texas

36 months ago

A mud logger doesn't need to have a geology major for the position. No one can never start at the top, but their are oilfield positions besides mudlogging that are entry level and pay twice as much. Having a 40,000 dollar degree and going to work at 13 an hour for 5 years is unproductive. Mudlogging companies just use and abuse Geology graduates. Almost all follow crude practices. Anyone here have a positive mudlogging experience?

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jaloshes in Jamaica, New York

36 months ago

ras in Auckland, New Zealand said: I graduated in 2007 with a BSc in geology. It was during the boom in Australia so a gold company hired me before I had even sat my last exams. But mining really sucks, especially as a girl. But I worked in nz for 5 months then went to Australia in 2008 and was fought over by companies it was crazy. But I got a job in the middle of nowhere it paid good but was the most boring thing ever, I didn’t even need a degree and spent most of my time falling asleep. If you like geology don’t do mining! At least do exploration or engineering geology. I haven’t tried to get a job since and have just been travelling around, I might go back to Australia because so well and I have a massive student loan, but it sucks so much it will be a last resort.

Hi, i was wondering if you could give me some insight as to how i can build some experience in the industry. I really dont mind how boring it is, as I too have student loans to pay and have become more or less desperate at this point. Is the company you work for currently seeking Geo grads? Also if you know of any options for US citizens?

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Arcadian in Calgary, Alberta

36 months ago

Lots of dishonest logging companies out there. Some are downright dirty and dangerous so you be safe and live and learn.

About the JOB...your Geo degrees does not match experience. You'll have to suck it up til you have some time and formations on your resume'. Been logging for 7 years. Started as a sample catcher. Now I've been running my own jobs for 5 years.
Study up on your well control and hydraulics and you'll do fine. I Love this job. And if a company is dirty or asks me to do something unsafe for profit i just get another job. When you have the experience you make your own way. Good Luck!

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Soon to be geo in Edwardsville, Illinois

36 months ago

Hi, im currently a freshman in college at missouri university of science and technology. I was really thinking about majoring in geological engineering and I didn't know if that was a good choice. Would it be difficult to get a job? and how much traveling would be involved? and overall, would you recommend it? Thanks for the help!!

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Bob in Dallas, Texas

36 months ago

It would not be difficult to get a job, however that job is most likely going to be mud logging and it would be 100% travel. If your a single male who isn't looking for a family life or hanging out with the same friends. Then go for it. Mud loggers live on the rig and make 30,000 to 50,000 if you work nearly every day of the year.

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Flemflamman in Midland, Texas

35 months ago

Be a petrogeologist, I know some of ours make over $200,000 a year. I wouldsuggest visiting with a professional recruiter, they can tell you whats hotand whomakes what money.

Good luck!!!!

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nairobi_fari in Jamaica, New York

35 months ago

is that short for petroleum geologist? what company is that? also how many years of experience will land you a salary like that, and what are good entry level jobs to get started on a career in that path..?

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Bulldog in Brookville, Pennsylvania

35 months ago

I have read through this post but only a few mudlogging/ well logging companies were actually mentioned. What logging companies are typically hiring? What are the big loggers in the Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia area? Any help would be appreciated greatly! Thanks!

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BN97201 in Portland, Oregon

35 months ago

As a practicing geologist who has struggled over the past decade to find good, well-qualified graduates for hydrogeology positions, reading the overly negative comments in this forum make me concerned for the future of our profession. I hope prospective geologists understand that the people posting in forums such as these are not necessarily representative of the tens of thousands of practicing geologists who have stable, satisfying, well-paying careers solving real problems that benefit society. We need smart, highly-qualified people graduating with geoscience degrees because there are many problems facing the world's nations that fundamentally involve an understanding of the earth and its myriad processes.

Late in my undergraduate career, before Superfund was law and before regulations had been written implementing RCRA, I elected to focus on hydrogeology rather than petroleum geology because, among other reasons, I knew I didn't want to live near the Gulf Coast. I studied hydrogeology for my Master's. After getting out, it was difficult finding my first job because the environmental/hydrogeology business then was in its infancy. Things are much different now. There are many thousands of practicing hydrogeologists and the science of hydrogeology is involved in most commercial or industrial land transactions, in implementing decisions to expand or shrink manufacturing plants, and in cleaning up orphaned sites that pose real risks to local populations. At the same time, potable water is becoming an increasingly important resource and groundwater, for either simple development or management via aquifer storage and recovery, is going to become only more and more important over time.

I would encourage any student interested in science to consider geology and, specifically, hydrogeology. Talk to your counselors about it and seek out people in the business to interview. It may be the best career decision you'll make.

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Val Bayuga in Angeles, Philippines

35 months ago

Good day to all the Geologist on this site. I am not a Geologist but I am seeking advice from all of you. Don't have money to pay for Geologist consultant so here we go.

Cement, gravel, sand and water as usually applied in road building or construction of highways. This one is different.It is perhaps, the most hardened cement concrete one can ever imagine. The presence of affirmative evidence proves that the endurance and hardness of the same is comparable to iron steel. Based on continuing studies and research, there is that enormous amount of silica quartz and pyrites mixed together with undetermined amount of resin adhesive and hardener. There is also an authentic presence of fly ash and intrusion aid. The process of mixture is dry pouring method. The moisture of the soil served as a slowing catalyst.
My question is how can I break this seal? Portable jackhammer is painstaking. Can't use a bigger jackhammer because there is little room to work. Drilling takes too much time and I have used a lot of bits because it keeps breaking or tip smoothen out. I've been told that there is a chemical that I can se that can aid or hopefully break and even melt this formidable seal. Location is in a cave and yes this seal is man made. I appreciate for any input from all of you fine Geologist.

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huami in Vancouver, British Columbia

35 months ago

I m in Canada looking for geology jobs. I have no experience. Really anything I can take even without pay.

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huami in Vancouver, British Columbia

35 months ago

I graduated in june 2011 with a general geology degree. I could not identify what I had learned at the university as being useful.

I took all the easy geology courses but the university still let me graduate. I agree that no geology software was taught.I don't think I can do mudlogging with just general knowledge in stratigraphy & sedimentation.

No work experience. No geology software knowledge. Vulcan, ArcGIS, AutoCAD, what what what?!
What to do now? Am I doomed? I'm stuck.

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3 in Mugla, Turkey

35 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller. I need help.

I am looking for a geologist to work for free on a documentary - if successful, then we can discuss payment !!! - at the moment, we are just starting out and are looking for an eager, forward thinking individual to help us in our quest - a great opp for perhaps a paper? - any thoughts would be most welcome - cheers and thank you. Anne

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londonguy in London, United Kingdom

35 months ago

hi guys,

situation over the bond isn't great either! UK is in the dumps, and my BSc Geophysics is getting me no where. I was unemployed for 11 months and am not working for a beauty and cosmetics company. It's not ideal but i've got some money coming in and my parents are off my back. I have got an offer to do a MSc Petroleum Geophysics but I really don't want to go back to uni as I hated uni during undergrad and will hate it for masters. I want to work my way up but no one is interested! I've been rejected left/right and centre. Anyone get into the oil and gas industry and work their way up? How and where can i get work experience from? That's my biggest weakness I think. I don't have work experience so can't get a job, and I can't get work experience, probably because I don't have work experience!

Lame situation to be in...anyone else feel like their life is wasting away before your eyes?

Good not just me then :)

londonguy

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Greg in Smithtown, New York

35 months ago

Hi, I'm going to be graduating with a BS in Geology this Spring (2012) from SUNY Binghamton and will then be taking an internship with the USGS for the summer. Reading these posts is a bit nerve-wracking as I constantly struggle with the idea of graduate school and 90% of these posts make it seem like without an MS I am fated to mudlogging (which I have never even considered...). On the one hand I am quite frankly sick of my financial dependence on my parents and want to just start a job, become independent and enter what I imagine to be "the adult world". On the other hand I absolutely adore geology, both the science and the outdoorsy field work aspects.

With this said I see myself as having 2 options: pursue a job (perhaps with the USGS) or come back from the internship to live with my family and focus on getting into a good grad school. I love traveling but building friendships for me is important, so although I don't mind where I am, a certain amount of stability (namely, socially) is necessary. Does anyone have an opinion on what path to take?

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Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

35 months ago

Regina in Windermere, Florida said: To all you graduate of BS Geology. Geologist are highly sought after here in Florida. Because of Sinkhole we always have around. A lot of Engineering Companies like ours are looking for so long for a Licensed Geologist who could write report and work for us. if you have an excellent writting skills and highly impecable eye for working on details. Do send your resume to us. info@wpes.net

If you don't even have enough professional experience to know how to proofread your own "writting" what makes you think that people will want to work for you?

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jenny in Houston, Texas

35 months ago

Hello all,

I debating on going back to school as a post baccalaureate student for geology. I currently have a nutrition degree therefore it would only take me roughly 2 years to finish a second BS in geology, but would it be absolutely nessecary to get a MS in geology? After i am done with school, i would like to get into the job market asap. Is this highly unlikely?

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BN97201 in Portland, Oregon

35 months ago

jenny in Houston, Texas said: Hello all,

I debating on going back to school as a post baccalaureate student for geology. I currently have a nutrition degree therefore it would only take me roughly 2 years to finish a second BS in geology, but would it be absolutely nessecary to get a MS in geology? After i am done with school, i would like to get into the job market asap. Is this highly unlikely?

It really depends on what field you enter. I'm most familiar with environmental consulting and hydrogeology. As a person having only a Bachelor's degree, you would likely have a harder time being hired than would someone who has a Master's degree with coursework involving several quantitative groundwater courses. Most likely, you might be hired to do field support (soil and groundwater sampling, remedial system operations/optimization, well logging, some simple report writing). From that, you could progress to more responsibility and higher pay (if your skills and performance warrant it), but you'd still be better off with a Master's, in my opinion. You'll be more versatile and valuable to your employer.

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londonguy in London, United Kingdom

35 months ago

Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: If you don't even have enough professional experience to know how to proofread your own "writting" what makes you think that people will want to work for you?

you are a douchebag.

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Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

35 months ago

londonguy in London, United Kingdom said: you are a douchebag.

I thought it was good advice since the poster was asking for "excellent writting skills." Bottom line: An employer shouldn't demand professionalism if they are not professional. It's usually a very stressful thing attempting to get a job, and yet you have companies coming on here and telling stressed out people that they want a high degree of professionalism without having much themselves. A job should be a MUTUAL privilege between the employer and employee, not "You'll want to work for us no matter what we say, how we act, or the amount of professionalism we exhibit." If an employer expects you to show up to an interview in a suit, I expect THEM to be able to proofread themselves.

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Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

35 months ago

jenny in Houston, Texas said: Hello all,

I debating on going back to school as a post baccalaureate student for geology. I currently have a nutrition degree therefore it would only take me roughly 2 years to finish a second BS in geology, but would it be absolutely nessecary to get a MS in geology? After i am done with school, i would like to get into the job market asap. Is this highly unlikely?

I agree with what the other poster (BN97201) said. Geology is one of those professions where a Master's makes a world of a difference. I would also recommend investigating the many sub-disciplines of Geology (if you haven't already!) and perhaps Google "What types of jobs can a _____ get." There's the fantasy of Geology - working in the field and making decent money, going to exotic locales, being immersed in nature...Then there's (what could be) the reality - working long hours in an unstable energy industry, being in the middle of nowhere in less than favorable weather, being a grunt where "field work" is generally seen as bottom rung of the corporate ladder (if you want to advance you will probably be working in an office).

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bubbalutz in Regina, Saskatchewan

35 months ago

huami in Vancouver, British Columbia said: I m in Canada looking for geology jobs. I have no experience. Really anything I can take even without pay.

Move to Calgary

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Blah in Rock Springs, Wyoming

35 months ago

Tom in Texarkana, Texas said: A mud logger doesn't need to have a geology major for the position. No one can never start at the top, but their are oilfield positions besides mudlogging that are entry level and pay twice as much. Having a 40,000 dollar degree and going to work at 13 an hour for 5 years is unproductive. Mudlogging companies just use and abuse Geology graduates. Almost all follow crude practices. Anyone here have a positive mudlogging experience?

Believe it or not there are quite a few mudlogging companies that only hire degreed geologists. Although, I have heard that it dosent take much to be a mudlogger in Texas. I have been a mudlogger in Colorado for about 2 years now and have had a fairly good experience thus far. Granted its not something I want to be stuck doing for the rest of my life. I make around 80k a year and get to take off as much time as I want. Typically, I work approx. 2-3 weeks a month. You WILL need a Masters to get a Ops Geo position with an O&G company. However, they do offer many geotech positions that assist the exploration and productions teams as well for undergraduate degrees. You gotta start somewhere right?

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Tom in Dallas, Texas

35 months ago

Blah in Rock Springs, Wyoming said: Believe it or not there are quite a few mudlogging companies that only hire degreed geologists. Although, I have heard that it dosent take much to be a mudlogger in Texas. I have been a mudlogger in Colorado for about 2 years now and have had a fairly good experience thus far. Granted its not something I want to be stuck doing for the rest of my life. I make around 80k a year and get to take off as much time as I want. Typically, I work approx. 2-3 weeks a month. You WILL need a Masters to get a Ops Geo position with an O&G company. However, they do offer many geotech positions that assist the exploration and productions teams as well for undergraduate degrees. You gotta start somewhere right?

Yes, I am aware many companies only hire people with Geology degrees. As far as Texas mudlogging companies, your looking at making 150 - 200 a day. At these rates if you worked every single day of the year you would only be around 50k - 65k. Your either working all the time, or Colorado day rates are significantly higher in the Niobrara. You said 2 - 3 weeks a month? That would put your day rate at about 350. I am sure everyone on this board would want to know which mudlogging company is paying that rate.

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Dawn in Sydney, Australia

35 months ago

Move to Australia! There are tons of jobs for geologists especially in the booming mine industry. Ive had no problem getting 2 engineering geology jobs here with only a bs in earth sciences and a few engineering classes.

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o in Pleasantville, New Jersey

34 months ago

So, I'm in the same boat as most of you here. I'm looking for an entry level geologist job but haven't gotten any responses back. I thought that getting HAZWOPER certification might help, but so far my situation hasn't changed. I think what's holding me back is my lack of job experience in the field. I'm stuck in the circle: I can't get a job because I don't have experience and I don't have experience because I can't get a job. So I'm wondering if anybody here knows of any internships/apprenticeships/opportunities out there where I can get the experience I need? Even if it's unpaid? I'll travel anywhere to do it. I really want to join this field so desperately. The responsiveness from potential employers has been really disheartening. I just don't wanna feel like my time at college has been a complete waste. Please help?

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jenny in Houston, Texas

34 months ago

Garrett in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: I agree with what the other poster (BN97201) said. Geology is one of those professions where a Master's makes a world of a difference. I would also recommend investigating the many sub-disciplines of Geology (if you haven't already!) and perhaps Google "What types of jobs can a _____ get." There's the fantasy of Geology - working in the field and making decent money, going to exotic locales, being immersed in nature...Then there's (what could be) the reality - working long hours in an unstable energy industry, being in the middle of nowhere in less than favorable weather, being a grunt where "field work" is generally seen as bottom rung of the corporate ladder (if you want to advance you will probably be working in an office).

All of this talk about not being able to get a job with a geology degree is scaring me! I'm already experiencing this with my nutrition degree and would not like to go through this again :( with just a BS in geology, what type of pay would entry level be? and as for mud logging, what type of pay do they receive? I really cannot afford to get a masters, I need to start a career asap.

Another question, would relocating to another country pay better than jobs in the states? Just wondering. Thanks everyone!

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jenny in Houston, Texas

34 months ago

Also, is there anyone out there that has received their BS in geology recently and has a success story to tell?

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Kajun

34 months ago

Too many bad stories here. Let me share you a good one. And a lot are saying that mudlogging really sucks. I guess it depends on the company.

Ive been working on this mudlogging company for almost 2 years now. I got accepted straight out of college. I work 4 weeks on-2 weeks off schedule and we stay in Bakersfield, california for the duration of our work. They fly us in and out for our days off and have a great per diem + separate housing per diem. We make about 60-70k a year which is not bad for an entry level job.

We are planning to hire more people this month due to the number of our people going back to grad school or getting a better paying job.

So my point is, there are still good jobs out there. Try Canrig drilling technology and check out the California division.

Good Luck!

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Brett in Owasso, Oklahoma

34 months ago

I started working as a petroleum geologist in 1981. I worked thirty years for several oil and gas companies, and never lost a job. This included working through the terrible downturn in the 80's when half the oil and gas jobs in the country disappeared. I really hate to tell you guys (and girls) this, but things are a helluva lot better right now.

First of all, if you studied geology in college because you heard the field was paying big money, or you didn't know what else to major in, I really am very sorry for you. Be honest with yourself. If you did not hang around the geology department half the night, beg professors to be the lab assistant, knock out an "A" in geology and a "B" in everything else, there is just not much hope. There is no way you can compete with a person who loves geology, and showed their interest every day at school. You should get into another line ASAP.

If you grew up collecting rocks and reading science books, you have a BS in geology, and you now work for a mud-logging outfit because geology is you, get back in school and get your MS ASAP. A couple of years of mud-logging experience (say, 2-3) is good. But don't keep it up much longer than that. Mud-logging is fine, but not 10 years of mud-logging. It just does not play well. Get back in a MS (not MA) program. Go to the school that will give you a teaching or research assistantship. Go to a school in Oklahoma, Texas, or Louisiana if possible. Once you get there, make sure you keep busy. Act (and be) interested all the time. Find out which professors worked (or now consult) for oil companies, and hang out with them.

If you have a BS and MS degree, and you can't find a job, you might think about moving. Yes, you might have to go to Houston. Yes, you may have to go international.
If you want a job in petroleum geology, you can't stay in Seattle.

That's all I can type, due to word limit. Sorry if I offend.

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OP in Washington, District of Columbia

34 months ago

Geology was interesting until I realized I had to dedicate my time to catching up on math and science from trigonometry upward, along with my electives, and can't spend enough time on geology. If I could have focused on geology it would have been better. Multitasking or not geology took a back seat due to the fact that it was easier to pass geology classes than math and physics. But I never liked rocks as a kid anyway so that must mean it wasn't meant for me.

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Jenny in Houston, Texas

34 months ago

Bret, I've heard all success stories fr those who have graduated over 20 years ago. Do you have any insight for the job market ahead?

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scissorhands in Hamilton, Bermuda

34 months ago

very very helpful and insightful!!

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Brett in Owasso, Oklahoma

34 months ago

Jenny, all is not roses. I can't predict the future. I know plenty of geologists with a MS degree who lost jobs in the eighties. If geology was not for them, they stayed out permanently. But 90% of them came back into what they loved. You could not keep them away.

I don't think there is anything wrong with the current petroleum job market. It's better than it has been in years. I'm afraid expectations among recent graduates are too high. I'm afraid BS applicants are not taken seriously, because they have not taken geology seriously. Mud-logging is one of the few opportunities available to graduates with a BS (in the petroleum field).

If no one ever told you there was a very sharp line between BS applicants and MS applicants, I'm telling you now. It's HUGE.

This industry has always been a boom-bust affair. Dedicated people who loved the job and tried to give the company something for their money have survived through good and bad cycles. Work ethic and attitude are everything. If you don't show those attributes right up front, you are not going to make it in any field.

Sorry if I sound like an old guy, but there are lots of young people here asking for direction. I want to show part of the other side.

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me

34 months ago

I graduated with a BS in Geology during December 1985. Mt GPA was a 2.3. After several years of working for a mining company I was layed off. I floundered around for several years and managed to find a graduate program that was willing to work with me. I graduated with a MS in environmental geology/hydrogeology in May 1993. Mt GPA was 3.25 and I did not let that stop me. I wanted to be a geologist. Time and reality caused me to accept other jobs. Even to this day, my low gpa comes back to haunt me. I had to have a geology job and I am now working as a mud logger. The pay is low, I average a little over $20.80 per hour. I work 12 hour towers until the well is completed. That works out to 84 hours a week, but when the rig moves I am left without a pay day for about 10 days. I wish I had done better in school but I was a young, dumb, and very naive kid when I was in college. Some people took advantage of me and I was left in pieces, trying to graduate. I did the best I could while in graduate school and working full time. I have no regrets during that time. I was notthe sharpest pencil in the box. My message: do what you can and do your best.

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me

34 months ago

Frank in Odessa, Texas said: We need to warn those we care for about this degree and what lies in store. I am talking about fellow classmates and those new to Geology programs. I would like to see many Geology departments close their doors. They simply do not teach skills relevant or necessary to the oil industry. Field Camp with mapping projects and drawing strat columns? Give me a break... Lets teach students more about data processing and program usage. As this is actually relevant. Spread the word about this Forum!!!!!!!!

For years the oil companies have said the same thing. The Universities must teach the basics before they can do the program usage. Most say that it is the oil companies job to teach new hires how to use the programs and data processing. At my old college it is still that way! A lot of the majors use their own programs, which can't be used by all colleges. The cost of common programs, such as KINGDOM Suites and Petra, are very high for the license and computer usage. I doubt most faculty know how to use those packages.

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me

34 months ago

I doubt that will happen. Most of the faculty does not know how to use it. They must teach the basics before the computer usage gets taught. There are a lot of software packages out there, so which ones do they buy? The major oil companies have been asking all the universities to teach data processing and modelling for years! The colleges respond by telling them that they must teach the basics first. It is the oil companies job to teach new hires how to use their, high priced, software applications.

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