B.S. Geology, need job

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Garrett in Allentown, Pennsylvania

58 months ago

Frank in Odessa, Texas said: If colleges can't produce or adapt and teach skills relevant to the work force of today, then shut the programs down. Lets not milk student's for every last dollar by teaching irrelevant courses on Paleontology or Petrology...

It is frustrating. The thing about most Geo departments is there's a love/hate relationship with "dirty" energy companies. They know that most of their graduates, at least the ones not pursuing an academic career, will be working for these companies, but at the same time they don't want to be affiliated or tied to these companies for that reason. They don't want to have to tailor their programs to the companies they disagree with. It's maybe a bit political considering most college professors are "liberal." Oil jobs were definitely looked down on by the profs. where I went, ignoble, frowned upon.

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South Texas Mudlogger

58 months ago

I graduated with my BS in geology in summer of 2010 and could not find any other job, so i took one as contract(no benefits, insurance, etc.) mudlogger. Working in the field hasn't been the best experience but it has not been the worst either. Much of my time out here is spent trouble shooting chromatographs, stroke counters, gas detectors and anything else under the sun. I get the least respect, least money, and stay out here the longest. Having said that, I have learned A LOT about drilling holes, more than what I would have if i went back for the MS degree. But I know nothing about using geological software(petra, geographix) or prospecting. As a mudlogger, you must accept the fact that if you come out here you will be forced to PAY YOUR DUES. There is no getting around it. The next logical step for a mudlogger is to move onto wellsite geology and geosteering, but most of those jobs are held my much older, more EXPERIENCED people. Case in point, if you have only an BS degree, you will most likely be pidgen holed into field work, but you will learn a lot, and field work will be what you make of it. If you come out to the field, remember all of this and remember that no one out here cares if you carry a degree. All they care about is if you can call out kicks before they turn into blowouts

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WV/PA Mudlogger in Calgary, Alberta

58 months ago

I really don't understand why everyone is complaining in regards to mudlogging. You are making a great amount of money starting out of school. Yes the amount of hours and amount of time spent out on the rig is more than most; however, as the poster above stated, you have to pay your dues. It really is a simple job. You have your good days and bad days out here. While I would not want to do this job for a career, I am fine with putting in my year or 2 before finding an advancement. Just grit your teeth, take deep breaths, and wait for that paycheck every other week.

My question though is I do not understand the difference between mud logger and wellsite geologist. They are pretty much the same from what I gather. I have searched for the difference but have seen the same description. I just have been promoted to geosteer with my company while mud logging. My question is, how do you go about becoming an operational geologist? I believe this would be the next advancement from mud logger pertaining to the degree. I have a bachelors of science in geology and have delayed going to grad school to get experience (and a break from classes). Most of these jobs state to have 5+ years experience of already being an operational geologist. This has been a curious thing for me since I have started last July and have tried asking many company men about it to no avail (most say mud engineer or mwd is what most loggers go too).

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J. Carson in Northampton, Massachusetts

58 months ago

I think a lot of the contention around mudlogging has to do with different personal opinions and standards.

To me, $20 an hour is a lot of money, but then again I'm pretty much a young kid with little experience and no family to support. It's more than any of my friends are making. The company I work for also pays a base monthly salary, not by hour. When I'm on site the only bills I have to pay are my car payment, my cell phone, and food and gas (which my company gives a daily stipend for, not a lot but more than I usually spend). I save up a lot, and it's been great for paying off student loans. I guess I'm just tempermentally suited for the long hours and little time off - it can get boring sometimes, but mostly I'm okay with it. Do I want to do this forever? Probably not. But for now it's a pretty sweet gig.

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Anton in Pretoria, South Africa

58 months ago

It would seem that the problem with finding a decent job isn't only restricted to the US and UK, but is also prominent here in the southern hemisphere... I graduated in 2011 with my BSc in Geology. I applied to a whole bunch of companies (most of them are in the mining industry, of course). I didn't get a single interview with any of them, despite me being at the top of my class. I decided to carry on studying this year, but I'll be specialising in igneous petrology, because I saw a brighter future for myself as an academic. Unfortunately, I have to mention that this situation was, kind of, forced onto me (given the current economic and social climate in my country). So... My question is: Is there any future in the academic field as a young geologist who graduated in South Africa in the international scene? I know that my quetsion is specific, but would appreciate any feedback.

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mle2468 in Westminster, California

57 months ago

Hi all,

I took a break from school and I'm going back for the last quarter to finish up a B.S in geology. I'm applying to jobs/internship now and starting to realize that work usually consist of being in the middle of nowhere--but that's fine, I'm actually getting used to that idea. My main concern is, there's entry level jobs out there but most of them require at least 1 year of experience. I guess this is due to the poor economy making the companies reluctant to train people. After reading comments on this site, I see a trend of advice: start at the bottom. That does make sense but, it's hard to get to live in the middle of nowhere if the internship doesn't pay. So if you've been through this, I would really appreciate it you offer some guidance.

Cheers,
Shelly

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mle2468 in Westminster, California

57 months ago

BN97201 in Portland, Oregon said: It really depends on what field you enter. I'm most familiar with environmental consulting and hydrogeology. As a person having only a Bachelor's degree, you would likely have a harder time being hired than would someone who has a Master's degree with coursework involving several quantitative groundwater courses. Most likely, you might be hired to do field support (soil and groundwater sampling, remedial system operations/optimization, well logging, some simple report writing). From that, you could progress to more responsibility and higher pay (if your skills and performance warrant it), but you'd still be better off with a Master's, in my opinion. You'll be more versatile and valuable to your employer.

I was wondering what an environmental consulting career would consist of.

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jrs71

56 months ago

Hello there, I am currently a mudlogger, and I actually love it. I have been working for the same small firm for 2 years now and i started out at the familiar and basic rate of $150 a day and now that has more than doubled. I am basically fuctioning as a well site geologist. My question for experienced geologists that may be reading this is; do I have any chance of obtaining a mudlogging contract on my own? I have a degree in foresty (I really wish it would have been in geology now). Have you ever heard of an experienced mudlogger working on his own and securing contracts for mudlogging/consulting? This is something I would really like to do in the future. I've thought about going back to school for at least a BS in geology. I'm getting up there in age though at 41. I am very grateful for the opportunity that the company I work for has provided me. I also work two rigs at once on occasion so that original $150 rate is often more than quadrupled. And I'm not complaining at ALL. I love the work and I like who I work for. But I'm the kind of person who is always looking for more and I see myself as a wellsite geologist in the future. Any input is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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Arcadia

56 months ago

sounds like your well on your way. And of course you can get your own contracts!!! Its all about Business Relationships. I have one without a degree because i hired a degreed Geo for degree/name only. Your word and work ethic obviously makes your clients lots of money Now. So take the step and Good Luck!

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Ashley B in Calgary, Alberta

56 months ago

I am currently a geology major at OU and am planning on getting my masters after I get done with my BS. My husband is also a mud logger in Oklahoma and I plan on working during the summer break with him. So many people complain about how little money it is but he made over 90k last year. If you can get experience through mud logging do it. Just being on the rigs with my husband have given me endless contacts. Any experience is better than no experience!

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Sona Turley in Denver, Colorado

56 months ago

Summit in Englewood, Colorado said: I am looking to expand my small company in Denver. I am looking for wellsite geologists to work in North Dakota and Montana. I will be starting the wage at $400 per day up to $600 per day. Included will be a $50 per diem and $1.50 per mile. Samples will be caught by rig crews and the gas detection is provided by Pason.

Dear Sir,

I am a retired petroleum geologist trained by Exxon with extensive wellsite experience onshore and off. In recent years I have done contract work in North Dakota for minerals exploration. I would be happy to supply you with a resume should you wish to pursue this further.

Sincerely,

Sona Turley

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Kevin Watkins in Logan, Utah

56 months ago

I am currently majoring in Geological Engineering from University of Utah. I have to say I am a little nervous after reading a lot of these posts. Is there a big difference between Geoscience, Geology and Geological Engineering? I am minoring in geology and I was going to put an emphasis in petroleum, but wanted to know if I should follow mining or metallurgy? Any information would be great, especially since it's not too late to change my emphasis and major if needed. I have a lot of contacts through BP and Chevron, but have not decided where I really want to end up (mining, metallurgy or petroleum).

Kevin Watkins

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Leah in South Africa

56 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller . I need help.

Geologists are rare speciments but I can't find a job! I'm from South Africa and nothing has happened for me. I have a BSc Geology degree and I am making wine at a wine farm in Stellenbosch!!!!

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Mandy in Beaumont, California

55 months ago

BN97201 in Portland, Oregon said: As a practicing geologist who has struggled over the past decade to find good, well-qualified graduates for hydrogeology positions, reading the overly negative comments in this forum make me concerned for the future of our profession.

I have an undergrad degree in Environmental Science focusing on water quality/ hazardous materials management. What grad schools in hydrogeology do you suggest?

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Larry Boucher in Englewood, Colorado

55 months ago

They are hiring like crazy in North Dakota due to the Bakken play.

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Frank in Calgary, Alberta

55 months ago

Larry Boucher in Englewood, Colorado said: They are hiring like crazy in North Dakota due to the Bakken play.

They might be hiring like crazy, but that doesn't mean they need people with Geology degrees. Unless you want to go work the rigs or drive a semi... Thus defeating the point of getting a degree because non of those jobs require one.

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Frank in Calgary, Alberta

55 months ago

Larry Boucher in Englewood, Colorado said: They are hiring like crazy in North Dakota due to the Bakken play.

Just because they are hiring like crazy in North Dakota.. It doesn't mean they are hiring people with Geology degrees.. Unless you want to go work a rig or drive a semi.

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BN97201 in Portland, Oregon

55 months ago

Mandy in Beaumont, California said:

When I was in graduate school three decades ago, you could count the number of good hydrogeology programs in the U.S. on one hand. Because of the boom in hydrogeology employment spurred by environmental regulations, good programs now are pretty common. The National Ground Water Association has a list of what they consider the strongest programs: www.ngwa.org/information-for/students/Pages/Leading-hydrogeology-programs.aspx. If you are interested in "top" programs, you can't go wrong with schools like Arizona, Stanford, or Waterloo. My recommendation would be to review the list NGWA has prepared, do a little research on schools that interest you to see if the programs are geared more toward undergraduate education rather than graduate students, and begin your inquiry regarding admission given your undergraduate work. If you didn't major in geology as an undergrad, you'll probably have some prerequisites to make up.

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Amitesh in Auckland, New Zealand

55 months ago

Anyone keen to do a geology assignement for a reasonable price?

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Cheeeeeese in Calgary, Alberta

55 months ago

mikeg19_82 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I graduated in May 2008 with a BS in Geosciences from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have had no luck finding work. I've applied for many many jobs including oil companies, as well as local, regional, and national environmental consulting jobs. One world-renowned company I just about got hired to in Washington, DC had a hiring freeze after my final interviews. My resume is on most databases and the "environmental jobs" websites.

What do degree holders do with this degree? I'm currently a part-time bank teller . I need help.

The problem which you don't forsee, is that you attended Post-Secondary in the united States... Unless you go to an Ivy League school, you are recieving a sub-par education.

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JJ in Houston, Texas

55 months ago

Cheeeeeese in Calgary, Alberta said: The problem which you don't forsee, is that you attended Post-Secondary in the united States... Unless you go to an Ivy League school, you are recieving a sub-par education.

Thank you for the useful response!

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Casey in Fountain, Colorado

54 months ago

I have had two jobs in mining/exploration since graduating in 2009. I still have very little professional experience and I'm looking for another job. My sights are set on Australia. Keep your heads up. You'll find something!

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JJ in Houston, Texas

54 months ago

Id appreciate some current insight into petroleum geology and hydrogeology. I'd appreciate moments on the current nature of the industry.

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bloodyuseless in Vancouver, British Columbia

54 months ago

Why do universities teach useless theories when in the real world job market you need to have technical geological knowledge? Just stop bragging about the high paying jobs in the industry when you can't even get a foot in the industry. This is just ridiculous!

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JJ in Houston, Texas

54 months ago

Could the onus be on the student to seek out internships or organizations where he or she could make connections in order to introduce them to this technical experience they need to have in order to gain eventual employment? Do students expect too much and prepare too little or is there a real lack possibility for them to find what they've been "promised"? I'd love someone with experience to answer this, and by experience I mean someone who has worked or found employment.

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stopyerwhining in Casper, Wyoming

54 months ago

I find all of these posts like this irreprehinsible. My advice to you is to stop touting your degree as some kind of entitlement and go to work...for anyone. If you can hack it. Learn and better yourself in the path that you have chosen. Too good to be a mudlogger? then go sell fries. You have to learn at your craft in the field. It was the same with me in forestry. And now by chance I'm a mudlogger/performing as wellsight geologist. Learn what people show you and expand on it. Your degree is not entitlement to a good paying job. Unless you are related to the bush's or chenney's.

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Bill in Austin, Texas

53 months ago

stopyerwhining in Casper, Wyoming said: I find all of these posts like this irreprehinsible. My advice to you is to stop touting your degree as some kind of entitlement and go to work...for anyone. If you can hack it. Learn and better yourself in the path that you have chosen. Too good to be a mudlogger? then go sell fries. You have to learn at your craft in the field. It was the same with me in forestry. And now by chance I'm a mudlogger/performing as wellsight geologist . Learn what people show you and expand on it. Your degree is not entitlement to a good paying job. Unless you are related to the bush's or chenney's.

I don't think most of us were wanting to be Wellsight Geologist... I think we all had dreams of doing a little field work and mostly being in the office. Some people have the mentality of working long tedious hours. You go home when you can and your own dog doesn't even recognize you.. If I knew I would have to be on a rig dealing with oil field trash I would of majored in something else

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Jenny in Houston, Texas

53 months ago

Bill, do you have a M.S in geology? I am curious because I am in Houston and there is plenty
Of jobs for those that have completed graduate school

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Bill in Austin, Texas

53 months ago

Jenny in Houston, Texas said: Bill, do you have a M.S in geology? I am curious because I am in Houston and there is plenty
Of jobs for those that have completed graduate school

No, I decided against it not wanting to move to Houston. Plus the University I went to disbanded their masters program.

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bferguson in Calgary, Alberta

53 months ago

Summit in Englewood, Colorado said: I am looking to expand my small company in Denver. I am looking for wellsite geologists to work in North Dakota and Montana. I will be starting the wage at $400 per day up to $600 per day. Included will be a $50 per diem and $1.50 per mile. Samples will be caught by rig crews and the gas detection is provided by Pason.

Hahahah....I guess you are looking for inexperience, As an experienced wellsite geologist working in Northern Alberta, I make $1350/day PLUS the extra mileage to get to & from Calgary.

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albrta Oil fan in Edmonton, Alberta

53 months ago

After going through all these discouraging comments, i am really starting to doubt if i made the right decision in going into geology. I am currently finishing my Specialazation in geology program at the University of Alberta, just have 8 more courses to finish to get my BSc. I haven't really found a job yet but thats not to say that there arent anything out there. There are lots of oppurtunities out there but most of these require atleast a year or two of experience. Its really challenging when you have no experience in the field and dont know where to begin. Some of the people that i know at school have either a parent or a relative working in these types of industries and they pretty much have a gueranteed job when they graduate.
I would really appreciate if a felow albertan here with experience/knowledge in the field can provide alittle advice on where to look for any opportunities to get into soft rock.

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Mantzy in Maidstone, United Kingdom

53 months ago

I've read through all of these comments on here, having followed this discussion for the best part of 2 years, and one thing I've noticed is that lots of people don't think they should travel to find work. I just have to ask those people, why did you think geology was a good career for you?

Geology careers tend to take you all over the world, to all sorts of weird (Houston) and wonderful (anywhere but Houston in comparison) places, and that's part of the job and the intrigue that goes along with it. Yes, you may be stuck in a ice-cold field away from anywhere getting coated in mud, or in a baking hot desert analysing rock chips, or up a mountain, hanging precariously while trying to analyse fold lineations but what other career gives such wide ranges of possibilities.

Yeah, some of isn't glamorous, but you already knew that. This is a career that you have to accept travel as a major part of it. It's not (generally, especially at the lower end) an office job. Hell, I'm based in a geologically boring part of England but am moving over to Australia, away from friends and family. Why? Because I have to. Some of you are complaining you'll have to leave your state! You're a geologist! Think global people!

To all those trying to get jobs, keep looking, and then look further afield. Accept the crap to start as it'll still count as experience, and experience is king. It'll not always be easy but that's what will eventually separate the wheat from the chaff. Never give up trying.

Good luck

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JJ in Houston, Texas

53 months ago

Mantzy in Maidstone, United Kingdom said: I've read through all of these comments on here, having followed this discussion for the best part of 2 years, and one thing I've noticed is that lots of people don't think they should travel to find work. I just have to ask those people, why did you think geology was a good career for you?

Geology careers tend to take you all over the world, to all sorts of weird (Houston) and wonderful (anywhere but Houston in comparison) places, and that's part of the job and the intrigue that goes along with it. Yes, you may be stuck in a ice-cold field away from anywhere getting coated in mud, or in a baking hot desert analysing rock chips, or up a mountain, hanging precariously while trying to analyse fold lineations but what other career gives such wide ranges of possibilities.

Yeah, some of isn't glamorous, but you already knew that. This is a career that you have to accept travel as a major part of it. It's not (generally, especially at the lower end) an office job. Hell, I'm based in a geologically boring part of England but am moving over to Australia, away from friends and family. Why? Because I have to. Some of you are complaining you'll have to leave your state! You're a geologist! Think global people!

To all those trying to get jobs, keep looking, and then look further afield. Accept the crap to start as it'll still count as experience, and experience is king. It'll not always be easy but that's what will eventually separate the wheat from the chaff. Never give up trying.

Good luck

Thanks for adding this, awesome!

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Well Geo in London, Ontario

53 months ago

bferguson in Calgary, Alberta said: Hahahah....I guess you are looking for inexperience, As an experienced wellsite geologist working in Northern Alberta, I make $1350/day PLUS the extra mileage to get to & from Calgary.

What company are you working for and are they looking for anyone new? e-mail me shushu_34@hotmail.com, thanks

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Hi There!! in San Francisco, California

53 months ago

I just got my BS in Geology and I've been applying to many different companies from government to oil service companies. Does anyone know who is hiring right now?. I am willing to commute to the end of the world!
I have also know ArcGIS 10 and cartography.
Thanks

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Briestoll in Houston, Texas

53 months ago

Hi There!! in San Francisco, California said: I just got my BS in Geology and I've been applying to many different companies from government to oil service companies. Does anyone know who is hiring right now?. I am willing to commute to the end of the world!
I have also know ArcGIS 10 and cartography.
Thanks

Hey contact me @ Stoll@thebarracudagroup.com I may be able to help you or point you in the right direction at least.

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wrongdegree in Midland, Texas

53 months ago

Jim Thornton in Hudson Falls, New York said: The problem is not your degree, it is YOU. Apparently either your interview skills are lacking, your resume needs polish, or you are not applying to jobs. There is ABSOLUTELY no reason to be unemployed with a BS in geology. If you are looking for jobs as a "geologist" or "senior geologist" it may be difficult, as a BS is an entry level degree. However, there are plenty of mud logging positions, and even SOME entry level geologist I positions available. The percentage of people who actually obtain a BS in geology is smaller than the amount of people needed. Thus, the problem lies within yourself... I suggest updating and polishing your resume and looking for jobs suitable for your degree.

Have you ever worked a mud logger? or... Are you still in school thinking that once you finish your bachelors and masters that all doors will open up for you? If mud logging actually paid decent money for the sacrifices made.. i'm sure more people would be open to it, but to do a job that pays crap, sacrifices friends and family, and is horrible for your health! Too many chemicals.. Too many fumes...

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Jim Thornton in Hudson Falls, New York

53 months ago

Wrongdegree in Midland, Texas said: Have you ever worked a mud logger? or... Are you still in school thinking that once you finish your bachelors and masters that all doors will open up for you? If mud logging actually paid decent money for the sacrifices made.. i'm sure more people would be open to it, but to do a job that pays crap, sacrifices friends and family, and is horrible for your health! Too many chemicals.. Too many fumes...

Honestly, I am still in school. That said, I have several friends who pursued a degree in geology, a BS at that. After which, they went on to successful jobs as engineers and environmental scientists. While they are not geologists, they are certainly employed. The people who cry that they cannot find a job can't find a job because they're crying that they cannot find a job. It's a paradox, that is the reality of the situation. I don't expect doors to open for me, I will open them myself.

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Paul in London, United Kingdom

53 months ago

I graduated with a good Geology BSc 5 years ago, however for family reasons I didn't want to relocate so instead pursued a career in call centre management. I have been successful at this and am now responsible for over 70 people, however this is not my passion in life and I now would really like to pursue a geology career. I am interested in working in the mining or oil industry and would be keen on relocating to Australia, Canada or the US for the right money. The trouble is I am not sure how many doors my degree will open, and what sort of salaries I could expect to earn, partly due to not haveing an MSc and partly due to being away from the field for so long.
Any advice would be welcome!

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BigChris in Lafayette, Louisiana

53 months ago

It can be done. I know of some folks that have done it.
You need gas equipment: Meech Gas in Tx. or MudLogging Systems in Grand Junction

and you need supplies: US GeoSupply or OFITE.

You will also need some type of instrumentation. Either your own sensors or a wits feed from the rig's system.

You will need log drawing software. I suggest GeoDraft.

You will need a business license and a tax ID.

You will need a customer and another logger.

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BigChris in Lafayette, Louisiana

53 months ago

My comment was supposed to be directed in reply to this post but it came out at the end of the entire thread:

jrs71

3 months ago

Hello there, I am currently a mudlogger, and I actually love it. I have been working for the same small firm for 2 years now and i started out at the familiar and basic rate of $150 a day and now that has more than doubled. I am basically fuctioning as a well site geologist. My question for experienced geologists that may be reading this is; do I have any chance of obtaining a mudlogging contract on my own? I have a degree in foresty (I really wish it would have been in geology now). Have you ever heard of an experienced mudlogger working on his own and securing contracts for mudlogging/consulting? This is something I would really like to do in the future. I've thought about going back to school for at least a BS in geology. I'm getting up there in age though at 41. I am very grateful for the opportunity that the company I work for has provided me. I also work two rigs at once on occasion so that original $150 rate is often more than quadrupled. And I'm not complaining at ALL. I love the work and I like who I work for. But I'm the kind of person who is always looking for more and I see myself as a wellsite geologist in the future. Any input is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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Rob in Etobicoke, Ontario

53 months ago

Hi, Im looking to start a Independent Oil Exploration Company. I would need a functional team of Geologists before I were to sent off on this venture. I'm located in Toronto Ontario but future project looks to be in California. I Have no clue what wages would be yet but you will be paid accordingly you can contact me with resume at pandora.oil.rh@gmail.com

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Brenty in Nottingham, United Kingdom

53 months ago

wilkeje in Bluefield, West Virginia said: I'm in the same boat - BS in geology , been applying for 7 months. I hope someone provides some insight!

OH dear , is this what i have to look forward to ?!:)Recently graduated with 2:1 Geoscience and all vacancies require at least 2 years experience,(i am a mature graduate of 44.)i have 25+ years work experience but i doubt it ll make much difference when applying for geoscience roles. :(

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Floyd10 in Cork, Ireland

52 months ago

me said: I graduated with a BS in Geology during December 1985. Mt GPA was a 2.3. After several years of working for a mining company I was layed off. I floundered around for several years and managed to find a graduate program that was willing to work with me. I graduated with a MS in environmental geology/hydrogeology in May 1993. Mt GPA was 3.25 and I did not let that stop me. I wanted to be a geologist . Time and reality caused me to accept other jobs. Even to this day, my low gpa comes back to haunt me. I had to have a geology job and I am now working as a mud logger. The pay is low, I average a little over $20.80 per hour. I work 12 hour towers until the well is completed. That works out to 84 hours a week, but when the rig moves I am left without a pay day for about 10 days. I wish I had done better in school but I was a young, dumb, and very naive kid when I was in college . Some people took advantage of me and I was left in pieces, trying to graduate. I did the best I could while in graduate school and working full time . I have no regrets during that time. I was notthe sharpest pencil in the box. My message: do what you can and do your best.

Who took advantage of you and why??

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ismailazam in Brooklyn, New York

52 months ago

Susan in Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania said: Howdy,

I am from Texas and presently work in Pennsylvania. Typically, I work with another female because when we work in the same area, the company supplies an apartment or hotel . We are normally the only females on site, but that can't be all bad. Anyway, our company is good and we are looking for experienced loggers that are degreed. Send me your resume and I will forward it to my company. PA would be a more suitable location in the Marcellus Shale, no doubt. I do miss Texas, though.

I need a job of Experienced Mudlogger OR Wellsite Geologist.

Ismail Azam S.M
PROFESSIONAL SUMMARY:
I have been working in the Oil and Gas Exploration and Production business since September 1993. During this time I have worked as Logging Geologist, Well site Geologist, Operations Geologist, Team Leader along with being Senior Geologist in the Wire line Logging business in DCS (Data and Consulting Services).I am open to relocate anywhere in the US for Geologist position. I am legally authorized to work in U.S.A without any sponsor ship of oil and gas operating OR services companies
M.S in Petroleum Geology, having more than 10+ years of work experiences as a Geologist in oil and gas services and operating companies.
Technical skills include Operations, Planning and development, Drilling, Well Placement (Geosteering), Mud Loggoing and Well site Geology, Worked on Exploration, Development, Appraisal and Data wells. Reservoir Studies and Characterization (Field Development), Coring/core analysis and core fixing, petro physical and log interpretation background. CCA/SCAL Studies. Mentor and trained newly hired geologist. Worked on carbonates, clastics, tight rocks, shale gas and CBM, Wored on Offshore and onshore rigs. Follow all QHSE Policies of companies I worked,My gmail address is ismail.azam5@gmail.com

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Roy in Johannesburg, South Africa

51 months ago

I am a South African geologist with close to two years experience in exploration.
Can someone in the Americas (Canada, US) give me info on job prospects for expats on that side? Really would like to see myself working over there in the near future but the feeling I get is that companies are only interested in hiring locals.

I've considered Australia as well but word coming from there is that companies are scaling back.

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Eze in Plano, Texas

43 months ago

Rob in Etobicoke, Ontario said: Hi, Im looking to start a Independent Oil Exploration Company. I would need a functional team of Geologists before I were to sent off on this venture. I'm located in Toronto Ontario but future project looks to be in California. I Have no clue what wages would be yet but you will be paid accordingly you can contact me with resume at pandora.oil.rh@gmail.com

Hello Rob, I was just going through this forum and came across this post. Are you still looking for geologists?
Looking forward to reading from you. thanks

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Tim in Oak Forest, Illinois

42 months ago

Hey it seems that you have been in the mud logging business for a while now. I am a recent graduate looking for a mud logging career. I was looking to seek some information about mud logging. I was wondering if you maybe know of some companies around you that are hiring or even if yours is. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

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VanessaFas in East Haven, Connecticut

42 months ago

Depending on what your state requires for certification, you may be able to parlay this degree in Geology into a teacher certification for Science. Check into that, as each state's requirements vary.

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Robert M. in Fredericksburg, Virginia

42 months ago

Tim in Oak Forest, Illinois said: Hey it seems that you have been in the mud logging business for a while now. I am a recent graduate looking for a mud logging career. I was looking to seek some information about mud logging. I was wondering if you maybe know of some companies around you that are hiring or even if yours is. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

Around 10 years ago I worked for Noram from Billings, MT. Unfortunately my knowledge and skills were not up to it. Nonetheless they are a very good company. I recommend you study drilling engineering and petroleum reservoir engineering before starting to mud log.

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