B.S. Geology, need job

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jadedetroyer in Mount Pleasant, Michigan

31 months ago

I am currently studying to become a Geology major, but seeing all this makes me want to honk otherwise. Any suggestions from anyone to hopefully find a decent job in the next few years?

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Oz_Geo in Merewether, Australia

31 months ago

Casey in Fountain, Colorado said: I have had two jobs in mining/exploration since graduating in 2009. I still have very little professional experience and I'm looking for another job. My sights are set on Australia. Keep your heads up. You'll find something!

It's quite unfortunate the amount of geologists that are being churned out worldwide each year. The money was great here in Australia but now the market is flooded with overseas geo's and I've recently been made redundant due to the downturn. I CAN'T GET A JOB IN MY OWN COUNTRY. OS geos have been working for less and have driven wages way down; Australia is one of the most expensive places on Earth to live so you can't own a house on what these foreign geo's have driven the wages down to. I've got >5yrs mining experience but I know people with 10 that can't get a job. Institutions need to raise the entry requirements so everyone can work that completes a degree.

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akr88 in Texas

29 months ago

Jade Detroyer in Mount Pleasant, Michigan said: I am currently studying to become a Geology major, but seeing all this makes me want to honk otherwise. Any suggestions from anyone to hopefully find a decent job in the next few years?

You're going to have to get an MS. If you want to work in the O&G industry you will have a very difficult time finding work with just a BS.

If you want to be a professional geologist or involved in academia you will need a PhD.

You really should just figure out why you like geology and find a way to make money using that skill. From my experience, O&G is the only way to make the big bucks which was necessary for me because I have student loans to pay back.

I would say that most of the people getting a degree in geology are just getting a BS. They think they can get a job with that any it's rare unless you have a connection to someone. Even them you're limited. I'd say suck it up and work very hard during your undergrad to get scholarships for a MS. You'll find a job that way. But otherwise it will be difficult even to find a job as some kind of a technician. Good luck! Geology is great but it takes a sharp mind and ambition, like most things in life, to do something with it!

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walrusmt in Fort Collins, Colorado

27 months ago

Don't think an M.Sc. is the answer. Most of the people - in fact all but one - that I completed my M.Sc. with are still looking for jobs or making less than 40K a year - mostly 30K or less. Getting in with an operator as a REAL geologist really boils down to a couple of things:

1. Get your M.S. from an oil school - These are in south Texas, central Oklahoma and south Louisiana. You have to graduate from a school that has close ties with a major.
2. After/While you're completing task number one be sure to build a strong network with the operators that are affiliated with your school.
3. After completing 1 and 2 - get an internship with the operator.

I've learned this all too late and first hand. It is spelled out on the AAPG web page if you look under career advice. 90+% of M.Sc. geologist are either loggers, or looking for work. Sad facts but true. Good Luck!

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gEO_Kristine in Quezon City, Philippines

25 months ago

hello, did you find work now? I'm looking for work right now too.

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gEO_Kristine in Quezon City, Philippines

25 months ago

Hello,could u help me find work too in geology. :)

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still retired in Hawaii

25 months ago

They are looking for muddloggers with Weatherfordi n the Ohio region Lots of geologist to work with. Pay? Room to grow at this time. Don't dismiss the small private logging companies especially in the Texas region. Mom and pop exploration companies are out there check the Houston Texas areas.

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GDR in Houston, Texas

24 months ago

I feel compellell to comment. I'm a 50 yr old geology man. I've worked on Rigs as a muddlogger from the gulf to the North Sea. I've worked on ships all over the world as a seismic proceccer. I've been laid off thru down times where I had to go back to grad school because there was nothing else to do. This is a job not for the faint of heart. You had best learn a second backup skill. I became certified as a Linux admin. And was able to Segway this into a computer/geophysicist job. I now work from home 3 days a week supporting geo software. It's been a long journey but Geology has allowed me to see and travel the world that most couldn't even imagine. It's not a bed of roses though. If u want a family life at a young age and Starbucks u might consider a career change while ur still young. Trust me on this....It's unstable. Jobs come and go so u better save ur money when times are good.

-peace

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still retired in Hawaii

24 months ago

Very true GRD. It has its very lows and very highs. It's feast or famine.

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Mantzy in Brisbane, Australia

24 months ago

Hi all,

I made a comment on here 2 years ago, saying that you have to keep fighting for work and to think global, and now I'm basically writing to say that it seems I was right. When I wrote that, I was still in Uni, but knew that'd it would be a struggle to find work so moved from the UK to Australia. Even here it hasn't been easy - the mining boom is over, there is a glut of experienced mining geos in the market with several years experience etc. Eventually, and I'm meaning 9 months later, I was able to find work, as a mudlogger. It's not glamorous, but it's a start and that's all you need. No-one is going to offer you an office job straight out of uni, and I still believe that no geologist really wants office work, at least not all the time.

I think the key to being a muddy is to get in with a decent company (preferably one of the big ones as they're obliged to train you sufficiently, if for nothing else, it keeps their reputation in check, plus better rosters) and use your time there to learn your trade and network with the OCRs and wellsite geos. This will stand you in good stead in a few years to help you on your next step up the ladder. I'm not sure what pay is like in other countries but muddies here earn about $65K pa as a newbie and upwards so not terribly bad, even in a country with a very high cost of living. It'll take at least 5 years of hard graft in the field before you'll step foot in an office, especially with only a BS. Sure, get an MS when the market slows down, and it's probably worth doing so for your future career progression (and I was enrolled in one just before this job came up) but always remember that EXPERIENCE IS KING.

Most of all, just don't ever give up. You studied geology because you like geology. Find a way to turn your interests into your career, even if you have to start at the very bottom.

Again, good luck everyone

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Shaun in Chester, Virginia

23 months ago

How did you start your business and what services do you offer?

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Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta

23 months ago

mle2468 in Westminster, California said: My main concern is, there's entry level jobs out there but most of them require at least 1 year of experience.

No not sure you read this anymore since your post was thirty months ago but I can help you here and perhaps a few others.

Some background, I have been doing well site geology (Oil rigs) for roughly 12 years now, I consult my services to oil companies in western canada. During those 12 years I have drilled over 300 holes all over the westercandian sedimentary basin. I've done almost everything there is to do in this area and field from exploratory holes, to core samples and logging just to name a few of the older stuff that does not really happen anymore.

On to your post, you are correct almost no one will hire a field geologist w/o experience, this is starting to change slightly from what I hear but some of it still remains. Myself, after school I had to "train" for a year with a geologist in my field in the field. This training is not paid and in fact when I first started almost all the geologists in my feild wanted me to pay them to train with them (standard rate back then was 100 a day). After my year of training I was out working solo. So when the places you apply to require you to have 1 year experience what they are saying is they are not willing to take you on for that year making no money off you.

For the rest of you wondering what the difference between a mud logger and a wellsite geologist is, the best way I can explain it (from a geological standpoint, never done mud logging) is the geologist is a direct representative of the oil company (geology side) were the mud logger logs the mud and goes home. I examine drill cuttings through a microscope, help guide the directional paths of wells, tests for hydrocarbons, provide estimation of porosity and perm, and place all this on a log for the clients.

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Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta

23 months ago

Also for those of you wondering why there are no classes to teach you how to use log programs this is part of the training I mentioned above.

Anyways hopes this gives some insight to some of the questions posed here.

Peace be upon you all and good luck

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mantzy in Australia

23 months ago

Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta said: For the rest of you wondering what the difference between a mud logger and a wellsite geologist is, the best way I can explain it (from a geological standpoint, never done mud logging) is the geologist is a direct representative of the oil company (geology side) were the mud logger logs the mud and goes home. I examine drill cuttings through a microscope, help guide the directional paths of wells, tests for hydrocarbons, provide estimation of porosity and perm, and place all this on a log for the clients.

I can only speak from my experience but in Australia the muddys on land rigs do the sample catching (getting the mud and cuttings from the shakers and washing them to get a nice clean sample - water-based mud thankfully), the cutting descriptions, the logging of the samples, monitoring gas levels for kicks, and do reports for the both the O&G company as well as our own people. We also have to maintain all our equipment and sensors, and know a fair bit about the IT systems we use too. Depending on the WSG, they want to see the cutting descriptions. Basically, on the land rigs, we do the 3 jobs of sample catching, mudlogging and the data engineering ourselves. Offshore, there is still 3 people doing the individual jobs (oil based muds). However, you do get the shack to yourself for many many hours and this is either a good thing or a bad thing depending on your perspective. I take my ipod with me. If they're doing a bit trip or casing, there's not much you can do so the WSG generally goes to bed and we get the chance to clean the shack, bag and box samples for the O&G company whilst we carry on monitoring the gas levels - I have 8 monitors in front of me. You get used to it. At first it seems like lots of work but other than a few frantic moments in top hole (very fast drilling) and during payzone (lots of frequent samples) it's okay if you're methodical and keep on top of things.

HTH

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

After my undergrad, I only worked for about 2 years in the Alberta Oil sands before I decided I wanted to do my Master's. So I did and now I am in this awkward phase where I don't have the typical 5-year-minimum level of experience. I also fear that I am not getting any responses because a Master's may be too much for most entry level positions. Perhaps employers think I won't stay in a wellsite job for long or I'd demand too much pay? idk, just wild guesses here. Either way, I have been unemployed for many months now and I am not hearing back from anyone. I have thought of leaving off the Master's but then I cannot explain the 3 year gap. Does anyone have experience/ advice regarding this situation? I can only say, to readers trying to figure out whether to go back to school or not, make sure you get at least 5 years under your belt before making that leap. As Manzty said above- experience is really king.

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Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

geogirl in Calgary, Alberta said: After my undergrad, I only worked for about 2 years in the Alberta Oil sands before I decided I wanted to do my Master's. So I did and now I am in this awkward phase where I don't have the typical 5-year-minimum level of experience. I also fear that I am not getting any responses because a Master's may be too much for most entry level positions. Perhaps employers think I won't stay in a wellsite job for long or I'd demand too much pay?

You answer your own questions here. Its likely all these reasons you are not hearing back from clients. Id suggest stay away from the oil sands and try wellsite consulting. If you have a one on one with a consulting firm and explain your situation they are likely more amenable to your position. You can get your 5 years with these guys then decide what you want to do from there. I know a lot of smaller companies are hiring, the one I work for is screaming for long term people.

Hope this helps.

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Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

Mantzy in Australia said: I can only speak from my experience but in Australia the muddys on land rigs do the sample catching (getting the mud and cuttings from the shakers and washing them to get a nice clean sample - water-based mud thankfully), the cutting descriptions, the logging of the samples, monitoring gas levels for kicks, and do reports for the both the O&G company as well as our own people. We also have to maintain all our equipment and sensors, and know a fair bit about the IT systems we use too. Depending on the WSG, they want to see the cutting descriptions. Basically, on the land rigs, we do the 3 jobs of sample catching, mudlogging and the data engineering ourselves. Offshore, there is still 3 people doing the individual jobs (oil based muds). However, you do get the shack to yourself for many many hours and this is either a good thing or a bad thing depending on your perspective. I take my ipod with me. If they're doing a bit trip or casing, there's not much you can do so the WSG generally goes to bed and we get the chance to clean the shack, bag and box samples for the O&G company whilst we carry on monitoring the gas levels - I have 8 monitors in front of me.
HTH

WoW mud loggers get treated like poo! As a WSG in AB doing land wells (obviously), the roughnecks catch our samples (both invert and gel based chem), bring them to our shack or wash shack (in cases of invert) where we clean them further, describe onto logs along with ROP/GAS data. We always get a shack to ourselves these days (unless doing HZ wells then its shared with a night shift WSG).

After reading your post I think I need to start asking for a mud logger (or should I say slave) heh. But whats the definition between them? Is it education or experience or who you know or what?

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta said: You answer your own questions here. Its likely all these reasons you are not hearing back from clients. Id suggest stay away from the oil sands and try wellsite consulting . If you have a one on one with a consulting firm and explain your situation they are likely more amenable to your position. You can get your 5 years with these guys then decide what you want to do from there. I know a lot of smaller companies are hiring , the one I work for is screaming for long term people.

Hope this helps.

Yes, helpful. Thanks for the insight.

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

Gigolo can I pick your brain some more?
I am thinking seriously about this now. I have looked at a few companies' websites. The majority say they are loking only for experiences geologists but one says explicitly that they will take on juniors and train them and that at the end of the training period, said juniors should be prepared to purchase all equipment and a vehicle. My question to you: what kind of costs am I looking at (what do I need to purchase)? As someone who just completed a masters I don't have to tell you that I am flat broke, so is this fiscally feasible in only a few months? You said you essentially volunteered ("trained") for a year before going out on your own. How were you able to purchase the microscope, truck, etc? Thanks

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

One more question- I understand that drilling is done typically while the ground is frozen. Do you work year-round? and if so, what else are you doing and is it for the same company?
Ps. Even though I have addressed these questions to Gigolo b/c we are in the same area, I value anyone's answers. It's all appreciated!

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Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

Im happy to help if I can.

As I said before most companies require you to pay them for the experience\training. But some (as in this case likely) will essentially take you on as a slave. Meaning they will get you to work and back and you can use the other WSG gear for your training, They will still bill for you but you will likely get nothing.

As far as costs go it depends how much you want to sped/put yourself in debt. My first microscope was fifteenth hand from the 60's or before Id expect. I picked it up for like 500 bucks I think? There are always guys selling microscopes, you can talk to any of the guys at wildrose geo as them to keep an eye open for you for a used one.

After you get back on your feet, if you love rocks like I do =), you will likely want to pick up a newer one, right now Im rocking a Zeiss Stemi-2000-C and I love it, not top of the line but I paid 5k i think for it, my boss' is worth over 10k heh. I know a guy and will give you an email (at the end of this) you can contact me at if you want his name and number he is a dealer for Zeiss and MIGHT have a used one for you.

As far as a vehicle the first thing I took out to work was a 89 civic. I thrashed it and as soon as I got paid I picked up a used jeep that did me for a few years then just kept upgrading after that. Some rig roads (depending where you are going) are simply impassable but most nowadays you can get to with a car (though I would not recommend it). Right now Im driving a 08 F-350 but shes on her last legs and Im looking at the new jeep cherokee (diesel because on most rigs you can jack purple for free and thus not paying for fuel). One thing i would recommend is not to lease or finance (personal preference) because you never know if you will like field work.

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Gigolo in Sundre, Alberta

21 months ago

How was I able to come up with these meager costs being dead broke heh, well things were different when I started. I had to have everything right off the bat, nowadays almost all wells are HZ and you can get away with just a laptop with windows 7 and xp mode installed on it. Everything else comes with time. How I did it was with massive help, I begged and borrowed heh. You will make a lot of money and can pay it all back.

The drilling rigs go all year round these days. We used to have spring break up but I have not had more than a month off in over 8 years now. We drill all year round.

I created a email for you to use gigoloab@hotmail.com I can send you the info if you want it from here. For anyone else reading this I will never use this email again so dont bother sending anything to it.

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

Haha, veerrrry informative (and entertaining) Gigolo. Helpful info about the truck because I thought I would only be able to afford to lease at first. Maybe I can trade my car in for an older truck or something. I suppose it's up to my employer or the company I am representing if they have stipulations about that or anything else. And free "purple"? I'm learning, haha. I will hit you up on the email because I have just sent out a few resumes and hopefully I will hear something soon. Thanks for doing that btw

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mantzy in Australia

21 months ago

Gigolo in Calgary, Alberta said: WoW mud loggers get treated like poo!

Well basically we do much of the work of a WSG it seems. We log the gas,rop and lith interp all ourselves. What do the mudloggers do there? Not sure I'd like the roughnecks catching my samples! I've talked to some of the Canadian drillers we have here and some have never had loggers before. We seem to do more jobs then most but what are the wages like there too? We start at about AUD$80K, which isn't much for the oil field admittedly, but I find the job too easy as it is - maybe it's just me, I like to work. I know in the North Sea the wages are worse. Plus I'm not a fan of the cold and wet. Not sure if the heat and the flies is much better though! You do get promotions quicker elsewhere though. It seems here to be slower progression up the ranks.

You have to have a minimum of a geology degree. Funnily the same you needed to be a WSG for most of the companies here but you need a bit of experience first. Experience comes from mudlogging. Plus, my company trains me well, pays me okay and importantly, as a married guy in his 30s, gives me an equal time roster. I know that's a rarity. In the end, after holidays and training are removed, I only work 4 months of the year, and of that, only half the day (offsiding with another logger). So it's not a bad gig really. Surprised you need to buy all your own gear and train at your own cost. We get it all given to us and the WSGs use our gear. It seems harsh there! Maybe it's as I'm with a large blue company that it's that way, other companies may treat their muddys differently.

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mantzy in Australia

21 months ago

geogirl in Calgary, Alberta said: One more question- I understand that drilling is done typically while the ground is frozen. Do you work year-round? and if so, what else are you doing and is it for the same company?
Ps. Even though I have addressed these questions to Gigolo b/c we are in the same area, I value anyone's answers. It's all appreciated!

I'm assuming purple is like red diesel in the UK. Cheaper diesel sold to agricultural and manufacturing companies. We get ours free from the company town an hour away but we get it off the rig sometimes too. We drill year round too and we have the reverse of Canada - It's only the beginning of spring but it's set to be 40+ degrees this week. This year I'm missing the wife's birthday, flying in on my birthday and working Christmas Day. Just the way it is sadly.

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BigChris in Lafayette, Louisiana

21 months ago

I am a logger for Sperry and I work in the GoM. I agree experience is valuable. I do not have a college degree. I was a radio tech in the army and got into oilfield doing drilling instrumentation. I worked my way up through gas equipment and logistics support for a few logging crews. My grandfather was a true rock hound so I grew up with an interest in geology.
In this region and in the GoM small operators usually are focused on production and they contract all of the drilling operations. The company will usually have their own geo but he is office based and will contract or manage all geology services. Seismic, logging, mwd, coring and slickline. They will compile and control data sent into their office daily by the rigsite crews. Those crews can be on a land rig, jack up, barge or a truck rig. The geologist may make a rig visit when they expect you to get into the zone or for looking at cores or maybe not come out at all. Bigger companies tend to put a WSG on the rig.
Loggers normally have the job of monitoring drilling ops and are off the rig during casing runs. On smaller rigs offshore the power pack for the casing tools sits on the deck where the logging unit was. You have to come back out and rig up all over again for the next interval. Most times they only call you out for the last one or two intervals. They try to keep the same lead logger and night for the duration of the well which means you could be there for two months and then go sit at home for three months till the next well. Sample catchers (loggers in training)are employees of the logging company and will bag sample to be sent to the geo in the office and perhaps a storage site and a lab somewhere for more detailed analysis. If there is a geo on location they will expect your sample catcher to supply them, too. Some deep water jobs we also have paleo guys doing biostratigraphy.

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

Thanks for all this insight guys. It's important to get first hand knowledge so that I know what I'm getting into.

It seems that no matter where you are located there are pluses and minuses. You just have to make sure you're comfortable with compromises you yourself are making.

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jadedetroyer in Mount Pleasant, Michigan

21 months ago

Currently a Junior in College studying Geology and interested in the Petroleum industry. My university requires a minor with my major, what do you guys/gals have in mind? Any idea? Any insight is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

21 months ago

Not sure if you will want to dedicate a minor to this but it's always a good idea to take some business courses or project management courses along with your degree. I also think a minor in GIS would be valuable. It's one of those disciplines that is applicable to any industry. Let us know what you decide.

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emc2alvnet in Randolph, New Jersey

17 months ago

h6 in Richmond, Texas said: I was lured to Houston from Illinois by a horrible mudlogging job from a DISHONEST company. They told me I'd be working with a team of all-female mudloggers. It wasn't until they sent me out on my first rig that I learned I was not only the youngest person at the drillsite (by about 10 years), I was the only female. I quit after a month and the only job I've been able to get since is at JCPenney . All you geology undergrads- DON'T come to oil, DON'T come to Houston, you'll REGRET it like I am right now.

There are unfortunately very dishonest Companies as (Keep an EYE on DWL)Diversified Mud Logging Company, always lying about everything: Field Tech Support, Quality of Mudloggers and his qualifications, data delivered (full of cosmetic if some sensor did not work or for weird dessigned/ managed/trainning Software or for the lack of supplies) and most important they will stole your money as much you allow them( from your paycheck). If something will be wrong, which is highly probably in this Company who never invests in Professional Training YOU WILL BE FIRED with no chance to analyze the facts. Be Careful young guys!!!!

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emc2alvnet in Randolph, New Jersey

17 months ago

GDR in Houston, Texas said: I feel compellell to comment. I'm a 50 yr old geology man. I've worked on Rigs as a muddlogger from the gulf to the North Sea. I've worked on ships all over the world as a seismic proceccer. I've been laid off thru down times where I had to go back to grad school because there was nothing else to do. This is a job not for the faint of heart. You had best learn a second backup skill. I became certified as a Linux admin . And was able to Segway this into a computer /geophysicist job. I now work from home 3 days a week supporting geo software. It's been a long journey but Geology has allowed me to see and travel the world that most couldn't even imagine. It's not a bed of roses though. If u want a family life at a young age and Starbucks u might consider a career change while ur still young. Trust me on this....It's unstable. Jobs come and go so u better save ur money when times are good.

-peace

Wise Words Old Guy!!!

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nicherecruiter in Colorado Springs, Colorado

17 months ago

nickelpickle in Tustin, California said: hum,
all of your suggestions are interesting I am new in the field and am still in school .Any advice as to the direction of my career path.I am interested in mining as well as the oil fields.Would like to work in South America

I am a recruiter who has worked in the mining industry for close to 10 years. I have work forcompanies such as Newmont Mining andwith other recruiters with Barrick Gold. The problem is it's an employer's market at this time. You need to work your internships into employment. Don't take an internship that doesn't have any chance for you to be employed. It is more difficult for you to get a job once you have graduated.

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shira in Plymouth, Minnesota

16 months ago

wilkeje in Bluefield, West Virginia said: I'm in the same boat - BS in geology , been applying for 7 months. I hope someone provides some insight!

We are a company just starting up and one thing we need is a geologist who can find oilfield land with rights we have never done anything like this before but it is an opportunity on both sides we are looking into greeley colorado there is still a lot to do, like finding a broker and leasing equipment, but the land has to start first I really hope this will work out but feel free to contact me by replying to this comment

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old geologist in Clute Texas

15 months ago

wilkeje in Bluefield, West Virginia said: I'm in the same boat - BS in geology , been applying for 7 months. I hope someone provides some insight!

I have been mud logging for the last 4 years. Most of the Geologist I deal with only have a BS in Geology. One woman does not have a Geology degree. They seem not to know much, but all they do is look at Geosteering data each day. I am still applying for jobs at the very same companies I mud log and Geosteer for their operations departments. Unfortuitly, their HR departments still tell me I am not suitable for employment with their companies. I can't help but laugh at them; I'm the guy logging and steering their wells for very little money.

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Ismail Azam in Brooklyn, New York

15 months ago

You are absolutely right and it is true. I know almost tens of people with name and the companies that the male and the female are doing office work and preparing a final well report (working a clerical job) in office, no degree nothing...

Join rig site as trainee and then in a month writing Geological description (OH MY GOD). it has been done all under table, not fair.

We all Geologists and professionals has to raise their voices to stop this. I feel sometimes ashamed that the company is paying more than the Geologist and Engineers working with the same company.

We have to Control to build our nation in Energy and to stick on professionalism....

My Opinion is America is the best Country to work, but Human Resource and Hiring Manager has to check that to whom they are hiring and what degree they have and what job they need to do. GOD BLESS AMERICA

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Ismail Azam in Brooklyn, New York

15 months ago

shira in Plymouth, Minnesota I can join with you as a Geologist Please check my details in Linkedin..

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old geologist in Clute Texas in Texas

14 months ago

I am still looking for another job. The mud logging business is too slow. There is not enough work coming my way. I'll be 57 this year. Friends are telling me that there is no hope of any operator hiring me. My current employer wants me to live off my savings for the next 6 months. I need money coming in, so I need a job. I don't want to work for $18 an hour anymore.

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killerinstincts in San Antonio, Texas

13 months ago

So far the oil and gas industry has hit rock bottom . Competition is going to be the main thing that's going to prevent anyone to get in. I have a bs in geology and took me forever to get a position with a company called Lewis Energy. I'm starting off as a sample catcher but hopefully work my way up the ladder. They are looking for people out here encinal, tx for loggers and sample catchers from what I hear.

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ebeyer in west fork, Arkansas

13 months ago

It was nice reading all these posts as I have recently graduated with a BS in geology, have applied to over 160 places with minimal response, and have lab experience at a water resource lab that I worked at during getting my degree and afterward (lab tech I doesn't pay much, however). I have a great work experience. The responses that I do receive are positive although denials. They claim that they are "impressed" with my resume but either I don't meet all the qualifications of things they need. Many people have suggested networking, but on that case I am clueless. Any suggestions? I may be impatient as I have only recently graduated this may, but just talking about it will help as I really want to work as a geologist-it is my passion.

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geogirl in Calgary, Alberta

13 months ago

ebeyer, are you a student member of any professional organizations? even if you have graduated in most cases you can be a student member for the first year or so. go to the luncheons, events and try to get at least one business card per event and follow up with that person later. perhaps ask for an informational interview over coffee....
if you are an outgoing person,you'll have no problems but if you are shy like me it's a lot of work. also try to get a set of your own business cards made, vistaprint has decent quality cards for cheap, that just say your name, your degree and specialisation if you have one. then you can hand these out as well at events

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Junior Geologist in London, United Kingdom

10 months ago

I am a Junior Geologist from the UK. I have a BSc in Geology (2009) and a Masters in Geochemistry (2011). In 2012 I travelled to Australia to seek working in the mineral exploration industry. I found work as a exploration geologist for a small consultancy company and worked on various projects including gold, nickel, Iron ore and Copper. I was being sponsored by the company but the 457 visa was reject by the Australian government as they did not meet the requirements to sponsor a migrant.

In June 2014 I had to return to the UK. I have tried over the last year to seek employment as a geologist but have had no hope. I have sent over 100 emails, attended conferences, meetings and networking. I am now wondering what can I do as the exploration industry (including oil and gas) is in a bad shape.

Most people who I meet joke and say you can work as a bartender or taxi driver.

The mineral exploration industry seems to be far from recovering and it may take many years for it to boom again.

Does anyone have any ideas about positions in the UK related to geology that a graduate geologist can work in. I have looked for commodities trading, mine planning and logistics, geotechnical/environmental engineers and even finance but cannot secure a position.

I also want to know how many recent graduates are securing postions

Thanks

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Junior Geologist in London, United Kingdom

10 months ago

I am a Junior Geologist from the UK. I have a BSc in Geology (2009) and a Masters in Geochemistry (2011). In 2012 I travelled to Australia to seek working in the mineral exploration industry. I found work as a exploration geologist for a small consultancy company and worked on various projects including gold, nickel, Iron ore and Copper. I was being sponsored by the company but the 457 visa was rejected by the Australian government as they did not meet the requirements to sponsor a migrant.

In June 2014 I had to return to the UK. I have tried over the last year to seek employment as a geologist but have had no hope. I have sent over 1000 emails, attended conferences, meetings and networking. I am now wondering what can I do as the exploration industry (including oil and gas) is in a bad shape.

Most people who I meet joke and say you can work as a bartender or taxi driver.

The mineral exploration industry seems to be far from recovering and it may take many years for it to boom again.

Does anyone have any ideas about positions in the UK related to geology that a graduate geologist can work in. I have looked for commodities trading, mine planning and logistics, geotechnical/environmental engineers and even finance but cannot secure a position.

I also want to know how many recent graduates are securing postions

Thanks

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ebeyer in west fork, Arkansas

7 months ago

I have my b.s. in geology and a plethora of experience outside of my degree. I recently graduated in the spring of 2015 and am having a most difficult time finding a job as a geologist. Currently i am working as a wastewater operator and absolutely hate it, I was a lab tech for a water quality lab previously while getting my degree. I am desperate to be in the field of my studies and passion as I love geology and hydrology, I love being outdoors as well. I may be impatient, but does anyone here have any insight on how to get that coveted geology job with just your B.S.? I was completely burnt out after I graduated as I was a nontraditional student and it took me seven years to earn my A.S. and B.S. in geology and desperately needed a break. I would rather not go back and get my M.S. but I am getting desperate. Thoughts, suggestions?

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old geologist

3 months ago

Here it is April 6, 2016 and I'm about to take the third job I don't want to do. I'm about to be a truck driver. I'll be making next to nothing. My BS and MS in geology have proven to have been not worth much.

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Brian in Calgary, Alberta

3 months ago

old geologist said: Here it is April 6, 2016 and I'm about to take the third job I don't want to do. I'm about to be a truck driver. I'll be making next to nothing. My BS and MS in geology have proven to have been not worth much.

Wow! I'm with you, buddy! I'm a wellsite geologist, having worked five weeks in the last 18 months. I have an M.S. in geology from a major California university and I am about to take a job as a truck driver, too!

Sucks, eh?

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ismail azam in Brooklyn, New York

3 months ago

Thats good, But I need to be on my profession. I need this wellsite geology job. Can you please guide me and let me know where to apply and to whom I have to contact. I have done my Masters in Petroleum Geology having more than 10 years experiences. I need a job

Please help me out

Thank you
S.M.Ismail Azam

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old geologist in Texas

6 days ago

I went back to mud logging for less than $14 an hour. Anything less than $50 an hour is a poor income the jobs last about two weeks and they drill fast. The samples are 90 feet. You catch them wash them, look at them through the microscope, check for fluorescence, and write the description, take a picture of every sample, run a calcimeter, dry, and bag the sample. You must constantly keep their old SRI and crappy program running, and they're still using windows 98. I spend most of my time editing chromatograph data in their Excell based code. Their toss it into the data base program doesn't do a good job of getting everything where it should go. I'm frustrated and about to go broke.

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