Newly Licensed Cosmetologist wanting to throw in the towel. Help!

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Comments (38)

Janelle in Richmond, Virginia

37 months ago

I would suggest applying to as many salons in your area for an Apprentice or Stylist Assistant position. Those are the only job titles that will give you on the job training as a hair stylist. However, most of these jobs are for people who do not have a license (since most people would except someone with a license to be skilled in the basics).

Besides that you can go on Youtube and watch as many tutorials as you can and practice daily. Read books, read magazines, you must live and breathe hair until you are great!

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cosmogirl in Vicksburg, Mississippi

35 months ago

Janelle in Richmond, Virginia said: I would suggest applying to as many salons in your area for an Apprentice or Stylist Assistant position. Those are the only job titles that will give you on the job training as a hair stylist. However, most of these jobs are for people who do not have a license (since most people would except someone with a license to be skilled in the basics).

Besides that you can go on Youtube and watch as many tutorials as you can and practice daily. Read books, read magazines, you must live and breathe hair until you are great!

That sounds like great advice! Where can you take continuing education courses on coloring, skin care, etc., once you've become licensed, in order to become a Master Cosmetologist?

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liz lawrence in Scottsdale, Arizona

31 months ago

You must find intercoiffure america on line and see the 3 salons in your area and get hired and do an apprenticeship for atleast a year.

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Erin Myers in Reseda, California

31 months ago

You know, I received my manicurist license last July. What I experienced for about 6 months after was sheer hell. My teacher had told me I did good work, but when I got "out there", I found out I don't do the best work-even with nails, there's lots to learn and it does take 3-5 years to build a full clientele. There's no such "thing" as a nail apprentice or assistant job, you're just thrown to the wolves and expected to rise up quickly. I was essentially eaten alive. I'm actually interviewing for salon receptionist jobs this week-I need a BREAK from it all (not to mention the pain in your neck, wrists, and lower back from doing nails gets pretty bad), going to do my darndest to get one of those jobs so that I can get a solid reference and "block" of experience-then I'm going to go work at a spa, once I have better references and a better resume-they're one of the very few that will actually "train" you. That being said-you need an apprentice/assistant job-it's the only way you'll learn!

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liz lawrence in Scottsdale, Arizona

31 months ago

school equals a license only.

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Shannon Cardenas in Murrieta, California

31 months ago

Erin Myers in Reseda, California said: You know, I received my manicurist license last July. What I experienced for about 6 months after was sheer hell. My teacher had told me I did good work, but when I got "out there", I found out I don't do the best work-even with nails, there's lots to learn and it does take 3-5 years to build a full clientele. There's no such "thing" as a nail apprentice or assistant job, you're just thrown to the wolves and expected to rise up quickly. I was essentially eaten alive. I'm actually interviewing for salon receptionist jobs this week-I need a BREAK from it all (not to mention the pain in your neck, wrists, and lower back from doing nails gets pretty bad), going to do my darndest to get one of those jobs so that I can get a solid reference and "block" of experience-then I'm going to go work at a spa, once I have better references and a better resume-they're one of the very few that will actually "train" you. That being said-you need an apprentice/assistant job-it's the only way you'll learn!

Sorry to hear your going thru that, but also glad to hear someones experancing the same thing. I'm taking a break from it all for now, just got a bad taste in my mouth for the industy right now. There's alot of things that they don't explain to you.

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Frenchick in Minneapolis, Minnesota

31 months ago

I got my license in March 2011 and it was tough trying to find a job. Almost got a job with great clips but their 15 mins time limit didn't sound good so I didn't pursue the position there. I went to an advanced school and they require that you to bring in at least 15 new clients in 3 months, which wasn't as bad as others but was bad timing due to some eye surgery I needed. They didn't seem to understand I needed my vision to do hair (duh), so that didn't work. I ended up getting a job in a different field since my bills were piling up. Just got laid off from that job so now I'm back to looking for a job again. I'm hoping I can find something in cosmetology but it is so difficult when you don't have much skills. Most salons want experienced stylists only. I wish they had more salon assistant positions open but they don't, not here in MN :( If I can't find anything soon, I will have to settle for some other type of work instead like I did last year. Man this sucks but I felt better coming across this board, knowing I'm not the only one. I still wish you the best and hopefully a year or two from now we will all be happy doing hair instead of having wasted our time and money on getting our licenses :D

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Warren in Sun City, California

29 months ago

Shannon Cardenas in Murrieta, California said: Sorry to hear your going thru that, but also glad to hear someones experancing the same thing. I'm taking a break from it all for now, just got a bad taste in my mouth for the industy right now. There's alot of things that they don't explain to you.

I need a Haircut.

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Kaela in Parkville, Maryland

26 months ago

DONT FEEL DISCOURAGED!!!!!!!!! I am a hairstylist and this SAME exact thing happened to me! I went to hairschool and all we did was fool around in class all day we learned NOTHING!!!! finally when i graduated I went to a high class salon and still learned nothing. Everyone was so stuck up their own ass to give a hand to a new hairstylist out of school! I finally said screw this and went to GREAT CLIPS...which is only haircuts no color or anything. I thought it would just be a "stepping stone" in my career because i love doing color but I love it at great clips. You make HOURLY so if it is a slow rainy day u still make $$$. You also make comission on products which isnt much but still is a few bucks in ur paycheck. You should really see if there is a great clips in your area! You get benefits within 6 months of being there. Paid vacations and full time hours with a GOOD paycheck! Don't give up YET! I almost did but there is HOPE at the end of the tunnel!!!! I hope this helped you some!!! Goodluck!!! :)

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Kaela in Parkville, Maryland

26 months ago

U should go back and apply at great clips! I work there and it is a great company. You make more $$ than you think! the 15 min haircutting thing is Not a big deal. They also help you with new haircuts. I walk out almost everyday with ATLEAST $50-$100 in my pocket. RECONSIDER!!!

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Disenchanted in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

25 months ago

Shannon Cardenas in Temecula, California said: I just got my California Cosmetology license June 13th 2011; I’m now starting to realize how it is starting out. My school didn’t teach me anything, it’s like starting at point A, I really thought that school was teaching me all the tools that I need to go out there into the big, big word of cosmetology. I don’t know how to cut hair for crap, they never taught us, standard 90, 180, & 0 degree cuts. So I started working at a salon (commission only) I knew I wasn’t going to be $$$, I was there hoping to learn. I sat there for two weeks doing nothing, no one taught me one thing not even going over the hair color line or product line. So I moved on and got a job working for fantastic Sam’s, thought now I’m going to get the training that I need. First day of work they taught me nothing, not even the computer system. I found out that I messed up this guys clipper cut, I told them from the get go that I need help and that I didn’t know how to cut men’s hair. I’m so discouraged, on top of that there like you need to loosen up (it’s hard to learn on your own and hold down a full on conversation at the same time). This big wonderful dream that I had is falling apart all around me, and I’m not a quitter but I really want to put my tail between my legs and run. What do I do Help!!!!!
P.S. I’m really angry with my school due to the fact of the lack of teaching us how to cut hair.
Where do I getting the training that I need to feel confident? Do I quit and try to do and internship ? Do I quit and realize maybe this isn’t for me?

Don't feel like the lone ranger. I feel the exact same way wondering why I even went to school for this. I think the instructors should be realistic when they talk about the field. I graduated 2010 and I only worked in one salon. They did not provide me any additional training the only knowledge i had was what the school taught me.

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Cosmetology 101 in Baltimore, Maryland

24 months ago

There's always advance training classes, cosmetology school is only the basivs. Refresher courses are also a options but they cost. If this post your dream this field is ever changing, invest in yourself get more training.

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Woohooo in Granada Hills, California

21 months ago

START AT SUPERCUTS! I currently work there and I've been there for a year now. It's a great place to start, and they offer a great amount of education and experience. At first I was skeptical, but I know other people in the hair business and that's where they advised me to start. Very soon I'll be moving on to a full service salon with plenty of confidence and experience. I also learned a lot of the business aspect of being a hairstylist. Goodluck!

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Tony in Concord, California

20 months ago

Shannon Cardenas in Temecula, California said: I just got my California Cosmetology license June 13th 2011; I’m now starting to realize how it is starting out. My school didn’t teach me anything, it’s like starting at point A, I really thought that school was teaching me all the tools that I need to go out there into the big, big word of cosmetology. I don’t know how to cut hair for crap, they never taught us, standard 90, 180, & 0 degree cuts. So I started working at a salon (commission only) I knew I wasn’t going to be $$$, I was there hoping to learn. I sat there for two weeks doing nothing, no one taught me one thing not even going over the hair color line or product line. So I moved on and got a job working for fantastic Sam’s, thought now I’m going to get the training that I need. First day of work they taught me nothing, not even the computer system. I found out that I messed up this guys clipper cut, I told them from the get go that I need help and that I didn’t know how to cut men’s hair. I’m so discouraged, on top of that there like you need to loosen up (it’s hard to learn on your own and hold down a full on conversation at the same time). This big wonderful dream that I had is falling apart all around me, and I’m not a quitter but I really want to put my tail between my legs and run. What do I do Help!!!!!
P.S. I’m really angry with my school due to the fact of the lack of teaching us how to cut hair.
Where do I getting the training that I need to feel confident? Do I quit and try to do and internship ? Do I quit and realize maybe this isn’t for me?

We run into the sort of problem you talk about all the time with recent graduates. That is why the drop out rate in the industry approaches 80%. If you want to stay in Cosmetology, specifically haircutting and styling, check out www.the-comb.com. We can teach you in a short time for low cost how to learn to cut hair precisely and accurately EVERY TIME.

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Tony in Concord, California

20 months ago

Warren in Sun City, California said: I need a Haircut.

Don't give up totally. We are launching a new haircutting concept that deals with teaching kids precise haircutting using a patented tool that trans you to cut precisely accurately and consistently everytime. Visit www.the-comb.com. It is wave of haircutting education that will train you in a short period how to understand haircutting and leave school with confidence in your skills. Good luck. This is information not a solicitation to buy, but we are coming to an academy or salon near you.

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BBNY21 in Albany, New York

20 months ago

I want to do Cosmetology but I am worried about having a unstable income. Can you realistically make 40k a year?

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hc in Arlington, Washington

17 months ago

I totally know how you feel. My school similarly failed to teach us clipper hair cuts. Totally hindering our growth in the industry. Skin tight fades are still an issue for me, but the rest of the clipper cuts turn out fine.
My school did teach us about elevation and all those types of things, but in beauty school they taught us the minimal basics I think.
Find 1 or 2 people that you feel are good. Then ask them if you can watch and if they can watch you cut hair to teach you a bit.
Also, if you practice the techniques that work for you, you WILL get better.
Lastly, don't quit until you've really given yourself a good chance. We are our worst critics. I wish you the best of luck and hang in there!

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goshay in San Gabriel, California

17 months ago

Don't look for quick success. It will take time to build a large clientele. The schools only provide the basics. If you want to get good at you profession treat it that way. Hopefully you will take the 5 day precision haircutting class at vidal sasoon academy.Also Redkin Exchange in New York have excellent 4day advanced training classes. That is what we need when we want to become a professional hairstylist.Don't quit on yoursely simply watch those thougt of yours.You keep refocusing on being successful and flush out the wrong thinking. You can make it,create a enviorment of support like attending hairshows and taking classes and the practicing what you have learned.Set some goals to master layer cutting and what effect those angels create in your cut.

And remember don't quit. I'm a hairdress and Instructor and you can do it to.Eventually goal long term is to rent a booth that way you can create your own situation like how many days you work and how you want to make.It this industry it really is up to you. All you need is the right education and don't get side tracked and you will get to where you are going.

As I mentioned, eventually you will have to take a advanced haircutting class and color. Don't forget to check out Redkin Exdchange in Ny,Ny.Also check out matrix professional sight.They have advanced cutting also someting called craft methodology and then you have malys of california who have various classes at the beauty supplys across the country you can get the information at the website at malys in the education area of the site. This I would like to ad to,you can make it and if you need direction email me and I will respond just don't quit you can have all the success you are willing to work for.

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goshay in San Gabriel, California

17 months ago

Your school had to of taught you something. You have your license so they accomplished that part of the equation.Now you have to get advanced education at Redking exchange in ny, ny and vidal sasoon, or Matrix craft academy and practice and sharpen up what you have learned.

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goshay in San Gabriel, California

17 months ago

l,iz lawrence in Phoenix, Arizona said: You are all off base. You must get an apprenticeship from an intercoiffure salon. Period. School is just to be licensed, everything you leasrn is just to be licensed, for you know nothing. Hairdesign is a dead end streeet, no benefits and no retirement. Go into another field like nursing. Be a bartender !

Cosmetolgy is a profession just like any other profession.You have know limits, like that job being mentioned here.Professionals create the retirement for themselves and they pruchase their own medical insurance. Now employees on the other hand are just that wanting not to be a professional but to have some on do it all for them unfortunetly them day or passing on.To be successful you have to learn you craft from to advanced academies like vidal sasoon precision hair cutting and hair coloring.or attend Redkin exchange or Matrix craft academy or any of the other advanced academies and you can get benefits in the industry if that is all one wants just get hired at a chain salon and they make money as well.My partner was making about 50 a year at jc penney with benefits medical, profit sharing. and employee discounts and working only 37 hours per week. Don't become misinformed on this forum, I speak from experience and not just from misforming.

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anthony@the-comb.com in Los Angeles, California

17 months ago

goshay in San Gabriel, California said: Your school had to of taught you something. You have your license so they accomplished that part of the equation.Now you have to get advanced education at Redking exchange in ny, ny and vidal sasoon, or Matrix craft academy and practice and sharpen up what you have learned.

The most advanced haircutting education academy is coming to California. Hair Salon Educators Academy featuring "The Comb" Advanced Education System will teach the young stylist still struggling with haircutting how to cut hair accurately, consistently every time. We expand your understanding of angles, cutting line and body position with a precision tool. Check us out at www.the-comb.com. Classes begin in June. Journeyman stylists will find their previous understanding of haircutting is extremely limited after they take our intro classes as well. Become a Master Stylist with our system. Everyone benefits. Good luck!!

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Molly Knappen in Chico, California

16 months ago

If you are in the same position as the original poster- don't give up! The fact that your own work isn't yet measuring up, just shows off your great style sense and your ability to see in your head what would be awesome. If you were not able to become great, you wouldn't notice your own work stinks in the beginning. You just have to slog through it. The rule of thumb is that it takes about 10,000 hours of practice to become a virtuoso. That is about 10 years of work. Buckle in. Don't quit. Don't let the mismatch of great taste and beginner hands thwart you. What you do will someday match your ambitions.

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Tony in Salt Lake City, Utah

16 months ago

Molly Knappen in Chico, California said: If you are in the same position as the original poster- don't give up! The fact that your own work isn't yet measuring up, just shows off your great style sense and your ability to see in your head what would be awesome. If you were not able to become great, you wouldn't notice your own work stinks in the beginning. You just have to slog through it. The rule of thumb is that it takes about 10,000 hours of practice to become a virtuoso. That is about 10 years of work. Buckle in. Don't quit. Don't let the mismatch of great taste and beginner hands thwart you. What you do will someday match your ambitions.

Wow, 10,000 hours? That represents a lot of mistakes, al lot of unhappy customers, and an ogoing lack of confidence. Look at learning about our new educational system that will have you cutting hair precisely, accurately and with growing confidence in 1/100th the time of trial and error. Hair Salon Educators in Corona del Mar, CA. OPur goal is to help the young stylist learn how to cut hair with consistency and confidence by teaching you an entirely new method using our patented tools to do it. You cannot go wrong. Otherwise, best of luck surviving in an industry that devalues that is changing rapidly and will obsolete the traditional salon industry in a few more years.

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Julia Hik in Surrey, British Columbia

16 months ago

Just wanta share a thought.Dont know if you are aware of the fact most of us that are in the Hair World or Were Are gifted.You may not realize that the Hair is the excuse the clients come to you> Your Heart and how you help them with your words is Most important. I always wondered why the schools dont help with Communication skills too. So if you have passion and are ok making mistakes stay in. If not follow your heart,But please google www.businessballs.com/nlpneuro-linguisticprogramming.htm This was years later I found this and I believe it would have helped.Changed my life.Take care many Blessing, we are amazing people and are loved by many.And we get to share uson a real level.Food for thought

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SelfeducatedNSTILLLOST in Florence, South Carolina

12 months ago

GC in Cleveland, Ohio said: Hairstyling and the full business of cosmetology is a serious one. However, while I was attending cosmetology school, I found that the instructors and the students were more focused on fundraising and playing childish non-cosmetology related games. These kids are disruptive during school and then whine after they graduate that they didn't learn anything. How many times during your one year of education were you disruptive? How many times did you take the adult responsibility to independently educate yourself in any way? Please, kids, stay home until you are ready to behave in a professional, mature, and focused manner. The art of hairstyling and cosmetology is a very in depth field and should be respected as such. It isn't up to your employer to train you. Whatever books or DVDs your school didn't supply you with, you should take the initiative as an adult to educate yourself. Salons are too busy to hold a child's hand. Grow up. It is your responsibility to educate yourself prior to walking through the doors of a salon for employment. 'Show up, shut up, do what you have to do and go home.' 'Treat a school day as an paid working day and behave in a focused, mature, and professional manner', so that when you graduate, you are ready for the adult world.

You know u really made a few good points, but really there was no reason to b so rude. I showed up daily, early, set up and ready to go. My instructors didn't teach me anything and going to school all day, having 4 children 2 in marching band one in excelled art at the college a husband not to mention the house I have to take care of doesn't allot for a lot of time at home to do stuff that I paid $30,000 to be
Taught at what was supposed to b the best school around me!

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Bella in Summerville, South Carolina

12 months ago

Please don't give up. Just start a personal blog giving more value rather than trying to beg for clients. I can point you in the right direction :-)

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Mel in Portland, Oregon

11 months ago

I would recommend doing an apprenticeship/assistant position at a reputable salon(do some research about training programs). I did 2 internships/apprenticeships, one in color and one in cut. But, be aware they have you sign contracts, so you don't quit just for the training. You usually need to stay for at least a year and a half after training is over. But, it makes you very confident. Make sure to READ what you sign, if they make you sign a contract! When I was about to graduate, a friend who was doing an internship told me you could learn how to do hair in a salon 2 ways: 1) by your own mistakes on your clients or 2) by someone else's mistakes more senior than you in a training program on models. I chose 2! It was hard and took me longer to make money, but, you end up making more money in the long run by charging more. Everyone does it different and what works for one person might not work for someone else. I just knew I didn't feel confident enough to just do it. Some people are just good out the gate and some of us(me) needed more polish. I also really wanted to learn precision cuts and color. That is just my story. I hope it helps you in making a decision.

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Cin in Anza, California

11 months ago

Shannon Cardenas in Murrieta, California said: Royal college of beauty

I was planning on going to that school. Did they really not teach you anything? Are they not good teachers?

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anthony@the-comb.com in Los Angeles, California

11 months ago

Your best bet to learn haircutting and to survive is to attend a class at our newly opened academy in Newport Beach. Hair Salon Educators features The Comb Advanced Educational System where you will understand haircutting, not just try to guess at doing haircuts. You will not regret it. E-mail me and I will send you testimonials from kids, experienced stylists, salon owners and educators who are taking our training. Best of luck in your decision.

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Teresa Reagor in Livermore, California

11 months ago

BBNY21 in Albany, New York said: I want to do Cosmetology but I am worried about having a unstable income. Can you realistically make 40k a year?

It is possible to do $40,000 or more a year. Although it does take awhile to build up the skills, the proper service fees and client base required.

For example:

For an independent contractor who does...

An average of $300 per day gross x 5 days a week = $1,500
$1,500 x 4 weeks = $6,000
$6,000 x 12 months = $72,000 gross

Let's say your station rent is $850 a month x 12 months = $10,200 a year

You are now at $72,000 - $10,200 = $61,800

Now take away your backbar supplies of an average of $6,000 for the year + insurance averaged at $600 for the year = $6,600

$61,800 - $6,600 = $55,200 left for the year... although you still would need to pay your income taxes from this amount. Depending on your taxes owed, let's say you owe 20%, which is $11,040, you would be left with $44,160 for the year.

This amount of money can be made, and plenty of hair stylists do earn it and more. The chance to be your own boss, set your own prices and schedule are worth it.

I hope this is helpful and encouraging for you.

Sending You My Best Wishes,
Teresa Reagor
www.HairColorClass.com

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Hannah in Bonney Lake, Washington

4 months ago

Shannon Cardenas in Temecula, California said: I just got my California Cosmetology license June 13th 2011; I’m now starting to realize how it is starting out. My school didn’t teach me anything, it’s like starting at point A, I really thought that school was teaching me all the tools that I need to go out there into the big, big word of cosmetology. I don’t know how to cut hair for crap, they never taught us, standard 90, 180, & 0 degree cuts. So I started working at a salon (commission only) I knew I wasn’t going to be $$$, I was there hoping to learn. I sat there for two weeks doing nothing, no one taught me one thing not even going over the hair color line or product line. So I moved on and got a job working for fantastic Sam’s, thought now I’m going to get the training that I need. First day of work they taught me nothing, not even the computer system. I found out that I messed up this guys clipper cut, I told them from the get go that I need help and that I didn’t know how to cut men’s hair. I’m so discouraged, on top of that there like you need to loosen up (it’s hard to learn on your own and hold down a full on conversation at the same time). This big wonderful dream that I had is falling apart all around me, and I’m not a quitter but I really want to put my tail between my legs and run. What do I do Help!!!!!
P.S. I’m really angry with my school due to the fact of the lack of teaching us how to cut hair.
Where do I getting the training that I need to feel confident? Do I quit and try to do and internship ? Do I quit and realize maybe this isn’t for me?[/QUOTE

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Hannah in Bonney Lake, Washington

4 months ago

Hey! Don't give up, beauty school no matter how prestigious only teaches the basics. The very basics.. my first salon job was horrible, like you they taught me absolutely nothing except clearly i needed a lot of help! And i took things into my own hands. I got a job at great clips where i only did haircuts all day every day i got new skills fast they send you to a training program that teaches easy to do shortcuts, i worked there a couple years even became manager and i hired every new out of beauty school girl and taught them as much as i could , i gained skills and confidence. I work for hairmasters now and absolutely love it! I feel confident in my work. I YouTube color techniques and cutting and styling all the time it's helpful. Don't give up. Find a company that offers training and base wage get your skills up practice build clientele and keep going!

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Alliescut in Saint Louis, Missouri

4 months ago

Shannon Cardenas in Temecula, California said: I just got my California Cosmetology license June 13th 2011; I’m now starting to realize how it is starting out. My school didn’t teach me anything, it’s like starting at point A, I really thought that school was teaching me all the tools that I need to go out there into the big, big word of cosmetology. I don’t know how to cut hair for crap, they never taught us, standard 90, 180, & 0 degree cuts. So I started working at a salon (commission only) I knew I wasn’t going to be $$$, I was there hoping to learn. I sat there for two weeks doing nothing, no one taught me one thing not even going over the hair color line or product line. So I moved on and got a job working for fantastic Sam’s, thought now I’m going to get the training that I need. First day of work they taught me nothing, not even the computer system. I found out that I messed up this guys clipper cut, I told them from the get go that I need help and that I didn’t know how to cut men’s hair. I’m so discouraged, on top of that there like you need to loosen up (it’s hard to learn on your own and hold down a full on conversation at the same time). This big wonderful dream that I had is falling apart all around me, and I’m not a quitter but I really want to put my tail between my legs and run. What do I do Help!!!!!
P.S. I’m really angry with my school due to the fact of the lack of teaching us how to cut hair.
Where do I getting the training that I need to feel confident? Do I quit and try to do and internship ? Do I quit and realize maybe this isn’t for me?

Allies

I understand how frustrating this can be. I am a Cosmetologist and Instructors of Cosmetology. I can help you. I have the Fantastic Sams and Great Clips training and am willing to guide you through those cuts at no cost. I have developed a systems to help you overcome your fears. You may contact me via E.mail and we will set up a system to get you started. I

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Lea in Milford, Connecticut

3 months ago

I have the same problem...I went to hairdressing school in CT and did learn a few things but not very much. Not enough of the basics to even get a job in a salon. I feel it was a waste of 18,000. But I did pass the state test with a 94% overall. If we had to do a practical test, I would have failed it. A few of the girls have tried to get jobs in salons and are told they are not qualified & that the salons don't have time to train them in the basics.

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Jessica in Glen Burnie, Maryland

2 months ago

School just gives you the basics. I'm kind of shocked that there are so many people here who never need to take a practical exam!

You need to start in a corporate chain salon - Super Cuts, Hair Cuttery, JCPenny etc. because they all offer a lot of advanced training and are focused on training stylists fresh out of school. Don't both rent (you'll be in way over your head) and don't work for a privately-owned salon unless they have a good new talent training program. Go to hair conventions - almost every major metropolitan city has them, and most of the classes are included in your ticket price. Contact your local professional beauty supply, sometimes they give classes in-store. And if you're still in school, make a goal to learn something specific each week and then ask your instructors (or even other students) to show you. The girls I went to school with weren't overly friendly, but most of them were happy to show you something new (if only because it stroked their ego that someone was asking THEM for help...haha!) Tell friends and family you'll do their hair at home for free and practice on them - friends and family are more likely to let you experiment and won't be so hard on you if you mess up.

And remember...doing hair is not about perfection, it's about making your client happy. If your client loves her color and in reality it's a bit brassy...then you did it perfect, because THE CLIENT'S opinion is the only one that matters! :)

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jjvgavon in Clementon, New Jersey

1 month ago

Alliescut in Saint Louis, Missouri said: Allies

Hi,
I am in the same boat as the original poster as well, I graduated from beauty school in 1995, got my license and to this day I was told that I lack technical skills, it's horrible, because you would expect a licensed cosmetologist of 18 - 19 years to have some experience, well I don't, I also was taught nothing in beauty school, a lot of book work, quizzes, tests, and goofing off all day was what occurred- we did a lot of roller sets and played with each other's hair and did facials!!! I would love to gain some haircutting skills, but these salons never train, they want you to be experienced right from the start and it is a little discouraging especially when you are someone like myself, who is very motivated, a quick learner and very willing to learn. I have looked into super cuts since they state that they send you to training before they give you a chair, that is what I need lots of hands on training, I don't know what else to do, I let my license expire because I wasn't working In a salon for a few years, and all I ever did for the salons I have worked for was shampoo hair, I did work for one salon that the manager wanted me to watch and learn the hair cuts, but it is a little hard to watch and learn anything when they constantly have you cleaning the salon, doing laundry and cleaning color bottles!! I am a little frustrated that I am licensed and can't even get behind the chair, I feel like getting licensed was all for nothing. help!!
Jennifer

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spicee tee in Enterprise, Alabama

1 month ago

jjvgavon in Clementon, New Jersey said:

I was just talking to a girl that I went to beauty school with about this. We graduated almost 2 years ago. We had a class of about 30 and maybe only 5 of us took the state exam. Our school was the same as yours; a LOT of doing nothing (sometimes we didn't even have an instructor for the day), roller sets and facials and drama between some of the teachers and students. I'm really surprised to see that you are feeling the exact same way that I'm feeling! That just goes to show you how truly important it is to learn the basics but what do you do when the basics are not taught in the first place! It's almost like you have to go to advanced training school for another year or so after getting your license. I'm in desperate need of some help as well!

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Societies Change in Silver Spring, Maryland

1 month ago

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