am i making the right decision about being a hairstylist?

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sandra in Malvern, Pennsylvania

75 months ago

Rene,
FYI... You mentioned renting a booth at a salon and working for yourself. This came up as a topic of discussion in our class, and in PA, it is illegal to charge for booth rental at salons. You may want to look into whether or not it is in your state too.

Best of luck in your transition and don't worry about what your academia world may think of cosmetology. I too was worried about what anyone and everyone would think of me doing this, and surprisingly enough, more people than I ever are so proud of me for just moving my life in a direction that gives me more happiness. I was most worried about what my husband would think and he's been wonderfully supportive and is and investment banker...the last person who I would think would support the idea of being a hairstylist. He's been so pleased though to see the change in my overall approach to every day since starting school. My outlook on everything is sunnier and happier since doing this. It's effected everything from good times with my kids, to my husband, to a much more functional household. Amazing what being happy can do for you:0)

Let me know how it all works out for you!
Sandra

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BMFitness in Redwood City, California

75 months ago

SheriC,
my name is Yannis. I was browsing the site when I found your testimonial here. It is a great description of the daily reality of the hair stylists. I'm a fitness and wellness professional. I'm developing right now a DVD for hairstylists on how to stand and move better while they work, so they can protect themselves. I would love to use what you wrote here in the forum for people to see the long term impact of the nature of this job. It took me a long time of study and research to develop these techniques in order to help the hairstylists. I see that the industry is in deep need of someone who can provide the "tools" to hairstylists to protect themselves, and I found it strange that nobody before me so the importance to do so. I hope I can give hairstylists something of value because I find them underrated and under-appreciated and I like to help the "underdogs." Thanks.

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SheriC in Orange Park, Florida

75 months ago

BMFitness in Redwood City, California said: SheriC,
... I would love to use what you wrote here in the forum for people to see the long term impact of the nature of this job. It took me a long time of study and research to develop these techniques in order to help the hairstylists. ....

Yannis, you're welcome to use what I wrote. People truly do not realize how constant movements of joints affects the body. It's more than "carpal tunnel" issues, which are relatively easy to alleviate for a time... only to have that type of issue to return.

Good hairstylists/colourists that are in high demand typically try to book as many clients as they can. Why? Because this is typically a commission business. (Not absolutely true, but I'd say over 90% of salons are commission only.) So, they work like DOGS GONE WILD and they **KNOW** how to push their bodies so they can perform, much like athletes push themselves. The only problem is there is no TRAINER to watch out and make sure that they are taking care of their hands and bodies. No one is bringing up in the salon the long term effects of NERVE DAMAGE: BECAUSE IT DOES HAPPEN. And once the nerves are damaged, it affects everything in your life. From trying to bend your wrist to wipe your buttocks (no joke... bought a Toto Jasmine (Google it) to help me out there. Even bought one for my mother who had severe Rheumatoid Arthritis, which I do not have.)

Having migraines is another culprit. Most brought on by *fragrances*, and I thought I was dying when a salon I worked for became an Aveda Concept Salon; "aroma therapy" type products, which produced migraines.

I eventually learned more about nerve damage from a neurologist, who gives me occipital nerve blocks (8-10 shots starting at the base of my skull, side of spine, & shoulders). Doing hair well & rights is detrimental to your future health. I'm 51 and know what I'm talking about.

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Rene in Pasco, Washington

75 months ago

Sheri C,

Wow -- everything that you have gone through and continue to endure sounds increadibly painful. I know previously you had indicated that you wouldn't work more than six hours a day and would not do shampoos amoung other things. My question is this -- knowing what you know now, would you choose to still have been a stylist? Is it something that you would or would not recommend getting into? I truly values your thoughts and insight.

Amy

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Amy Rene in Pasco, Washington

75 months ago

Also: Does anyone know of scholarships available for cosmetology school? Unfortunatly due to my degrees I am no longer eligable for pell grants. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

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BMFitness in Redwood City, California

75 months ago

Hi SheriC,

sorry for my delayed reply, I wanted to thank you for your answer to my question and your permission to use your own experience for the benefit of other hair stylists. As a thank you I would like to offer you some tips from my own professional experience and knowledge.

If I understand correctly your biggest problem is the neural damage from years of abuse. There is a good side and a bad side to this. You can always regenerate the nerves and make them a whole lot better but it takes time and it needs a complete shift in your lifestyle. But, I am sure that the trade-ff to no pain is super good. The injections from your neurologist DO NOT solve the problem. They ONLY DEAL WITH THE SYMPTOMS. And there is a negative long term effect to the body from the drugs.

The best way to deal with the nerve rehabilitation is to attack the problem holistically from different angles:
1. You need to go to a good chiropractor. This is the best www.NUCCA.org
2. Ice your arms 2-3 times a day for 10-15 minutes.
3. Nutrition: Get rid of all the sugar, including white carbs (pasta, bread, rice, potatoes) and fried foods.
4. Supplements: Omega 3, vitamin B-complex, for regeneration, bromelain, for the pain.
5. Exercise: Strengthening the weak muscles and stretching the tight muscles.
6. Proper biomechanics (how you move and stand) and ergonomics (how you arrange your work space)
If you want more details, please e-mail me at BMFitness@netscape.net and I will tell you more. I will send you also a few pictures with great stretches. Do this and you'll feel better

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Lizzie in Ottumwa, Iowa

75 months ago

I'm 25 years old and trying to justify enrolling in cosmetology school after spending 4 years earning my BA in Fashion Design.

I have been considering going for a Masters in Industrial Design, but worry that I'd be right back in the same boat. Not to mention that the professors seem to go out of their way to make ID sound like a drag. Are they trying to recruit students or have their program dismantled? I'll never understand why creative majors have to be so tortured about everything.

Beauty school sort of seems like a step backward, but also sounds insanely fun. The economy sucks, we all know it. Companies can pick from a wide variety of talented and experienced designers who need work, so it's harder than ever for new graduates to break in. In my mind, hair is just another fiber within textile design. Designing hair would be a potentially enjoyable way to generate some income.

On the other hand, would I be able to pay off my $18,000 loan on the income of a hairdresser? Some people boast incomes well over $50k/yr while others cry out that they have been crippled and can barely make ends meet. I can only assume that this gap is caused by differences in talent/effort/personality/location.

I've come to the conclusion that I have as good a chance as anyone at being successful at cosmetology. I like going to school. The school is local. No unpaid student loans. No kids or pets. Boyfriend is willing to pay full rent. Already went to college and know how to study. Can continue to do my current graphic art job part time in the evenings. Friends have already volunteered their hair for practice (poor [expletive deleted]s). Took many business, science, and design courses in college. Current job involves creating various promotional materials. Have an extra room in our apartment if I want to set up a mini salon. Mom actually has a chair dryer for some reason. I'm healthy and not getting any younger. Why not? Let's do this.

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Amy Rene in Pasco, Washington

75 months ago

Just because you have a college degree and plan to return to cosmetology school, it doesn't mean that you are taking a step backward. I have my masters degree and I plan to return to cosmetology school as well. I think of this as something in addition to the educatio that we have already obtained. I think of this industry as a scope of freedome for creativity, structure, and postive challenges. The traditional college education that we have earned will ultimatly be helpful when speaking with clients or even running our own business possibly in the future. I understand the concern, but keep up your great work in pursuing a career that you're passionate about instead of a career that doesn't necessarily advance you.

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Lizzie in Ottumwa, Iowa

75 months ago

Thanks for the encouragement, Amy. It's funny, but instead of college helping me to communicate better within the cosmetology field, I think cosmetology will help me obtain the communication skills I never seemed to pick up in college. This may have had something to do with avoiding people I considered to have self-destructive behaviors (excessive drinking, drug use, being just plain crazy, etc). I imagine that doing hair will be a lot like speed dating, giving me the opportunity to try to read and talk to many different kinds of people on a daily basis in an environment where I have sharp objects to protect myself (kidding, sort of).

My speech patterns are a terrible combination of to-the-point, but that point is a little...off. Many people find this hilarious although that is not my intention. I have never interviewed well. Days of prep before interviews have helped with the nervousness, but I still lack the ability to come up with good (or even normal) answers on the spot. Answers and solutions that quickly come to other people's minds are not obvious to me. I think this is both the gift and the curse of creative thought. Questions about weaknesses that are meant to be engaging just seem like some old pointless formality. It's excruciating to follow the script, but it's not like I've got anything better.

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Rene in Pasco, Washington

73 months ago

What are everyone's thoughts on the Tony & Guy Academy?

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Andrea in Littleton, Colorado

73 months ago

Hi all, I just need some advice if you wouldn't mind?

I am an 18 year old college freshman studying apparel and merchandising, and although I love the school and the environment, I just can't justify making my parents pay 18,000 a year, while I am still not convinced college is for me, and not even sure what I want to do with y life. I have loved hair and makeup and fashion and all that stuff for a long time now, but recently decided I really would love to go to cosmetology school instead. Getting a degree in fashion I feel would not help me much, living in the non-fashion-state of Colorado.

As of now, I decided to finish out my first year and then transfer to a cosmetology school. It would be cheaper, as well as a faster degree, that I could start actually working within the next few years and making money, as opposed to paying money the next for years in hopes that my degree will get me somewhere. All of my cousins and friends that have graduated are having problems even finding jobs, and I don't want to go through 4 years for nothing.

My plan is to go through beauty school, and then do Colorado State online afterward (or during) fr 1 more year to receive a basic 2 year associates degree, just to have under my belt in case hairstyling is not for me.
Any suggestions? I'm so torn. What do you all think about a job as a hairstylist? Are you bored with it after so long? Any advice is appreciated. Thank you!!!

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skazoo in San Diego, California

73 months ago

Andrea, try to get an apprenticeship with a good company in a big city. I would try Vidal Sassoon or Tony and Guy in LA, Chicago, pr NYC. You can always go to College afterwards or start taking courses along the way. Just going to Cosmetology school won't cut it. There are also good places in the Orange county area.

Andrea in Littleton, Colorado said: Hi all, I just need some advice if you wouldn't mind?

I am an 18 year old college freshman studying apparel and merchandising, and although I love the school and the environment, I just can't justify making my parents pay 18,000 a year, while I am still not convinced college is for me, and not even sure what I want to do with y life. I have loved hair and makeup and fashion and all that stuff for a long time now, but recently decided I really would love to go to cosmetology school instead. Getting a degree in fashion I feel would not help me much, living in the non-fashion-state of Colorado.

As of now, I decided to finish out my first year and then transfer to a cosmetology school. It would be cheaper, as well as a faster degree, that I could start actually working within the next few years and making money, as opposed to paying money the next for years in hopes that my degree will get me somewhere. All of my cousins and friends that have graduated are having problems even finding jobs, and I don't want to go through 4 years for nothing.

My plan is to go through beauty school, and then do Colorado State online afterward (or during) fr 1 more year to receive a basic 2 year associates degree, just to have under my belt in case hairstyling is not for me.
Any suggestions? I'm so torn. What do you all think about a job as a hairstylist? Are you bored with it after so long? Any advice is appreciated. Thank you!!!

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SheriC in Orange Park, Florida

73 months ago

Andrea in Littleton, Colorado said: Hi all, I just need some advice if you wouldn't mind?... My plan is to go through beauty school, and then do Colorado State online afterward (or during) fr 1 more year to receive a basic 2 year associates degree, just to have under my belt in case hairstyling is not for me.
Any suggestions? I'm so torn. What do you all think about a job as a hairstylist? Are you bored with it after so long? Any advice is appreciated. Thank you!!!

I *hear* you, loud and clear. I do not know if you're paying out of state tuition or not, but $18K a year is ridiculous. I have paid a lot of money for kiddos to go to school and if you can live at home and go to college, then that's the way to go. It's only a short time in your life to get a degree that will serve you for the rest of your life.

If you want to make money at hairdressing, then educate yourself so you can attract the type of clients that are also educated. "Like" attracts "like". Dress professional, talk professional, be professional and you will become a success no matter the field of work you decide to choose. Always 'act' like the person that you want to become. Soon enough, you will not be acting. I've heard people say 'fake it till you make it'. I am not saying fake anything. I am saying believe in yourself.

I was once at a crossroads such as yourself. Parents will never feel that they are sacrificing for their child if the child does well and FINISHES WHAT THEY START. You will NEVER regret having a college degree; what you will always regret is not having one. It would be more beneficial if you got a degree with a skill, like CPA or teaching. Just having a 'degree' is only a key. A key to a specific door is more helpful, imho.

But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane,
In proving foresight may be vain;
The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men
Gang aft agley,
And lea'e us nought but grief an' pain
For promised joy!

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Andrea in Fort Collins, Colorado

72 months ago

Where did you all attend beauty school? I am looking at Regency, possibly Empire, and would love some feedback about them! :)

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Look up! in Orlando, Florida

72 months ago

Janna in Calmar, Alberta said: Well if you love what you are doing, why let these people bring you down!

Trust what God has put in your heart, when you enjoy what your doing so will your clients. They will want to come to you just for the pleasant experience, you are not only touching their hair but their life...and they come to escape the stress and hopefully come out looking good in the midst of it. Don't listen to the nay sayers keep learning and be the best you can be. Your diligence will be rewarded....why go back to school to do something else you know you won't enjoy? This is your life and you only got one. Live it to the fullest! Be who you are:)

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emailcpowers521@*****.*** in Everett, Washington

71 months ago

I want to know what do you think? I am 62 have been in college working on my bachelors for a while now but I am not sure I want to continue. I wanted to do hair when I was younger but never finished. Am I too old to do this?

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Adrienne in Sarasota, Florida

71 months ago

The way i see it, you are never too old. You will make as much money as you choose to make. So if you are exceptionlly great, then you can charge as you wish and do well. You can hustle and make a good living, or work as you wish and do alright. It does usually take some time to develop a strong client base, but if hairstyling is your passion then you should follow your heart. This is a tough economy and college degrees are only needed in certain areas that are actually hiring. Learning a trade is never a bad thing. It will take about a year to complete. Good Luck!

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kat in Powder Springs, Georgia

70 months ago

Are there any part time only salons where a person can work 2 or 3 days for a smaller amount one would pay for full time space?

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SheriC in Green Cove Springs, Florida

70 months ago

kat in Powder Springs, Georgia said: Are there any part time only salons where a person can work 2 or 3 days for a smaller amount one would pay for full time space?

If you understood how to trim down a business to work part time, you could. I did hair, went from full time to part time. Full time was 4 days(M,W,T,F), 3 days (M,W,F 8-5), 2 days every week(M,F), then to 2 days (W,T) every other week when I moved two hours away. I did not work nights or Saturdays. Why? Because I did not want to build a clientele that needed me on those days. Period. I built a clientele that had money and could afford me. Most of my clients had spouses that supported them, or had jobs that allowed them the freedom to get their hair done during my business hours. I was a single mother for many years and I had to pick up my children by 5:30 and I was leaving work at 5:15, so I was DONE by 5 o'clock, no exceptions. NONE. My clients 'got' it, or they went to someone else. Period. KNOW your clients and them little about you. Also, I made the same money working 4 days a month as working FULL TIME. I started working smarter booking only certain types of appointments, which is another story...

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sassielady in Phoenix, Arizona

68 months ago

Just wanted to follow up on the people om this forum, to see whatever happened...please share if you are still out there!

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Allie in Richmond, Virginia

68 months ago

Erica in Charlotte,NC said: wow! this site is great! i am also a new hairstylist. im apprenticing at a nice busy salon in charlotte,NC. i went to this salon right after school and my concern is that it is departmentalized. if i one day want to work for myself, or booth rent...do you think i need to learn the best of both worlds? i love every aspect of coloring and cutting, so having to choose bothers me, but it seems as though its the new trend! i hear departmentalizing is more for benefiting the salon rather than making a hair stylist wealthy. any comments?

Where do you work? I'm looking to get back to a departmentalized salon and I'm having a hard time finding salons here in charlotte.

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Carolina in Hamilton, Bermuda

68 months ago

Loving what you do is all that matters, cause it doesn't mean a thing to have a degree and you hate your job. You have what most people want, the satisfaction of loving what you do :)

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tiffani in Biloxi, Mississippi

67 months ago

aholley in Union, Kentucky said: I too am 35 and after 10 years in finance I quit to do hair. I am in my 4th month of school and I'm loving it. No you aren't to old. I thought the same thing. Many women are changing careers and doing what they love. Now the majority of girls going to the school are teens and in their 20's but there are a hand full of 35, 45 year old women in my school. You'll never know unless you try it! Go for it!!

could you tell how is it now, that you are finish with school? how do you like the field now and are you working fulltime? i too plan to go back to hair school after working in the medical field for 10 years. thanks

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Juhoneyj in Charlotte, North Carolina

67 months ago

Hi I'm 20 years old and I'm considering going to Paul Mitchell's school. I'm just really confused because I want to make money and be successful at what I love, but I hear most people say that you don't make good money in this industry. If I don't choose Paul Mitchell, I'm going to go to school to be a nurse, but I honestly don't think I will enjoy it as much as I would the cosmetology field.
I would like to know as a Paul Mitchell graduate what is job placement like and how much money does this make you?
I'm just really getting my life started and I don't want to struggle like I did growing up. I want to make good money doing what I love, that's why I'm asking.
If anybody can give me advice it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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Courtney in Bristol, Connecticut

66 months ago

Hi everyone I am 31 yrs old mother of 3 and am really thinking about attending Cosmetology school. I have an appointment today for a tour. I am really not sure if this is something I want to do. Absolutely no one in my family supports this career. I have read enough career books that tell you to think back to when you were a child and what did you enjoy dong. When I think back I loved Barbies, clothes, hair and shoes. When I go to beauty supply stores I get an excitement inside. I could be in there for hours. I wanted to do this career 10yrs ago but my mother discouraged me. So I became a medical receptionist for 12yrs and I hated every minute of it. Now here I am 10yrs later and still wanting to pursue this career. I have a friend who just graduated cosmetology school and works at an exclusive salon in their 9mo apprentice program. She said she absolutely loves it and if she had to do it again she would. The downside is the pay. She said she only makes $9-10/hr and it barely covers the gas in her ford expedition so she does home healthcare on the side. She said she knows in 2years she will make alot more. I love her attitude because she is doing something she enjoys. My husband wants the money now, big house fancy cars even if that means hating your job and being on the verge of jumping out a window. Of course I want to make money I have children but I want to be happy. I am creative, I love fashion, Art, drawing and obsessed with shoes and hair. I hate being stuck in an office for 8hours answering phones. This is why I want to try out this profession. I feel that I am still young enough, everyone swears I am 19 because I have a very young face which runs in my family. I look at it like this, if I do this I will give it my all, be the best I can be and if I fail I can always do something else but at least I tried and will no longer be curious. My family wants me to be a nurse because of the pay but I want to be happy.

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Carol in Harvest, Alabama

66 months ago

Liz in Los Angeles, California said: LOVE THIS SITE!! So, I'm one of those people considering a lifestyle/career change... AND at the top of my list is becoming a hairstylist. BUT, I feel a little overwhelmed when I look at different schools (Aveda, Paul Mitchell, Toni and Guy, local JC's etc) and really not sure the best and most cost effective direction to take. Any advice?? I do have a big reservation... I'm 30. Yep, just turned the big 3-0. Maybe I'm just insecure about it, but I'm wondering if I'm too old to really start in this profession and to become successful at it. I would greatly appreciate any help or advice anyone is willing to give me. HELP!!

I just graduated from Paul Mitchell The School, Huntsville, and I am 49 years old! Go for it, if I can do it, you can. I can't wait to get back to Los Angeles. And support myself as a single woman. To the ladies/gents - get a great education and be prosperous xoxo

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Courtney in Bristol, Connecticut

66 months ago

Well everyone, I went in for my tour yesterday at International Institute of Cosmetology. The school was amazing and the tool kit you get was unbelievable. I loved the curriculum and everything was state of the art. I was all ready to sign up even after hearing that the tuition was $20,000. but then the admission rep told me there was a $50 app fee and a $150 registration fee which is fine with me but then she said I had to pay a $1500 downpayment that was not included in financial aid. I was crushed because I am a mom of 3 and I really cant afford to just drop $1500 for a downpayment. I have been to schools before and I have never been asked to put down so much money. I really love the school and don't want to go anywhere else but that is just too much. The admission rep said they never did that before but they want to separate the students from who is really interested because you are putting money down. I think being responsible for $20,000 of student loans shows that you are interested. I think I might call the Paul Mitchell school and see if they are the same way.

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Secret Stylist in Scottsdale, Arizona

66 months ago

I feel 20,000.00 for school is just too much, when I went in 1984 it cost 2,500.00 it took me 5 yrs to pay it off at 50.00 a month. The education basics is the same as when I went to school just the price went up. When I went back to school 5 yrs latter to get my Instructors license it cost nothing and I got a check for 300.00 I aplied for a pell grant and student loan and the grant must of covered everything.I really feel an evaluation should be given for how much a stylist really makes an hour and what their chance of benefits are in this industry, and a school should not charge any higher than what a student would make for a average living expense, and no student loan should be given to a school that does not meet the requirements, this would be a buyer be where red flag. You can wish in one hand and piss in another and see wish one fills up faster.

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Mimi in Fremont, California

66 months ago

Adrienne in Sarasota, Florida said: I was not talking about LAZY hairstylists simply because they choose to work 9-3, that is their choice. They can give the best service in those hours and not be deemed LAZY. it depends on what your agenda is. If that's what I chose to do, than that will be what I do. If I am good enough, I will have clients. Of course Saturday is a necessary day to work. As with any CAREER the more you put into it the more you will get out of it. Anyone wanting to do hair has a love of doing hair, so it may be of little significance how many hours they are putting in if they love being there. If your friend hates what she's doing ( and is a mother of four) I'm sure she could tell her clients when she is available, and then it is a matter of prioritzing one's life. For me family would come first.

Yes I am totally agree with you. There are no stylist Lazy, for reason the stylist can not come to work on schedule busy time because of family. Life is too short
Busy making money to forget about family it is not the point. Also depend on the job you are doing, some of stylist love what they are doing and however they can put their heart on the job because their have life

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pinkfusion in California

63 months ago

liz in Los Angeles, California said: That's it, I'm SOLD!! I was leaning toward Aveda, but as I said before, the tuition was holding me back. After reading your advice/reviews... I'm going for it. My age worries me a little (30... YIKES!!), but I think that I'm just going to have to get over it and tell myself that 30 really is the new 20. Gulp. ;-) Thanks guys for your help and sharing your experiences. I really needed to hear them. Any other words of wisdom/advice, etc. is more than welcomed.

I haven't read the rest of the thread, so forgive me if you have posted about whether or not you have completed school and how it went. Thanks

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pinkfusion in California

63 months ago

Secret Stylist in Scottsdale, Arizona said: I feel 20,000.00 for school is just too much, when I went in 1984 it cost 2,500.00 it took me 5 yrs to pay it off at 50.00 a month. The education basics is the same as when I went to school just the price went up. When I went back to school 5 yrs latter to get my Instructors license it cost nothing and I got a check for 300.00 I aplied for a pell grant and student loan and the grant must of covered everything.I really feel an evaluation should be given for how much a stylist really makes an hour and what their chance of benefits are in this industry, and a school should not charge any higher than what a student would make for a average living expense, and no student loan should be given to a school that does not meet the requirements, this would be a buyer be where red flag. You can wish in one hand and piss in another and see wish one fills up faster.

I went through a local ROP program here in southern CA and paid for nothing but my kit, which was $350.00. It got me my license, which should be the point of beauty school. You can get advanced classes for 1000 bucks at Paul Mitchell or Aveda once you've gotten your license.

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pinkfusion in California

63 months ago

I see a lot of replies in this thread saying "do what you love" and I agree with that, but when older women/men go into the industry at 40 or 50 plus, it really concerns me. If you do not have a nest egg and something saved for retirement, you may be living in poverty in 30 years when you can no longer do hair. I think it's important to think ahead. Those that have a college degree will be better off later in life if they have to switch careers if it doesnt work out. If you are older and cannot go to beauty school without getting into debt, I wouldnt do it. Sorry.

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sidney vallon in Nashville, Tennessee

62 months ago

Before making a concrete decision to be a hair stylist, I have two essential recommendations that I can offer that each potential hair stylist should do to gain more clarity on the matter:
1) Shadow a hair stylist or work as a receptionist in a hair salon for a minimum of four weeks to get a feel for how things really work in a salon. See how a stylist interacts with their clients, what is expected of them. You need to see the different personalities that come through the door. Working in a salon is not fun and games every day. You will encounter grouchy, bitchy people who can never be pleased.

2) Take the Myers Briggs personality test to see what your personality is and if being a hair stylist is a good career match for you. If you are highly introverted, you probably will not enjoy being a stylist. Stylists come in all varieties and not all are highly outgoing, but you need to truly enjoy talking to people and getting to know them. It can be draining to talk to people all day and be "on" at all times. As a hair stylist, it's part of your job. Clients won't enjoy sitting in your chair if you are not talkative, a bit "up" and can keep a conversation going. This can be draining for introverts.

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pengirl in Sacramento, California

60 months ago

So I have a meeting with the manager at a salon on Tuesday, they asked me to bring in an updated resume. My problem is that I have no work experience in a salon. I am licensed both in AZ and Ca but have not had the chance to work because I don't have clientele(and cali took forever getting me a test date for my exams.) What should my resume look like? what do they not want to see on it?? Your advice would be greatly appreciated!!

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lindsey_smith10 in Brampton, Ontario

60 months ago

I've been looking into going back to school for cosmotology. It's great to read all of the advice and experiences. I'm 35 an I think you're never too old to learn some thing new, I think it's time for me to learn some thing new and move on. I've been in the same dead end part time job in retail for 10 years with out seeing a promotion or much appreciation. Right now I'm lucky if I get more then 5 hours a week at $10.77 per hour. I'm so bored because I don't have the money to do any thing besides grocery shopping. I've tried to get other jobs but they never seam to work out.
When I think of going back to school it scares me a bit, but I need to do some thing different, more creative and rewarding. It also wouldn't hurt to earn more money and work more hours.

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Nicole in Beaverton, Oregon

59 months ago

This forum is very informative. I stumbled upon it trying to glean more information about becoming a stylist. I love seeing the positive and negative aspects of joining the field. I am still debating when the timing will work for me as I have a 10 month old son as well as a 3.5 year old daughter that I quit corporate america to stay home with. I have no intention of going back to that soul sucking environment but where else does one make $60+k a year? I have no problem earning less if I can set my own hours/days. I get stir crazy if I am not busy and being an independent stylist has that flexibility - if you can afford to take fewer days.

I have decided to go the quick and cheap route as I want to pay off my debt inside of one year of working. If I only pay $7k vs $18k that is a HUGE difference. I caution all young ladies about taking on large debts. It takes a lot of effort to pay back $20 grand! Make sure you understand the pressure of owning that much. I will spend my cash on advanced training after getting my license.

My question is how to find an internship/apprenticeship in the Pacific NW? Not super common over here. Is the smartest thing to find the most successful stylist to work for? or just the most technically skilled? My desire is to become an expert cut and colorist as I've been told that is where the most demand is.

Also, age is just a number. As long as you have a youthful attitude, sense of personal style and are easy to talk to you should have no problem with gaining a clientele. If you have an abrasive personality, like to complain frequently, I would choose another career path as people don't like going to negative stylists. They want to do the talking. You are the listener & technician. Also, I agree with the comments regarding the spelling/grammar I see here and there on this thread. Atrocious. Young ladies - spelling and grammar matter!

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lindsey_smith10 in Brampton, Ontario

59 months ago

I have a college certificate in fine arts and floral design and look where I ended up. Working in an arts and crafts store for the last 10 years. I also worked in a flower shop before that for about 4 years. It all depends on path you chose to take.
I'm trying not to be negative and I don't complain a lot. Don't take me wrong I'm greatful that I have a job it's just time for me to move on from it. I'm usually friendly and easy to get a long with I'm also creative. I'm not the most out going person in the world but I can talk with people. Even though I work at a craft store, I don't get to do any thing creative while I'm at work.
When people tell me I can't do it or it's too hard, that only pushes me more to do it. I know it can take a while to get estabolished but if I'm determined enough to become a really good hair stylist (and gain lots of clients) then I could at least make a good living out of it. I know I would be happier, if I can making a living out of a career where I can use my creativity.
By the way: I don't think there is a spell check or grammer check on this site, would be nice if they had it.
As for finding an apprentice maybe do some research on salons in your area even cold call them and ask around. Or even try in the next town or city closest to you if you can't find one in your area. If you have any friends with good hair cuts find out where they got their hair done and ask the stylist they can take on an apprentice.

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Cami in Waldorf, Maryland

58 months ago

2Sexy in Hattiesburg, Mississippi said: ^^^ The ones that make a lot of money in the hair industry are working very long hours standing on their feet. If they don't work the long hours, they don't get the pay. The ones that are making up in the millions are celebrity stylists, and they might not have to work those long hours but they have to be at the celebrity's beck and call. I know of a hair stylist that is making about 80,000 a year, and she is working ALL the time. Also, she has 4 children and she is married, but she is the bread winner bringing in most of the income. Her children are all young in age. She spends most of her day in the salon, and that has to be hard being a mother of 4 and not having time to spend with your children. Anyway, my reason for saying all of this is that those who want to make close to 6 figures in the hair industry are going to have to work their butts off. Working long hours and being there whenever the client needs their hair done. Yeah, you might be able to make your own schedule, but still your schedule will be around your clients. You have to cater to when they get off of work and so on. So you actually don't have a schedule, your schedule is your client's schedule. If anyone has an ounce of laziness, I would suggest them to become a hair stylist. I know of some lazy hair stylist, that don't want to half way work and they are NOT the ones bringing in 80,000 a year.

2Sexy why are you on a forum about the career of a hair stylists when it clearly seems like you are against hair styling...stfu and go do something more productive with your life!

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Funnyface22 in Winter Springs, Florida

57 months ago

I graduated last year from Paul Mitchell the School at the age of 28, this was supposed to be a second career for me, something I could use my creative and people skills in. Im not sure why no one tells the truth about this industry but I feel everyone has a right to know. If you can go at least a year or more making below minimum wage and be ok then you should be fine, but if your like me with a son to support and no help then you can't afford to make the switch. I find this career so enriching but I have to give it up because I can't build a clientele fast enough and trust me...I'm a hustler. I've marketed in magazines, handed out fliers, put my self out there on Facebook, twitter, and even offered to do hair for free if people would refer to me. Everyone that sits in my chair comes back but unfortunately I can't get enough into my chair. It may vary slightly from state to state but here in FL I am at the number 5 salon in the US (voted by modern salon magazine) and I get a check for around $250 a week for commission and tips. So ive just started applying for Project Manager jobs again...back to the cubicle...but at least I'll have a roof over my head...though I will owe 16,000 to a school for something I will never make money doing.

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OxleyMiami in Miami Beach, Florida

44 months ago

Hi Everybody !
Is it a good idea to become a hairdresser (later hair stylist, I hope) with being a male and being 40 ?!
Usually people think I am less than 35 and last time a woman thought I was 29 but I think she was more polite than anything else ;-)
My question is more about the opportunity to be hired being not anymore in the 20's or 30's.
School's advisors say it is a good point because of the maturity, etc. But can we trust them ?!
Thanks for your opinions.
Regards.

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Thanks! in Jodhpur, India

43 months ago

Can anyone recommend a way to make the roots of your hair have more body? I have thick straight hair, but I tend to think I could use a half inch lift at the roots?

Use a larger roller brush when styling and blow dry against the way the hair is growing. If you wear your hair wavy, another option is to leave some velcro curlers in at the root while you put on make-up and/or get ready.

If hair is already dry, then use a very fine tooth metal comb to tease the hair at the root. Add a bit of hairspray to help keep the teasing in place. You can do this around the crown area, or anywhere you want lift.

Also, it helps not to condition the roots or put any products in like leave in conditioners, etc.

Thanks!
www.thehaircarespot.com/indian-remy-hair/

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mofo in Monterey Park, California

43 months ago

just go to a community college there much cheaper, and you won't have soo much dept after your done, if you want a better education you can always go to beauty shows and take classes or take additional classes from paul mitchell or vidal sassoon they cost like a thousand or so.

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BlondeQueen19 in Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania

39 months ago

I am currently 20 years old and in college for art education. I started out at a community college in general studies. I started considering being a hair stylist after I started going to a new hair dresser that was very inspirational and introduced me to extensions, new colors, and started making me branch out with different colors and styles all around. I thought about going to hair school but knew that I would regret it if I didn't go away to college. I worked my butt off in extra community work with children all through high school and even became a volunteer coach. I guess what im saying is that the thought of hair school is still on my mind, but I just keep thinking about all the work ive put in over the years for college credits. . . . . what do I do???? I just want a happy life and like most of you say, you want to go to work liking your job. im just worried about finding a job as an art teacher, and making a decent living as a stylist if I do choose that cause I know I want to get married and have a family some day and I want to support them and their dreams. . . im super conflicted someone please help :(

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Kelsie in Brook Park, Ohio

34 months ago

foxyannie24 in Mount Holly, New Jersey said: I LOVED LOVED my Aveda school. I went to Brown Aveda Institute in Ohio.
IF you are planning to work in the general area that your school is in, then the job placement is great. We had a HUGE job fair where all the higher-end salons came to our school, talked to us, and we were able to get a lot of information. I live in Philadelphia... but it was super easy for me to find a job at a great salon. We had a lot of books, yes haha. The kit they give you is huge...pretty good tools as well. I still love my texturizing shears I got from school - 5 years later! The Aveda school I went to was very strict and really turned you into a professional. Some of the girls hated that it was so strict with being on time, "no sitting" while on the floor, and certain rules... but that's the real world! If you want to make good money, you have to be a professional! The people who own the school - the Brown's - also own two salons called Ladies & Gentlemen. One of the salons is next door to the school and in your final term they have an internship at the salon if your grades are good. The internship was AMAZING. We got to work with artists who have won multiple awards for Aveda, and teach at all of Aveda's big shows. AMAZING for a cosmetology student!! Now I know all Aveda schools run on pretty much the same curriculum - but I'm sure everyone has a different experience. I loved my school and I rave about it to everyone. They were so helpful and it was the kind of place that I could call 10 years down the road and ask for career advice, or advice on owning my own salon and they'd be happy to help with whatever they could. LOVVVVED it!

Are you allowed to take kit home with you to practice or no? And do you get your kit the first day? I start April 15:)

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deborahryan10 in Portland, Oregon

32 months ago

Listen, if your head and heart are in it, then you shouldn't be second-guessing your decision at all. Everyone should do what makes them happy. I'm sure you've done your research about the industry before making a decision to go ahead with it, so enjoy it! Don't stress. I'm currently looking into the programs offered at Marinello in Simi Valley www.beautyschoolsdirectory.com/schools/marinello-simi-valley-ca
and I'm quite excited about starting my own beauty career as well! :)

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jop.art in Las Vegas, Nevada

6 months ago

I graduated college 3 years ago with a BS degree in Nutrition and am now applying for Paul Mitchell Institute. It took me about a year to build up the courage and make this decision for myself. I kept thinking, man, what a waste.. 14k for a degree i'm not going to use. I had the fear of regretting my choice of career change, but then again, I don't have the same passion as I do with hair. It's hard changing my career path towards the beauty industry because I get comments like "that will be a good hobby, but keep your profession", or "you're dropping your career for Great Clips?" and so on. These negative comments used to bother me, but now I use them to push myself harder to climb to the top and prove everyone (including my old self) wrong. I do have the luxury of staying home with my parents during this transition and it's a little disheartening seeing friends move on with their lives buying houses, cars, and getting married, but I'm trying to keep my patience and telling myself my time will come.

Reading all of these success stories of people following their dreams is such a confidence booster and makes me more excited than ever to get started :)

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