How to choose a Graduate Interior Design Program?

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Evelyn in Brooklyn, New York

57 months ago

Hello!

I'm just wondering if anyone in the Interior Design/Architecture industry has advice for choosing a graduate Interior Design program. I've been accepted to several of the top programs, including Pratt Institute and RISD. However, I am faced with a very difficult decision due to the varying tuition costs and because I will be repaying my loans independently. Can anyone advise how important the program you attend is when finding a job after graduation?

I appreciate any advice you can give!
Evelyn.

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sharedvisions in Oklahoma

57 months ago

As you are in New York the situation may differ from in our area, but I believe this principle is sound -
You need to look honestly at the positions which will be available to you after graduation for the next few years(regardless of the university where that degree is obtained - assume the best). Only you can evaluate the worth to yourself based on how many years you will be saddled with the loan if you are earning a realistic salary. I personally would keep it very balanced...attend a quality program, but don't have so much debt that you can't enjoy life when you get out. In our area a graduate level education is not really any more valued than a bachelor's form a good program and then quality experience. (our industry is so results oriented - and more contingent on the abilities of the individual than on their pedigree). It comes down to the bottom line - regardless of how talented a designer is, there is a limit to what clients will pay for the 'product' (interior design services)... Supply and demand. Your salary will be based on this, especially in the early years of your career. Anyway, that is my experience and 'two cents worth'.

Congratulations on your acceptance to these programs. I wish you success, whichever path you choose!

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Michael in Tappan, New York

57 months ago

Hi Evelyn,

I am facing a similar situation. I was just accepted to Pratt Graduate interior design also. I am trying to get a sense of what I will be looking at after I graduate in terms of income, as $150k is no joke. Does anybody have any sense of what typical earnings are for someone graduating with this degree in New York City? I'm trying to see if it makes sense to do it at all.

Thanks!

Evelyn in Brooklyn, New York said: Hello!

I'm just wondering if anyone in the Interior Design/Architecture industry has advice for choosing a graduate Interior Design program. I've been accepted to several of the top programs, including Pratt Institute and RISD. However, I am faced with a very difficult decision due to the varying tuition costs and because I will be repaying my loans independently. Can anyone advise how important the program you attend is when finding a job after graduation?

I appreciate any advice you can give!
Evelyn.

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cajineer STANKS in Seattle, Washington

57 months ago

I wouldn't do it unless you have a trust fund, low starting salaries in the field plus your high monthly loan payments are not a good combination if you want to eat.

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rit, nyc in New York, New York

57 months ago

Hey Evelyn and Michael,

I have the same concern as I have also been accepted to the Graduate Interior Design Program at Pratt. I am also trying to figure out the starting salaries after graduating and if it makes sense at all. Do any of you know anybody working as an interior Designer/Architect in the city. I have tried looking online and the picture doesn't seem very good!!I believe the course is quite intense and with the loan...the outcome should be worth it.
Pls post some details if you find out regarding the salaries...i will too as soon as I find something.

Thanks a ton.

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michael Pastore in Tappan, New York

57 months ago

I'm seeing what you are seeing. It's very disappointing, and this isn't a painting degree where you do it with no real practical strategy for a living! It looks as though you will need to work at a very corporate firm such as Gensler to make anything, but nobody at Pratt will tell me anything. That makes me suspicious. If you were applying for an MBA they would probably welcome the chance to give you a range of their graduates' earnings...

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sharedvisions in Oklahoma

57 months ago

I'm a registered designer and have worked in the field for over 20 years - several early years in the facilities department of a medical center, and the balance with an architectural firm. We aren't a huge company, but we do moderate/large healthcare, university, etc. projects. I now am in a position that I help with marketing, Invoicing, and contracts as well as design. It's tough to keep a business profitable right now, and I believe some of the changes in our industry are permanent. It's just the whole atmosphere; competition is fierce and long term value is often not as appreciated as it once was. This of course drives the fee an architect or designer can charge. Most contracts, even if they are written on an hourly basis, have a "not to exceed" amount the client will pay for design fees...this in turn usually has a % relationship to the construction cost of the project, and is finite. The firm simply can't collect more than this amount, and therefore can only justify a set salary to the staff designers and architects. Like I said earlier - supply and demand. I would strongly advise finding ways to set yourself apart from the competition without going deeply into debt.

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Evelyn in New York, New York

57 months ago

Thanks everyone for your feedback. I'm somewhat relieved to hear that others are dealing with the same concerns that I am. I was able to find a PDF from Pratt that lists the average starting salary as between $40-45K. This seems very low to me (by NYC standards), and I wonder when this was posted and if it still holds true.
Here's a link to where you can download the document:
www.pratt.edu/admissions/for_parents/life_after_pratt/life_after_pratt_guides/

Just out of curiosity - what other programs are you guys considering? I'm still waiting to hear from Drexel, which could potentially be a more financially feasible option for me.

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ajg in Brooklyn, New York

57 months ago

Hi Evelyn,

I've been working in the field in NYC for a few years and can provide some insight. $40-40k sounds about right. These days you may even expect less. I've heard of entry levels taking jobs for $35k, even at the big firms. Competition is insane in NYC. You'll see people, even with a few years of experience behind them taking unpaid internships and part time/freelance jobs just to say in the field. Having experienced many of the problems that Sharedvisions noted, I ended up leaving design and now do more corporate facilities planning. It's definitely not as creative but it offers more stability and a bit more money and career advancement opportunities. I have many friends who have also left the design end of the spectrum and are now doing sales, real estate or 3D graphics just to keep afloat.

I was also excepted into the Pratt MS program 5 years ago and decided against it. I enrolled in the Parsons AAS program, part time at first and finished up in 2 years. While it's not as great or well rounded a program as Pratt's, it didn't cost me as much and I still made great contacts in the industry. Have you considered doing a BA at FIT? If you're in-state you'll be able to attend for MUCH less of any of the private schools.

Feel free to contact me with any questions since I am VERY familiar with these challenges. GOOD LUCK!

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shrad87 in Madras, India

56 months ago

hi,
I'm actually from india and i'm looking to come to NYC next fall to pursue a course in interior design. Ive been working in a small firm here but im looking to broaden my horizons and i have wanted to study in this field for some time.
I'm looking at NYSID, Pratt and Parsons. Though i have lived in india for almost my whole life i'm a canadian citizen by birth. I want to take the chance and enroll in the course next year. I will have to take my set of loans as a result of which im wondering what im gambling with. I am wondering how the current state of designers are there with the financial setbacks and everything that the world is seeing. After 3 years of study i'm hoping i wont be stranded with a huge loan and no job situation. I was wondering if anyone will be willing to give me an insight as you all seem to be based in NYC. I want to study so badly, but i dont want to be caught in a terrible situation once i'm there....i'm willing to take the chances but how far will i have to go? Please give me your views on the current situation there...

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casey in Stratford, Connecticut

56 months ago

Hi Evelyn,
I am on the same boat: accepted to Pratt's MS ID program but worried about the high tuition. I would so love to go to Pratt as its program is consistently ranked in the top but the thought of graduating with an $80K loan (I plan on scraping by on the little I have saved and not taking out any living expenses) makes me very uneasy.

I've been accepted to drexel which is a much more affordable option(I'd graduate with about 30K in loans) but I'm wondering how good the program is and if I'd be giving up a great opportunity to attend one of the best schools (Pratt) by going elsewhere because of money.

Any Interior designers out there have any advice?

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Sam in San Francisco, California

54 months ago

Hi,

I worked for the aforementioned firm and had 8 years experience prior when hired. I just want to tell you that having a masters will not guaranty you a high salary.
This is architecture and everyone starts from small, a low billing rate.

Big firms = big overhead. Big firms = big politics.

Do you want to be a design educator or a practicing professional?

Be wise with your decision a 'brand' isn't always everything...it's how you use it.

michael Pastore in Tappan, New York said: I'm seeing what you are seeing. It's very disappointing, and this isn't a painting degree where you do it with no real practical strategy for a living! It looks as though you will need to work at a very corporate firm such as Gensler to make anything, but nobody at Pratt will tell me anything. That makes me suspicious. If you were applying for an MBA they would probably welcome the chance to give you a range of their graduates' earnings...

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Interior Design Hopeful in Annandale, Virginia

53 months ago

Hi all, I am currently looking to change careers into interior design. I am coming from a legal background and I have completed both my MBA and a MA in interior design. As I live in the Washington, DC area - 40 to 45k seems to be the same starting salary here as well. Any advice for breaking into the profession?? All comments would be truly welcome!!

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jessilynn in Brooklyn, New York

53 months ago

Hello all, this has been a very helpful and insightful thread. I am in the same boat as the other aspiring interior designers... i have a bachelors in an unrelated field and I was thinking of doing a masters in interior design. But from some of your comments, it seems like you don't really benefit from the extra expense. So the question I have now is, do I go get another bachelors, or should I pursue a 2 year associates degree instead? Any recommendation for schools in the nyc area? Any suggestions on how to get connected and land a great internship? To all the practicing interior designers who have responded to this thread, thank you soooo much for your invaluable real world input!!

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sharedvisions in Tulsa, Oklahoma

53 months ago

Depending on what your current Bachelors is, it could be a great asset (business or marketing are very complementary...even psych.). I've put together a little website over the past couple of years (Just started organizing the links and resources I'd collected, and one thing led to another)that might give you a jumping off point idmyfuture.com/ look at the "beginning" tab on the right, and click through the appropriate questions. There's a lot more info there than I could ever cover here.

Basically, though, for an entry level design job competency will be expected in certain areas - an understanding of construction documents (best learned from drafting courses), CAD, and even assembling presentation boards. These things are taught in Studio classes (go to the website above, and click on the "skills" tab to see a list of skills that are taught in a basic design curriculum...). The bottom line is, to be competitive in this business as a new designer you really need to take the NCIDQ exam and (if required in your state) become registered. There are several paths to be able to sit for the exam (different combinations of education and work experience). More school = less work experience... again, follow the links at the website for states that require registration, what schools are accredited, pros and cons of advanced degrees, salary opportunities vs cost of living based on where you live, etc...

Best of luck - JL

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Interior Design Hopeful in Falls Church, Virginia

53 months ago

Hi all, I just wanted to take a few minutes to thank everyone who responded to this post. Your advice has been so helpful!! Also I wanted to add to this post as well. I can definitely see where those designers already holding an undergraduate degree in ID would think it unnecessary to pursue a MA in ID. But for those like myself who have undergraduate degrees in another field, I have to say that I respectfully disagree. Although I am not in the ID field yet (and my opinion might change once I get into the field), I can say after going through my program (which for people like me, rolled 1 year of undergraduate courses into the program and then made you sit through a portfolio review before allowing you to finish the program) the experience was like nothing I have ever been through before. This program was harder than any of my previous programs - even my MBA - because of the fact that I don't work with ID components on a regular basis since I work in a completely unrelated field, i.e., there is no use for AutoCAD in a law firm. Being able to participate in a studio class with design professionals coming in to critique your work is the most intense and gratifying experience that I took out of my program - and I think is preparation you might not be able to get pursuing an AA. I had several classmates that transferred into my program after taking classes at a local community college intent on getting an AA. They transferred because they felt that our classes were more intense (which they should have been) and that in the Washington D.C. area, having an MA instead of the AA would get them where they wanted to go a little faster - especially since they figured that they would eventually have to complete the MA anyway. This might not be the case for everyone!!! I know everyone is different!! But, for my personal choice, I'm very happy that I chose to get my MA in ID (from a CIDA accredited program). Now I just have to get out there and put it to use :o)

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shabnam in Cyprus

41 months ago

I have bachelor of interior architecture and i am graduated from master of architecture i was research assistant also. and i don't have any work experience. i finish my study this summer. you think is it possible to find a job in Los Angeles or not?

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urban roof in Fayetteville, North Carolina

39 months ago

i have my bachelors in architecture from india. i have 4 yrs experience as an architect and 4 yrs as an entrepreneur of an interior designing and turnkey company. i am in usa now. i am not sure wht i shld study now. masters in architecture, masters in interiors or mba ( as i have a 4 yr experience handling my own business and i thgt thr is nothg more interesting than business)
i like interiors too. am nt sure how much i really want to practice architecture.
also what is the scope of jobs being an architect, interior designer or with a mba degree.
can i do project management and work as interior project manager?
can someone put some light on how it works the us way.

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Jake in Chicago, Illinois

35 months ago

We are working on a new business idea for Kellogg School of Management for Interior Designers that would allow them to access "jobs" on the internet.
Please have a look, your feedback is appreciated: kellogg.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_4SbNuWJsSfDu9nu

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Pooja in Bangalore, India

33 months ago

Hello Grace, I have been thinking about the same thing. I got into two year Diploma course in Industrial Design for September 2012. But I am reconsidering because I will have to repay my loans later on my own. And living cost would be too much. Should I go? Did you go?

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erika 111 in guatemala, Guatemala

33 months ago

cajineer STANKS in Seattle, Washington said: I wouldn't do it unless you have a trust fund, low starting salaries in the field plus your high monthly loan payments are not a good combination if you want to eat.

I agree :-)

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erika 111 in guatemala, Guatemala

33 months ago

I allways wanted to study in fashion in Paris

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erika 111 in guatemala, Guatemala

33 months ago

here in guatemala we have fashion but I think in Paris its better because there are a lot of good brands. What to you think ?

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stephanie in Brooklyn, New York

33 months ago

rit, nyc in New York, New York said: Hey Evelyn and Michael,
I have the same concern as I have also been accepted to the Graduate Interior Design Program at Pratt. I am also trying to figure out the starting salaries after graduating and if it makes sense at all. Do any of you know anybody working as an interior Designer/Architect in the city. I have tried looking online and the picture doesn't seem very good!!I believe the course is quite intense and with the loan...the outcome should be worth it.
Pls post some details if you find out regarding the salaries...i will too as soon as I find something.

Thanks a ton.


I'll be honest, I have been a designer in NYC for 10 years. Although what I do is more along the lines of interior architecture. Save your time and moneI'll be honest, I have been a designer in NYC for 10 years. Although what I do is more along the lines of interior architecture. Save your time and money, look at positions and what they are looking for, autocad, revit, indesign, various 3d programs, photoshop. Spend your money on taking certified courses in theses skills, though non certified is cheaper.

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a in Alexandria, Virginia

33 months ago

stephanie in Brooklyn, New York said: I'll be honest, I have been a designer in NYC for 10 years. Although what I do is more along the lines of interior architecture. Save your time and moneI'll be honest, I have been a designer in NYC for 10 years. Although what I do is more along the lines of interior architecture. Save your time and money, look at positions and what they are looking for, autocad, revit, indesign, various 3d programs, photoshop. Spend your money on taking certified courses in theses skills, though non certified is cheaper.

I would have to agree. I was also admitted to the 3 year Master's at Pratt and decided to do the shorter AAS program at Parsons instead. I am sure that I would have gotten a better, more well rounded education at Pratt, but after spending over $90K on a design degree, you'd be lucky to be making 1/2 that for the first 5 years or so. Plus you'll be working 50-80 hours per week doing CAD, renderings, photoshop, etc. In my option,if design is really your passion, you'll be better off doing something that's related to design like sales, project management, marketing, real estate, even facilities. Unless you have a trust fund or are married to an IBanker, being a designer in NYC is tough. It can be tons of fun, but it's not easy! After the economy blew up and I went through 2 layoffs, I decided to go another route and am working as a space planner for a large corporation. While it's certainly not as exciting nor as creative, it's much more stable and pays better, plus my hours are manageable and allow me to do some of my own design work on the side. Good luck!

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peter in Olbia, Italy

33 months ago

An architect is a person trained in the planning, design and oversight of the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to offer or render services in connection with the design and construction of a building, or group of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, itself derived from the Greek arkhitekton (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e. chief builder.[2]

Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture. The practical, technical, and academic requirements for becoming an architect vary by jurisdiction (see below).

The terms architect and architecture are also used in the disciplines of landscape architecture, naval architecture and often information technology (for example a software architect). In most of the world's jurisdictions, the professional and commercial uses of the terms "architect" and "landscape architect" are legally protected.

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Zinnia in Muscat, Oman

32 months ago

casey in Stratford, Connecticut said: Hi Evelyn,
I am on the same boat: accepted to Pratt's MS ID program but worried about the high tuition. I would so love to go to Pratt as its program is consistently ranked in the top but the thought of graduating with an $80K loan (I plan on scraping by on the little I have saved and not taking out any living expenses) makes me very uneasy.

I've been accepted to drexel which is a much more affordable option(I'd graduate with about 30K in loans) but I'm wondering how good the program is and if I'd be giving up a great opportunity to attend one of the best schools (Pratt) by going elsewhere because of money.

Any Interior designers out there have any advice?

Hi,
I too an Interior Designer. I have done my Diploma in ID from India & moved to Muscat now for work I have been working for around 1.5 years and now want to pursue a Masters in my field.However, there are plenty of things to consider. Firstly my Diploma makes things tough. Though my course was intense and had proper Technical as well as Design Subjects, but it is not considered in some places as equivalent to a Bachelors. Secondly I would really like to penetrate the US or UK market and hence am searching for courses that are in US and UK or having accreditation to those places. Finally there is the cost issue. Courses are not cheap and moreover UK and US economy seems down at present. I am not sure of what the job prospects would be for me even after the course abroad. It is a difficult step to go back from the money earning to money spending stage. So if someone could shed a light on whether they find it wiser to try for further education or for a better job and learn through practical experience itself..plz share them wt me..Also if anyone knows of a good Masters course in the US/UK that accepts diploma+job exp as a base for entry..plz let me know..thnks

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Joanna in Brooklyn, New York

32 months ago

Hi there,
I am in a similar situation to several other commenters. I am a New Yorker with a liberal arts BA degree in an unrelated field, and I am considering getting a masters via 3 year program, or getting an a bachelor's (or perhaps just an associates degree) from FIT. As a NY resident FIT would obviously be remarkably cheaper, but it is also not a master's degree. I know some commenters from the field said there isn't much of a difference in the kind of work you'd be doing, but given these kind of options, what would you ID veterans choose?

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Emily in New Paltz, New York

32 months ago

Evelyn in Brooklyn, New York said: Hello!

I'm just wondering if anyone in the Interior Design/Architecture industry has advice for choosing a graduate Interior Design program. I've been accepted to several of the top programs, including Pratt Institute and RISD. However, I am faced with a very difficult decision due to the varying tuition costs and because I will be repaying my loans independently. Can anyone advise how important the program you attend is when finding a job after graduation?

I appreciate any advice you can give!
Evelyn.

I've been accepted to Pratt MS in ID and right now I'm facing the same dilemma. What did you end up choosing? I do not want to graduate wtih almost 200,000 of debt from student loans...

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Margie in Chicago, Illinois

27 months ago

Hi All,

I'm currently working as a school psychologist and am strongly considering pursuing a career in interior architecture. I currently have a BA in applied psychology and a specialist degree (masters + 30) in school psychology. I've always had a passion for art and design and recently took some painting classes at a community college. Can anybody recommend the best way to gain experience and education in this field while still working full-time? Would it be a good idea to begin with classes at a community college? I do have summers off and can see myself using those few months for study or field experience. Thanks so much for any and all suggestions!

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Charlotte Baldassari in merchantville, New Jersey

26 months ago

After a successful career in mortgage sales and real estate finance, I finally decided to follow my childhood dream of doing Interior Design. I applied to Drexel (only 10 min from my house). I completed my coursework in Interior Architecture and Design in Philly in 2007.

I graduated with a bunch of student loans ($30k). The cost of school was greatly offset by Graduate Assistants positions for the first two years of school. It cut the costs in half. Phenomenal.

I got a job working in the library of a small commercial firm. I spent most of my time organizing binders and CAD work. It wasn't the best set-up as I only made about $12/hour with no overtime?!?! I stopped working in summer of 2007, right before the bubble burst. Here in Philly, lots of firms laid off their junior designers or went out of business. As it turns out, we started a family and with no jobs even being advertised, staying home was the only option.

Recently, I met with a successful local designer and she was very straight forward with me about the reality of getting a design job at firms like hers. As she presented it, work is stressful, little benefits (rarely health insurance) and pay of about $25k for a designer with 3-5 years experience. She offers a more generous benefit package than most I've talked to. Many of her designers work 7am to 8pm and later for this salary.

I also studied interior design and furniture design in Copenhagen with students from RISD, Pratt, NYSID, Parsons and many other schools across the country. My experience is that my fellow Drexel alums were on par with students from other schools. Many of the students that stood out were ones that had internships at firms with modeling studios or a focus on drafting and model-making in their curriculum. The actual school mattered less.

Wishing you all luck. I don't know if I would have gone into Int.D. after the bubble. Just doesn't pencil out.

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nycprep in New York, New York

23 months ago

I have been in the same situation. I had a Bachelors of Science in Business Administration and had worked full-time for 5 years. I tried to both work and take as many Interior Design classes as I could. It is possible, but very hard. Pretty much all of the Masters programs in Interior Design that are for students with a degree in an unrelated field are full-time programs. There are some schools that offer part-time AAS degrees. Although, if you still plan to continue to work full-time, expect this route to take awhile. Most classes are about 3 hours long, with some classes like Studio being 8 hours per week. In addition to all of the class-time, there is also a significant amount of work that is done outside of class. Therefore, if you work full-time its pretty much only manageable to take about 2 classes, 3 Max and that means not having a life outside of work, school, and school work. A lot of people start out by completing most of the first year in the program part-time then they just end up quitting their job and finishing up the rest as a full-time student. Also, the Admissions department at most schools don't know much, and are clueless, if you are serious about a certain program, I would make an appointment with the Chair of the Interior Design Dept. and explain to them your exact situation and see if they can best advise you what to do.

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jcano in West Hollywood, California

21 months ago

All this information is very insightful. I know most of you reside on the East Coast, but I have been researching the MA in Interior Architecture at UCLA Extension. The program is accredited and it is geared towards working professionals, so you can take classes at your own pace and not go into a bunch of debt. It also seems very good for networking and they help set you find internships while completing the program. 90% of their graduates found jobs afterwords. This seems like a good choice for people who want to get a Masters but not break the bank, and also get a decent job out of it. Any thoughts/input regarding this program would be helpful!

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housebrook in California

18 months ago

stephanie in Brooklyn, New York said: I'll be honest, I have been a designer in NYC for 10 years. Although what I do is more along the lines of interior architecture . Save your time and moneI'll be honest, I have been a designer in NYC for 10 years. Although what I do is more along the lines of interior architecture. Save your time and money, look at positions and what they are looking for, autocad , revit, indesign, various 3d programs, photoshop. Spend your money on taking certified courses in theses skills, though non certified is cheaper.

I completely agree with Stephanie.
but add sketchup pro to this list .... And maybe Revit is not as important as it was ... it depends on your area of interest.

There is not reason to get a master's at this point in your career ...maybe later , or maybe never.

If you want to make money, don't work for a architectural firm. The only people who make money there are the principals. If you work for them briefly to establish a business model and some connections great .... But DO NOT expect to make money working for any Arch. firm. Start you own firm or work for an in-house department within your specialty... like a store design dept within a retailer.
It doesn't matter what your education level is , it matters what your talent level is ... and if you are a team player, a good leader when required, and a great business person . If you are not a good business person than find a partner who is.
Some designers never make more than 35k a year and other make 150K a yr and others become very famous and make boatloads of money ... and none of it depends on how well they did in school

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Anthi_marie in Athens, Greece

14 months ago

Good evening everybody,

I am a current interior architectural design student and I am gonna get my BA degree in June! I am thinking of doing a M.A. In interior Design/Architecture. If anyone please advise me about universities in the U.S. I ve done some research about it and found out that Pratt, RISD and Parsons has a good reputation but I read for other universities as well.. Please help me!!! I am not able to visit them and have a personal opinion

Thank you..

Anthi-Marie

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Walaa, MA in Falls Village, Connecticut

10 months ago

Hi Everyone;

it is amazing place seeking help from people who experienced ID field, actually i have a Master Degree in Business and would like to switch my career to ID, i am international student and i need to know the best place to study in

Regards

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k in Mountain View, California

8 months ago

Evelyn,

What did you decide to do? Did you pursue the Pratt Degree? I am in a similar situation myself.

Thanks :)

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Brianna Walsh in White Plains, New York

6 months ago

Hello Evelyn,
I came across your post and I have the perfect opportunity for you. I see you posted this quite some time ago, did you wind up perusing the degree? If not, I have a suggestion that you may not have though of. I am the Franchise Marketer for Decorating Den Interiors. Decorating Den Interiors has been in business for 45 years providing full-service Interior Decorating to thousands of clients all over the US and Canada catering to their style, their lifestyle, and their budget, using any of our hundreds of top brand name vendors. Decorating Den Interiors is growing incredibly fast and with your interest in interior design you may be a perfect candidate to open up your own Decorating Den Franchise. We provide you with training (and certifications), business systems, advertising, and support of every kind to get you up and running and establishing your own successful interior design business. Instead of investing in schooling, you may find it worth your money to purchase a successful franchise that can provide you with any appropriate training while handing you every piece of knowledge and every tool you need to start your own business. If you are looking to establish your career here in NY, I believe we could mutually be a great fit. Please feel free to check out our website www.decoratingden.com and look into our franchise information section. I also encourage you to reach out to me directly with any questions or concerns.

Brianna Walsh - Franchise Marketer
Decorating Den Interiors
BriannaWalsh@DecoratingDen.com

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