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What are typical journeyman lineman salaries? Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

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kcmillz in Ashland, Ohio

72 months ago

Man,if you have an in let me know. I will be in Cali in no time if there is a job. Right now Im nonunion,but would be willing to join union if condition were right. Im actually a 2nd year apprentice.

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36572 in Hartland, Michigan

71 months ago

What would an average lineman salary be in Detroit area? Is it better to get on with a utility provider or work for a contractor? I'm trying to weigh my options with regard to where I'll have more opportunity for overtime. Any insight?

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Mixer Mike in St. Petersburg, Florida

68 months ago

How does one get started as a lineman apprentice? paughms1@hotmail com

I'm driving trucks in Iraq right now...used to be a cable guy, though lineman job would be cool.

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Tyler Baker in The Dalles, Oregon

55 months ago

You dont get a degree, you got through an apprenticeship program that consists of on the job training and supplementary course work. Usually takes 3 1/2 to 4 years to become a journeyman lineman. You can apply at a utility if they are hiring, but usually they hire from within. You can also apply with the JATC covering your area. www.ajatc.org Two ways to get experience that with give you extra consideration when applying are work as a groundman, or go to a line college. Nonunion groundman jobs are like any other jobs, find them, apply for them and impress the guy doing the hiring. To get a union groundman job, go to the local union hall and tell them you want to sign their groundman books. You will work your way to the top of the books when the people who signed before you get called to work. When you finally get called take the job, bust your ass, learn what you can. If you really want to be a lineman, it would be worth traveling to a part of the country where the work is booming to sign there groundman books as the wait can be exceptionally long in slow parts of the country. Check out www.ibew.org for unoin hall locations.

Option two it line college. Its not an accredited college. Its more of a "This is what line work is like, and how to do it" school. Lasts as up to a year for some of them. Can cost as much as $10,000.

Also a commercial drivers license helps in being selected for a apprenticeship position.

Its an up hill battle to get in but once you're in, you're set. Its a bad ass job, and if you are willing to travel, and work LONG hours (as much as 32 at one time) you'll make an ass load of money. I made $135,000 last year as an apprentice in Cali and only worked 9 months.

Good luck.

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allgirl in Fresno, California

55 months ago

Megan in Altus, Oklahoma said: Hi I am a 26yr old female lineman Apprentice in Oklahoma.
I will be finishing my first year at the end of april this year and will have completed the first year apprentice book.
I work for a city owned Power company, its a municiple. The pay is way below the national average.
What are the chances of me getting a apprentice position with a contractor, a City owned Power/Utility company or major power company in Oklahoma or surrounding states once I have completed my second year as an apprentice, considering that I am a woman?

Hi Megan. So tell me how you go to where you are? I'm considering going for being groundman. I've talked to a lot of the local lineman, some say go for it and the others say that women are not wanted and they'll find a reason to fire me. Whats the hardest part for you...the physical aspect or the men giving you heck? I think it sounds like an exciting job. Thanks for any info.

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allgirl in Fresno, California

55 months ago

Hi Megan. So tell me how you go to where you are? I'm considering going for being groundman. I've talked to a lot of the local lineman, some say go for it and the others say that women are not wanted and they'll find a reason to fire me. Whats the hardest part for you...the physical aspect or the men giving you heck? I think it sounds like an exciting job. Thanks for any info.

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Megan in Altus, Oklahoma

55 months ago

I have not had any hell from the guys, its more the physical aspect that is difficult, as we as women are not as strong as the guys, but, its more about technique and working out how to do the same things the guy's do, by mastering the technique. My position requires me to lift 60lbs only, any heavier than that and it requires two people to lift whatever it is.

It seems that they guys I work around like having a woman around, instead of being surrounded by dudes all day!! There is another woman that works with me also, and she is doing good.

I originally wanted to be a normal Sparky (electrician) but this job came up and I applied for it, I really didnt think I had got it and was lining up other jobs to take when I got a call about six weeks later, had an interview and got offered the position. I beat out 10 guys for the position.

You must be willing to learn to climb if you would like to be a Linewoman, which i myself am not that keen on, but you get used to it. Most places do most of the work using bucket trucks nowadays as Its safer.

You should have no problem doing groundwork, there is no reason why being a woman should hinder your chances, in fact I personally think that me being a woman actually helped me get the job, you know equal rights and all that.

Its a cool, but dangerous and physical job, I enjoy it.

Good luck for the future and I hope you get the position.

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Megan in Altus, Oklahoma

55 months ago

BTW, I have just completed my 2nd year.

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allgirl

55 months ago

Hi Megan. Great info..thanks! Do you think I can email you off of here. I have more questions I'd like to ask. If it's not terribly hard than how come mire women aren't doing it, that's I want to know. I think it sounds exciting.

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falainwest in Cameroon

48 months ago

hi Tyler,
I want to become a lineman to, i have an advanced diploma in electrical power engineering. can you please tell me the best route to take. i got no clue. My email is falainwest@yahoo.co.uk

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linxtj in Dayton, Ohio

46 months ago

Nate Local 126 in Burbank, Ohio said: In Akron OH a A linemen make $29.72 an hour. Anything after 8 hours is time an half anything after 16 hours is double time same with sunday and out of town calls.

Is their a school in ohio that i can attened for lineman

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jstockw in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

45 months ago

Fixing to graduate from a local colleges associates program in Power Transmissions and Distributions Technology program (lineman program). I feel like it may not be enough to get me "in the door". What kind of experience does the average "rookie" groundman/lineman have. We have been certified to climb, used bucket trucks and diggger/derrick trucks, pulled and reset poles, hung transformers, hurt man rescues, installed wire crossarms insulaters etc.

I am just wondering if anybody could rank me in comparison to the average "rookie". I feel that a power company might not appreciate the degree, but would rather have hands on training. However, i am often my own worst enemy (and worst critique) so that may be the case. Any comments would be appreciated.

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Meat in Lawrenceville, Georgia

45 months ago

Wife in Terre Haute, Indiana said: My husband is trying to become a lineman. He is trying to figure out his best option. Should he go to a school in Georgia for 4 months? Is it worth the $12,000? My email is lshorter3@yahoo.com...Thank you!

The fastest way to get started in linework would probably be to start with pike electric or another contractor co. Learn the job and then try to get hired on at a big utility co. He can go the school route but y'all will have to pay for the classes and they are usually only looking at the top 1 or 2 student in the class. That's all well and good unless someones son or brother in law already works at the hiring utility. Our company has hired alot of the students from all the Georgia schools and the hiring has slowed down quite a bit int the last few months. Hope this helps!! It really is a great profession to get into and well worth the effort it takes to succeed .

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nkb022684 in Amarillo, Texas

45 months ago

I am about to start training in the local community college lineman program
here in Amarillo, Tx it is the first program they are offering and they are teaming up with xcel and many other local companies i was just wondering what advise anyone has for me I am 27 and in good shape and love physical jobs my wife is a little worried but i think it will be great thing for our family

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steezydz in Salt Lake City, Utah

44 months ago

I have been trying my best to research how to start a career as an electrical lineman. However I have been having troubles figuring out where the best place to start my first step would be? Should I go to some training school somewhere? Or should I talk to some lineman guys working whenever I get lucky enough to find some working somewhere? I would really appreciate it if someone would tell me good advise to tell me where is the best place to start my first step to start my career! THANKS!

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benow in Sydney, Australia

41 months ago

hey im a qualified linesman from australia looking for a job if anyone can help me out would be great beno_williams@hotmail.com

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Lineguy27 in Los Angeles, California

35 months ago

Host said: What are typical journeyman lineman salaries? Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

51.50/hr in LA , Ca . Some lineman around southern Cal have made over 300k

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L in Saint Paul, Minnesota

35 months ago

Host said: What are typical journeyman lineman salaries? Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

I'm a JL in local 702 IBEW. West Frankfort il. Our scale is 43.20 p/h...our benefit and retirement total package is around 75 p/h. ,great job union strong. It's an apprenticeship program called ALBAT. It's 3 hrs long. 7000hrs. School one weekend a month until yur 7000 hrs are up. .book work and OJT. Hope that helps

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Local hand in Saint Paul, Minnesota

35 months ago

L in Saint Paul, Minnesota said: I'm a JL in local 702 IBEW. West Frankfort il. Our scale is 43.20 p/h...our benefit and retirement total package is around 75 p/h. ,great job union strong. It's an apprenticeship program called ALBAT. It's 3 hrs long. 7000hrs. School one weekend a month until yur 7000 hrs are up. .book work and OJT. Hope that helps

3 years. Not hrs sorry

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amanda in Chicago, Illinois

34 months ago

Yeah there is money to be made. But what people aren't saying is how dangerous linework is. Its the 3rd most dangerous job! People die or get mutilated every year. Many lineman also spend half the year laid off. And the taxes you have to pay are pretty steep! You need to know the pros and cons before entering this trade. Traveling also gets expensive. Transportation, hotel, food. And with all this in mind, the apprenticeship to is difficult. You work by being on a list, and they send u to jobs. U don't choose. Its not as easy as everyone thinks. They hear $40 an hour and jump the gun. That money also has to last when ur laid off.

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slaptest in Elmhurst, Illinois

34 months ago

hey amanda apply @ yer local utility. it is dangerous but better odds than many places:SAT for 12 hours today due to the storm.

BUT stupidity prevails here at the regional utility so folks do get hurt.

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daniel stone in Springville, Utah

33 months ago

kcmillz in Ashland, Ohio said: Man,if you have an in let me know. I will be in Cali in no time if there is a job. Right now Im nonunion,but would be willing to join union if condition were right. Im actually a 2nd year apprentice.

did you ever make it too cali? where did you go to school?

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mpiazzola

32 months ago

steezydz in Salt Lake City, Utah said: I have been trying my best to research how to start a career as an electrical lineman. However I have been having troubles figuring out where the best place to start my first step would be? Should I go to some training school somewhere? Or should I talk to some lineman guys working whenever I get lucky enough to find some working somewhere? I would really appreciate it if someone would tell me good advise to tell me where is the best place to start my first step to start my career! THANKS!

I met my husband while he was an apprentice lineman in Utah. He became an apprentice throung Mountain State Line Construction training. www.mslcat.org, If you go to this website you can apply for the apprenticeship there or find out whatever you need to know. My husband LOVES this trade and the company he now works for, but it is a dangerous occupation. Good Luck!

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jbo

32 months ago

Host said: What are typical journeyman lineman salaries? Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

lineman salary depends what part of the country you are in, also if you are union or non union. average non union 25 per hour, average union may be 30 to 35 per hr.

I have met so many young men that say they are a lineman because they have hung street lights or done service work for ten years. you want make that kind of money with a utility company until you can show and prove that you are capable of doing HOT work. and capable of doing all task assigned as a ground man.

To those guys that call themselves lineman that can't perform the ground work and the capability of climbing dont need to be in a bucket doing HOT work. You need to pay your dues, allow your work to show for it self because this is very dangerous work you can be seriously hurt or killed in a minute. and it really is making things much harder for the rest of us real lineman

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

id like to say first off that ive been in the IBEW since 2007. i started out as a groundman, and did that for a couple of years before i took up operating full time. reading this forum, a lot of the initial questions are vaguely answered. im not a lineman, though ive considered it, and hell, even still consider it to this day because im only 28, but should i decide to do it, i know where to begin.

first off, will you be union or non-union? do you want to work for a contractor, or for a utility?

to go the union route, you need to look at what jurisdiction your state falls under: ALBAT www.albat.org/v3/more.html , Missouri Valley www.movalleyjatc.org/ , etc.....they each have their own rules and jurisdictions, for example IBEW sixth district covers illinois, indiana and michigan, therefor you will undergo training through ALBAT, and say if you are from minnesota, you would undergo training through Missouri Valley. do some searching people! if youre interested, do your research.
each local union hall that has an outside line division has x amount of seats they can send to training each year. you need to go to a union hall and fill out an application. usually once a year, they hold interviews, and you get ranked on how you interview. if say you are the #2 spot, after they send #1 off to work as a first step apprentice(training is divided into steps, which = what you have learned OTJ and in the classroom, having completed your bookwork. steps also = your % of journeyman wage, say if a journeyman makes $30, depending on which apprenticeship training program you fall under, a first step can be 50% of journeyman wage, so $15, and the % goes up in 5% and 10% increments as steps till you top out and become a journeyman), you would then be the next on the list to become a first step apprentice.

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

beware: if you interview terribly, and say get ranked #50, and by the time say next year they do interviews again, and youre down to say the 15th spot...the new interviewees who get ranked better than you will bump up your place on the list.....so it is in your best interest to have a good interview. thats how you get into the apprenticeship on the union side.

for the non-union route, its honestly like any old job interview. yes, expensive classes earn you an edge for hiring, but in the end you work your way up. you learn on the job and pray you arent killed. i am nccco crane certified, and an outfit down south wanted to hire me on for my crane skills and make me a lineman for them as well. they would teach you groundwork and slowly incorporate you into the HOT work. just imagine your foreman telling you that youll be in the bucket today with "old joe," but dont worry, hes only been electrocuted twice and still has most of his fingers. thats not only scary, but that can be you learning from "old joe," and to top it off, for a whopping rate of $25 and little or no benefits when youre a full fledged "lineman". most groundmen in the IBEW make +/- $25 and have excellent benefits. just food for thought if you want to be a rat.

utility apprenticeship:
some utilities are union and some are non. either way, some utilities hire you on with 0 training, and teach you on the job and have you do in-house training, courses, etc. taking a class helps, but it is expensive....my suggestion, is to contact the utility company you want to work for, and ask them what training they would want you to have, as they would suggest courses, or tell you what or where a certain school offers that they do or do not accept as training (accreditation).

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

contractor vs utility: pros and cons
the general purpose of a contractor is to do the work that is either too technically difficult for a utility, is too large of a job and there is a time crunch, or the utility lacks the manpower and/or equipment. the benefits of working for a contractor are usually a higher wage, more hours, and possibly per diem. the downsides to working for a contractor are travel, time away from home, and job security. when that 50 pole change out is done, youre done. if the contractor values you as a hand, they may port you to another project and keep you working, otherwise youre headed back to the hall. usually as a tramp line hand, you go on a book signing tour and develop a network of friends, who keep in touch, shoot the sh-t and talk about ongoing and upcoming jobs around the country, as well as they may be able to vouch for you and get you on a job if theres no one on hand at the hall to take a call. when you go to the contractor side, youre master of your own destiny, you travel where there is work and where you want to work. if youre on a job, and you hear a different job for a diff company is about to ramp up for more hours(or less, your choice) and more pay, you can drag up and head that way.

working for a utility definitely has pros and cons. usually to even work for a utility, you have to reside within x amount of miles from it. youre home every night, no travel, and in general, you have strong job security. most utilities have their linemen do the lighter and more casual work, ie take an entire day to change out an arm with an hour or two lunch lol. for the stuff they dont want to do or feel is dangerous or too difficult, they have a contractor do it. a downside to working for the utility can be the pay. they usually pay less than a contractor and unless there is a urgent project, most utilities work their guys 40 hours with no overtime or minimal OT, not to mention that you are on call 24/7/365.

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

id like to say first off that ive been in the IBEW since 2007. i started out as a groundman, and did that for a couple of years before i took up operating full time. reading this forum, a lot of the initial questions are vaguely answered. im not a lineman, though ive considered it, and hell, even still consider it to this day because im only 28, but should i decide to do it, i know where to begin.

first off, will you be union or non-union? do you want to work for a contractor, or for a utility?

to go the union route, you need to look at what jurisdiction your state falls under: ALBAT www.albat.org/v3/more.html , Missouri Valley www.movalleyjatc.org/ , etc.....they each have their own rules and jurisdictions, for example IBEW sixth district covers illinois, indiana and michigan, therefor you will undergo training through ALBAT, and say if you are from minnesota, you would undergo training through Missouri Valley. do some searching people! if youre interested, do your research.
each local union hall that has an outside line division has x amount of seats they can send to training each year. you need to go to a union hall and fill out an application. usually once a year, they hold interviews, and you get ranked on how you interview. if say you are the #2 spot, after they send #1 off to work as a first step apprentice(training is divided into steps, which = what you have learned OTJ and in the classroom, having completed your bookwork. steps also = your % of journeyman wage, say if a journeyman makes $30, depending on which apprenticeship training program you fall under, a first step can be 50% of journeyman wage, so $15, and the % goes up in 5% and 10% increments as steps till you top out and become a journeyman), you would then be the next on the list to become a first step apprentice. this was my first post, but it disappeared :/

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

sorry i reposted my first comment, but it disappeared on me. continuing on the utility side:
a downside through receiving your training at a utility company is that your training is valid and valued at THAT utility. what if you get fired or youre laid off? on the IBEW side of things, you are a "utility lineman," you are second rate and have not received the full spectrum of training from the IBEW. you are given a B ticket, or also known as a 'white ticket'. journeyman training is a golden ticket, you can work for a contractor or go to work for a utility. side note: after you complete your journeyman status, there is fine print and work stipulations, i believe there is a 3 year period you must work for a contractor before you go to a utility after you top out, otherwise you may have to pay a $10,000 fine or pay back the cost of the apprenticeship. in terms of the union and the 'out of work' list, a utility lineman is 3rd rate. for example, at local 9 in chicago, if that is your home local, you are book #1. if you live outside of that jurisdiction and say youre from local 196, you may sign book #2. if you are a flunky utility lineman or some form of white ticket(utility, former non union, or grandfathered in as a lineman aka you were a cable tv technician and passed a written journeyman test to build powerlines), you are considered book #3. to go to work, local 9 would put out all of their book 1's, then 2's, then 3's. so it may be a very long time, years, before you clear off the list from book 3.

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

wages:
union hands make the top wages. typically, a JOURNEYMAN lineman makes between $30 to $50+ depending on your local. i think long island, NY makes the highest in the country at 50 some dollars an hour. not sure, i was there for hurricane irene though. other classifications such as general foremen, foremen(usually 110% or so the rate of linemen) apprentices(1-7 step), heavy operators, specialty operators, light operators, material handlers, groundman/operators, groundman truck drivers, experienced groundmen(non CDL holders) and inexperienced groundmen(less than 6 months in the trade) make applicable %'s off of the base lineman wage. being a union hand, each local yearly reviews their contracts and you wind up with an increase in wage depending on their negotiations (1% increase for example). OT rules vary local to local. in a defined work day, you may get straight time for 8 hrs, time and a half for 4hrs, and anything after 12 is double. for some places, its anything after 16 is double. during storm work, or an unplanned outage, contracts vary. some locals pay doubletime the moment you get the phone call, 8 time and a half and 8 double, or time and a half up to 16 hrs then double. it all varies.

non union rats vary in pay. outside line construction is the 3rd most dangerous industry, and we do HARD LABOR. i dont truly knock non union labor, i just refer to them as rats as a habit. being union is a choice, but if a person wants less money and/or benefits, that is theirs to make. we all have to pay bills and feed our families at the end of the day. non union hands just drive down the wages being happy to accept anything given to them. as stated earlier, a non union company such as pike, pays around $25-$27 for an A class or level 1, whatever i forget, "lineman". starting wage non union also varies, but expect $12+. for storm work, i hear some rats do it for straight time and some time and a half. most non union wont pay double unless its a holiday.

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

if you have any questions, you can email me- rmdionisio@aol.com . I am not the bottom line authority on all that ive posted, but i do have a pretty good idea to point you in the right direction. ive been in this industry since 2007, been a union steward, and ive done work all over the midwest, the south and on the east coast. im a traveling IBEW operator, i was a long time groundman, and i do crane work wherever and whenever i feel like it, but i do IBEW work whenever theres a call as i keep my roots in this awesome industry. feel free to contact me and ill try to help you out.

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IBEW Crane Op in Fargo, North Dakota

30 months ago

if you have any questions, you can email me- rmdionisio@aol.com . I am not the bottom line authority on all that ive posted, but i do have a pretty good idea to point you in the right direction. ive been in this industry since 2007, been a union steward, and ive done work all over the midwest, the south and on the east coast. im a traveling IBEW operator, i was a long time groundman, and i do crane work wherever and whenever i feel like it, but i do IBEW work whenever theres a call as i keep my roots in this awesome industry. feel free to contact me and ill try to help you out.

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joe Blow in Marquette, Michigan

27 months ago

Wife in Terre Haute, Indiana said: My husband is trying to become a lineman . He is trying to figure out his best option. Should he go to a school in Georgia for 4 months? Is it worth the $12,000? My email is lshorter3@yahoo.com...Thank you!

$12,000. a month is alot for four months of training, but yes it is worth the cash. That is if that school has good recruiting and he is employed after. For him to go to school and not have employment opportunities after, it would be a waste of time and cash.

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joe Blow in Marquette, Michigan

27 months ago

Host said: What are typical journeyman lineman salaries? Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

The typical starting salary for a journeyman lineman is $10.00 an hour. If you have a CDL then it is $13.00. Now if you have climbers it will increase to $19.00. But, if you can actually climb with them bump it up to $22.50. After that you have a few options. Working both overhead and underground with get you $25.25. Add some digger/derrick skills in with this it’s an easy $28.00. If you know who Hendrix is it’s an automatic $31.75. From here it’s kind of funky. You have to take your age, square root it and add the length from your elbow to your wrist, in inches. Now add the number of Beers you can drink in a night. That is the average wage!!

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IBEW Crane Op in Brookings, South Dakota

26 months ago

joe Blow in Marquette, Michigan said: The typical starting salary for a journeyman lineman is $10.00 an hour. If you have a CDL then it is $13.00. Now if you have climbers it will increase to $19.00. But, if you can actually climb with them bump it up to $22.50. After that you have a few options. Working both overhead and underground with get you $25.25. Add some digger/derrick skills in with this it’s an easy $28.00. If you know who Hendrix is it’s an automatic $31.75. From here it’s kind of funky. You have to take your age, square root it and add the length from your elbow to your wrist, in inches. Now add the number of Beers you can drink in a night. That is the average wage!!

very sad, but informative. one correction though, joe Blow. when you talk about rat wages, do not refer to rat linemen as "journeyman linemen," as they never went through an apprenticeship and earned that title. journeyman lineman classification is earned through the union, and is a status you work towards. just letting you know, so when you climb into a bucket after your long night of elbow mathematics and blackout drinking and kill someone, youll know to just put "lineman" on your resume when youre looking for work....indeed.

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Lineman 6 in Truro, Nova Scotia

19 months ago

Just to let u know, I'm not sure of any company pays there lineman 10$ an hour, I'm 8 years in the trade and I average anywhere between 120k-130k annually at my utility in eastern Canada, travel west and the hourly wage goes from 36 an hr to 50+ an hour, there trade is very rewarding and demanding, before u take the leap be sure u can handle heights, extreme weather conditions and long hours with lots of overtime. Any person making 10$ an hour they are not lineman, we are highly skilled and very proud.

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Lineman 6 in Truro, Nova Scotia

19 months ago

amanda in Chicago, Illinois said: Yeah there is money to be made. But what people aren't saying is how dangerous linework is. Its the 3rd most dangerous job! People die or get mutilated every year. Many lineman also spend half the year laid off. And the taxes you have to pay are pretty steep! You need to know the pros and cons before entering this trade. Traveling also gets expensive. Transportation, hotel , food . And with all this in mind, the apprenticeship to is difficult. You work by being on a list, and they send u to jobs. U don't choose. Its not as easy as everyone thinks. They hear $40 an hour and jump the gun. That money also has to last when ur laid off.

People die when people are stupid, is electricity dangerous " yes" but any good electrical utility or contractor will provide you with the proper training and protective equipment and work methods to do the job safely, I've been doing this job or 8 years now, I possess a red seal interprovincial ticket and right now I am qualified to work anywhere in North America, the job is very rewarding but physically demanding. I truly would recommend this profession but in saying this be sure to follow the work methods provided and don't ever be scared to ask questions, the only stupid question is the one not asked.

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TRT LLC in centerburg, Ohio

10 months ago

My question is if you get throught one of these schools
What's the job market looking like here in central Ohio
Columbus area? In the process of getting into a lineman
Training school locally...all ready have a class A cdl
With lots of driving experience...what's my odds looking
Like around here after I spend 10 grand? Lol

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Jeremy in Moncton, New Brunswick

6 months ago

I've been a lineman for 10 years now and I love it and would not change it for the world, yes we do make great money but only after time and you have reached your red seal, typically after 4 years and 8000 hrs accumulated and multiple block release training, it's not easy but with time and effort he can do it, as far as the dangers of the job, well it is dangerous but with safety the way it is now the only way you will get hurt is by cutting corners, the company's now adays provide you with all the equipment to minimize the risk taken by the worker, like I said its a great career and as per the last post, I have never been without work since I started, it's a trade in high demand with few skilled workers to fill the demand. I would say to your son if he is committed they go for it but if he plans on going in half assed and expecting things to be give to him then to find another trade. Hope this helps you

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Wanting to know in Dallas, Texas

3 months ago

What are the basic interview questions asked at union interviews.And how does a person get a high ranking

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