Massage Envy experiences...

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (951 to 1000 of 1564)
Page:  « First « Previous   17  18  19  20  21  22  23  Next »   Last »

Speak out in Fairfax, Virginia

67 months ago

Why not just become a PT instead of a Massage therapist then if you truly want that medical respect and leave the field
to those that are not interested to work in the medical field with all the other headaches that go with the medical field such as insurance.To those that want to be part of the medical field you should go talk to all the Chiropractors out there who many have dropped the medical insurance because of all the rules and low pay reimbursements.The more you get involved with the medical field the more you get involved with the bureaucracy that goes with it.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Speak out in Fairfax, Virginia

67 months ago

Why not just become a PT instead of a Massage therapist then if you truly want that medical respect and leave the field
to those that are not interested to work in the medical field with all the other headaches that go with the medical field such as insurance.To those that want to be part of the medical field you should go talk to all the Chiropractors out there who many have dropped the medical insurance because of all the rules and low pay reimbursements.The more you get involved with the medical field the more you get involved with the bureaucracy that goes with it.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Millar in Portland, Oregon

67 months ago

That's why I say leave the basic 500-hour training alone for the folks who want it and add a certified medical massage program for those who want that. You wouldn't have to mire yourself in the bureaucracy if you didn't want to. I agree the bureaucracy stinks. But there should be a program that requires less education than PT but more than MT, something between. There's a real need for it.

I don't personally believe in chiropractic. Muscles move bones. I don't see any evidence that moving bones changes anything. I also have not heard of any chiropractors out there who have dropped medical insurance, and I belong to a professional association. It's just not happening.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

DOLORES in Austin, Texas

67 months ago

The reason not to become a PT instead of an MT is --- I want to do massage. I agree with Millar - there needs to be different levels of massage. Not everyone wants or is ready for more education, but right now even if I were able to obtain a master's degree it really wouldn't make any difference in my status or earning capacity. As to chiropractor's dropping insurance I don't think that is happening. The insurance may not pay the full amount, but that is why you have copays and at least with my insurance, I am responsible for the difference. The problem for MT's are they are trying to go it alone. They are trying to negotiate contracts, do the paperwork, and everything else all alone. What other profession does this? None that I can think of. MD's, chiros, PT's, OT's, Dentists, lawyers, architects -- every profession I can think of -- all belong to groups and share the expenses. We need do the same. Millar - as to chiropractors - I had a severe headache for 3 weeks. My MT didn't help, nor did my MD, nor did a visit to the ER and a catscan. A chiro popped my neck back in place and my headache was gone in less than a minute. It all depends on what is wrong.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Millar in Portland, Oregon

67 months ago

I stand corrected, Dolores. You are right, the effectiveness of any therapy depends on what's wrong and what works for the individual.

As massage moves into a true profession perhaps we'll support each other in sharing services like insurance filing so we can all focus on our core competencies, serving the client through MASSAGE.

I personally don't want to be a PT or an OT, either. Massage is almost perfect for me, but it could be better!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

DOLORES in Austin, Texas

67 months ago

As massage moves into a true profession perhaps we'll support each other in sharing services like insurance filing so we can all focus on our core competencies, serving the client through MASSAGE.

Very will stated Millar!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Jules in Round Lake, Illinois

67 months ago

Millar in Portland, Oregon said: Interesting discussion, and it's coming at a time when massage is being developed into a true profession in the US. The Body of Knowledge is finished ( www.mtbok.org/ ) and time will tell where we go next. I find it interesting how many therapists disparage formalized education (not judging, just noticing). Jules is correct, way more education outside of the certified program is required to practice therapeutic massage, so why not go ahead and formalize it within a certified program? We should keep the basic 500-hour relaxation program and add a medical massage certification as well. Another client is also right, medical professionals have formalized medical education and we should be no exception, expecially now as more and more therapists are demanding respect and better pay.

Im actually enrolled in a medical massage certification program and I have to be honest, the curriculum flew over way to many heads in the classroom. 60% of them were completely lost on stuff as basic as bony landmarks. During technique they looked like a deer in the headlights when the teacher said words like distal, caudal, coronal etc. It upset me that I payed that much money for the teacher to have to waste classroom time answering questions about the most basic local and systemic contraindications that just about everybody in this profession deals with on a weekly basis, and these are not nervous people fresh out of school. Dont get me wrong Im not trying to sound like some massage guru but what the hell are they teaching or NOT teaching in these schools?! I cant believe these people got certified and actually passed the national. If your lost on the basics you DO NOT belong in any medical massage program and then go out and use that application on your own. Our professions education system has no structure and I feel bad for those who think they got a good education but were actually served garbage and charged tuition for it.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

DOLORES in Austin, Texas

67 months ago

There are good massage schools out there -- but there are a lot of crummy ones. I taught First Aid at one and the recruitment policies were evil to say the least. They recruit to people in low paying, dead end jobs (Wal-Mart, retail, etc). The recruiters get big bonuses for keeping those classes filled. They lock you into expensive contracts that you can't get out of (just as bad as student loans). The curriculum is terrible and if you pay your money you get a certificate whether you learn anything or not. They are lying to people telling them what a lucrative career they will have when they get out, earning tons of money for very little effort. When you are slaving away for $7/hr at Wal-Mart, this sounds really appealing. No wonder when they find that all they can get is a ME job, they are so unhappy! I think a lot of reform needs to take place in this industry. I think therapists are getting exploited on all levels. That is one reason I am so in favor of more/better education. JULES -- WHAT PROGRAM ARE YOU IN? if you don't mind sharing. I'm in Texas, so not up for anything in Ill, but I like to try and keep abreast of what is going on in education.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Millar in Portland, Oregon

67 months ago

Yeah, I'd like to know what program you're in as well, Jules. It's very important.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Jules in Round Lake, Illinois

67 months ago

This link will send you to the web site. This certification is offered at different cities throughout the country so dont worry about being from Chicago. Although I cant vouch for every teacher, this company did there homework when they hired the staff. They are educated well beyond massage therapy so take advantage of that. Its pricey but well worth it. Let me know what you think : )

www.lmtsuccessgroup.com/index.php

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

DOLORES in Austin, Texas

67 months ago

Jules [- They look like interesting classes. Its good to see the business and marketing classes they are offering. The prices seem in line with other training. I hope you enjoy you classes and thanks for sharing the info.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

jjj in Denver, Colorado

67 months ago

Very disappointed in Massage Envy. Scam they told me over the phone no problem to freeze membership for 6 months because I was out of town for a while then they kept charging up my card. Then when I went in to get massage they refused service that I paid for without charging my card more they own me $150 and will not let me even use it till I pay more? WTF?
Do not recommend SCAME alert!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Speak out in Fairfax, Virginia

67 months ago

Call your credit card company and have them remove the money.Also change your credit card number like today.Never ever give anyone permission to take money out of your credit card or bank automatically.It always seems like a good idea but this is the kind of thing that can happen.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Caring LMT in Redmond, Oregon

67 months ago

Eric and other LMTs - My recommendation is: If you are thinking of working for a specific M.E., go find out who the owner is, who the manager is and find out how accessible either of them are. Try to meet and learn about the owner; they have a big 'trickle down' impact on their businesses. To me, the atmosphere, attitudes and work philosophies define what employee experiences will be. If you don't have an owner and/or manager that understands and cares about having a respectful, fun, warm and enjoyable work environment, than you won't have it. With a few simple questions you will also find out how much they DO or DON'T really understand or appreciate what a massage therapist does. Massage is a caring, nurturing profession. Because most M.E. office staff have never been on the 'giving end' of massage therapy, unless they are a deeper person, they will have no real appreciation for your work or skills. Watch out for that! Most often, 'bad' managment doesn't even realize the impact they are having on those they supervise and therefore impact daily (good or bad). Good managment, however, will be willing to talk with you and will say the kinds of things that reflect their value in a respectful and fun working environment. In a nutshell, if the management doesn't have time to answer your questions, OR you get a bad feeling while asking any of these questions; PAY ATTENTION to what your gut tells you when your leaving! This advice would work in lots of potential employment situations.

I have had the chance to meet M.E. managers who were wonderful and M.E. managers (and yes owners!) who were horrible, cold and even disdainful of LMTs! BOTH TYPE are out there; each 'franchise' will be different. REMEMBER that each one will be different based on the people who run it!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

jpgr in Houston, Texas

67 months ago

You are so right....we had some excellent owners, but they sold to our new owners who could care less about us....they have cut so much...from mints and water for clients....to some crappy brand of massage cream and lotion...no bonus at Christmas time like before...cheap brown paper towels in the restrooms...our quartley bonus percentage has been changed not to mention the managers treat the therapist like first graders....Hopefully the economy will get better so theraist who care and love what we do can move on to places where we are appreciated.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

More Respect for Massage Therapists in Bishop, California

67 months ago

Another client in Dallas, Texas said: Yes I have given a massage and I agree it isn't easy. But you chose to do it. The average massage is $62 according to the AMTA. Is it my fault you chose to massage and tear up your body instead of doing something else? Really it's not worth more. If you want to be paid a professional salary and get professional benefits then go to college and do your time. Don't just to to technical school and demand that your clients pay for your lack of commitment.

Have you not felt the benefits of massage yourself, as a receiver of massage?

To me those benefits are worth far more then paying my therapist $26 per hour of physical work to help improve my life, my pain, my happiness, my over all well being. Massage is worth more to me and I value the PERSON giving so much of themselves to me to improve the way I feel. It takes a special, Kind person to give and give to others, all day.

Physically, Mentally their work is valuable.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jules in Round Lake, Illinois

67 months ago

I love how people like this get on there high horse because they had mommy and daddy to foot the bill for 150k worth of university. So what your saying is that our parents are losers because they didnt have the money to send us right? Our parents are losers because they fix your cars or clean your house, or work construction , and couldnt help us be winners like you and your piece of paper. Just because your a heifer in a cubicle that can hang a degree on the wall doesnt make you more deserving of medical benefits and a decent wage you cheap donkey!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

skaye84 in Edwardsville, Illinois

67 months ago

Caring LMT in Redmond, Oregon said: REMEMBER that each one will be different based on the people who run it!

Thank you for a productive & relevant advice! I hope all LMT's stop griping & start taking responsibility for their choices of where they work. We don't have the power to stop M.E., but we do have the power to make it better. The owners that respect LMT's & our knowledge are currently moving towards putting therapists into management positions, so our voices will be heard. However, these positions need to be filled by the right people who can balance the management responsibilities w/ their massage work which believe me is a bigger challenge than you might think. I'm excited to be a part of this field & this company as it shifts, expands & changes.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

More Respect for Massage Therapists in Bishop, California

67 months ago

When I first started massage over a year ago, I graduated into a sea of therapists and very few jobs willing to take a risk on a recent graduate. I tried 3 other jobs but since Massage Envy had recently moved in, Independent Massage businesses were hurting. After 8 months of very little pay I accepted a position at Massage Envy. The first month was great, then I quickly started to learn that I could not physically perform enough massages in a week to even pay back my school loans on such a low earning wage. Although each room was equipped with hydrolic tables and a busy schedule, their lack of respect for the backbone of their business is more then apparent.
Yes, there are pluses to this business; Working on most of the general public, over 1,000 hrs hands-on experience in my first year, and the ability to utilize all the modalities I was taught as I graduated with OVER a 1,000hrs of training, far above the average Massage Therapist.

With that being said There is a lack of professionalism at any MassageEnvy, they are loud and do not create a healing, client centered atmosphere. They are just boxes of windowless rooms that pack in too many bodies, sales men of "discounted" massage rates, and low grade therapists. The so called continuing ed is a joke and the so called benefits are none. I was paid $16/session with an average tip of $8. Most days I was booked solid with mostly 2 hour sessions, back to back for 6 hours, most days only being allowed 30 minute breaks, not 1 hour as requested. I tell anyone in Massage School to seek Massage Envy for only a short time, to build your professional skill but as your grow, seek other employment that Respects your efforts has a Massage Therapist and truly demonstrates the healing, client centered atmosphere

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

darhopevan in Reno, Nevada

67 months ago

I have been a massage therapist for 14 years. I have worked for myself and worked at a spa, and at a holistic health center. When I became certified, in California, I was hired at a spa, and worked 5 days a week, and sometimes would be called in when there were extra clients. At the holistic center and working for myself, I worked only when I had clients. I am not certified to work as a massage therapist in Reno, I would have to go back to school for 500 hours, and take the National Exam. Not sure I want to do that at this time. I can, however, perform Reflexology and Reiki and Shiatsu, which I was trained to do.
Where ever you work as a massage therapist, you must be certain of the difference between being an employee and being an independent contractor. While working at the spa, the therapists got a 60/40 split and could keep their tips. When we had no clients, we were paid an hourly minimum wage. The owner of the spa never, ever ran specials. I made really good money, and I averaged 6 massages a day, 5 days a week. When I had my own business, I averaged 4 massages during a 5 day week.
I have not read every single comment, however, I do not think being unionized is the way to go. There are resources for Massage and Body workers - certification, and associations. You, no matter where you work, are a professional, and must behave as a professional. No one can take that away from you. It is your license, your permit, your certification. If you do not like the terms that you are given at a particular Massage establishment, do not sign the dotted line, and go elsewhere, or start your own business. You will not become as rich as Trump performing massage only, you need to build your business. It is not easy, but it can be rewarding. Why did you become a massage therapist to began with? Was it to make big bucks, or was it to help others. The reason that the National Exam has been pushed, is to keep massage and prostituion separated.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

quincunx in Mesa, Arizona

67 months ago

I have an interview at ME in a few days. Actually I sent my resume in and someone from ME called me to schedule a practical. I was on my cell and didn't have the time to ask too many questions, but it struck me as odd that they didn't ask me to come in for an interview first before doing the practical. Is this how ME is doing it these days?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Massage Hopeful in Big City, Texas

67 months ago

quincunx in Mesa, Arizona said: I have an interview at ME in a few days. Actually I sent my resume in and someone from ME called me to schedule a practical. I was on my cell and didn't have the time to ask too many questions, but it struck me as odd that they didn't ask me to come in for an interview first before doing the practical. Is this how ME is doing it these days?

I went this week and that is what they do. I filled out the application and then did the practical. I have yet to really talk to the manager and they seemed more concerned about getting me to work full time and wanting me to work weekends and evenings.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

More Respect for Massage Therapists in Bishop, California

67 months ago

Of course they just want you to perform a practical. No need for an interview, they don't care about your personal life or previous work experience as long as you can perform multiple massages in a day with safe draping.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

samantha in Grapevine, Texas

67 months ago

anonymous in Akron, Ohio said: Since you are an owner operator I have a question for you. Is it true that it is Massage Envy's policy to book male therapists first?

Massage Envy books according to percentage. Since male therapists typically have more openings available, they have a lower "booked" percentage, and if the client does not a specific therapist request, or a gender preference, the appointment will be booked with whichever therapist is the most open for the day, whether it is male or female.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

oldtimer in Round Rock, Texas

67 months ago

I am a ME client and thoroughly enjoy my appointments with them. I've been a member for about 8 months and don't plan to change that relationship. The service is very good, especially for the price, and I do tip well, usually $20 for an hour message, and always get excellent service.
I tip because it is expected, and I know that at the membership price of $39.00 for an hour message, the MT can't be getting rich on wages.
And just so you know, I've been unemployed for about 2 years now and living on my savings. So no.... I'm not well to do...not by a loooong shot.
As for wages at ME or any other job for that matter, you should know that the national trend for the past 30 years has been a slow downward spiral in wages in all trades, both professional and skilled/unskilled.
For example, in 1975 I went through community college a got a trade license to work on aircraft. It's a FAA issued license that takes 3 years to get at community college level, or you can go to a "for profit" school, pay $25,000 and get it in as little as 18 months. But the pay back in 1975 was two to three times what it is today, adjusted for inflation, and that's for a job where you are legally liable in any litigation, or accident!!! No other job in America pays so little while exposing the worker to so much financial danger.
So before you go into debt up to your eyeballs for that piece of paper to hang on the wall, know the wage history of your chosen field and look to the future to see if you'll ever pay off that loan. The trend in wages says NO! unless you find a profession that over the past 30 years has at least kept up with inflation.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

samantha in Dallas, Texas

67 months ago

anonymous anonmous in Freehold, New Jersey said: To Used & Abused MT,
You can get insurance through ABMP instead. It is adequate, in my opinion (AMTA offers the biggest coverage, but ABMP has a lot too).
While the professional agencies do some good, it mainly seems to be about the money. They should not forget the hand that feeds them, i.e. the massgae therapist. We resent companies like Massage Envy which denigrate the massage therapy field. AMTA should not back Massage Envy -- they should take the ethical role and tell them they have a conflict of interest. If asked what, they could tell them that they do not feel (I do not speak for AMTA) that Massage Envy pays ethically.

You know that ABMP backs ME as well, right? And that ME employees get a discout on the first year rate with ABMP?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

DadMike in Maryland

67 months ago

Can't blame ME for low massage wages. They offer a good service- I am happy to be a member, receive a good and consistent massage, was happy to find a regular therapist there and have been seeing him monthly for the last 4 months. I'd go more often, but that's all I can afford. And that is why ME is a godsend to those of us that can't drop 150-180 for every massage- the going rate, plus tip, in my area, for 90minutes. I pay 100 for 90minutes, including a 30 dollar tip.
Entry level wages are low because educational entry standards are low; and, honestly, fresh graduates are not very skilled. But they can do passable jobs, they want work, and as long as Massage schools churn them out like a Chinese factory they will keep coming out. And private practitioners are hit and miss, and expensive. Why blow over a hundred bucks a pop for an hour until you find someone good, when you can blow 60 an hour until you find a good person shopping the different therapists at ME??
13 grand is NOTHING-- avg. 4 year degree now is well over 20.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

musiclady420 in Chicago, Illinois

67 months ago

Well, I have many clients who did not go to any college and work at the railroad making $38.00 an hour to start. So, I am curious to know what those who say our work isn't worth much, what do you have to say about that? Crap, I am going to work for the railroad. I don't even know why I went to school?!?!? Thanks for pointing that out dadmike!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

DadMike in Maryland

67 months ago

musiclady420 in Chicago, Illinois said: Well, I have many clients who did not go to any college and work at the railroad making $38.00 an hour to start. So, I am curious to know what those who say our work isn't worth much, what do you have to say about that? Crap, I am going to work for the railroad. I don't even know why I went to school?!?!? Thanks for pointing that out dadmike!

Not saying your work isn't worth much- massage is valuable; as is social work, nursing, teaching, and other under-paid but valuable services. It's market forces. ME and similar chains and spas would not pay so poorly if they could not find employees willing to work for those wages. The reason people are willing to work for those wages- the credentials to be a MT are too easy to obtain, therefore there are too many MTs, and surplus workers always drives down wages.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

weenis in Dauphin, Pennsylvania

67 months ago

MusicLady, the reason they make a decent wage is that they have union and they require to be paid at their just value. Maybe even a little more.... But you can't say unless your in their shoes. In any case, MT's can too. The hardcores that tell you you don't deserve it are the same ones that would let a child die on the at the entrance to the hospital because the parents didn't have insurance.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Speak out in Fairfax, Virginia

67 months ago

Easy please let me know after you have taken and passed the national exam.Also theri are some pretty good schools out their I would compare to many of the nursing school as far as information in the inner working of the body.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Caring LMT in Redmond, Oregon

67 months ago

DadMike in Maryland said: The reason people are willing to work for those wages- the credentials to be a MT are too easy to obtain, therefore there are too many MTs, and surplus workers always drives down wages.

Well, unfortunately I do see that the training programs for LMT's is not being controlled the way nursing schools and such are. In my area there is an overabundance of LMT's. The basic requirements for taking the state exams is somewhere around 550 hours, but there are some of us that have well above the 'basic' training to get licensed. Licensing alone includes written, practical and a law exam in oregon. Many LMT's here have two year degrees in conjunction with two year LMT certificates and over 1200 hours before they get out there to work. THAT isn't cheap either! I owe over 21,000 even after scholarships and grants! People seem to forget that a massage therapist has to have a lot of anatomy, kinesiology, pathology and are trained to know and understand (and watch for) health issues that could cause mild to severe problems if not handled per critical protocols that we are taught. The skill and knowledge to be a good or great LMT is really pretty huge. Most serious LMT's get (expensive) ongoing training every year to keep up with CEU requirements and to also conscientiously direct and expand their skill base. I appreciate and so respect my mentors and colleagues in this profession. It kills me to hear and see when people blow us off like this is fluff and such simple work. They have no idea what they are talking about. None!!! I wish more of American society had a greater understanding and appreciation for what goes into this profession. We just aren't there yet, but I hope we get there.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

DOLORES in Austin, Texas

67 months ago

If all MTs were required to get the training you speak of, then I think our profession would be in a lot better shape. Schools are churning out 500 hr therapists who don't even grasp what they learned in that time - but as long as they pay, they get the certificate. It leaves the general public with the impression that anyone can be a MT - and they are right in that respect. As a society we value things that are hard to get. I am always pushing for more education. Not because I think we are stupid. Many of us are well educated, but we are an overpopulated field and as long as our education comes from trade schools we will stay overpopulated, and places like ME will flourish. I graduated in 1993. There were 3 schools withing 100 miles of me. By 2005 there were 8 schools within 5 miles of me -- all churning out at least 100 students a year. When you added up all the schools in the state, they were churning out several thousand therapists a year. Do you really need that many therapists in a state of 5 million? I used to joke that at some point the whole state would be MTs. The schools have obviously figured out that there is big money in teaching. They are not particularly concerned with our opportunities after that. (I am generalizing, there are good schools - but there are also a lot of chain schools in it for the money). If we want to become a respected profession then we need to take control of our industry.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

DadMike in Maryland

67 months ago

Caring LMT in Redmond, Oregon said: Well, unfortunately I do see that the training programs for LMT's is not being controlled the way nursing schools and such are. In my area there is an overabundance of LMT's. The basic requirements for taking the state exams is somewhere around 550 hours, but there are some of us that have well above the 'basic' training to get licensed. Licensing alone includes written, practical and a law exam in oregon. Many LMT's here have two year degrees in conjunction with two year LMT certificates and over 1200 hours before they get out there to work. THAT isn't cheap either! I owe over 21,000 even after scholarships and grants! People seem to forget that a massage therapist has to have a lot of anatomy, kinesiology, pathology and are trained to know and understand (and watch for) health issues that could cause mild to severe problems if not handled per critical protocols that we are taught. The skill and knowledge to be a good or great LMT is really pretty huge.

What matters in terms of wages is the BASE LINE EDUCATION needed to become a fully active and employable practitioner. I've read many posts where the MTs have much, much more education than 500 hours- and are very bitter because they make as much as the 500-hour cert people. That is what happens when your industry is flooded by low entry standards- it cheapens the profession overall. Wasn't so bad before chains- but now huge chains like ME are capitalizing in this, and driving down wages. Delores gets it. The slam on MT salary is a direct result of the massage schools caring more about making money than in increasing the respect of the profession.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Babyace in Verona, New Jersey

67 months ago

Another Client in Dallas said: Actually I went to massage school as a hobby. It was very very easy, my friend. As was the national exam. I do remember every muscle and bone in the body, the origin, insertion, action, synergist, antagonist, etc.

I also have earned my master's degree in kinesiology and work as a corrective exercise specialist. So as you see I have indeed done my research and am a true professional, unlike you.

I bet when you do get clients on the massage table, they can just "feel" the tense, contracted, constipated like state of your judgemental mind, in each and every muscle of your body.

Just saying.

Wow, Yes, I believe every word you type on here. Do you get computer access from Prison? Just sayin.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Speak out in Fairfax, Virginia

67 months ago

Like I said you can know every bone, muscle but that doesn't mean you will be a good massage therapist.If you don't have the touch and the desire to help people heal then you will just go through the motions.There are many people who have great memories like some surgeon I know but they don't have the natural skill that some doctors have.The best therapist I've met have a natural touch and all the training can't make up for that healing touch.So take your hobby and try model cars.The massage field doesn't need someone who only is in it for a hobby but is in it to help people.So don't waste the time of people who want a person who is vested in massage as a career.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

DadMike in Maryland

67 months ago

Speak out in Fairfax, Virginia said: Like I said you can know every bone, muscle but that doesn't mean you will be a good massage therapist .If you don't have the touch and the desire to help people heal then you will just go through the motions.There are many people who have great memories like some surgeon I know but they don't have the natural skill that some doctors have.The best therapist I've met have a natural touch and all the training can't make up for that healing touch.So take your hobby and try model cars.The massage field doesn't need someone who only is in it for a hobby but is in it to help people.So don't waste the time of people who want a person who is vested in massage as a career.

You are absolutely right about the commitment piece. That is the problem with states that require little or no education, 500hours for most, none at all for some!, to set up a shingle as a fully licensed/practicing MT. It attracts people that are in it because it seems so easy with so little up front commitment. I know others go on for more ed and such- but when the baseline is so low, it affects perception and esteem for profession.
I strongly believe MTs should have AT LEAST a 2-year certificate before they can practice AT ALL, and licensing laws should exist in all 50 states and be strictly enforced to erase the "happy ending" image massage all too often sadly implies.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Tony in Battle Ground, Washington

67 months ago

Speak out in Fairfax, Virginia said: Like I said you can know every bone, muscle but that doesn't mean you will be a good massage therapist.If you don't have the touch and the desire to help people heal then you will just go through the motions.There are many people who have great memories like some surgeon I know but they don't have the natural skill that some doctors have.The best therapist I've met have a natural touch and all the training can't make up for that healing touch.So take your hobby and try model cars.The massage field doesn't need someone who only is in it for a hobby but is in it to help people.So don't waste the time of people who want a person who is vested in massage as a career.

I don't understand this attitude which seems very common among massage practitioners. You do not have the right or the responsibility to tell others how they should practice and what their motivation should be.

The massage field is open to a variety of perspectives. I am very successful giving a few massages on the side to select clients. If you want to vest your entire professional life into it so be it. Why the need to attack others?

I am simply amazed with the negative attitude towards practitioners who want to approach massage from an intellectual point of view. I am also a NASM-certified personal trainer and yes, I do know every muscle in the body, including innervation, concentric and eccentric action. It's extremely important to my work. If it isn't important to your work so be it. Don't attack others.

Why so much hostility? Isn't your energy better used in a more positive direction?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Grace in Kailua Kona, Hawaii

66 months ago

I think its disgusting that this BUSINESS is trying to take advantage of the bad economy by trying to make money off of Massage Therapists talents by paying them less than what they are worth. I agree with previous posts. WORK ANYWHERE ELSE. RETAIL STORES OR WHATEVER. LET THESE PEOPLE GO OUT OF BUSINESS LIKE THEY SHOULD. Just don't work for them. ITS LIKE THE HAIRDRESSING BUSINESS WHO ADVERTISE $10.00 HAIRCUTS. DON'T WORK FOR THEM EITHER IF YOU HAVE A BEAUTICIAN LICENSE. Its not worth it. We cannot continue to bring down the value of these jobs. THEN WHERE WILL WE BE?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

weenis in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania

66 months ago

Bravo, Grace. You have a good understanding of the problem and its solution. Another solution is to network amongst MT's to work for yourselves. The fact is your boss will impoverish you all the while congratulating him or herself on how smart he or she is. I know some people will think that's just good business sense but it is in fact an easy, ruinous and dangerous for people and communities.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Unhappy and Underpaid Therapist in Miami, Florida

66 months ago

An update on my situation...been yelled & threatened at by my manager for problems at the spa that I have nothing to do with as scheduled for... I can't take any time off during season "unless I'm dead or in the hospital". And of course, they haven't given me a raise - what's that - I'm told to sell more products & services & get more members - to get my raise . If I say anything,they'll fire me... BUT I'M ACTUALLY ONE OF THEIR MOST TALENTED & RELIABLE EMPLOYEES...ALWAYS THERE ON TIME, ALWAYS GOING THE EXTRA MILE...AND FOR THESE LOW WAGES? I now realize they don't care, won't ever care, & why should I? I've gotten my internship there, so I'm in the process of moving on-- -VERY SOON, I HOPE...I now have private clients & am doing my own practice, without telling them about it & with letting them keep their "cheap clients".
I CAN'T WAIT FOR THE DAY WHEN I TELL THEM...'TAKE THIS JOB & SHOVE IT...."

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

heather in Richmond, Virginia

66 months ago

DONT WORK AT MASSAGE ENVY! i did for a week and then i got fired! it was bs! when i 1st started it was great and every said i did a good job then 1 client complained that he didnt feel secure in my draping ( i would never do anything unprofessional so he shouldnt of flattered himself) and the lights werent right and it was my fault.. i keep asking all my clients is everything ok? did u enjoy ur massage? and they all said yes then my boss told me he kept getting complaints and had to let me go..it was bs..they never gave me a chance! plus u dont get paid crap 4 the massage and theres no benifits!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Suriya in Vallejo, California

66 months ago

Eric in Toronto, Ontario said: I'm curious about people's experience with Massage Envy. I hear a lot of negative comments especially with regards their pay scale. Has any therapist found working at Massage Envy to be a positive experience? Are you able to accept tips at Massage Envy? Are there other perks in working there in terms of professional development or benefits?

I was offered a position with a local, California Massage Envy clinic. In their New Hire packet they state that one of the requirements of employment is to get a local, City massage technician permit through the Sheriff's Office.

I informed the Spa Manager that due to the current, recent laws that have been passed, it's actually illegal for CA cities/counties to require additional licensing if you have been state certified. They have not answered an email since I informed them of this, much to my dismay.

I find it unbelievable that they would require therapists to spend additional and unnecessary money to get a permit that is by law, unable to be required. I also find it a shame that the Massage Envy management staff won't be professional and address this issue, despite the fact that I contacted the California Massage Therapy Council (CAMTC) who verified that the additional permits are absolutely NOT necessary.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Speak out in Alexandria, Virginia

66 months ago

Hey I wish Va would do that too.We have state,county,city and in some places Town licenses

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

PatrickPowers in Salt Lake City, Utah

66 months ago

P in Indianapolis, Indiana said: If you are making 50,000 per year doing therapeutic massage and without a license, I hate to say it, you have to be doing more than massage. That is top pay for lets say a massage therapist working in a plastic surgeons office. Your body can only do so many therapeutic massages per day, per year. It is people who think they can do this without proper licensing that give this profession a bad name. The market is so over saturated now, businesses like Massage Envy won't run out of therapist for a very long time. Massage Therapist don't seem to be smart enough to keep massage prices locked, like dentist,and doctors. I am starting to regret ever considering this for a career. Most states are regulated now, if you are in a regulated state, I hope you get caught.

That's pretty sad. The fact that you decided to spend tons of time and money learning to do something that others can obviously do a lot cheaper is no reason to wish them ill. What the hell business is it of anyone else's if I want to have someone rub my back who didn't have to go to school for 18 months? Seriously, you want to prosecute people for getting a back rub just because you paid good money to learn what you could from a youtube video? That is tyranny and Americans shouldn't put up with it. This country was founded by men who were willing to fight and die to separate themselves from a tyranny that was, in all reality, nothing compared to the average state licensing board.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Ruiris in Fort Myers, Florida

66 months ago

sally said: Massage Envy really takes advantage of their MT and if you have any self respect you won't stay employed there long.

That.s true! Just work for your self to enjoy it!!!Not for ENVY.......

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jules in Round Lake, Illinois

66 months ago

First off tyranny is the wrong application for the subject and you obviously dont fully grasp the definition. Theres no abuse of power in the education and licensing requirements. Its completely justified in any field where are person is putting there hands on you whether it be massage, exercise/stretching, or medicine. You know why? BECAUSE PEOPLE CAN GET HURT! We dont carry insurance so everyone can have peace of mind. Pathologies of the human body are absolutely affected by massage and if the therapist (or random person that rubs you) doesnt understand what is and is not an appropriate technique to apply I guarantee a negative outcome for his/her career. So Im glad that you found someone out there that does it "cheaper". Unfortunately your comment makes it quite clear that youd be the first gerk in line to sue somebody due to your generic brand of massage. Cheers

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

No More Envy in Stoughton, Massachusetts

66 months ago

LOL!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

No More Envy in Stoughton, Massachusetts

66 months ago

Maybe Pat likes the OTHER kind of massage...................

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Nason in Ellicott City, Maryland

66 months ago

Eric in Toronto, Ontario said: I'm curious about people's experience with Massage Envy. I hear a lot of negative comments especially with regards their pay scale. Has any therapist found working at Massage Envy to be a positive experience? Are you able to accept tips at Massage Envy? Are there other perks in working there in terms of professional development or benefits?

I started working at Massage Envy 8 months ago. I work their part-time and have a full time job somewhere else. I call the work that I do drive-thru massages because you barely have time enough to do a full body massage much less really help someone with their muscles. My day job treats their employees very well. I am shocked at how poorly Massage Envy treats their Massage Therapists. They pay their therapists a very, very low wage with no benefits. I know the Massage Envy that I work at packs people in on a daily basis so they can afford to pay their therapists a better wage. I am staying their for a year or two to get experience and then moving on to another place. My advice to anyone trying to decide whether or not to pursue Massage as a professional career would be that it is great part-time work but it is not a business that you would want to be doing full-time. You pay a lot of money to go to school and if you get stuck working at Massage Envy you probably wouldn't be able to pay your rent much less anything else. Choose another career.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Page:  « First « Previous   17  18  19  20  21  22  23  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.