Massage Room in the Home?

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Pam in Paint Rock, Texas

106 months ago

Hi,
I am 50 and have just retired from a job I have had for 30 years. I am going to reflexology school and then on to massage school in the Fall. I am very excited about a new career in massage!
My question is, once I am licensed, where should I work?
I have a large bedrood that would probably be perfect for my massage business. I am considering taking out the furniture and setting it up for my business. It looks out into an attrium and would be relaxing for the clients. What are the pros and cons of doing this rather than working in a salon/spa? Trying to make a decision so can start on the room if that is the way to go. Thanks so much!

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Otheo Muse in Bridgewater, New Jersey

106 months ago

Hi Pam
I think that doing massages in your home is a great idea. Now that your retired, you can go on your own pase and don't really have to worry if your client base is large.I now work for a chiropractor,a spa on Saturdays and a hair salon on Fridays and Sundays and hate them all.(lol) i would give them all up if i could work for myself and be retired. Just be carful of who your clients are because people are crazy, but working for other people where you are in life and doing massages is not good. you are on the right track, I hope this info helps.

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LMT in Whitman, Massachusetts

106 months ago

Pam,
Check with your local board of health as to the requirements for massage therapy in your town. Also, you should do an extensive intake of your potential clients before you lay a hand on them. I am not saying that people are crazy, but you need to protect yourself from "weirdos". Of course you can have someone else home at the time your massages are scheduled just in case something goes awry. You will learn this in massage school as part of the business section of your education.

Good luck and have fun in your new career!

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Julie in Redmond, Washington

105 months ago

Working out of your home there are many issues to consider:

- home owners insurance will have to be updated to include a home business.
-You may be working on strangers and opening your house to others who you may not really want there. It is important to have a security system in place and learn to screen callers and get a referral system going from those that you trust.
-If you have pets, people may be allergic.
-You will have to keep your house clean all the time.
-You will want a separate bathroom if possible.
-Check zoning laws.
-Is there parking available that is convenient and not intruding on the neighborhood.

thebodyworker.com/massage_blog/setting-up-a-home-office/

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endlesslight in Hilo, Hawaii

105 months ago

No Problem. Best of Luck for your great successful future!

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Yvonne in Desoto, Texas

100 months ago

Pam in Paint Rock, Texas said: Hi,
I am 50 and have just retired from a job I have had for 30 years. I am going to reflexology school and then on to massage school in the Fall. I am very excited about a new career in massage!
My question is, once I am licensed, where should I work?
I have a large bedrood that would probably be perfect for my massage business. I am considering taking out the furniture and setting it up for my business. It looks out into an attrium and would be relaxing for the clients. What are the pros and cons of doing this rather than working in a salon/spa? Trying to make a decision so can start on the room if that is the way to go. Thanks so much!

Hi Pam,
Having a business at your home is a great thing. Be sure to stick to a time schedule. In home massage clients will take more of your time. They like the enviroment and they feels very special. Sometimes they don't see you as a real business. Also set up a follow up appointments to keep them on a regular schedule. Initially, work with people you know. Be careful on how you advertise yourself. Word of mouth work best!!

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Pam in Brownwood, Texas

100 months ago

Thank you for the information! I have been working on my room and atrium and intend to open in Oct as a Certified Reflexologist. I start Massage school on the weekends in Oct too. I am excited and appreciate all the feedback from those already knowledgeable on this. : )
Pam

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Melanie in Belgrade, Montana

99 months ago

From '06-'07 when I was newly licensed, I did home-calls in western NY in a medium-sized city. I primarily advertised on craigslist as well as bulletin boards and word of mouth. From the first month I had an income of $300 & sometimes as much as $850. Over that year, my avg income was ~ $600. This was part-time. About half of my income was regular clients which were gained throughout the year.

If you already have a client base, this could be much easier. People love getting a massage at their home especially if the price is comparable to what other therapist charge at the office. I charged $65 for an hour and never charged a gas/travel fee under normal circumstances. It was great not having any over-head room rental fees. The cost of gas, comparatively is negligible.

A regular client of mine referred me to a friend who worked at a corporate office who wanted someone for a day of chair massage. It wasn't something I usually did. I rented a chair from the massage school as I didn't have one (the company paid for it). I charged $65/hr for a 6 hour day. Did I tell you they even gave me a paid lunch? $400 in one day is not bad! Doing this regularly, I would charge a slightly more reasonable fee, but these companies can certainly afford it and health perks are becoming very popular. Chair massage for hours at a time is really tough on the hands so don't charge too little and take time to stretch between each chair massage. On a side note, I suggest investing in non-disposable (fabric) face-rest covers as well as a good massage chair bag that has wheels. Also, be prepared to massage people through their really starchy shirts (especially the collar!). The higher up in the company, the stiffer the shirt! :)

I would be happy to provide more advice if you need it!

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valerie in Edison, New Jersey

95 months ago

Otheo Muse in Bridgewater, New Jersey said: Hi Pam
I think that doing massages in your home is a great idea. Now that your retired, you can go on your own pase and don't really have to worry if your client base is large.I now work for a chiropractor,a spa on Saturdays and a hair salon on Fridays and Sundays and hate them all.(lol) i would give them all up if i could work for myself and be retired. Just be carful of who your clients are because people are crazy, but working for other people where you are in life and doing massages is not good. you are on the right track, I hope this info helps.
You seem to be making extra money can you pay for your daughter to have her root canal

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jross in Brookville, Pennsylvania

88 months ago

how do you set up a home office for massage in PA?

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hollys in Saint Petersburg, Florida

87 months ago

It's certainly do-able but you need to do a lot of research ahead of time. You need to look into the laws for your area, not just what the state massage association says it wants (if anything.) You may have to deal with getting both city and county business licenses or permits, health inspections, a DBA permit (Doing Business As), maybe even a state tax collection permit (also possibly you might have to pay local taxes too; again it depends on the laws where you live.) Liability insurance is a must. What happens if someone slips and falls on your driveway as they are leaving your house and they sue you? Not good. Zoning rules are huge. Some cities do permit you to run a massage business in your home, but the ordinances or the code might require a separate entrance and bathroom (and there's no way around that if you don't have it, other than move or remodel $$$.) Some areas are going to be zoned for no home business at all, or will not even allow you to put a small sign in the window.

and on top of all that, I would strongly recommend finding a very good accountant, preferably a CPA.

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Kat in Seminole, Florida

82 months ago

Otheo Muse in Bridgewater, New Jersey said: Hi Pam
I think that doing massages in your home is a great idea. Now that your retired, you can go on your own pase and don't really have to worry if your client base is large.I now work for a chiropractor,a spa on Saturdays and a hair salon on Fridays and Sundays and hate them all.(lol) i would give them all up if i could work for myself and be retired. Just be carful of who your clients are because people are crazy, but working for other people where you are in life and doing massages is not good. you are on the right track, I hope this info helps.

Can a Esthetician in florida work out of their home/apt ?

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flamingo in Lakewood, New Jersey

81 months ago

hi i am taking an on line reflexology course. i understand n. j. does not require 'licensure' yet. I am going to try to rent a room in a beauty salon and do treatments there. What kind of liability insurance would I need for this? Thank you so much if you can help.

flamingo

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pam in Brownwood, Texas

81 months ago

Insurance can be obtained through the International Reflexology Association in Warrenton, Va. You will have to be Certified in order to obtain insurance. I had over two hundred hours plus written and hands on testing through the International Institute of Reflexology in St Pete Florida when I opened my office. I would highly recommend this school if you decide to obtain certification. I wish you the best in your new field!

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Lenoir city , Tn. in Smyrna, Georgia

74 months ago

I just finished massage school and am about to take my national exam! My question is if you run your business out of your home what type of insurance do you need to have incase someone slips and fall on your property?

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kingofmiami6 in Dayton, Ohio

74 months ago

i would recommend AMTA insurance for massage therapist. But im not sure if they cover slips and falls in your property.. Put out a wet floor sign? ;)

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kingofmiami6 in Dayton, Ohio

74 months ago

you will make alot more money if you run your own buisness out of your home. But you must make it like a buisness.. CLEAN. NO NOISE. NO PETS. NO SMELLS. PROFESSIONAL.CHAIRS.TABLE.PAPERWORK.ADVERTISING.. Think you can handle it? if so, kiss your 15 an hour salon/part time job good bye after a few months

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Tracy in Bakersfield, California

71 months ago

How does one really screen potential callers when potentially allowing a stranger into your house?

I just finished massage school, and am allowed to have a massage business from my house, thankfully!

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Ruby in Bozeman, Montana

71 months ago

I think the previous comment was very rude... but there is some truth to that. I have previously had a massage business where I went to the client's home. Most of my clients were great. However, there were also a handful of clients that I felt very unsafe around and would NOT invite them into my home. In almost all cases, I was not able to simply screen these people out. On the phone, these clients sounded normal. Only once I arrived at their house (sometimes not until the middle of the massage) did things begin to feel unsafe (varying degrees of lecherousness or behavioral signs of drug-use, etc.). Even in small city Montana where the crime rates are very low, I still worry about the potential combination of drug users/lecherousness and the fact that a lot of people have guns. Thankfully, when I had my home office I didn't have any of these clients come to my house.

My words of advice for any practitioner who goes to hotels, the clients homes or has a home-office... Only do this for established clients or referrals from established clients. I know this is not practical because you would need a massage office and that may not be affordable or ideal in your situation. You could also use the home office/home-calls as a side business to your massage job, like at a spa. This may not be possible because some jobs don't allow you to compete. Another option would be to network with other massage therapists who can refer their clients to you for home-call/home office work. This would be ideal if you and your massage therapist colleague offer different types of massage...

Maybe this is worrying too much. Sometimes it's better to be safe than sorry. The chances of anything happening to you are probably very small, but things DO happen!

Whatever you decide... be safe and good luck!!

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kluc in Houston, Texas

69 months ago

"I have a large bedrood that would probably be perfect for my massage business. I am considering taking out the furniture and setting it up for my business. It looks out into an attrium and would be relaxing for the clients. What are the pros and cons of doing this rather than working in a salon/spa? Trying to make a decision so can start on the room if that is the way to go. Thanks so much!"

I have been in practice 19 years and belong to another massage therapy forum, Bodyworkonline.com. We have had a few threads on the forums which cover this issue.

One of the threads noted this, which may be useful to you:
"checking with your state for regulations about such things, as well as with your local/city. Even if your state will allow you to have a home massage office, your city or local codes may prevent it, or have stipulations on how it is set up, etc.. Things anywhere from whether or not you can have clients coming to your home at all, to how the place it set up, and all sorts of things in between.

I know that in Texas, there is a whole set of regulations on how home massage offices must be set up, including a separate entrance, a dedicated bathroom, and a LOCKABLE door between the massage/business area and the rest of the house/where people sleep. Of course, such stipulations, if followed, would make it easier to prove a home business deduction with the IRS....

Check with:

your state massage board
your city
your homeowner's association, if you have one
your insurance agent (homeowner's insurance by itself probably will NOT cover a business issue; even if you already have something like ABMP or AMTA, your homeowner's insurance needs to know that you're operating a business out of your home).

Different states will have different regulations on how many therapists and what other requirements there are to being registered as a "massage establishment"."

Here's a link to the thread: www.bodyworkonline.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=22338

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kluc in Houston, Texas

69 months ago

I was trying to add a comment, but I am not sure where it went. I'll try again.

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lgh426 in Lake Worth, Florida

56 months ago

Pam in Paint Rock, Texas said: Hi,
I am 50 and have just retired from a job I have had for 30 years. I am going to reflexology school and then on to massage school in the Fall. I am very excited about a new career in massage!
My question is, once I am licensed, where should I work?
I have a large bedrood that would probably be perfect for my massage business . I am considering taking out the furniture and setting it up for my business. It looks out into an attrium and would be relaxing for the clients. What are the pros and cons of doing this rather than working in a salon/spa? Trying to make a decision so can start on the room if that is the way to go. Thanks so much!

You can do it ONLY if you are organized enough to remember to pay your taxes quarterly and other bills paid on time and remember even though it is in your other bedroom, it is still a business. You must also contact the local authorities and see what licences you must have to have a home office, if you can even have a home office. If all that works out, it can be quite a bit of fun and very profitiable. Being your own boss is fun most of the time!

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ifty in United Kingdom

19 months ago

email me if you already have started the massage business
ifty0121@hotmail.co.uk

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Princess Laya in Columbia, South Carolina

8 months ago

Ruby, what permits or licensure did you need when you went to the clients home for massage services?

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