Short Lived RMT's

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Michelle O'Neil in Windsor, Ontario

85 months ago

ohmmmassages in Las Vegas, Nevada said: Watch your body mechanics to preserve yourself. Take continuing education courses to keep your mechanics/posture correct and learn new techniques and strokes that give you a balance between using your hands, fists and forearms. People usually burnout after about 2-3 years of full-time massage. So I recommend cutting back your schedule to part-time before you reach this and teach for a couple years (You'll burnout from this in about 2-3 years also). Then you can return to full-time massage if you want. You can even work a part-time job and do part-time massage so you have a nice balance. I've done all of the above and my best advice is the same I give my students: make time for yourself every week, take vacations, take classes and listen to your heart - when you start disliking massage it's time to take a break and re-explore what you love about massage. Always remember to massage from your heart and NOT from your client's wallet; your client can feel the difference in your touch and it will affect your gratuity. Finally, gratuities are a reflection of your client's gratitude for the relief you provide (within his/her financial means), so be greatful for any and all gratuities received no matter how big or small. Work for your fee/commission and stash your tips away for the slow season. (P.S. Most people paying with a gift certificate do not tip so don't expect it and just be pleasantly suprised when you get one.) I hope this helps. If you need any other general assistance, please email me at dr_mehudar@ohmmmassages.org.

Thank you for your reply. I replied to you via e-mail my emial address is bdazzledim1@yahoo.ca

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Julie in Redmond, Washington

81 months ago

Body mechanics and the physical challenges of being a massage therapist is really only the tip of the iceberg.
What leads to burnout and causes the physical challenges is trying to hard to help others.

A career in massage is more about learning to take care of yourself and set boundaries that support your needs for making money and working with people.

Most people have a hidden agenda under their ideas about helping others that also leads to burnout. Learning about yourself and becoming aware of the reasons why you help are more important than learning any massage technique.

www.massagetherapycareers.com
www.thebodyworker.com

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tranettew in Chicago, Illinois

80 months ago

Okay the average burnout is definitely not 2-3 years. You have to have some REALLY bad body mechanics for that. The average career for a massage therapist, according to the AMTA is 7 years. I know a couple of therapists who have been working for 10 years or more so it's really about how committed you are to doing self-care, cont. ed, and checking your body mechanics. Clearly, you won't be doing 40 hours of massage a week but even if you work full time for a therapist (20-30hrs), you should be fine if you do what you need to to ensure your longevity as a bodyworker.

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Kelly in Atlanta, Georgia

78 months ago

I have an urgent need for a travel physical therapist for a 10 week assignment in Southern California. Must be available immediately and have current California license.
Position is Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 pm, with rotating weekends.
Paid travel/housing. This is a hospital setting, inpatient acute care experience is a must.
If you or anyone you know is interested, please contact Kelly Morgan @ 866.574.8874 x5979 or email kmorgan@trilliumhr.com

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Jane in Orangeville, Ontario

65 months ago

What is the average age that RMTs retire? What does a RMT usually do for their next career? I am 48 years old and am considering becoming an RMT. Am I too old?

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Ohmmmassages in Las Vegas, Nevada

64 months ago

You are NEVER too old to become a Massage Therapist. And honestly, you never really retired. Even if you only massage family and friends when in dire need of relief. :)

The age an RMT or LMT retires is relative to the age a person is when they begin, how many hours of massage you do a week, how much rejuvenation and vacation you take, if you use proper body mechanics, etc.

Even if one changes from working in a clinic or spa to teaching, you really haven't retired.

What I WOULD encourage you to do, is meet someone at the school and learn how much hard work you're going to need to put in just to be able to work. I've heard Canada requires a 4 year degree. Let that aide you in making your decision to change careers.

Whatever you decide to do, I wish you well!

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MUR in Surrey, British Columbia

61 months ago

What is the entry level wage of an RMT/LMT? If you are working 8 hours a day, does it mean that you'll have 8 clients a day? What do you do when you're not with a client?

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thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington

61 months ago

$12-$15 an hour. You usually do not work on 8 clients a day - maybe 5-6. If you don't have a client you get paid minimum wage. You usually clean the bathroom, fold sheets, do laundry, clean shelves...

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SincerelyYours in Georgetown, Ontario

59 months ago

Just wanted to let you know that to be an RMT in Ontario, Canada it is not a 4 year degree but a 2 year diploma in private career colleges and 3 years in an Ontario college.

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Doug RMT in Campbell River, British Columbia

58 months ago

RMTs do not get paid (in most cases) like a normal profession. 98% of us do not get an hourly wage, but instead get paid only for the treatments we do. At this time it is usually $70-80 per hour. If you work for yourself, it is al yours, but then you have to cover your own overhead/expenses. Another option is to work in a spa/clinic, where they will take a percentage of that amount (they take between 25-50% dependinig on the place and your negotiating skills). The average RMT will see between 10 and 30 people a week, depending on their clietnele and how many people they can see in a single day. Most chose between 3-6 per day and between 3 and 6 days/week.

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Nibz in Delta, British Columbia

54 months ago

Michelle O'Neil in Windsor, Ontario said: I am seriously considering going back to school to become a RMT. Based on my research in the labour market, personal experience in recieving massage, all the reading I have done on what I will learn about natural healing; I find that this career change would suite my personality and would be an extremely rewarding career - both financially and spiritually.

I would be completely changing my career direction though, because for the last 20-years I have been in Marketing, Fundraising and Public Relations. Since I started doing all this research there is one reaccuring criticism about the RMT field. Many people have said that it is a short lived career because it is HARD on the RMT's body and that they burn out quickly or eventually are forced, due to physical demands on their bodies, to only work part time.

How true is this? If this is true than how do RMT's work around this in order to still remain in the field of Massage Therapy?(

NOTE: I am 40-years-old and in great physcial shape.

Actually, right now I'm stuck between choosing to studying Marketing or register for the RMT program, and I'm a little confused. Can you give me any tips or suggestions, since your well experienced in Marketing. I'm 24 years old and would take me about 2 years 2 finish either choice.
Thanks, please if you could get back to me.

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Idea in Clinton Township, Michigan

53 months ago

Nibz in Delta, British Columbia said: Actually, right now I'm stuck between choosing to studying Marketing or register for the RMT program, and I'm a little confused. Can you give me any tips or suggestions, since your well experienced in Marketing. I'm 24 years old and would take me about 2 years 2 finish either choice.
Thanks, please if you could get back to me.

I would do BOTH, but first start with Massage therapy. After you finish MT program, you can move on to marketing and still be a Massage Therapist..the beauty of the field! Flexability!

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Idea in Clinton Township, Michigan

53 months ago

20 hours of massage is concidered full time. It can be a lot of work depending on how demanding your clients are :D It is not a normal hourly wage typically, and depending where you work will debate on tips. Working under a chiropracter, a MT may not see as many tips as a spa or salon venue. But, I have found it proveds a safe theraputic enviroment and working along with a Doctor can be great. Depends on your goals. I have not known any MT to make 70k a year..most make from 12-18/ hr, or get 30% commissions...There is a lot of hype around the profession, and only the truely passionate will stick with it...it takes a lot of self motivation and passion to stay in the field. The class i was in maybe 20% of the students stuck with it..the rest moved on to other professions.

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SBwell in Coeur D Alene, Idaho

51 months ago

Michelle O'Neil in Windsor, Ontario said: I am seriously considering going back to school to become a RMT. Based on my research in the labour market, personal experience in recieving massage, all the reading I have done on what I will learn about natural healing; I find that this career change would suite my personality and would be an extremely rewarding career - both financially and spiritually.

I would be completely changing my career direction though, because for the last 20-years I have been in Marketing, Fundraising and Public Relations. Since I started doing all this research there is one reaccuring criticism about the RMT field. Many people have said that it is a short lived career because it is HARD on the RMT's body and that they burn out quickly or eventually are forced, due to physical demands on their bodies, to only work part time.

How true is this? If this is true than how do RMT's work around this in order to still remain in the field of Massage Therapy?(

NOTE: I am 40-years-old and in great physcial shape.

I am 56 years young & have joyfully been practicing massage therapy for 23 years. I began my career at 33 and was in fairly good shape to start with as I had been a recreation director and swim instructor - worked out at the gym periodically. Though as I got bussier I started to slack on the gym workouts and only hike/jog/walked and swam a bit. I ratonalized that my work kept me fit. Occassionaly I would work out with free weights and stretch at home and at work. Last year I finally got serious - got back into the gym. I began using the mashines & free wieights,stretching & hike/jog/walking w my dog at least 2-3X per week. This new regime has put new vim and vigor into my passion. I'm even coming up with inovative moves that are ispired by getting back in touch with how my own body functions.And my workouts are more inspiring because of the years of on-hands anatomical study and manipulation. Uz ur marketing experince :)

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findingmypassion in Denver, Colorado

50 months ago

I am a 41-year-old citizen of the USA and after 9 years in information technology and 7 years of being a full-time stay-at-home mom, have been working for 2 years in windpower. I have received a couple of years of matrix repatterning treatments from my chiropractor/wholistic docter here in Denver, and would really like to change to working with or for matrix repatterning--something that I passionately believe in.

The question is, how best to support the cause? Would I be able to take any massage courses in Colorado, transfer them to Canada, finish an RMT, then become certified in matrix repatterning? Would it be better to somehow advocate for matrix repatterning locally here? Any suggestions? Thanks!

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evelise in Houston, Texas

46 months ago

Julie in Redmond, Washington said: Body mechanics and the physical challenges of being a massage therapist is really only the tip of the iceberg.
What leads to burnout and causes the physical challenges is trying to hard to help others.

A career in massage is more about learning to take care of yourself and set boundaries that support your needs for making money and working with people.

Most people have a hidden agenda under their ideas about helping others that also leads to burnout. Learning about yourself and becoming aware of the reasons why you help are more important than learning any massage technique.

www.massagetherapycareers.com
www.thebodyworker.com

Uau.....One of the best, if not the best post about MT career expectancy.

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evelise in Houston, Texas

46 months ago

In big cities (USA) you can top 90,000 US dollars working hard,really hard but then at the end of the year you'll be completely burn out. That happened to me and I'd say: not worth it!
I had other colleagues that went through the same and one of them start to have panic attacks which was unknown to her before. I believe that there's a lot of electricity transferred from body to body and other "energies" as well . Now I work doing something else with my daughter and massage only part time.
Good luck !

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cheryl in Houston, Texas

45 months ago

Maria in Eau Claire, Wisconsin said: I am 5'in height and petite. Everyone around me says that I am too small to do this type of work. Any advice would be appreciated.
Thank you

theres always room for nice relaxing swedish massages

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luc in Houston, Texas

39 months ago

What a great group of therapists. I hope you will all consider chiming in at bodyworkonline. com

My personal note to this thread is that I have been in practice for over ten years, and find that boundaries are very necessary. If you let the clients take too much energy, you will burn out. But it doesn't have to be. I am in my mid 40's.

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jackie in Melbourne, Australia

29 months ago

I am 66yrs old and have massaged for 22yrs and have just started another advanced course for two yrs and had to have a hip operation this year, but am still doing the course and think I can work for another 6yrs. It depends on how well u look after your bones and keep fairly fit. Drink lots of water and limit your massages to how many u feel you can manage a day.My answer is go for it and relax while doing a massage.

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reAnn in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

25 months ago

Then stay in good shape and do not become a massage therapist!!! I have been a therapist since 1999 and I have aches and pains every day of my life due to years of wear and tear. You have to stand on your feet all day which is not good for your back, knees, or feet. You have to hold yourself in slightly awkward positions all day which is not good for any part of your body. You have to use your precious hands all day which can lead to arthritis down the road as giving massage puts a lot of strain on joints. Wrists take a lot of impact, too. I am not the only one with many aches and pains, as I have friends who have been in the industry for years and they are exhausted and hurting pretty much all the time. Too, the income is not that great bc you work hourly so there is a cap to how much you can make unless you are going to do seminars and sell products in addition to giving massages. Schools want your money so don't be fooled by what they tell you about using proper body mechanics and getting regular treatments for yourself. Also if you go to a massage therapist and ask them, they often want you to have such a great experience that they will tell you they love being a massage therapist and that it doesn't hurt them too much. They may also tell you this because they themselves have to be in this mind-set just to make it through the day. My advice is to save your body. Learn a little massage on your own to do on friends and family once in awhile. I think it is a great thing to know how to do but I don't think it is a great thing to do day in and day out for pay, week to week.

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r in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

25 months ago

Maria in Eau Claire, Wisconsin said: I am 5'in height and petite. Everyone around me says that I am too small to do this type of work. Any advice would be appreciated.
Thank you

I am petite and have been practicing since 99'. If you do decide to go into the field: I would not recommend massaging men and I would not recommend you ever do deep tissue on women. Also, limit yourself to doing only one session per day. Take at least two days off a wk for your own muscle recovery time.
I am paying for years of massaging people much larger than myself, doing too many massages a day, and giving deep tissue.
Go to a school that won't cost you an arm and a leg, because you should only do this work very minimally. I am having to change career paths bc it just doesn't make sense for me to be in this much pain all of the time. god bless

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sonya in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

25 months ago

Maria in Eau Claire, Wisconsin said: I am 5'in height and petite. Everyone around me says that I am too small to do this type of work. Any advice would be appreciated.
Thank you

another thing to consider if you wish to run your own practice: you will have to deal with a lot of perverts. it gets old fast. I am not the only one who has had this experience, as I have talked to other women in the profession who have said the same thing.
If you are young (18 to 45) and fairly attractive running a private practice/your own single establishment, or even if you are working for someone else, you will run into this problem and it is a bad feeling every time. trust me.

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Eddie in Denton, Texas

23 months ago

jackie in Melbourne, Australia said: I am 66yrs old and have massaged for 22yrs and have just started another advanced course for two yrs and had to have a hip operation this year, but am still doing the course and think I can work for another 6yrs. It depends on how well u look after your bones and keep fairly fit. Drink lots of water and limit your massages to how many u feel you can manage a day.My answer is go for it and relax while doing a massage.

Hi Jackie, I'm in my 3rd week of massage school. How many hours a week were you massaging all that time for 22yrs? Can you tell us more about how you lasted so many years after starting in your mid forties? Thanks, Eddie

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DD RMT in Vancouver, British Columbia

23 months ago

I have practiced almost 30 years. I have not burned out. In school, we were taught we would "burn out" in 7 years. It did not happen. However, I have had many physical challenges in these three decades of practice. First of all, I am a body-builder and have seriously lifted weights for more than 30 years. I specifically trained my hands before I went to massage school and I never stopped training at school or after graduation. My point is that I was in top shape. Even so, the ligaments and small muscles in my hands almost stopped me from practicing my first year. Then they spontaneously healed. My back began to become unbalanced from using the massage table more on one side than the other (which means using my body on one side more than the other) because people have their problems on one side most of the time (the same side). We were taught to use both sides of the table for this reason, but it is not possible without straining in other ways reaching across the table. Also, in the past 30 years, massage tables have become wider. There is no physical necessity for this, and it puts more strain on the therapist's back reaching across. The reason for the wider table is economic: so the same table can be sold for acupuncture where the patient's arms have to be on the table and not below. So, in conclusion, there is no certainty but the better shape you are in the longer you will probably last. Consider this in your equation: you can only work one patient at a time. How many hours do you need to work--to retire one day? Because that is your limitation. One patient per hour or so for 4 hours or so. Some therapists try to work longer hours and get away with it for awhile--and then sometimes need an operation. Physical therapy takes longer to study but you can work more than one patient per hour and it is easier work.

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Runa in Tobyhanna, Pennsylvania

22 months ago

Michelle O'Neil in Windsor, Ontario said: I am seriously considering going back to school to become a RMT. Based on my research in the labour market, personal experience in recieving massage, all the reading I have done on what I will learn about natural healing; I find that this career change would suite my personality and would be an extremely rewarding career - both financially and spiritually.

I would be completely changing my career direction though, because for the last 20-years I have been in Marketing, Fundraising and Public Relations. Since I started doing all this research there is one reaccuring criticism about the RMT field. Many people have said that it is a short lived career because it is HARD on the RMT's body and that they burn out quickly or eventually are forced, due to physical demands on their bodies, to only work part time.

How true is this? If this is true than how do RMT's work around this in order to still remain in the field of Massage Therapy?(

NOTE: I am 40-years-old and in great physcial shape.

Hi Michelle, massage can be a rewarding career from both your self and the client I have been in practice for 12 years with no injury or burnout there are techniques you can develop for any modality both swedish and deep tissue that you learn to develop that you can use that requires the whole body and knuckles and elbows that prevent fatigue instead of using just your arms, fingers, and thumbs which can become injured if used excessively and you can also use those technidques to preform relaxtion massage too as many think those techniques are for just deep tissue. here is a example of classes out there tho this one is home study that gives you a idea www.authmethod.com/workshops/ and there are many live classes on the subject as well so dont let the idea of burnout prevent you from pursuing your goals in this field. wish you good luck in your pursuits..let us know how it goes!! and I too Im in my 40's..

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Karin in Brookings, South Dakota

19 months ago

thebodyworker in Seattle, Washington said: $12-$15 an hour. You usually do not work on 8 clients a day - maybe 5-6. If you don't have a client you get paid minimum wage. You usually clean the bathroom, fold sheets, do laundry , clean shelves...

WOW! your pay rate is terrible!! I'd find a new spa to work at if I where you!

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robbie@hypnosistrainingcanada.com in Burlington, Ontario

3 months ago

You may want to consider becoming a hypnotist to compliment your massage therapy career. That way you can heal the body and the mind. If you do it right, you can enjoy a great career of helping people and earn a very high income. Your body can heal because it will be less physical. I have been a hypnotist for 8 years and counting, and it was a great career choice.

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