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Patrice in Houston, Texas

58 months ago

Medical coding is EXTREMELY difficult to enter. Most employers require at least 2 years of experience. I am currently studying for my R.H.I.T. exam (Registered Health Information Technician) which is a 2 year associate degree... If you do not having coding experience, I would not suggest obtaining just a coding certificate which usually takes a few months. Employers will hire a 2 year graduate. ALSO, let me warn you of those medical coding/billing schools that ARE NOT ACCREDITED. Do not waste your time and money on these schools. Go to the AHIMA website (you can just google that) and they have information on schools accredited in various states. Good luck! H.I.M. is a great field. It will only grow with the implementation of EHR (electronic health records)... A friend finished before me and received her certification in 2008 and already make $50,000 a year. Good luck to you.

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Jejunum in Mesa, Arizona

58 months ago

You mean a MLM?

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Patrice in Houston, Texas

58 months ago

I enjoyed my program. The program was not very demanding. The only class I took more then once was first coding class. There was option to take that in class and I should have, prob. wouldnt have taken twice. When I realized there were so many areas of H.I.M, I enjoyed even more. Yes my goal is to become a R.H.I.A. and I am looking for online programs for the Fall 2010 semester.

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Marianne in Venice, Florida

58 months ago

Patrice in Houston, Texas said: Medical coding is EXTREMELY difficult to enter. Most employers require at least 2 years of experience. I am currently studying for my R.H.I.T. exam (Registered Health Information Technician) which is a 2 year associate degree... If you do not having coding experience, I would not suggest obtaining just a coding certificate which usually takes a few months. Employers will hire a 2 year graduate. ALSO, let me warn you of those medical coding/billing schools that ARE NOT ACCREDITED. Do not waste your time and money on these schools. Go to the AHIMA website (you can just google that) and they have information on schools accredited in various states. Good luck! H.I.M. is a great field. It will only grow with the implementation of EHR (electronic health records)... A friend finished before me and received her certification in 2008 and already make $50,000 a year. Good luck to you.

Hi Patrice - I have been a medical/radiology transcriptionist for 11 years, and now I want to learn coding -- do you have any suggestions for someone like me? Thanks!

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Jejunum in Mesa, Arizona

58 months ago

So I've done a bit of research in the last few days but I'm still unclear on what jobs a person with RHIT certification would be eligible for?

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Jejunum in Mesa, Arizona

58 months ago

Talked to a couple of OT friends the other day and they say with the switch to EMR, they are doing their own coding - just a couple of clicks after seeing a patient and it's all done.

If the progression is toward more EMR, won't that mean that practitioners will be doing the coding instead of staff?

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Ashley in Cape Coral, Florida

54 months ago

Patrice in Houston, Texas said: Marianne, as I stated to the above lady coding is very difficult to break into. Since you have medical records experience in the form of transcription I would also recommend your 2 year degree in health information. At least, with degree and your R.H.I.T. credentials you can supervise/manage and sometimes become a director of medical records with all your years of experience. Also, since you want to code employers are more willing to employ a R.H.I.T. at entry level coding vs just someone with a certificate and no coding experience.

how do you gain experience then?

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Mendy in Hemet, California

41 months ago

Patrice in Houston, Texas said: I enjoyed my program. The program was not very demanding. The only class I took more then once was first coding class. There was option to take that in class and I should have, prob. wouldnt have taken twice. When I realized there were so many areas of H.I.M, I enjoyed even more. Yes my goal is to become a R.H.I.A. and I am looking for online programs for the Fall 2010 semester.

Thanks for your blog I found your information helpful. Let me ask you, I’m in the process of changing careers I was trying to get into nursing school but it has been so challenging to get into. There is a 2 year waiting list for a lot of the colleges here in CA. I ran across the R.H.I.M program, the program sounds very interesting and seems like it falls in line with my educational background. I have a degree already in business and have several years of experience in pharmaceutical sales. I have applied to the R.H.I.M program and will be starting the program this fall. However, I'm just concerned that once I graduate from the program it may be difficult for me to get a job in the field because I don't have any coding experience and I haven't really seen a lot of job posting in my area for H.I.M do you have any advice?

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patrice in Mesquite, Texas

41 months ago

Hi Mendy. With your current education level, I would direct you into seeking credentials for individuals with their 4 year degree already. I do believe some schools offer a certification if you already hold a degree. Now to answer your question, obtaining a degree in H.I.M. does NOT mean you are limited to H.I.M. There are a ton of other fields out there with individuals that decide going the traditional route of medical records/coding is not for them. My current job title is nurse auditor. LOL. I am not a nurse, however my education in Health Information falls in the category and was giving the position. H.I.M. degree has many opportunities, you just have to do your research. A rule of thumb: when seeking a job review the requirements for position. If they advertise for nursing and it does not involve actual nursing on the floor/patient care, I would advise to apply. Our curriculum is almost identical as nursing students, except we are less patient driven. Coding is very difficult to get into. Even with my experience, and currently in a RHIA program, I still find it difficult to obtain coding job. Which is understandable because a hospital would be risking possible audits and large amounts of money if coding isn't accurate. I hope I was helpful to you and answered your question. Thanks!

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Mendy in Murrieta, California

41 months ago

wow, thank you for the advice especially the hint on how to apply for jobs that have nurse in the title. I really would like to stay in touch with you once I start my certification program and I'm actively seeking employment.

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patrice in Dallas, Texas

41 months ago

Sure thing!

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patrice in San Antonio, Texas

41 months ago

Lol, sorry I'm not logged in so my location is constantly changing now I'm in San Antonio. :) Anyway, my current position was obtained because of the experience I gained while in school. My first job I received was performance improvement/quality auditor. Honestly, I was lucky to even receive that job, because I had no experience and I heard so many horror stories about students not being able to locate jobs right out of school. But, I wonder if that is because they are only looking at H.I.M. jobs and not ALL jobs as I recommended in earlier post. My advice is do your research and determine what area you would like to work. Once you determine, be aggressive. Apply to jobs, volunteer, work part time, whatever you MUST in order to gain experience. Experience is all employers want. I have a friend who just graduated nursing and she can't find a job because lack of experience. Plus, when you are assigned your practicum NETWORK NETWORK NETWORK. When you refer to RHIM exam are you referring to the RHIT (2 year) or RHIA(4 year)? I have put off the RHIT for a few years because I kept receiving jobs,lol. I have applied for the RHIT and plan to take this month. I hear the RHIT exam is more difficult because we are usually the supervisors or the workers and have to know what to do. The RHIA is more administrative and is less difficult. I begin the remaining 2 years for RHIA this summer. Yes, there will be stats on the exam. And no need for coding/billing training with RHIT exam because you learn coding in your program.

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Mendy in Orange, California

41 months ago

your such a great resource you should do a "Youtube" video" :)

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patrice in San Antonio, Texas

41 months ago

Well thanks, I thought about Youtube but there is another lady on there. She is also very informative about the H.I.M. profession and I believe she has several videos out there. Sorry can't think of her name.

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

patrice in San Antonio, Texas said: Well thanks, I thought about Youtube but there is another lady on there. She is also very informative about the H.I.M. profession and I believe she has several videos out there. Sorry can't think of her name.

Hi Patrice. I am considering a degree in HIM. Please tell me what you honestly like, and do not like about your profession. That would be helpful, thanks so much!

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patrice in San Antonio, Texas

41 months ago

Hi Joy. I enjoy the flexibility in my profession, and I also wanted a career in medical field without patient care. So H.I.M. was the best option. As with flexibility, H.I.M. is a profession where you can literally fit in anywhere with the appropriate experience. Unlike going to school for let's say a teacher, you are pretty much a teacher your whole career. But, let's say you really enjoy coding but 5 years from now, you can't stand to enter another code in a hospital well you can go somewhere and fit in other places. As for my dislikes, honestly I am so new in my career 2 years now that at this point I do not have any dislikes. Thanks!

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recess lights in Bangalore, India

41 months ago

Patrice in Houston, Texas said: Medical coding is EXTREMELY difficult to enter. Most employers require at least 2 years of experience. I am currently studying for my R.H.I.T. exam (Registered Health Information Technician) which is a 2 year associate degree... If you do not having coding experience, I would not suggest obtaining just a coding certificate which usually takes a few months. Employers will hire a 2 year graduate. ALSO, let me warn you of those medical coding/billing schools that ARE NOT ACCREDITED. Do not waste your time and money on these schools. Go to the AHIMA website (you can just google that) and they have information on schools accredited in various states. Good luck! H.I.M. is a great field. It will only grow with the implementation of EHR (electronic health records)... A friend finished before me and received her certification in 2008 and already make $50,000 a year. Good luck to you.

valuable info.

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

Well, thank you for responding! See, I wouldn't have guessed flexibility in this field just because it seems such a serious profession. I love flexibility. Do you find the work very stressful, or do you get any eye strain from looking at a computer all day? I am new to administrative work, and these are the types of questions that occur to me. Also, you don't see EHR implementation putting coding at risk for losing many jobs to outsourcing, do you?
Also, the college I'm considering teaches ICD- 10, is that a good system?
I am very glad you love your career so far, and I pray that continues for you.

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

Jejunum in Mesa, Arizona said: I've been a massage therapist for over a decade and am wanting to supplement my income with medical coding/billing. Where do I start?

Is there a governing body of coders? How long is the schooling? I would prefer a physical school as opposed to online. Is there a school in the Phoenix area that offers coding and billing instruction? Thanks for any answers y'all can provide!

Did you go into coding after all?

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Deena in Suwanee, Georgia

41 months ago

Joy in Omaha, Nebraska said: Well, thank you for responding! See, I wouldn't have guessed flexibility in this field just because it seems such a serious profession. I love flexibility. Do you find the work very stressful, or do you get any eye strain from looking at a computer all day? I am new to administrative work, and these are the types of questions that occur to me. Also, you don't see EHR implementation putting coding at risk for losing many jobs to outsourcing, do you?
Also, the college I'm considering teaches ICD- 10, is that a good system?
I am very glad you love your career so far, and I pray that continues for you.

I would highly recommend checking out the "Medical Records and Health Information Technicians" section of bls.gov. Good luck.

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valentine in Park City, Utah

41 months ago

Joy in Omaha, Nebraska said: Well, thank you for responding! See, I wouldn't have guessed flexibility in this field just because it seems such a serious profession. I love flexibility. Do you find the work very stressful, or do you get any eye strain from looking at a computer all day? I am new to administrative work, and these are the types of questions that occur to me. Also, you don't see EHR implementation putting coding at risk for losing many jobs to outsourcing, do you?
Also, the college I'm considering teaches ICD- 10, is that a good system?
I am very glad you love your career so far, and I pray that continues for you.

EHR eliminating coders has been the scare for many years, I don't see it happening. There is too much gray area when it comes to coding. Software is too analytical to be able to code accurately. and coding is all about being accurate, to receive the highest possible reimbursement.

Hopefully your school will mainly focus on ICD 9 since ICD 10 will not be implemented in the US until Oct 2013.

My employer already has us becoming familiar I 10 and it certainly will fix some issues that ICD 9 has had, but it will be a long transition, getting everyone up to speed.

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

Deena in Suwanee, Georgia said: I would highly recommend checking out the "Medical Records and Health Information Technicians" section of bls.gov. Good luck.

I already did. But I can't hear enough from actual workers in the field- that's where the real story is. Thanks, though.

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

valentine in Park City, Utah said: EHR eliminating coders has been the scare for many years, I don't see it happening. There is too much gray area when it comes to coding. Software is too analytical to be able to code accurately. and coding is all about being accurate, to receive the highest possible reimbursement.

Hopefully your school will mainly focus on ICD 9 since ICD 10 will not be implemented in the US until Oct 2013.

My employer already has us becoming familiar I 10 and it certainly will fix some issues that ICD 9 has had, but it will be a long transition, getting everyone up to speed.

I think they probably teach ICD 9 also, but they want me to know that they are competitive. They claim their students get hired fine without experience because their are not enough experienced coders to go around.
So, was that a yes on the eye strain, and do you find your work very stressful?

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valentine in Park City, Utah

41 months ago

Joy in Omaha, Nebraska said: I think they probably teach ICD 9 also, but they want me to know that they are competitive. They claim their students get hired fine without experience because their are not enough experienced coders to go around.
So, was that a yes on the eye strain, and do you find your work very stressful?

I don't know about their claim in regards to employment...while there is a shortage of experienced coders, from what I have observed, most employers would rather leave a position vacant then fill it with a new grad.....It isn't very fair, but seems to be the way of the world.

I do not have eye strain. I am up often enough that my eyes take a break. The only time I feel stress is sometimes meeting productivity when I have had a couple difficult charts in a row.

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

Thank you for your response. I want to know all I can before going into this field because I wont stay anywhere if I'm unhappy. I'm glad you don't have eye strain, and that you seem to have only moderate stress. Can I ask you, do you have to speak to physicians often? I know their handwriting is hard to read and I wonder how you can read it.
I told the director I had been on this forum doing research and asking around and shared some of what I've learned about the difficulties people are having. But she said students are finding work. I don't know. She didn't know how many out of the most recent class of 38 were employed as coders, but she gave me names of facilities where they went to, Med Center, several hospitals, etc. I know they just want me to enroll, but I will base my decision on my gut in the end. Sounds like a comfortable job for me. Thanks again!

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valentine in Park City, Utah

41 months ago

Joy in Omaha, Nebraska said: Thank you for your response. I want to know all I can before going into this field because I wont stay anywhere if I'm unhappy. I'm glad you don't have eye strain, and that you seem to have only moderate stress. Can I ask you, do you have to speak to physicians often? I know their handwriting is hard to read and I wonder how you can read it.
I told the director I had been on this forum doing research and asking around and shared some of what I've learned about the difficulties people are having. But she said students are finding work. I don't know. She didn't know how many out of the most recent class of 38 were employed as coders, but she gave me names of facilities where they went to, Med Center, several hospitals, etc. I know they just want me to enroll, but I will base my decision on my gut in the end. Sounds like a comfortable job for me. Thanks again!

I don't speak with them often, I send queries if I have issues with documentation or their handwriting (I work at a facility that still has paper charts, rather than EMR/EHR) but that will change in the next couple of months as we will switch to concurrent coding and I will speak to the providers each day.

Is she saying these students have coding jobs? I have no doubt that most probably got hired at a medical center or a hospital, but I don't think they are working as coders, probably something else in HIM, which is fine, that is how we all start out, but I think she might be misleading when she reports statistics.

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

Valentine, yes, she says these are for coding jobs. She thinks because her students are getting training on ICD 10 that gets them the jobs. We have a large medical community here, but I would not be surprised if she is misleading. Still, I could do another HIM job as long as it wasn't unenjoyable and it paid the bills.
So concurrent coding means you will speak to physicians everyday? How do you feel about that?

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valentine in Park City, Utah

41 months ago

Joy in Omaha, Nebraska said: Valentine, yes, she says these are for coding jobs. She thinks because her students are getting training on ICD 10 that gets them the jobs. We have a large medical community here, but I would not be surprised if she is misleading. Still, I could do another HIM job as long as it wasn't unenjoyable and it paid the bills.
So concurrent coding means you will speak to physicians everyday? How do you feel about that?

With inpatient coding, there is either retrospective (after the patient has been disharged) or concurrent (during the patients stay) So when we go concurrent, I will round each day to and read the patients chart, at that point if I have questions or if there are documentation issues I can speak to the physicians and they can document it then, rather than waiting until the patient is discharged, me reading the chart, sending it back and waiting for an answer. This process is supposed to help CDI (clinical documentation improvement)to run smoother.

I am actually looking forward to being concurrent, I hope the process will help the physicians to be more thorough in their documentation and me more accurate in my coding which all together should result in higher reimbursement for my facility. As I said, we haven't started it yet, so I am sure there will be some hurdles as we implement it, but I hope it will end up being beneficial.

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valentine in Park City, Utah

41 months ago

@Joy- in regards to your original question, pretty much everywhere I have worked, I have had little interaction with providers. When I first started out in a very small clinic, we would talk to the doctors all the time if we had a coding issue. But they have now centralized most coding depts, so we are usually separate from the clinical side and rarely see the providers we code for.

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Mendy in Riverside, California

41 months ago

From the research I have done everyone who currently has either HIM/HIT have said it is difficult to gain employment as coder in healthcare. If you want to work in a healthcare facility and can't get a job as a coder what are some other positions/job titles you could get with HIM/HIT degree to get your foot in the door at a healthcare facility?

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

41 months ago

valentine in Park City, Utah said: @Joy- in regards to your original question, pretty much everywhere I have worked, I have had little interaction with providers. When I first started out in a very small clinic, we would talk to the doctors all the time if we had a coding issue. But they have now centralized most coding depts, so we are usually separate from the clinical side and rarely see the providers we code for.

Sounds like you will soon be having more interactions with providers, and that you feel good about it. I don't know how I feel about doctors in general, but I suppose it doesn't matter- whatever makes the job easier or more effective. Thanks.

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Rak in Reading, Pennsylvania

37 months ago

Hi all, i would like to know which one is better doing for getting a job

a CPC course from AAPC

or

RHIT from AHIMA
Pls help

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Gail in Sherman, Texas

37 months ago

Rak in Reading, Pennsylvania said: Hi all, i would like to know which one is better doing for getting a job

a CPC course from AAPC

or

RHIT from AHIMA
Pls help


CPC is for outpatient and physician-based coding; RHIT, RHIA, CCS, CCA is for inpatient coding (hospital, LTAC, etc.). So it really depends on which course you prefer to go. However, I would recommend you get both a CCA (entry-level) AND CPC. I think it might be easier to get a job at an outpatient site or physician's office than it is with inpatient - most coders I've talked to say inpatient is more difficult to break into.

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Ernie in Glendale, Arizona

36 months ago

I am currently doing to my two year degree to become an RHIT. This is going to be a totally new field for me, so I don't know what to expect salary wise. I have seen that it varies greatly. Yet: can someone share what you can potentially make as an entry level RHIT? It kind of scares me that I have seen salaries as low as 26k a year. I am hoping for something a little better ;)

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Ernie in Glendale, Arizona

36 months ago

I am currently doing to my two year degree to become an RHIT. This is going to be a totally new field for me, so I don't know what to expect salary wise. I have seen that it varies greatly. Yet: can someone share what you can potentially make as an entry level RHIT? It kind of scares me that I have seen salaries as low as 26k a year. I am hoping for something a little better ;)

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anonymous in Fulton, Mississippi

32 months ago

Jejunum in Mesa, Arizona said: I've been a massage therapist for over a decade and am wanting to supplement my income with medical coding/billing. Where do I start?

Is there a governing body of coders? How long is the schooling? I would prefer a physical school as opposed to online. Is there a school in the Phoenix area that offers coding and billing instruction? Thanks for any answers y'all can provide!

I would use this program to help when taking the Certified Coding Specialist Exam. This product is worth every penny. You will need to succesfully pass a RHIT program from an accredited school.

http://396313j62fsj6l18ybsej8od7o.hop.clickbank.net/?tid=BUSTER14

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Burned out RN in Santa Cruz, California

32 months ago

I've over 15 years RN experience in Acute Care including Nephrology,Med/Surg and Apheresis. I've not researched RN coder training. Do you have any RN resources for ICD-10 coding available for Registered Nurses. Should I also train ICD-9 classes? Thanks

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danifirl78 in Seaford, New York

30 months ago

Hello everyone,

I was reading everyone's comments about medical/coding billing. I am looking into getting a degree. But i am not sure where ti start. I am looking into online schools since i have 2 children. Any suggestions???

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CPC Training in Los Angeles, California

30 months ago

The Altegra Health Certified Professional Coder (CPC) Training Program teaches all aspects of Medical Coding in a logical sequence as well as prepares the individual for the National coding certification examination. Our curriculum is prepared and approved by the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC), the organization that administers the national certification exam. All of our instructors have been specially trained by the AAPC to teach its Professional Medical Coding Curriculum (PMCC) in a classroom or online environment.

The course curriculum is presented in a 21-chapter format. The program is 21 weeks. Students may choose to achieve CPC certification upon successful completion of AAPC’s Professional Medical Coding Curriculum. Our online program is interactive and taught by a live instructor who will speak to you and answer your questions in our virtual classroom. For more information contact marcie.hughes@altegrahealth.com or visit www.altegrahealth.com

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dee@ in New York, New York

29 months ago

Hello,

I did coding and billing for 6 years and have 65 credits toward an AAS in medical office technology. Stopped working in the medical coding field in around 2006 and earn a masters in special education looking to start working in the field of medical coding and billing again to supplement may income thinking about attending a 5 month medical coding/billing course through a community college in NYC that prepares students to take the CCA or other national examination. With my prior coding/ billing experience and my degree what do you think my chances are with obtaining part-time employment. Thanks.

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valentine in Austin, Texas

28 months ago

Learn2Know in Boston, Massachusetts said: Greetings; I was told by student support at CertifiedCoderAcademy that due to the increasing demand for medical coders that jobs are opening up for people with the CCA credential too! You don't have to be a student for Certified Coder Academy to help you with current medical coding job information.

I wouldn't count on it. Most employers would rather leave a job empty and search for a candidate with the required experience, skills and credentials, then just fill it with someone without experience.

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Mike in Minneapolis, Minnesota

28 months ago

Learn2Know in Boston, Massachusetts said: Greetings; I was told by student support at CertifiedCoderAcademy that due to the increasing demand for medical coders that jobs are opening up for people with the CCA credential too! You don't have to be a student for Certified Coder Academy to help you with current medical coding job information.

This might be true when ICD-10 goes into effect but we really can't be sure when that's going to happen. Not only that but right now many companies are laying off staff not hiring. If I were not already employed in billing I wouldn't be looking in this market.

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Mike in Minneapolis, Minnesota

28 months ago

dee@ in New York, New York said: Hello,

I did coding and billing for 6 years and have 65 credits toward an AAS in medical office technology. Stopped working in the medical coding field in around 2006 and earn a masters in special education looking to start working in the field of medical coding and billing again to supplement may income thinking about attending a 5 month medical coding/billing course through a community college in NYC that prepares students to take the CCA or other national examination. With my prior coding/ billing experience and my degree what do you think my chances are with obtaining part-time employment. Thanks.

Well, that's hard to say. The CCA credential does not carry the weight that the CCS or CPC and many employers are not likely to give you much credit for coding experience after being out of the field for 6 years.

You'll have better chances of the complete newbie right of out of school but not too much better.

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gginevan in Gunnison, Colorado

28 months ago

I have to agree that it is so very hard not to get into coding as I went to a college that was not accredited but still graduated with highest honors 3.96 GPA and went an took my CCS but failed with a 298. I have spent a lot of time and money on my degree and was very disappointed that CTU never mentioned that they were not accredited if I would have checked or new what to look for before I signed up I would have went to Alfred State in NY I have to agree with a post that was earler in this thread that hospital are laying off not hiring our local hospital I live in a small town has laid off all coders and are using an offshore company for coding They have new management and most every dept including nursing is getting laid off So I guess since I have so much time and money invested in to my love of coding I will find some way to get that dream job Good luck to you all as we have worked hard now we just need a chance to prove ourselves

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crystal in Tampa, Florida

18 months ago

Joy in Omaha, Nebraska said: I think they probably teach ICD 9 also, but they want me to know that they are competitive. They claim their students get hired fine without experience because their are not enough experienced coders to go around.
So, was that a yes on the eye strain, and do you find your work very stressful?

hey joy, what's your response on 1cd-10 now? i've started my class today and they are still teaching 1cd-9, i'm nervous because it's so near to october for 1cd-10. should i just wait til then to start, so i can learn icd-10. my instructor says they will give us a refeshner on 1cd-10

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Joy in Omaha, Nebraska

18 months ago

I haven't found any new information on this topic, but am still interested. Since the transition to ICD 10 will take time at any rate, I don't think it would hurt you to learn ICD 9, as well. Of course, do what is best for you. If you want to wait til October, maybe you should.

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AngelaP in Fargo, North Dakota

18 months ago

Hello, my name is Angela and I have some questions about breaking into the medical coding
field. I went to school at Rasmussen and graduated in 2010. I found a job as a chiropractic
assistant shortly after graduating(had nothing to do with my degree but I needed toget away from
working in retail) anyways, I fell in love with the job and didn't try looking for a job in my field.
I thought, well I'm happy with what I'm doing and making pretty good money especially for being
right out of college even if it isn't in my field. Now it's almost 3 years later and it just feels like its time
for a change. I just ordered "step by step" 2012 version by carol j buck off amazon but now what? I feel
like I don't remember much from college (actually I do not feel I was taught very well from Rasmussen
but that's another story). I will study that step by step book to brush up but I was wondering, should I apply
for a job, any job, that's in the realm and work my way up? Or would they help jog my memory if I got a job
coding? Should I take the test (and which test) before I apply for jobs or after being there for awhile? Any other
Study material suggestions would be appreciated and any feedback also? My intimate goal would be to work from home one day.

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Mike in Brooklyn, New York

9 months ago

@Patrice..

To some degree you have made some valid points. However theres 1 thing u posted that I disagree with. You dont need ONLY a 2 year degree (Associates Degree)An Associate's is just one option. There are vocational schools or billing and coding programs that try to take your money but not all of them. I think the main thing to find is a school with good ratings,thats well known and has been around for years and years. I've looked online at Indeed and other websites to check out medical coding jobs and most of them that i've seen do not require you to have an Associates. Not every career fields requires college. But you do have 1 point, MOST medical coding jobs require you to have experience.

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Mike in Brooklyn, New York

9 months ago

(Continued) So to say that you'l only be hired as a coder from a 2 year college degree is not exactly accurate.

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Lookingforinfo in Brooklyn, New York

7 months ago

Mike in Brooklyn, New York said: @Patrice..

To some degree you have made some valid points. However theres 1 thing u posted that I disagree with. You dont need ONLY a 2 year degree (Associates Degree)An Associate 's is just one option. There are vocational schools or billing and coding programs that try to take your money but not all of them. I think the main thing to find is a school with good ratings,thats well known and has been around for years and years. I've looked online at Indeed and other websites to check out medical coding jobs and most of them that i've seen do not require you to have an Associates. Not every career fields requires college . But you do have 1 point, MOST medical coding jobs require you to have experience.

What college in NY would you recommend to get certified as a RHIT? Does a RHIT have to take medical coding courses and be certified in medical coding or is that by choice?

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