Always on your feet?

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Jane in Overland Park, Kansas

42 months ago

I am planning to become a clinical laboratory scientist. I currently work at a small company that strictly performs one unique semi-automated Elisa assay. I don't work in the lab. I have a desk job doing QA review. The techs in the lab are on their feet for their entire shift. They get two breaks and lunch. Here's my question: Is this typical for clinical laboratory scientists? Are they always on their feet? Do they ever get to sit down? I'm sure it probably depends on the lab. I'd just like to know how physically demanding the job is at other labs. I don't want to go into a profession where I can't ever sit down. I don't mind being active, but I don't want to be on my feet all day long. I'd love any feedback. Thank you very much.

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MLS in Bowie, Maryland

42 months ago

You're right in that it depends on the lab. In micro and blood bank, you're actually sitting for most of the shift. In core lab (chemistry and hematology), you'll most likely be standing for most, if not all, of the shift. You'll be sitting if you're doing manual heme though.

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Randy in Lincoln, Nebraska

42 months ago

I work in a Molecular lab and I am on my feet 50% of the time. Every lab is going to be different depending on what kind of testing they do and the test method. You might sit all day at some labs or never get to sit down at others. I'd say most clinical labs are somewhere in between. Other things to think about. It is not an 8-5 job. You maybe working all different shifts during the day and week ends and holidays. You might be on-call and have to come in at anytime. The pay off is not there when you get done with all the schooling. Med Techs don't earn very much compared to other Allied Health fields. All I can say is, do your homework. I would suggest job shadowing someone before you decide.

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jojo in Sterling Heights, Michigan

42 months ago

Randy in Lincoln, Nebraska said: I work in a Molecular lab and I am on my feet 50% of the time. Every lab is going to be different depending on what kind of testing they do and the test method. You might sit all day at some labs or never get to sit down at others. I'd say most clinical labs are somewhere in between. Other things to think about. It is not an 8-5 job. You maybe working all different shifts during the day and week ends and holidays. You might be on-call and have to come in at anytime. The pay off is not there when you get done with all the schooling. Med Techs don't earn very much compared to other Allied Health fields. All I can say is, do your homework. I would suggest job shadowing someone before you decide.
Really bc they make more than rad techs and all other techs like cyto histo and radiation therapists there are no jobs out there... no one appreciates job security

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Billy in Lexington, Kentucky

42 months ago

jojo in Sterling Heights, Michigan said: Really bc they make more than rad techs and all other techs like cyto histo and radiation therapists there are no jobs out there... no one appreciates job security

That really depends on what part of the country you're from. Here in ky, at the little hospital I work at, pay is basically the same for rad techs, sonography, med tech's and even nurses. There is 4 community college campuses without a 50-100 mile radius that churn out a swath of new grads every year and some programs twice a year. So this along with other factors keep pay even and relatively low for all allied health professions.

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jojo in Sterling Heights, Michigan

42 months ago

Billy in Lexington, Kentucky said: That really depends on what part of the country you're from. Here in ky, at the little hospital I work at, pay is basically the same for rad techs, sonography, med tech's and even nurses. There is 4 community college campuses without a 50-100 mile radius that churn out a swath of new grads every year and some programs twice a year. So this along with other factors keep pay even and relatively low for all allied health professions.

this is true but im speaking in general of course, nurses obviously get paid the most but with cyto's and histos and nuc meds schools are pushing out 15 students a year with barely any job openings. no matter what anyone says job wise you have a lot more options with a mls degree

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