MT/CLS schools in Texas

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Kayla in Houston, Texas

59 months ago

To any MT/CLS who went to college in Texas What program did you choose? Why? Would you recommend it? Did you feel prepared to pass the certifying exams and enter the workforce? I am from Texas and I am interested in becoming an MT.

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mdennison13 in Webster, Texas

58 months ago

Kayla I am also interested in becoming a MT. But I'm having a hard time finding a school that offers the program. I'm looking forward to reading replies to your questions.

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Lauryn in Duncanville, Texas

58 months ago

We have one here in Dallas TX, I have my interview next week. Not sure where Webster is located.

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mdennison13@gmail.com in Houston, Texas

58 months ago

Thanks for the reply. Webster is inbetween Houston and Galveston. How did you find the school you're going to?

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Lauryn in Duncanville, Texas

58 months ago

www.naacls.org.

List of all the programs (CLS/MT,MLT,HT/HLT and others)in all 50 states.

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mdennison13 in Webster, Texas

58 months ago

LAuryn,

Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!! great resource!!!!!!!!!!!

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Lauryn in Duncanville, Texas

58 months ago

Anytime

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Daniel in Lubbock, Texas

58 months ago

MD Anderson has a great program. They have a 2+2 program or a 3+1 program. They also have limited slots for 1 year certificate candidates, but that's if you already have a bachelor's degree. I interviewed with them in August, I got accepted but as a junior, which means I'd have to spend another 2 years for an undergraduate degree (I already have a BS in Microbiology). So I decided to go to Texas Tech HSC - they have a 1-year 2nd Degree program which I'm currently attending.

UTMB also offers a 2-year BS CLS program. The Methodist Hospital at the Med Center has a 1year program, but they only take so many students each year so it's very competitive. I was late turning in my application materials so I never got to interview with them.

If you're looking into moving out of Houston, there's UTHSC in San Antonio, UT Southwest in Dallas, Tarleton State, Texas State, and of course TTUHSC (an awesome program I might add).

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mdennison13 in Webster, Texas

58 months ago

Daniel,

Thanks for the information. I have a BS in general Biology that I earned in 1989. I have forgotten much of it : ( . I'll check out the local schools to see what they have to offer for people like me.

I wish you the best in your studies and in your future employment!

Margaret

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Corrie in Waco, Texas

57 months ago

mdennison13@gmail.com in Houston, Texas said: Thanks for the reply. Webster is inbetween Houston and Galveston. How did you find the school you're going to?

UTMB has one of the best programs around. I plan on goign through their online program next year.

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mdennison13@gmail.com in Cypress, Texas

56 months ago

Thanks Corrie,
I'll check it out.

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Lori in El Paso, Texas

52 months ago

Daniel in Lubbock, Texas said: (I already have a BS in Microbiology). So I decided to go to Texas Tech HSC - they have a 1-year 2nd Degree program which I'm currently attending.
QUOTE]

Hi Daniel,
Are you getting your certificate or a 2nd bachelor's degree? How are you liking the program so far? Oh and when did you receive your BS in Microbiology and when did you start the program? I noticed you are in Lubbock now.Is this because you are done with the online courses? Thanks in advance!

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Daniel in Rockwall, Texas

52 months ago

Hey Lori,

I got accepted as a 2nd degree Bachelor's student. Bachelor's and certificate students take the same classes and same number of hours, so the curriculum is identical for both. I think faculty or admin decides which degree you are getting in the end. It's a 12-month program, lectures are online via WebCT, and at the end of each semester you spend a week in Lubbock for lab. Then you spend the last 12 weeks doing a hospital-based internship, along with some online classes. It's very easy to lose focus and get distracted as it is an online program, but if you want to do well you're definitely gonna need a lot of discipline and commit time to studying. Challenging, yes, but doable. The instructors are very nice and helpful - they're willing to work with you as they want you to succeed. But ultimately, like most other things, it is what you make of it. I'm actually done with the lecture/lab part (time flies!). I'm currently doing my preceptorship, and if all goes well I'll be done the end of August.

I got my BS in Micro a few years back. I worked in academic research for a few years before I decided to go back to school last year.

Hope this helps. Feel free to let me know if you have anymore questions about the CLS program at Texas Tech.

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Lori in El Paso, Texas

52 months ago

Thanks for the info Daniel!

Congrats on almost being done! I am assuming you can complete the 12 week hospital-based internship at one of their affiliated sites? is this correct? How many students where in the week long labs you had to take in Lubbock? just curious to know more or less how many students they accept each year.

I received my Bachelor's degree in Microbiology back in 2000 so I was concerned that I might have to take the prerequistes all over again. I know some schools won't accept courses that are older than 7 years.

Thank you so much for responding! I am very excited especially since Lubbock isn't such a bad drive from El Paso. Now the hard part is getting accepted!

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Daniel in Rockwall, Texas

52 months ago

Thank you!

Yes, internships are done at an affiliate hospital. They actually have an affiliate in El Paso, so you don't have to move out of El Paso if you choose not to. They also allow you to do internships at a hospital of your choice as long as the lab meets certain criteria and TTUHSC is able to establish an affiliation contract with the hospital.

There were 10 students in my class. I believe they accept 10-12 students each year. As far as pre-requisites, I think you should be fine, but I would contact TTUHSC just to be sure. Here's a link to program's website:

www.texastechcls.com

Take a minute to explore the website, you might find it helpful in answering some of your questions. I would also contact the program director, Prof. Spearman, for more information.

Good luck!

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Lori in El Paso, Texas

31 months ago

Daniel, are you able to log into the online courses for Texas Tech at anytime or do you have to log in at a certain time to view the course? ... I've never taken an online course and wanted to know how they work.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

31 months ago

I'm in the Texas Tech program right now and yes, you can log in anytime (unless there's those random, once in a while late night maintenance crap).

Just in case anyone is curious, this program is extremely difficult. It is hard to get thorough explanations on a topic because you only have the web discussion boards to ask questions. I really did not think it would be that much harder than if I were to physically go to class, but it is. Everything is pretty concise and courses that normally take 2 semesters are crammed into one. It's a lot of information at once. I've bought many books on my own just to get a better grasp of concepts that were taught in a concise manner. It's a lot of self-study and having to find a more thorough and understandable explanation on your own.

The program is great and they are very helpful and want the best for you, but if I had the chance to physically go to school, I would take it.

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Puro in Denton, Texas

29 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: I'm in the Texas Tech program right now and yes, you can log in anytime (unless there's those random, once in a while late night maintenance crap).

Just in case anyone is curious, this program is extremely difficult. It is hard to get thorough explanations on a topic because you only have the web discussion boards to ask questions. I really did not think it would be that much harder than if I were to physically go to class, but it is. Everything is pretty concise and courses that normally take 2 semesters are crammed into one. It's a lot of information at once. I've bought many books on my own just to get a better grasp of concepts that were taught in a concise manner. It's a lot of self-study and having to find a more thorough and understandable explanation on your own.

The program is great and they are very helpful and want the best for you, but if I had the chance to physically go to school, I would take it.

Hey britt,

I just submitted my application to Texas Tech. How long should I expect for the reply? Is there an interview as well? I'd love to have your guidance if I ever get accepted. Maybe we can study together. :D

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DSPD in Vero Beach, Florida

29 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: I'm in the Texas Tech program right now and yes, you can log in anytime (unless there's those random, once in a while late night maintenance crap).

Just in case anyone is curious, this program is extremely difficult. It is hard to get thorough explanations on a topic because you only have the web discussion boards to ask questions. I really did not think it would be that much harder than if I were to physically go to class, but it is. Everything is pretty concise and courses that normally take 2 semesters are crammed into one. It's a lot of information at once. I've bought many books on my own just to get a better grasp of concepts that were taught in a concise manner. It's a lot of self-study and having to find a more thorough and understandable explanation on your own.

The program is great and they are very helpful and want the best for you, but if I had the chance to physically go to school, I would take it.

I applied to the Texas Tech program and have some questions about the on-campus labs. How long are you there and how many people are in the labs? I was told they are accepting a lot more people now and was wondering if they break the labs up and keep them to a small size so you have more student teacher interaction?

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

28 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: I'm in the Texas Tech program right now and yes, you can log in anytime (unless there's those random, once in a while late night maintenance crap).

Just in case anyone is curious, this program is extremely difficult. It is hard to get thorough explanations on a topic because you only have the web discussion boards to ask questions. I really did not think it would be that much harder than if I were to physically go to class, but it is. Everything is pretty concise and courses that normally take 2 semesters are crammed into one. It's a lot of information at once. I've bought many books on my own just to get a better grasp of concepts that were taught in a concise manner. It's a lot of self-study and having to find a more thorough and understandable explanation on your own.

The program is great and they are very helpful and want the best for you, but if I had the chance to physically go to school, I would take it.

Do you know how long it takes, after the phone interview, for them to contact you to let you know if you've been accepted or not? Is it just the phone interview or is there another interview that follows?

Thanks in advance!

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

28 months ago

I applied very early, I think February or March, so I can't really say how long it takes. But I got my acceptance letter and email on July 21st of last year. So they should let you know about a month before the program starts. I think my interview was in the end of June or beginning of July, I can't really remember the exact date.

As for the phone interview, it's pretty standard and not bad at all. They ask why you want to be in CLS, if you have any kind of clinical experience (lab work, anything in healthcare, etc.), your hobbies, how you handle stress, and if you plan on working during the program.

They suggest not working, and I completely agree with this. A few students were able to work and still get through the program, but for the most part I don't recommend it. My intention was to not work (fyi, they like this during the interview), but I had to work a lot during the second semester and it was horrible. The lab weeks are atrocious: no sleep, 8-9 hours of lab a day followed by hours of tedious homework assignments, followed by studying for lab finals. It's really a 7-day week because you have your lecture finals back-to-back the day before lab week starts, then you have lab week mon-fri, followed by all the lab finals on saturday: tough schedule.

On the last day of lab week, you have to pass each exam with a 70 or above or you get a D for the whole course, regardless of your other grades. The only reason I mention this is because it happens. I fell ill the last time I was in TX and went through the lab-week being sick, which made it the worst week of my life. Needless to say, I got a d on one of the six course tests and have to redo the lab course, so you may see me there next May, along with a few others. I call lab week "hell-week."

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

28 months ago

Don't be surprised if you see people break down into tears or falling asleep during labs. The professors and information are interesting of course, but you will get slim-to-no sleep during those weeks and there may be a few who have to retake lecture courses so they might be a little emotional.

I don't mean to scare anyone but just tell you things I wasn't quite aware of. My suggestion for the lab weeks: stay at the school directly after lab and do your work there, RIGHT AFTER. Follow it by an hour or two of studying. That way you may be able to go back to your hotel/room and get some sleep.

Oh and the phone interview was the only one I had. If you live somewhat near campus, they might ask you to do the interview in person. I don't think the interview was bad at all. Once it starts, your nerves will go away as they are quite friendly.

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moocaca in Austin, Texas

28 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: Don't be surprised if you see people break down into tears or falling asleep during labs. The professors and information are interesting of course, but you will get slim-to-no sleep during those weeks and there may be a few who have to retake lecture courses so they might be a little emotional.

I don't mean to scare anyone but just tell you things I wasn't quite aware of. My suggestion for the lab weeks: stay at the school directly after lab and do your work there, RIGHT AFTER. Follow it by an hour or two of studying. That way you may be able to go back to your hotel /room and get some sleep.

Oh and the phone interview was the only one I had. If you live somewhat near campus, they might ask you to do the interview in person. I don't think the interview was bad at all. Once it starts, your nerves will go away as they are quite friendly.

Hi Brittlv134,

Thanks for providing so much info. I applied to this program, so I might be going in the fall. One question - did you have to practice phlebotomy on each other? I know that it has to be covered in the curriculum, but was hoping I wouldn't have to stick anyone (or be stuck) :)

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

28 months ago

moocaca in Austin, Texas said: Hi Brittlv134,

Thanks for providing so much info. I applied to this program, so I might be going in the fall. One question - did you have to practice phlebotomy on each other? I know that it has to be covered in the curriculum, but was hoping I wouldn't have to stick anyone (or be stuck) :)

Haha yes! Pretty much everyone hated this part. There is an exam on it though. The sticking part (and actually doing a successful venicpuncture) is only worth a minute amount of your grade. If you do not get a successful stick, you can most certainly still get an A on the phlebotomy portion. The hardest part really is the customer service aspect (greeting, obtaining info, etc) and remembering all of the little steps and questions to ask. Other than that, it's a breeze and it will be over quickly, thankfully!

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

28 months ago

They suggest not working, and I completely agree with this. A few students were able to work and still get through the program, but for the most part I don't recommend it. My intention was to not work (fyi, they like this during the interview), but I had to work a lot during the second semester and it was horrible. The lab weeks are atrocious: no sleep, 8-9 hours of lab a day followed by hours of tedious homework assignments, followed by studying for lab finals. It's really a 7-day week because you have your lecture finals back-to-back the day before lab week starts, then you have lab week mon-fri, followed by all the lab finals on saturday: tough schedule.

I was told that there is one week after, both, the fall and spring semesters that you are required to go to campus, is that what you are referring to as "lab week." What weeks in December and May were you required to go to lab week? If you don't remember the dates, was it like late December and May?

Thanks a bunch =]

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moocaca in Austin, Texas

28 months ago

Thanks for the info again. I just heard today that they also expect you to perform phlebotomy on a patient during clinicals. Can anyone verify whether this is indeed true?

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Brittany in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

Yes, the labs are broken up into smaller groups, and then two sub-groups. There are two different lab weeks that they use to separate the whole class. One group goes around the beginning of December and May, the next group goes the week directly after the first. So, for example, I was always in the group that went first, in the beginning of December and in the beginning of May. So then, they divide the group that is there into two more groups, so you wind up in a small group of about 10 people in one lab, and 10 in another lab. Then in mid-day, those two groups switch. I hope this makes sense as it's kind of hard to explain. And yes, these are the weeks that you are physically in Lubbock, on campus.

Oh and yes! I forgot about the phlebotomy portion during clinicals. Yes, you have to stick 40 patients I believe. You can do them whenever you have time and they suggest getting them done as soon as possible so that you can get it over with.

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DSPD in Vero Beach, Florida

27 months ago

I also applied for the fall and had my interview at the beginning of May. About the phlebotomy, is it covered in clinicals only and not during lab weeks? Also, is there a diversity of ages in the program? Not that it matters, but I'm a career changer and was wondering if there are others like me that are going back to school after previous careers (I realize there is no way to know for the new class, but does your class have many older students).

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DSPD in Vero Beach, Florida

27 months ago

Oops. I see from the previous response that you do have phlebotomy during lab week. What if you already have a national phlebotomy certification? Do you still have to do it? I took a phlebotomy course and passed but I have noooooo desire to go through it again. For one thing, even though my instructor said I had great technique and I did hit the vein each time, I have a slight tremor, which is only obvious when I'm under stress, but it was enough to make me hate it. I know it is normal to shake when you first do it, but even after I felt comfortable with the procedure and technique, I still had a hand tremor. Everyone else stopped shaking after they were comfortable even though many of them could not hit the vein. It really was a difficult and embarrassing situation for me because I wanted it to stop but it wouldn't. Do you think this would be a problem?

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

27 months ago

There are two different lab weeks that they use to separate the whole class. One group goes around the beginning of December and May, the next group goes the week directly after the first. So, for example, I was always in the group that went first, in the beginning of December and in the beginning of May. So then, they divide the group that is there into two more groups, so you wind up in a small group of about 10 people in one lab, and 10 in another lab. Then in mid-day, those two groups switch. I hope this makes sense as it's kind of hard to explain. And yes, these are the weeks that you are physically in Lubbock, on campus.

I totally get it. Thank you so much for being so informative!! I really appreciate it. The week starts Monday and ends Saturday? In your opinion is the phlebotomy portion dreadful? I see some people have a lot of concern for this, and it's starting to worry me. During clinicals are these patients aware that you are new to this?

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

27 months ago

Oh Nevermind I see you answered the question of the days the labs are to take place, so just disregard that portion of my reply =]

thanks

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No1Boomer in La Verne, California

27 months ago

I understand from a post here that hospital-based internship at Texas Tech is only 12 weeks. Is this the norm for other MT/CLS programs in Texas? I ask because, although my son is considering going to school in Texas to become a CLS he would like to leave open the option to come back to California to work but California requires 1 year clinical rotations to get licensed.

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No1Boomer in La Verne, California

27 months ago

Daniel in Rockwall, Texas said: Hey Lori,

I got accepted as a 2nd degree Bachelor's student. Bachelor's and certificate students take the same classes and same number of hours, so the curriculum is identical for both. I think faculty or admin decides which degree you are getting in the end. It's a 12-month program, lectures are online via WebCT, and at the end of each semester you spend a week in Lubbock for lab . Then you spend the last 12 weeks doing a hospital -based internship , along with some online classes. It's very easy to lose focus and get distracted as it is an online program, but if you want to do well you're definitely gonna need a lot of discipline and commit time to studying. Challenging, yes, but doable. The instructors are very nice and helpful - they're willing to work with you as they want you to succeed. But ultimately, like most other things, it is what you make of it. I'm actually done with the lecture/lab part (time flies!). I'm currently doing my preceptorship, and if all goes well I'll be done the end of August.

I got my BS in Micro a few years back. I worked in academic research for a few years before I decided to go back to school last year.

Hope this helps. Feel free to let me know if you have anymore questions about the CLS program at Texas Tech.

I understand from a post here that hospital-based internship at Texas Tech is only 12 weeks. Is this the norm for other MT/CLS programs in Texas? I ask because, although my son is considering going to school in Texas to become a CLS he would like to leave open the option to come back to California to work but California requires 1 year clinical rotations to get licensed.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

DSPD in Vero Beach, Florida said: Oops. I see from the previous response that you do have phlebotomy during lab week. What if you already have a national phlebotomy certification? Do you still have to do it? I took a phlebotomy course and passed but I have noooooo desire to go through it again. For one thing, even though my instructor said I had great technique and I did hit the vein each time, I have a slight tremor, which is only obvious when I'm under stress, but it was enough to make me hate it. I know it is normal to shake when you first do it, but even after I felt comfortable with the procedure and technique, I still had a hand tremor. Everyone else stopped shaking after they were comfortable even though many of them could not hit the vein. It really was a difficult and embarrassing situation for me because I wanted it to stop but it wouldn't. Do you think this would be a problem?

You have to do every portion of everything in order to complete the program. If you have a slight tremor that is constant, it won't matter. Everyone there is nervous anyhow so no one will care and it's completely understandable. I drew blood before, in a professional setting, and I was still nervous during the exam. I actually kind of had a mild anxiety attack, but I just worked myself up over nothing. It was quite easy and I suggest just not thinking too much into or freaking yourself out. I still got an A and did fine. You can miss the vein, not have a successful venipuncture, and still get an A. Matter of fact, I drew blood well, but I forgot some customer service stuff and wound up getting a few points less than people who could not get a successful puncture.

I used to work with a girl that had a constant tremor, and she would just let the patient know that it was uncontrollable, and that she has been drawing blood for years and it was in no way related to being nervous. She was really friendly about it and no one ever said anything about it.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

avldz in Mckinney, Texas said: There are two different lab weeks that they use to separate the whole class. One group goes around the beginning of December and May, the next group goes the week directly after the first. So, for example, I was always in the group that went first, in the beginning of December and in the beginning of May. So then, they divide the group that is there into two more groups, so you wind up in a small group of about 10 people in one lab, and 10 in another lab. Then in mid-day, those two groups switch. I hope this makes sense as it's kind of hard to explain. And yes, these are the weeks that you are physically in Lubbock, on campus.

I totally get it. Thank you so much for being so informative!! I really appreciate it. The week starts Monday and ends Saturday? In your opinion is the phlebotomy portion dreadful? I see some people have a lot of concern for this, and it's starting to worry me. During clinicals are these patients aware that you are new to this?

No, we all mostly worked ourselves up for nothing. You have the option to take the phlebotomy exam the first day (Monday) and get it over with. You can take it anytime during the week, when there's a bit of time free. If you know everything (the dialogue, tubes, etc.), go for it and get it out of the way. I stayed after on Monday and practiced with a partner and mannequins. It helped tons. Then I took it on Tuesday. Best to get it out of the way so you don't worry about it.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

No1Boomer in La Verne, California said: I understand from a post here that hospital-based internship at Texas Tech is only 12 weeks. Is this the norm for other MT/CLS programs in Texas? I ask because, although my son is considering going to school in Texas to become a CLS he would like to leave open the option to come back to California to work but California requires 1 year clinical rotations to get licensed.

It is 13 weeks and I personally don't know of any programs in TX that do a year, but I could be wrong. If he lives in CA and has residency there, I personally think he should go to a school there. It would be nice to have the option of working in CA, as the salary is usually much higher than elsewhere. I wish I would have looked into that more because I may want to move back to CA one day. Better to be overcautious than regretful. The programs in CA (that are accredited) would leave no doubt in his mind that he could get a job there.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

avldz in Mckinney, Texas said: There are two different lab weeks that they use to separate the whole class. One group goes around the beginning of December and May, the next group goes the week directly after the first. So, for example, I was always in the group that went first, in the beginning of December and in the beginning of May. So then, they divide the group that is there into two more groups, so you wind up in a small group of about 10 people in one lab, and 10 in another lab. Then in mid-day, those two groups switch. I hope this makes sense as it's kind of hard to explain. And yes, these are the weeks that you are physically in Lubbock, on campus.

I totally get it. Thank you so much for being so informative!! I really appreciate it. The week starts Monday and ends Saturday? In your opinion is the phlebotomy portion dreadful? I see some people have a lot of concern for this, and it's starting to worry me. During clinicals are these patients aware that you are new to this?

Oh! The phlebotomy portion of the clinical, I haven't done this yet so I really can't answer. But yes, they are usually actual patients of the hospital. It is only like 40 patients and it's been recommended that you just get it over with. It isn't as bad if you don;t work yourself up too much.
As far as patients knowing you're new, if another employee is watching (which I'm sure they do), they will know. In the workplace, when I used to draw blood, they knew because I had someone watching over me. If a patient isn't comfortable with it, they will tell you and, no big deal, someone else will draw their blood.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

DSPD in Vero Beach, Florida said: I also applied for the fall and had my interview at the beginning of May. About the phlebotomy, is it covered in clinicals only and not during lab weeks? Also, is there a diversity of ages in the program? Not that it matters, but I'm a career changer and was wondering if there are others like me that are going back to school after previous careers (I realize there is no way to know for the new class, but does your class have many older students).

Yes, the program is pretty diverse: different ages, different backgrounds, etc. Most are career changers or people who had science degrees that were not useful, as far as getting a job and such. I wouldn't worry at all about that. I never thought twice about it. We all pretty much got along. The older students in my class were actually pretty amazing, as they usually did very well. It was nice for me because they would help me understand a concept if I didn't get it.

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DSPD in Vero Beach, Florida

27 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: You have to do every portion of everything in order to complete the program. If you have a slight tremor that is constant, it won't matter. Everyone there is nervous anyhow so no one will care and it's completely understandable. I drew blood before, in a professional setting, and I was still nervous during the exam. I actually kind of had a mild anxiety attack, but I just worked myself up over nothing. It was quite easy and I suggest just not thinking too much into or freaking yourself out. I still got an A and did fine. You can miss the vein, not have a successful venipuncture, and still get an A. Matter of fact, I drew blood well, but I forgot some customer service stuff and wound up getting a few points less than people who could not get a successful puncture.

I used to work with a girl that had a constant tremor, and she would just let the patient know that it was uncontrollable, and that she has been drawing blood for years and it was in no way related to being nervous. She was really friendly about it and no one ever said anything about it.

Thanks so much! That makes me feel a lot better. I remember taking the class and everyone did seem to work themselves up for nothing. I was hoping it would go away but it seems that when I want my hands to be still they just won't, especially when it comes to fine motor skills. However, it never seems to interfere with me actually being able to do whatever I need to do (thread a needle, use a pipette, etc...just looks bad and makes me feel embarrassed). I wonder how your friend got over her embarrassment. I guess it is new for me to have people watching me do things with with my hands...my previous career was not like that.

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shane in Colleyville, Texas

27 months ago

How long does it normally take to receive a decision after all application materials have been submitted? I've applied for the fall 2012 second bachelor's, and the suspense is killing me!

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No1Boomer in La Verne, California

27 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: It is 13 weeks and I personally don't know of any programs in TX that do a year, but I could be wrong. If he lives in CA and has residency there, I personally think he should go to a school there. It would be nice to have the option of working in CA, as the salary is usually much higher than elsewhere. I wish I would have looked into that more because I may want to move back to CA one day. Better to be overcautious than regretful. The programs in CA (that are accredited) would leave no doubt in his mind that he could get a job there.

Thanks for the reply. It's just that so many of the core courses are impacted that it typically takes 5-6 years to get a B.S. degree due to not being able to get the required classes.

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

27 months ago

What do think helped you get accepted? Was it your GPA? Did you have any work experience in the medical field? How stiff would you say the competition is?

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

avldz in Mckinney, Texas said: What do think helped you get accepted? Was it your GPA? Did you have any work experience in the medical field? How stiff would you say the competition is?

Personally, I didn't think I was a good candidate on paper, but I still got chosen, so I really don't know. My GPA for my 1st undergrad was 2.8. I had strong grades in the beginning and end of my undergrad. I explained why my grades dipped (family issues) in my essay and maybe that helped(?).
I was a clinical coordinator for a little bit so I am familiar with working in health care. I am also a first-generation college graduate. I think that may have helped. I was honest about my weak points and strong points; I am a horrible test taker, but I am very good in the lab and at applying my knowledge in the workforce. Yada yada, lol.
I'm not sure how stiff the competition is. I honestly don't know how much importance colleges put on race, gender, first-generation graduates, etc.; but I am kind of thinking that those factors might help in the decision making.

This (TTUHSC) is a growing program. I think the competition is going to become stiff but maybe not just yet. My class had the most students to date, so I'm sure they will only be growing and becoming more selective.

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

27 months ago

Sounds good! thanks =] Do you know how many people get admitted, more or less? I don't have any work experience in health care, and they did ask me that. They said it wasn't a requirement, but they wanted to know how much knowledge I already had within the field. Were there people in your class who had no experience in health care, as well? Hope that doesn't effect me. I fall into some of the categories you mentioned, so I hope that gives me a push.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

27 months ago

avldz in Mckinney, Texas said: Sounds good! thanks =] Do you know how many people get admitted, more or less? I don't have any work experience in health care, and they did ask me that. They said it wasn't a requirement, but they wanted to know how much knowledge I already had within the field. Were there people in your class who had no experience in health care, as well? Hope that doesn't effect me. I fall into some of the categories you mentioned, so I hope that gives me a push.

There were people who had experience and people who did not. I believe my class started with 56 people but I am pretty positive that some dropped out, maybe around 10 or so. Having experience doesn't really matter, I think. There were about 3-5 people in my group of 10 that actually had jobs related to health care during the program. It might look good but it also might look bad because they prefer you to not work. So, I don't think you have to worry much about that.

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

26 months ago

Will the acceptance letter state where our preceptorship will be at? So that way we know in advance if we can actually commit to the program or not?

Oh and also, does the school help with job placement after the program?

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

26 months ago

avldz in Mckinney, Texas said: Will the acceptance letter state where our preceptorship will be at? So that way we know in advance if we can actually commit to the program or not?

Oh and also, does the school help with job placement after the program?

No, they will not let you know where your preceptorship will be. That is the part that sucks and I had a huge problem with that. You have to basically find a lab yourself and try to get in touch with the directors of those labs to see if they will allow you to do your rotations there. I've found, being in Las Vegas and all, that no one really took me seriously because I had no information really about the contracts. It seems to work much better if the school calls those hospitals themselves on your behalf, since they have the information of what the contract entails. I was at a complete loss with everyone I called. I asked the school to contact a lab for me and it worked out, kind of. They had to hash out the contract before they would sign it. I spent the last semester of school stressed out beyond belief about whether or not I was going to have to move 3 states over. Some students had already (before starting school) worked in a lab that had promised to take them, and many others had already contacted a lab that had verbally agreed to take them Definitely something to think about.

I do not believe they help with job placement. I haven't heard anything about it which makes me think that.

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

26 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: No, they will not let you know where your preceptorship will be. That is the part that sucks and I had a huge problem with that. You have to basically find a lab yourself and try to get in touch with the directors of those labs to see if they will allow you to do your rotations there. I've found, being in Las Vegas and all, that no one really took me seriously because I had no information really about the contracts. It seems to work much better if the school calls those hospitals themselves on your behalf, since they have the information of what the contract entails. I was at a complete loss with everyone I called. I asked the school to contact a lab for me and it worked out, kind of. They had to hash out the contract before they would sign it. I spent the last semester of school stressed out beyond belief about whether or not I was going to have to move 3 states over. Some students had already (before starting school) worked in a lab that had promised to take them, and many others had already contacted a lab that had verbally agreed to take them Definitely something to think about.

I do not believe they help with job placement. I haven't heard anything about it which makes me think that.

My wording on the placement issue is a bit incorrect. They do guarantee placement, just not that you will get to decide where. They hand them out during the second semester. So, for instance, if you cannot get a lab near you to accept you, they will place you in the locations that are not taken. So, for example, my choices were a small city in NM or a small city in TX. You have to find housing, which, in small cities, can be awfully hard and expensive.

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avldz in Mckinney, Texas

26 months ago

brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada said: My wording on the placement issue is a bit incorrect. They do guarantee placement, just not that you will get to decide where. They hand them out during the second semester. So, for instance, if you cannot get a lab near you to accept you, they will place you in the locations that are not taken. So, for example, my choices were a small city in NM or a small city in TX. You have to find housing, which, in small cities, can be awfully hard and expensive.

So we can first try to get a lab close by, and if we dont find one in time they will assign us one during the second semester? How do we know which labs work with them, or do we choose just any lab nearby?

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brittlv134 in Las Vegas, Nevada

26 months ago

avldz in Mckinney, Texas said: So we can first try to get a lab close by, and if we dont find one in time they will assign us one during the second semester? How do we know which labs work with them, or do we choose just any lab nearby?

They give you a list of about 10-20 options to choose from. Most of them are located in Texas and there are a few, I think, in New Mexico and then one in GA and one in Alaska. There may be more but I can't remember, and I think it changes every year anyhow. But what happens is, you number them in order of preference. What sucks is that your choices are usually someone's first choice. Your best bet is to try to find a place nearby or even a place in a state over. I went through hell and high water to find a place 2 hours away from me in the next state over. I then had to look for housing that was affordable, which is hard.

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