Requirements to get a CA-CLS license: Out of State (DRAFT)

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SWCMLT in San Diego, California

47 months ago

CLS48 Does this refer to the list of Certifying Examination List of what CA excepts?
I got this from CAMLT.ORG
"Update 2008 - Laboratory Field Services announced at the CLTAC meeting held March 7th that the state will not administer the 2008 CLS Licensing Exam this November. As previously planned, the California CLS Exam has been phased out because LFS has now certified several national examinations as acceptable for CA licensing. Applicants will still need apply to LFS and pay the license processing fee, are still required to meet California training standards and also to pass a short on-line quiz testing their knowledge of State Law. See the flow diagrams below to see an overview of the application process.

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SWCMLT in San Diego, California

47 months ago

I Got this from LFS Also.
"Official training verification/work experience must be sent directly from the training coordinator/laboratory director showing the beginning and ending dates of the training/experience. This information should cover all areas in which the rotation was completed with the number of the hours/weeks for each specialty (chemistry, hematology, immunohematology, serology, parasitology, and bacteriology) and brief description of procedures performed.
Applicants receiving a "qualification letter with a unique ID" must take the CA Quiz online using their user ID and password provided in that letter.
Applicants receiving the "qualification letter with a unique ID" must take the certifying organization examination of their choice and request a copy of their satisfactory performance to be sent directly to LFS.
The following certifying organizations are approved by the Department for licensure examination:
ASCP certification for CLS (generalist) is accepted as of October 2002.
ASCPi (international) certification for CLS (generalist) is accepted as of June 2003.
AAB certification for CLS (generalist) is accepted as of January 2003.
ASCP certification for chemist scientist is accepted as of March 2004.
ASCP certification for microbiologist scientist is accepted as of March 2004.
NRCC certification for toxicology scientist is accepted as of March 2004.

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CLS48 in California

47 months ago

The key is 1 year of clinical rotations. Your experience as an MLT will not count. To get that one year, you do need to do a clinical internship at an approved program. To do that, the easiest way would be to go to the CLS program at UC San Diego, UCI, Loma Linda University, or CSU Dominguez Hills.

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SWCMLT in San Diego, California

47 months ago

CLS48 in California said: The key is 1 year of clinical rotations. Your experience as an MLT will not count. To get that one year, you do need to do a clinical internship at an approved program. To do that, the easiest way would be to go to the CLS program at UC San Diego, UCI, Loma Linda University, or CSU Dominguez Hills.

Thanks CLS48. I think thats what I am going to do for sure.

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anonymous in Chicago, Illinois

47 months ago

Eventaully, the laws will be altered in California since they have the lowest CLS (or MLS) population per capita or the educators will start churning out more CLS students. Or "ALL" Filipino's will migrate to CA (which I already think is the case).

Something has to give... Sooner or later...

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Chi in Oakland, California

47 months ago

anonymous in Chicago, Illinois said: Eventaully, the laws will be altered in California since they have the lowest CLS (or MLS) population per capita or the educators will start churning out more CLS students. Or "ALL" Filipino's will migrate to CA (which I already think is the case).

Something has to give... Sooner or later...

Hello,
I am BSMT(ASCP) since 1991, applied for limited Microbiology and received my license in 07/12/10. Since I have not landed a job, so I went back and take the exam again to get my CLS in CA. I have not hear any thing from them even after I had passed and the score was sent to CPDH. I do not remember exactly have many weeks my rotation was but is it safe for me to assume that since I have met the requirements for my limited license that I might be OK with the CLS. Is the rotation requirement for limited license different from the CLS?

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Sonia in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

42 months ago

I am so scared my Pennsylvania CLS program won't fulfill the 1 year clinical internship requirement for CA. Here is a program description from the college:

The College's Medical Laboratory Science Program prepares graduates to function in responsible positions in a laboratory environment. Students entering the 12-month program must have completed three years of college, and be eligible for a baccalaureate degree following completion of the program's coursework. The College will establish an affiliation agreement with the student's degree-granting home institution for one year of completed study in the Medical Laboratory Science Program. Candidates who have already received a baccalaureate degree may also be eligible for entry into the program.

The program is 12 months in length, with clinicals\lectures running from the beginning to the end.

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CLS48 in California

42 months ago

If you rotate 1 whole year then it should be ok. Make sure your education qualifies also though.

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anonnnmoyus in Brooklyn, New York

42 months ago

Sonia in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania said: I am so scared my Pennsylvania CLS program won't fulfill the 1 year clinical internship requirement for CA. Here is a program description from the college:

The College's Medical Laboratory Science Program prepares graduates to function in responsible positions in a laboratory environment. Students entering the 12-month program must have completed three years of college, and be eligible for a baccalaureate degree following completion of the program's coursework. The College will establish an affiliation agreement with the student's degree-granting home institution for one year of completed study in the Medical Laboratory Science Program. Candidates who have already received a baccalaureate degree may also be eligible for entry into the program.

The program is 12 months in length, with clinicals\lectures running from the beginning to the end.

that program is good, no worries.

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MAK in Anaheim, California

40 months ago

I graduated from Jordan with BS in medical lab sciences. Just failed :( the California CLS License exam offered by ASCP. The exam was tough. are there crash courses that prepares you for the exam.

I think I will do better after this experience. Some of the questions were out of scope and many of types were surprising. But still I am sure there should be kind of workshop which you can do for few weeks to practice sample exam questions.

Thank you

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Salem in Bellflower, California

38 months ago

Jake C.Y in Chicago, Illinois said: This is exactly what the girl wrote who applied to CDPH:

Seemly is not the right word. It is IMPOSSIBLE. California is the only state in the US that requires 3 semesters of physics and 52 weeks of clinical rotations. Only 3 states require 2 semesters of Physics all others only recommend the course (I've done the research, I email at least one school in every state and even in Singapore!). Even medical school entry only requires 2.

If you want, I can get the email of the CLS examiner herself (but be forewarned that she is pretty rude...even if its just via email)

As for now I applied and got approved for the CA MLT license. I don't think I can be able to not get paid for a period of 2 years (taking physics and training) while living in California. I may have to work as a travelling tech for a while.

I would appreciate that you would let me know if any changes in legislation occurs .


3 semester hours of physics or quarter equivalents which include specific required courses. See CA MLT website:
www.camlt.org/cls_index.html

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med techy75 in Lompoc, California

35 months ago

I took the University of Phoenix online fundamentals of physics class...5 weeks long and got approved for my CA CLS license with it as that is the only thing lacking.

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cacls12 in San Diego, California

35 months ago

med techy75 in Lompoc, California said: I took the University of Phoenix online fundamentals of physics class...5 weeks long and got approved for my CA CLS license with it as that is the only thing lacking.

Does it require prerequisite? I need to take phydics class too.

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medtechy 75 in lompoc in North Las Vegas, Nevada

35 months ago

No prerequisites, it's concepts of physics, not mathematics-based but covers the CA CLS light and electricity requirement. The only thing is its $890 for that class, expensive but worth it in the long run. Got a job at Stanford with that. : )

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cacls12 in Calimesa, California

35 months ago

medtechy 75 in lompoc in North Las Vegas, Nevada said: No prerequisites, it's concepts of physics, not mathematics-based but covers the CA CLS light and electricity requirement. The only thing is its $890 for that class, expensive but worth it in the long run. Got a job at Stanford with that. : )

Thank you!

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Raina in South Bend, Indiana

32 months ago

Hey guys, I have my BS in CLS and my school in michigan only required 5 months training. I got certified thru ASCP this year and Ive only been working as a generalist for liek 4 months. I wanna apply but I really don't want to get turned down because of that 1 yr training. BUT i'm engagd to a med school student in cali and I need to move.. i cant move and not work... any help?
I'll work as an MLT if possble... i do have 4 phys credts ( i took gen. phys 1).. there is no way i can train for a yr/go back to school jus to get a license.. any alternative ideas?

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QQ in La Jolla, California

30 months ago

med techy75 in Lompoc, California said: I took the University of Phoenix online fundamentals of physics class...5 weeks long and got approved for my CA CLS license with it as that is the only thing lacking.

Hi,med techy75:

I had 4 semester units of Physics way back from my BS. I noticed that CA required 3 semester units of Physics. I just wonder did you just have the University of Phoenix online fundamentals of physics class for your application without other physics?

I am very confused here and any help would be appreciated. Many thanks in advance!

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Liz in Chico, California

30 months ago

Rohan in Fresh Meadows, New York said: 3 semesters of physics..lol. Were only required to take one semester of physics in NYC. How can this be possible if past students from my program have been licensed by CA.

Its supposed to be semester units. Not semesters. So basically one physics class too.

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QQ in San Diego, California

30 months ago

Liz in Chico, California said: Its supposed to be semester units. Not semesters. So basically one physics class too.

Thank you for your reply! That does help A LOT!

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cls45 in Waynesboro, Virginia

30 months ago

medtechy 75 in lompoc in North Las Vegas, Nevada said: No prerequisites, it's concepts of physics, not mathematics-based but covers the CA CLS light and electricity requirement. The only thing is its $890 for that class, expensive but worth it in the long run. Got a job at Stanford with that. : )

that help a lot thank you

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cls45 in Waynesboro, Virginia

30 months ago

med techy75 in Lompoc, California said: I took the University of Phoenix online fundamentals of physics class...5 weeks long and got approved for my CA CLS license with it as that is the only thing lacking.

did you call them first and make sure that they will except it first. I want to take it too but i want to make sure that they'll except it because I just check it a very expensive class.

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rma83 in Philippines

30 months ago

I graduated BS CLS last year and ASCPi certified, i too have the 6 month internship in my curriculum quantifying my total internship hours approximately to just 1100 or more. According to the 1 year internship requirement in CA, i decided to go back to my institution and pleaded my case about my lacking hours and my dept along with the head of the university registrar decided to re-enroll me to full fill 6 more months of CA internship quota. its supposedly gonna be written of as me performing a year of internship after i finish...

My question is, am i doing the right thing and will LFS approve this?

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rma83 in Philippines

30 months ago

Im also guessing our curriculum is similar as the US, so im doubting il have a problem with the physics class situation... but to state the fact, i only took 1 class of physics(1 semester 3 units).

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

30 months ago

I suspect there is a little misinformation on this board. I'm in a NAACLS program in NJ and plan on moving to CA if not immediately, then within 2 years of. Regardless of what anyone on here tells you I have emailed and spoken to CA licensing boards. What you need are:

1 semester of physics (3 credits)

16 credits of chemistry including analytical (substitute for clinical chem) and biological chem (I've heard this is semi-flexible and I have 2 semesters of clinical chem which I think works check with you're state otherwise I have to take an extra class...oh well).

continued below...

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

30 months ago

18 credits of biological science including hematology, clinical microbiology, and immunology

Now the onto the clinical site "rotations." Many (if not all) NAACLS programs require you to rotate throughout the departments and I think you need to meet a 9600 hour rule or something like that. This does not mean however your program needs to rotate in a hospital 5 days a week for 12 mos. My school has hematology I rotations done on campus for example, yet several previous students got a CA license no problem. The moral of the store is you need to go to a 3+1 or 4+1 NAACLS program where the last year rotates you through all the departments, you get experience, hit the 9600 hour rule or whatever, but that doesn't necessarily mean you need to be at a hospital rotation site for the whole time. If your "rotations" were less than 12 months and you go to a NAACLS program it may be because the school counts labs done there as "clinicals" and meet the 9600 hour rule. And then, yes you should be able to get a license

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

30 months ago

Also as of now I'm not sure but you need to apply for the CA license within 4 years of graduating and getting your ASCP license. This is right out of the mouth of someone from CA licensing so I believe them.

I have family in CA and am familiar with the area. Salaries in CA are still the best in the USA. If you're worried about cost of living you can move to Sacramento and STILL get a job paying 30/hr+ as a new grad. This is an area where 1x family homes cost 150,000.

Another hot shot place to consider...Dubai. I heard one of my classmates friends moved there. He gets over 70,000 a year, is state tax exempt and after a year is totally tax exempt up to 90,000. Housing is expensive but gas is dirt cheap. Good food too, and alcohol is legal :-)

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CLSprospect in San Francisco, California

29 months ago

njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey said: 18 credits of biological science including hematology, clinical microbiology, and immunology

Now the onto the clinical site "rotations." Many (if not all) NAACLS programs require you to rotate throughout the departments and I think you need to meet a 9600 hour rule or something like that. This does not mean however your program needs to rotate in a hospital 5 days a week for 12 mos. My school has hematology I rotations done on campus for example, yet several previous students got a CA license no problem. The moral of the store is you need to go to a 3+1 or 4+1 NAACLS program where the last year rotates you through all the departments, you get experience, hit the 9600 hour rule or whatever, but that doesn't necessarily mean you need to be at a hospital rotation site for the whole time. If your "rotations" were less than 12 months and you go to a NAACLS program it may be because the school counts labs done there as "clinicals" and meet the 9600 hour rule. And then, yes you should be able to get a license

i've been sifting through this forum through multiple threads for months but if you are right with what you are saying then this is the most useful, helpful piece of information i've been able to gather since i started doing research on applying to CLS programs outside of california.
i'm trying to apply outside of california because the schools here are too competitive but i want to return to california for work once i'm done. some schools like in oregon (oregon institute of tech) or pennsylvania (thomas jefferson university) have a one year cls program where the academic labs/lectures/didactic courses take place during the first 8 months of the program while the clinical externship takes place during the last semester or 4 months. are you saying these programs will meet the CA one year of clinical rotation requirement even though we are not literally doing the clinical rotation until the last semester?

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Andy_UTMB in Galveston, Texas

28 months ago

njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey said: 18 credits of biological science including hematology, clinical microbiology, and immunology

Now the onto the clinical site "rotations." Many (if not all) NAACLS programs require you to rotate throughout the departments and I think you need to meet a 9600 hour rule or something like that. This does not mean however your program needs to rotate in a hospital 5 days a week for 12 mos. My school has hematology I rotations done on campus for example, yet several previous students got a CA license no problem. The moral of the store is you need to go to a 3+1 or 4+1 NAACLS program where the last year rotates you through all the departments, you get experience, hit the 9600 hour rule or whatever, but that doesn't necessarily mean you need to be at a hospital rotation site for the whole time. If your "rotations" were less than 12 months and you go to a NAACLS program it may be because the school counts labs done there as "clinicals" and meet the 9600 hour rule. And then, yes you should be able to get a license

Hey njbiodude,

Would you mind forwarding me any correspondence you had with the CA LFS licensing people? My e-mail is [ankazant (at) utmb (dot) edu]

I'm in a similar situation as you. We have shorter clinical internships because the facilities on-campus qualify as BSL-2 CLIA-certified laboratory, thus contribute towards the minimum lab hours for NAACLS accredation. I would really like to move to California after graduation and getting my MLS(ASCP) but the 1-year internship thing is really confusing for me.

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Sam in Astoria, New York

28 months ago

Sonia in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania said: I am so scared my Pennsylvania CLS program won't fulfill the 1 year clinical internship requirement for CA. Here is a program description from the college :

The College's Medical Laboratory Science Program prepares graduates to function in responsible positions in a laboratory environment. Students entering the 12-month program must have completed three years of college, and be eligible for a baccalaureate degree following completion of the program's coursework. The College will establish an affiliation agreement with the student's degree-granting home institution for one year of completed study in the Medical Laboratory Science Program. Candidates who have already received a baccalaureate degree may also be eligible for entry into the program.

The program is 12 months in length, with clinicals\lectures running from the beginning to the end.

Hey Sonia, I graduated from the same program as you. I am planing to apply for for ASCP California license. Please, Can you tell me if you were able to satisfy the CA license requirement?

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Davny in Rochester, New York

25 months ago

Recently I have been thinking to move to CA from East coast and after I read through every post on this thread I belive there shouldn't be any problems for me to switch NYS CLS(ASCP) License to California license.

I notice that there are three ways to do this but I just need to double check with poeple who have more knowledge and information in this regard. My situation fits cagetory A in CA state. I graduated from a 4 yrs ASCP accredited Medical Technology school, along with a full year of hospital onsite clinical internship. Does this mean that I should be able to obtain the CA license w/o any problems, right?

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mena08 in New York

24 months ago

Hi,
I am looking at MLS programs in PA/NJ. There is a hospital program that has 4.5 months of didactic and then 7 months M-F of full time rotations there. Will this be enough for CA? Also, I have my B.S. in biology already and have taken 8 credits of physics, general micro, applied micro, biochem, orgo 1 w/ lab and orgo 2 w/ lab among other bio/chem courses. I have not taken hematology, medical micro, immunology, or analytical chemistry. Even if my 1 yr (only 6.5 months M-F) of rotations is enough would I not qualify because I am lacking 4 courses? Am I allowed to take those courses now to qualify for CA license or even after I do my internship?

Thank you!

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Student in Milpitas, California

19 months ago

I think you have to get that 4 courses. No matter what. I'm also going to Washington for a CLS program, it a one year program which takes 18 weeks of lectures and lab, and 32 weeks of rotation, plus 1-2 weeks of holiday, add up to 52 weeks. I also worry if this will qualify the Ca license requirement. But I happen to know that my sister work as a phlebotomist and she knew someone go to a similar program in Sanford, Dakota (11 months program) and come back and now working at Stanford.

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Mike in Palm Bay, Florida

19 months ago

Hi, guys. This is kind of related to the topic at hand; I'm currently attending National University for distance learning. My major is CLS, which is difficult as is in a self-learning environment, but that's not what this is about; I wanted to see if my degree requirements sounded right to you seasoned professionals. I noticed that the only chemistry is Biochem, and there's only one course. Here's a rundown of the course list:
Requirements for the Major (11 courses; 49.5 quarter units)
Core Requisite(s):
BST 322 Intro to Biomedical Statistics
HSC 300 Legal/Ethical Issues & Hlth Pr
CLS 320 Clinical Lab Management
CLS 301 Clinical Biochemistry
CLS 401 Quantitative Analysis
CLS 305 Clinical Immunology
CLS 315 Molecular Diagnostics
CLS 310 Clinical Virology
CLS 405 Clinical Microbiology
CLS 410 Clinical Hematology
CLS 495 Clinical Lab Science Capstone
Upper-Division Electives (7 courses; 31.5 quarter units) Students must complete a minimum of 31.5 quarter units of upper division electives to fulfill the upper-division unit requirements for the B.S. with a Major in Clinical Laboratory Science. The following courses are strongly recommended:
CIS 301 Mgmt Information Systems
HSC 310 Issues & Trends in Healthcare
COM 354 Professional Presentations
HSC 410 Informatics for Health Profs
HSC 400 Mgmt for Health Professionals
CIS 440 Systems Quality Assurance
CIS 480 Health Information Management
HSC 420 Healthcare Research

It does also require a 52-week training program at a California-approved facility, which will be the trickiest part for me being that I live in Florida. I do plan to move to California, however.

Any advice?

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Mike in Melbourne, Florida

18 months ago

Bump.

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SteveK in La Jolla, California

17 months ago

Hello, I'm interested in attending out of state schools for CLS internship.
I figured that it's too competitive to get into CA schools, so even though I'm going to apply to CA schools, I'm looking into schools that offer 1 year internship out of state as well.

As long as I complete 1 year of internship, I wouldn't have any problem getting a CA license after I graduate?
Does internship have to be pure 12 months of hospital onsite clinical internship?
Can it be a combination of lecture/clinical internship?

NJbiodude... would you mind emailing me when you see this post?
My email is wyzbee@live.com
I have some questions to ask you.

I would also appreciate any answer you guys can give.
Thank you~

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OneAndroidOnTheRun in Arcata, California

15 months ago

CLS48 in California said: If you have a BS in CLS and one year of internship , you qualify for a CA license. If you have a BS in CLS, but less than one year of internship, you do not qualify because you do not have that 1 year of internship.

If you have a BS in some other field, you have to qualify by the credits listed in the CA handbook which includes:

(1) 16 semester or equivalent quarter hours of chemistry , including instruction in analytical and biological chemistry;

(2) 18 semester or equivalent quarter hours of biological science, including instruction in immunology, hematology and medical microbiology which may include bacteriology, mycology, virology and parasitology;

(3) 3 semester or equivalent quarter hours of physics, including instruction in principles of light and electricity

That means 3 semesters of physics. You also still have to have 1 year of internship along with the above credits if you have a BS in another field. Even if your education qualifies, but your internship is not one year, you do not qualify.


OK...This means 3 UNITS or SEMESTER HOURS of physics, not 3 SEMESTERS of physics (i.e. 3 courses).
It says this:
"16 semester or equivalent quarter hours of chemistry"
"18 semester or equivalent quarter hours of biological science"
"3 semester or equivalent quarter hours of physics"
Does it not? So by this logic, where everyone is freaking out b/c they think they need 3 semesters of physics, then this must also mean you need 16 semesters of chemistry and 18 semesters of biology.Which is untrue!

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Vlbraden in Nantucket, Massachusetts

15 months ago

I applied for my CA license and they said I needed to take a physics class... The physics class I took was called physical science... The class they suggested I take used the same book that I used for physical science. Because one side of the country terms things different I should retake the same class to meet their name?? I figure CA doesn't need Techs that bad if the wont go on curriculum if class verses name of it. I've been a Tech for over 16 years (not including my 1 year internship) and i don't meet standards??

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whisper in California

15 months ago

Vlbraden in Nantucket, Massachusetts said: I applied for my CA license and they said I needed to take a physics class... The physics class I took was called physical science... The class they suggested I take used the same book that I used for physical science. Because one side of the country terms things different I should retake the same class to meet their name?? I figure CA doesn't need Techs that bad if the wont go on curriculum if class verses name of it. I've been a Tech for over 16 years (not including my 1 year internship) and i don't meet standards??

If it's just an issue with the class name, see if you can have the school you attended send a letter to LFS regarding this course, and make sure the letter states clearly that the course covers principles of light and electricity. Depending on who is processing applications nowadays, they may require the letter to be signed by a specific person at the school (like the Chair of the Physics Department). You might also want to see if the school can send this letter with a tracking number or some sort of delivery confirmation. I've had a similar letter sent to LFS a few years ago, and it was lost the first two times.

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hybridMT in Santa Clara, California

13 months ago

I have a unique situation.
I have a BS in Biotechnology and after I graduated in NY, a hospital hired me and was so desparate to get licensed employees that they paid for me to go back to school and get my AAS in Medical Laboratory Technology. I was grandfathered in and got my CLS license for NYS but they still paid for me to continue my education. I graduated and worked in that lab for 3 years, but it was very large so I only worked in Chem & Heme. I did a 6 month rotation to complete my degree.
Moved to Texas and got my MLT(ASCP). Worked in a small lab for 2 years as a generalist (but we did not perform antibody IDs so could not take MT for ASCP.)
Now I have moved to California and feel utterly flabbergasted by the requirements to get either license. I did not have to take any physics for either degree that I hold. I don't even know where to begin and have found the folks at CDPH to be disinterested and not willing to help.
Requirements don't say whether the experience has specific testing requirements (ie like ASCP, must do antibody IDs to have BB experience count..)
It also says you need light & electricity for physics, which typically isn't taught until Physics II.
I love being an MT but really, California?!?

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whisper in California

13 months ago

hybridMT, you will definitely need a physics class to get the CLS license. From my experience LFS also seems more interested in the title of the class than what is actually taught, so if your class doesn't include "Light & Electricity" or "ANALYTICAL chemistry" in the title, you will have to jump through a lot of hoops to get your license. In my case, my school did not offer a class called analytical chemistry, but the chemistry department said that the analytical component was covered in the six chemistry classes I took. The registrar's description of the classes also included the word "analytical," but LFS e-mailed me and said they specifically wanted a letter signed by the Chair of the chemistry department. Oddly enough, a letter I received through the mail said I should send them a syllabus of the class.

Now as far as experience... I'm not sure what to tell you. Are you specifically looking for an MLT or CLS license, or are you just trying to get either? I don't think there are a lot of opportunities for MLTs in California, so if possible I would suggest just going for the CLS license.

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hybridMT in Cupertino, California

12 months ago

I have taken a course in analytical chemistry as part of my MLT degree..but I am afraid they will not count that.
I would like to get a CLS license but figured it to be next to possible.
Given how strict they are about everything else, I would be shocked to find that my experience counts (as it doesn't for ASCP) yet I have found nothing that delineates what proper experience is.

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MTFlorida in Parrish, Florida

12 months ago

I have over 28 years as a MT with a BS in Microbiology. I am certified as a MLT, MT with ASCP, and M. with both ASCP and NRM. In the old days, there were several ways to become a MT with ASCP, the only organization back then. I was just rejected by CA application process for a CLS license since I don't have the one year rotation as a Med Tech. I had it as a MLT student back in the 80's. It is rubbish to require older MT to jump new hoops just to qualify to take the test again. We still have to pass the test, so just give us the darn chance. These people think they are smarter than people from the other 49 states.

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Vlbraden in Nantucket, Massachusetts

12 months ago

I was having issues to. Only a 17 year tech though. I decided they don't need help so I pulled my app. Can work the rest... Who needs CA lol

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RMF in Fresno, California

12 months ago

MTFlorida in Parrish, Florida said: I have over 28 years as a MT with a BS in Microbiology. I am certified as a MLT, MT with ASCP, and M. with both ASCP and NRM. In the old days, there were several ways to become a MT with ASCP, the only organization back then. I was just rejected by CA application process for a CLS license since I don't have the one year rotation as a Med Tech. I had it as a MLT student back in the 80's. It is rubbish to require older MT to jump new hoops just to qualify to take the test again. We still have to pass the test, so just give us the darn chance. These people think they are smarter than people from the other 49 states.

If you don't have the 1 year rotation, then they will accept 4 years of experience as a generalist. Since you have 28 years experience then all you would need is a letter from your lab manager stating your experience at each bench.

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MTFlorida in Parrish, Florida

11 months ago

RMF in Fresno, California said: If you don't have the 1 year rotation, then they will accept 4 years of experience as a generalist. Since you have 28 years experience then all you would need is a letter from your lab manager stating your experience at each bench.

All of these stuffs to earn a right to take the test all over again after 3 decades in the lab? A test that the state of CA doesn't even administered but have ASCP do it for them. And I have passed with ASCP twice already in three different categories.

I am rethink the move to CA right now. Maybe it's not worth the trouble to deal with the audacity of some officials.

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whisper in California

11 months ago

MTFlorida in Parrish, Florida said: All of these stuffs to earn a right to take the test all over again after 3 decades in the lab? A test that the state of CA doesn't even administered but have ASCP do it for them. And I have passed with ASCP twice already in three different categories.

I am rethink the move to CA right now. Maybe it's not worth the trouble to deal with the audacity of some officials.

You wouldn't have to take anymore exams. There is a short (10 questions) online quiz about CA law, but it's open book.

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MTFlorida in Parrish, Florida

11 months ago

Whisper, I appreciated any input on this subject. Please check your info.. If you were certified by ASCP earlier than 2002 or 2004, then you have to retake the exam. Some are given by CA, some by ASCP and other organizations.
I don't mind getting a license and pay the fees, but I don't like the tactics of CA. What next? Are they going to question my bachelor and graduate degrees' credentials? Do I have to take a test to prove that I can function at the graduate level? If an organization is a national and known entity in the US, CA has no business scrutinizing anything. CA is not any better than any other state.
I would never complain about a 10 questions quiz.

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whisper in California

11 months ago

MTFlorida in Parrish, Florida said: Whisper, I appreciated any input on this subject. Please check your info.. If you were certified by ASCP earlier than 2002 or 2004, then you have to retake the exam. Some are given by CA, some by ASCP and other organizations.
I don't mind getting a license and pay the fees, but I don't like the tactics of CA. What next? Are they going to question my bachelor and graduate degrees' credentials? Do I have to take a test to prove that I can function at the graduate level? If an organization is a national and known entity in the US, CA has no business scrutinizing anything. CA is not any better than any other state.
I would never complain about a 10 questions quiz.

Oops, I didn't realize LFS only accepts ASCP certifications after 2002. That's crazy that you have to retake the exam.

I know the questions in your post were rhetorical, but yes, unfortunately sometimes LFS does question our credentials. It took seven months and a lot of back and forth (including various phone calls from my school and multiple attempts to mail a letter signed by the Chair of the Chemistry department of the university I attended) just to get my trainee license approved.

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MTFlorida in Parrish, Florida

11 months ago

whisper in California said: Oops, I didn't realize LFS only accepts ASCP certifications after 2002. That's crazy that you have to retake the exam.

I know the questions in your post were rhetorical, but yes, unfortunately sometimes LFS does question our credentials. It took seven months and a lot of back and forth (including various phone calls from my school and multiple attempts to mail a letter signed by the Chair of the Chemistry department of the university I attended) just to get my trainee license approved.

I went thru the very same thing with the state of Florida, but they changed the rule to accepting ASCP certification afterward. Now I doubt that I will want to do it all over again with CA. The irony is while they are using ASCP for testing, they are members of ASCP, but they don't accept ASCP standards for Med. Tech. If you ask old doctors to pass the board again after more than 20 years of practicing, I doubt any of them can pass it. You just don't put that kind of bs rules in place. There should be just a national standard instead of CA, NY and everyone else.

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Vicki in Alliance, Nebraska

11 months ago

I recently got my California license..it isn't impossible, but it isn't easy, either. I trained in Florida over 30 years ago, and at that time the clinical rotation was one full year. A few years later, the program was taken over by the University and the clinical rotation dropped to six months.
I did have to re-take the ASCP exam, but I passed it on the first try--not with as good a score as I got in 1979, but good enough to pass. I also had to contact the facility that I trained at and ask them to send my training records to California--they had not kept them. Luckily, some of the employees are still there who went through the same program and were awesome enough to re-construct the details of the program.
I did take one Physics class- three semester hours.
Although it showed in my college transcript that I had a full year of clinical rotation, they needed to know how many weeks I spent in each department.

I am working as a traveler, and when my current assignment is up I plan to go to California. They always have openings and are the highest-paid in the country. Cost of living is high, especially housing, but as a traveler that means you can get paid more and get a higher housing allowance if you choose that over having the agency supply your housing.

It costs $203 to apply for the California license (plus the cost of sending transcripts and training records), $225 to take the ASCP and I'm not sure why but they told me I had to take it at a test site in California (I chose Redding). But as a traveler I'm convinced it is more than worth it. California does seem to have a lot of CLS openings.

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