Stop complaining and demand more money

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Mike in New York, New York

27 months ago

There's a remarkable amount of wining on MT forums regarding the compensation. My wife is an MT, and I'm familiar with the pay rates for entry-level MTs at numerous NYC hospitals. I agree, for the level of education, and the rigor of said education, the compensation is lacking. What I'd like to do is purpose an alternative to the main ideas that seem to float around on these forums regarding the mitigation of this issue (i.e., getting labs to pay more).

The main idea I see over and over is unionize. I don't think that is the answer. NYC MTs are almost all unionized, and while it's resulted in a fairly level compensation package throughout most hospitals in NYC, it's also created an environment of stagnation that is holding people back. I don't believe unionizing in itself will result in any serious compensation gains.

As an alternative, I'd like to suggest people start turning down jobs. It may sound simple, or even silly, but that's it. Apply to jobs, even if you don't need a new one, and keep demanding more money. If they don't give it to you, reject the offer, and tell them it's because the compensation is laughable. If they tell you that's the market rate, tell them things are changing. Perhaps it's different elsewhere, but in NYC I frequently hear MTs complaining about pay. But I still see all these MTs accepting jobs with crappy salaries. So why would any lab offer more money, if you're going to accept it anyway? Other than my wife, I have rarely encountered a MT who actually turned down an offer and told them it wasn't enough money. Sometimes I see people pick 1 offer over another for another buck and hour or whatever, but outright rejection of a single offer because the pay sucks is far to rare.

Create an environment where lab supervisors begin to fear good candidates rejecting their offer because they don't pay enough. Demand more money, don't just ask, and walk away if they say no. Stop wining and do something about it.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

27 months ago

Well one look at salary data across all industries shows those that are unionized pay more period. Hospitals in NY and CA are unionized which is part of the reason along with regulations why they don't pay 19.50 an hour like in many other areas. I would personally encourage all med techs to get involved with the unions to push harder. I know everyone hates unions, but they really are what helped form such a strong middle class in the 20th century. Working with a union to push for wage increases across the board is actually better I think. After all, a hospital without a functioning lab is worthless.

The point is get involved with your unions and join one if you don't belong already and work from within. Then couple that with Mike's idea and you'll have fearful hospitals that are going to want to avoid strikes.

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CLS48 in California

27 months ago

Well pay is high in CA due to 2 main factors. First, regulation of CA CLS licenses is strict. You need to have a certain kind of education and at least 1 year of internship. With that 1 year of internship requirement, many MLS(ASCP) applicants from other states wouldn't qualify to get a CA CLS license. As a result, there is a shortage of licensed CLSs and the numerous labs have to offer a higher pay to compete for workers.

Second, MLTs are not prominent in CA. They just introduced licensed MLTs in CA in 2007. There are hardly any MLTs around in labs yet. Also, they cannot do microscopic work or blood bank, and they have to be supervised by CLSs. With this limited scope of practice, they cannot take the place of CLSs and labs cannot pay lower for an MLT because a CLS is needed to do a lot of things.

This keeps pay high in this state.

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Mike in New York, New York

27 months ago

njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey said: Well one look at salary data across all industries shows those that are unionized pay more period. Hospitals in NY and CA are unionized which is part of the reason along with regulations why they don't pay 19.50 an hour like in many other areas. I would personally encourage all med techs to get involved with the unions to push harder. I know everyone hates unions, but they really are what helped form such a strong middle class in the 20th century...

I disagree, unions effectively guarantee that you won't see major compensation gains. If everyone unionizes, then everyone will see a little bit of a gain, and compensation will be more egalitarian in the unionized hospitals. But then it stops. Once you have to negotiate every pay increase as a large organized body, the pay increases will be smaller. As an individual you can pressure a hospital into paying much more. But as a whole group, where paying everyone 15k/year more would actually be a substantial cost increase overall, the hospitals will never agree.

In addition, unions seem to drain the life out of talented MTs. Why would you work your ass of and perform better than your peers, if your raise is pre-determined and will be identical to everyone else anyway. Workers can't be fired unless they are egregiously out of line. Rewards go to people with the most years, not to people who actually deserve them. I don't believe unions are a good idea for skilled professions. MTs aren't as replaceable as as someone like an assembly line worker (where unions make a lot of sense). You have more power than you realize, you just need to show them you realize it.

Regarding regulations, I'm not opposed to that. I wouldn't want anything crazy, but something similar to CA where only MTs can release results, seems reasonable. That would empower MTs even more, and might result in serious compensation gains nationwide.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

27 months ago

Here would be an idea for example, Mike. Have the unions (and you might want to work with ASCP as well) to fight against MLTs being hired in NYC, and also require ASCP certification for new grads. You could argue this is necessary in big hospitals in NYC because of the large volume of patients you see etc. This is honestly I think the best bet if you guys (and maybe me in a year heh) want to see NYC catch up to CA in terms of pay. We'll all have to get involved though.

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Mike in New York, New York

27 months ago

njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey said: Here would be an idea for example, Mike. Have the unions (and you might want to work with ASCP as well) to fight against MLTs being hired in NYC, and also require ASCP certification for new grads. You could argue this is necessary in big hospitals in NYC because of the large volume of patients you see etc. This is honestly I think the best bet if you guys (and maybe me in a year heh) want to see NYC catch up to CA in terms of pay. We'll all have to get involved though.

I don't think MLTs are a big deal here. I'll have to ask my wife, but I don't think she works with any MLTs. Many hospitals here require MT ASCP (which is beyond what local law requires). One issue NYC MTs seem to have over other places is a better balance between the supply and demand of MTs. A large number of MTs my wife works with are immigrants who are grandfathered in, due to high medical qualifications. The old, I was a doctor in my home country, but I'm only an MT in America story. However, this problem may reside as most of these grandfathered MTs seem to be nearing retirement.

I do agree with you though, I would like reasonable regulations tightened up, at the Federal level maybe. The knowledge gap between older grandfathered techs, and fresher ASCP educated grads is a bit frightening. Getting this resolved will be a big win for both MTs and patients.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

27 months ago

A final idea, but this is going to have to be done at the city level, and perhaps work later to the state level initially.

Might want to do individual presentations to the mayor, big hospitals etc showing that for example california has a very rigorous continuing education plan and that laboratory mistakes can cause SERIOUS detriment and kill. Explain how CA's laws that limit nursing short staffing and require fully licensed MTs make healthcare safer as comparison, and explain that NYC has one of the busiest hospital systems in the globe serving as a nexus for a lot of emergency medical care in the tristate area. Explain how an MT recieve significantly better training than an MLT, and push for strong continuing education programs for MTs. Asking for a 15k raise won't work but this could certainly jack everyones salary up a bit. I still encourage working with uniions as well, perhaps encourage them to have a minimal tyearly raiise coupled with a small incentive based bonus? Moral of story we all need to be vocal and get involved.

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anonnnmoyus in Brooklyn, New York

27 months ago

njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey said: Here would be an idea for example, Mike. Have the unions (and you might want to work with ASCP as well) to fight against MLTs being hired in NYC, and also require ASCP certification for new grads. You could argue this is necessary in big hospitals in NYC because of the large volume of patients you see etc. This is honestly I think the best bet if you guys (and maybe me in a year heh) want to see NYC catch up to CA in terms of pay. We'll all have to get involved though.

The best way to set higher salary standards for MT in NY is to basically increase the educational standards. California only allows NAACLS certified schools to take the ASCP California examination(ALL are California DHS approved schools) , and many think the AAB is a shortcut, but in California - you can only take the AAB with the same requirements as taking the ASCP(you need to graduate from an approved DHS school, or it's equivalent with one year trainee experience)

New York for a long time, allowed any college with a medical technology program(even though it has to be approved first by NY) to work as MT. (Even after 2006 licensure came into effect). Well, that will stop in 2013. However - any school in NY that offers a 'certificate' MT program and is approved by NY state - is allowed licensure. Many of these programs are not approved by NAACLS. Hence, students can still become licensed in NY despite not attending a NAACLS program , which is the gold standard for medical technology school.

It's very simple - we need to head to Washington, D.C and lobby for a federal standard requiring clear cut definitions of medical technologist and 2 year degree ones, their roles and duties for each, and uniformed federal educational requirements. Each program can of course be slightly to moderately differently structured, but the key components should be there in order to attain licensure.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

27 months ago

Annonymous is right, but we can't jump from point A to point F. I'd start with the city of New York, and despite being a student, will gladly work with anyone in the next few months to have a meeting with the city council or local hospital boards or whatever you guys deem appropriate. We could state our points. If anyone is actually serious about this my email is jlsperling@yahoo.com, I'd be glad to partake. We could state
A.)Graduates of excellent NAACLS schools are getting shafted beacause of multiple licensing.
B.) Hospitals in NYC should adhere to strict standards analogous to those found in CA because of the large volume of patients seen and wide variety of esoteric medical cases seen.
C.)Require all new grads as of say 2014 in NYC be ASCP BSMT techs. Have schools like Hunter College try to add clinical rotation aspects to their programs to be accredited as well...

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anonnnmoyus in Brooklyn, New York

27 months ago

Mike in New York, New York said: I disagree, unions effectively guarantee that you won't see major compensation gains. If end perform better than your peers, if your raise is pre-determined and will be identic

Regarding regulations, I'm not opposed to that. I wouldn't want anything crazy, but something similar to CA where only MTs can release results, seems reasonable. That would empower MTs even more, and might result in serious compensation gains nationwide.

I concur with your statement.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

27 months ago

Hopefully if NYC saw this pass, it could spread to the state of NY and maybe other states like NJ, Connecticut etc. Honestly rural wyoming doctors probably don't need ASCP techs, and would serve as a major protestor to getting an entire law passed at the Federal level (very/very difficult!) but level 1 trauma centers in the urban northeast sure could use them. Its much easier to start at the local/state level I think.

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Unappreciated in Manorville, New York

24 months ago

I agree Mike, I am an experienced lab professional who is now completing a BS in MT through a rigorous program at university. I am shocked to find many of the highly qualified professionals I meet are making slightly more ($5-$10) an hour more than a higher end phlebotomist. Unions are of no help and as a matter of fact have been the determining factor in the low wages. MT's have a tremendously grueling education especially in comparison of RNBS and yet a significantly lower amount of pay. I have proposed similar ideas to MT's, do as RN's have and threaten a walk out or strike. A hospital cannot FUNCTION without a lab. They are either too tired or too fearful to move forward. Admittedly I like your idea better and will be passing it on in mass to my fellow students and employees alike.

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ak165 in New York, New York

17 months ago

Mike in New York, New York said: I don't think MLTs are a big deal here. I'll have to ask my wife, but I don't think she works with any MLTs. Many hospitals here require MT ASCP (which is beyond what local law requires). One issue NYC MTs seem to have over other places is a better balance between the supply and demand of MTs. A large number of MTs my wife works with are immigrants who are grandfathered in, due to high medical qualifications. The old, I was a doctor in my home country, but I'm only an MT in America story. However, this problem may reside as most of these grandfathered MTs seem to be nearing retirement.

I do agree with you though, I would like reasonable regulations tightened up, at the Federal level maybe. The knowledge gap between older grandfathered techs, and fresher ASCP educated grads is a bit frightening. Getting this resolved will be a big win for both MTs and patients.

Could you ask her what is the starting pay? what about pay after 2-3 years? After 5 years? Not sure whether leaving a job for school is worth it or not

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Mike in New York, New York

17 months ago

ak165 in New York, New York said: Could you ask her what is the starting pay? what about pay after 2-3 years? After 5 years? Not sure whether leaving a job for school is worth it or not

Pay is mediocre, relative to other positions within the healthcare industry that have similar education requirements. Pay is decent for bachelors level young professional. Most hospitals seems to pay around 48-55k per year entry-level. Many work overtime and/or have multiple positions (2 full-time, or 1 full-time + 1 per diem) to increase pay substantially.

Pay doesn't rise very much with years of experience. If you want to make more $$, you should find a hospital that promotes based on merit instead of seniority (tough to do here with the union) and work hard to become a lead tech early on.

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Ak165 in New York, New York

17 months ago

I make about $46k now but Stand most of the day and might be offered 50k soon. I would have to take a year off to go to school to make more money. I'd like to know where the 55k job is, would they count my unrelated lab experience?

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Mike in New York, New York

17 months ago

Ak165 in New York, New York said: I make about $46k now but Stand most of the day and might be offered 50k soon. I would have to take a year off to go to school to make more money. I'd like to know where the 55k job is, would they count my unrelated lab experience?

Even if you're not offered 50k, giving up a years salary and paying for school to land a 55k job sounds like a bad idea to me, from a strictly financial perspective. There would need to be some serious earning upside, because you're talking about several years to make up the lost salary. Now, if it's to pursue a career that brings you more happiness, then it may absolutely be worth it.

If you want to make more serious money in the lab, get an advanced degree and work for the pharm industry.

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Ak165 in New York, New York

17 months ago

Are there jobs in the pharm industry in manhattan? I have a science degree and years experience in a fragrance lab, which I don't want to continue doing. I would prefer a stable job and salary where I can work in manhattan since I live in manhattan. Which advanced degree could I get in2 years or less?

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New York Mets in new york, New York

17 months ago

Ak165 in New York, New York said: Are there jobs in the pharm industry in manhattan? I have a science degree and years experience in a fragrance lab, which I don't want to continue doing. I would prefer a stable job and salary where I can work in manhattan since I live in manhattan. Which advanced degree could I get in2 years or less?

If you are talking about to pharmacist, it is very saturated right now in NYC metro area. If you are referring to labs like fragance labs, etc, which many people hold a degree in chemistry/usually masters - most of these jobs are in New jersey and the pay is around 60k.As in regards to advanced degrees, the best bet are physician assistant(2 years post bac) are try for masters in health policy/adminstration - although you must network yourself to get experience in a hospital. Remember, managing hospital finances is a tough job and honestly the pay is not as rewarding compare to people in high positions of business finance. Good Luck on whichever path you choose!

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Ak165 in New York, New York

17 months ago

I actually work at a fragrance lab in manhattan. There's some cosmetic lab jobs like hair product formulation but hard to get into. CUNy also hires for lab jobs which is around 40k, the city sometimes hires for labs which is also around 40k. However these jobs move higher in the scale faster

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Ak165 in New York, New York

17 months ago

Forgot to mention that I tried to be a PA. They schools want you to have so much volunteer experience which is unpaid, then there are so many people trying to get into the healthcare like nursing that there were 5 new volunteers coming in a day then they treat u like slaves without any appreciation.

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TFarnon in Sparks, Nevada

16 months ago

Yes, I think it would be good if MT's made more money. The education, training and responsibility required argue strongly for higher compensation.

Personally, I would do the job for half the starting pay, because I simply like lab work that much. During my internship, one of my mentors told me a "horror story" about one of the techs who had died looking through the microscope on graveyard shift, and he wasn't found until morning. I chose to not horrify my mentor by telling her that I couldn't think of a better way to die, doing something I really love to do. If I wanted to make piles of money, I probably would have chosen a career field other than science. I doubt I would like it as much, though.

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CLS48 in California

16 months ago

I have almost 6 years of experience and make 85K as a supervisor. I think I'm a bit low for my position but I suppose I can't complain. I want to be around 6 figures within the next 5 years by possibly moving to a larger lab or becoming a manager.

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Mike in New York, New York

16 months ago

CLS48 in California said: I have almost 6 years of experience and make 85K as a supervisor. I think I'm a bit low for my position but I suppose I can't complain. I want to be around 6 figures within the next 5 years by possibly moving to a larger lab or becoming a manager.

Don't most MTs in California make that much? Seems low.

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CLS48 in California

16 months ago

That's about $41 an hour. In my first job, I started at $28 an hour 6 years ago. I've progressed ok in 6 years. A CLS with 10+ years of experience in SOUTHERN CA would make around that much and yes techs with 15+ years of experience get more than me. Northern CA pays more and larger hospitals pay more.

It is not uncommon at least in CA for bench techs to make more than supervisors if the supervisor is new with little experience vs a bench tech with 15+ years as is my case. I'm still young, so hope to progress career and salary wise within the next 5 to 10 years.

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CLS48 in California

16 months ago

I should clarify that within the same lab, generally supervisors should be getting more then bench techs based on the scale range, with maybe some overlapping. I'm really not sure if the more experienced techs do get more in my lab. I'm assuming they might. I know for sure though that more experienced bench techs at say UCLA or Cedar Sinai get more than me simply because those hospitals pay a lot.

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CLS_248 in San Jose, California

16 months ago

CLS48 in California said: That's about $41 an hour. In my first job, I started at $28 an hour 6 years ago. I've progressed ok in 6 years. A CLS with 10+ years of experience in SOUTHERN CA would make around that much and yes techs with 15+ years of experience get more than me. Northern CA pays more and larger hospitals pay more.

It is not uncommon at least in CA for bench techs to make more than supervisors if the supervisor is new with little experience vs a bench tech with 15+ years as is my case. I'm still young, so hope to progress career and salary wise within the next 5 to 10 years.

Yeap, Northern CA does pay a lot more. When I was speaking to the education coordinator at Kaiser, they mentioned their starting pay is $44-$55/hr depending on shift/differentials.

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CLS48 in California

16 months ago

CLS_248 in San Jose, California said: Yeap, Northern CA does pay a lot more. When I was speaking to the education coordinator at Kaiser, they mentioned their starting pay is $44-$55/hr depending on shift/differentials.

Well, that's probably $44 an hour starting without experience possibly with a shift differential.

Kaiser in southern CA starting is about $36 an hour with no shift differential. I'm not sure northern CA Kaisers would be that much higher. Also, it's very difficult to get into Kaiser as a new grad if not impossible. Generally, you have to have experience to get in. Also, usually you either have to get into per diem first or a ft graveyard or pm shift.

I always preferred day shifts and day shifts don't give differentials. I also doubt other labs other than Kaiser would start at $44 an hour. UC Davis starts in the mid to high 30s an hour.

I sit most of the day on my computer surfing the net and directing the bench CLSs to do things. It's a pretty easy job. I'd prefer my job over a higher paying job at Kaiser. I've worked in busy hospitals where you have to do 50 UAs a shift, run and release 500 BMPs, or do 50 CBC differentials a shift. It's not fun unless you like working like a slave trying to keep the TAT. Lab management is where it's at. It's not all about the money.

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whisper in California

16 months ago

The difference in pay between Southern and Northern California can be pretty significant depending on which hospitals/labs you're comparing. Some of my classmates are getting well over 85k as their first job out of training. One is working at Stanford, a few at biotech companies, and one at Kaiser. Base pay at Kaiser in the Bay Area without any differential is $40/hour. One of my classmates is working graveyard at Kaiser and getting paid $49/hr because the supervisor decided to give her an extra $3/hr just because of where she trained (plus $6/hr for shift differential).

As CLS48 said though, it's not just about the money. I have never worked at Kaiser, but I've heard it gets pretty stressful there. You just have to find something that has a good balance of everything you want.

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CLS_248 in San Jose, California

16 months ago

whisper in California said: The difference in pay between Southern and Northern California can be pretty significant depending on which hospitals/labs you're comparing. Some of my classmates are getting well over 85k as their first job out of training. One is working at Stanford, a few at biotech companies, and one at Kaiser. Base pay at Kaiser in the Bay Area without any differential is $40/hour. One of my classmates is working graveyard at Kaiser and getting paid $49/hr because the supervisor decided to give her an extra $3/hr just because of where she trained (plus $6/hr for shift differential).

As CLS48 said though, it's not just about the money. I have never worked at Kaiser, but I've heard it gets pretty stressful there. You just have to find something that has a good balance of everything you want.

Of course, I completely agree it is not all about the money. I'm just stating it for those who are curious. I am curious about your friend that works at Stanford. I'll be training there and was wondering how he liked it there.

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whisper in California

16 months ago

CLS_248 in San Jose, California said: Of course, I completely agree it is not all about the money. I'm just stating it for those who are curious. I am curious about your friend that works at Stanford. I'll be training there and was wondering how he liked it there.

Definitely. If it was all about money, we would probably be in a different field! :) The starting pay for entry level looks pretty promising, but we don't get the same raises that people get in the corporate world. I do find the pay difference between Southern and Northern California pretty interesting though since the cost of living can get pretty high in the LA area and in Orange County.

I didn't talk to the Stanford students too much since most of my classmates from other clinical sites didn't attend lecture in person. Both of them really seemed to like it though, based on what I heard from them at school meetings and from their graduation speeches. Also, one of them decided to relocate to work at Stanford after training, so that's always a good sign if people are willing to relocate for the job.

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CLS48 in California

16 months ago

I think though, it's good to look at how the lab field in CA is progressing. A thing to worry about is how MLTs came to be officially practicing in 2008 in our state. Before then, the extreme shortage of MLTs caused CLS pay to increase drastically. However, there are schools opening every year for MLT and I've seen an increase in MLT openings.

MLTs can release Chem and hematology, but cannot do microscopic work or Blood Bank. My lab has never hired an MLT but we now have an opening because they are cheaper than a CLS. In 5 to 10 years, I predict MLTs will gain more prominence and take over many CLS jobs. Why would you pay a CLS $45 an hour if you can pay an MLT $25 an hour to do the same thing?

UCLA and Kaiser have all started using them. You will start seeing fewer CLS openings and more MLT openings in the future.

Also, with Obamacare hospitals are getting squeezed to cost cut. The influx of new patients with bad insurances and low payments to hospitals will cause smaller hospitals to close and will lower pay for healthcare professionals across the board. This will make the MLT look more valuable and cost effective than a CLS.

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njbiodude in New Jersey

16 months ago

I'd think 30-50/hr is in line with most corporate jobs if not better. Most corporate jobs paying over 50k also require people to work a lot more than 40 hrs. a week, and job security is bad. Outside of CA, the average salary is lower, but not horrible either. There's also management/supervisor positions which are more "corporate" and can certainly pay 70-100k a year with benefits, not bad.

If you guys want more money look into working in Dubai, working for the military or the CDC, or going to Medical/PA school after your degree.

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Faustina in California

16 months ago

Whisper, where did your friend train that got her $3/hour extra? That's interesting because I've heard different viewpoints. Most seem to say it doesn't matter at all where you train because having the CLS license is all the hospitals care about. But I've heard a few hints that some training programs are more highly regarded than others and may get their graduates a better position. I'm not sure how true that is. Obviously beggars can't be choosers, but it would be interesting to know.

To the three of you, CLS48, whisper, and CLS_248, thanks very much for sharing your observations and inside info-- it's been very helpful.

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whisper in California

16 months ago

Faustina in California said: Whisper, where did your friend train that got her $3/hour extra?

The person who got the $3/hr extra trained at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center which is affiliated with SJSU. Our ed coordinator says that Valley Medical has a good reputation in the area for training the students well. I don't know how Valley's training compares to other places, but in my experience, the training was excellent. Our training in hematology even makes sure that you can work at a good pace - in order to pass, you have to do a certain number of differentials in a certain amount of time. They constantly say that they want to prepare you well enough so that you will feel confident about taking a job where you might have to work by yourself. Also, by the end, everyone in my class at Valley took the ASCP exam right after training was done. I talked to some classmates who trained at other facilities and some of them want to take time off to study. Everyone at SJSU always passes, but it's nice having the confidence to take the test right after you finish training.

For the most part, when it comes to hiring, I don't think it matters where you train. The main thing is that you have your CLS license. However, based on what I've heard from some supervisors and coworkers, some places seem to train better than others. This sounds crazy, but I have heard from more than one supervisor that some hospitals don't allow the trainees to work on real patient samples.

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DickTrickle in Charlotte, North Carolina

16 months ago

Back on topic, we get it Cali Laboratorians your pay does not suck. To the OP, I agree whole-heartedly. Unfortunately, many hospitals have a steady stream of fresh meat who do not yet know their market value and just want a job. Personally, after a decade in this field, I know I am damn good at what I do and my worth to a healthcare facility and its patients is immeasurable. I now have no problem telling a potential employer to suck it if I am given an offensive offer. I honestly find it rather enjoyable and may have to do it many times in the near future, thinking about making a move.

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TFarnon in Sparks, Nevada

15 months ago

I'm probably part of the reason that MT pay may not seem to be commensurate with the education and responsibility required. Thing is, I love working in a lab. I'm not picky--pretty much as long as there are benches and chemicals and I'm using the latter at the former, I'm happy. As long as I can make a living wage (which is less than I make as an MT), I'm good. If other jobs pay more (and they do), that's fine with me. I don't want to do those other jobs. I want to work in a lab. Did I already mention that? Let me say it again: I want to work in a lab. I do work in a lab. I like working in a lab. I'd rather be paid "less" to do what I like to do than be paid more to do something I don't like nearly as much.

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Andy_UTMB in Galveston, Texas

15 months ago

TFarnon in Sparks, Nevada said: I'm probably part of the reason that MT pay may not seem to be commensurate with the education and responsibility required. Thing is, I love working in a lab. I'm not picky--pretty much as long as there are benches and chemicals and I'm using the latter at the former, I'm happy. As long as I can make a living wage (which is less than I make as an MT), I'm good. If other jobs pay more (and they do), that's fine with me. I don't want to do those other jobs. I want to work in a lab. Did I already mention that? Let me say it again: I want to work in a lab. I do work in a lab. I like working in a lab. I'd rather be paid "less" to do what I like to do than be paid more to do something I don't like nearly as much.

Football players like playing football too. That doesn't mean they should get paid below their worth and their demand.

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medlabtalk in Fair Lawn, New Jersey

15 months ago

There is a shortage of laboratory professionals. It will take some time before there is real need for us. As of now hospitals are pushing for turn around times, how fast you can result the sample once it gets in the laboratory. While staff is short, management still pushes this and if not met, it will reflect on your evaluation. So basically work is getting done with a short staff. As long as this progresses there will not be a demand for Laboratory Professionals. Not to say that everyone should slow the work down, that is not what I am trying to say. Just do the work as mush as you can without overexerting oneself plus this will lead to less mistakes. If the management complains say the truth we need more staffing. Remember the late 70's and 80's they were a short of nurses, and high in demand. Look at them now, but that took time.

Medlabtalk

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medlabtalk in Fair Lawn, New Jersey

15 months ago

TFarnon in Sparks, Nevada said: I'm probably part of the reason that MT pay may not seem to be commensurate with the education and responsibility required. Thing is, I love working in a lab. I'm not picky--pretty much as long as there are benches and chemicals and I'm using the latter at the former, I'm happy. As long as I can make a living wage (which is less than I make as an MT), I'm good. If other jobs pay more (and they do), that's fine with me. I don't want to do those other jobs. I want to work in a lab. Did I already mention that? Let me say it again: I want to work in a lab. I do work in a lab. I like working in a lab. I'd rather be paid "less" to do what I like to do than be paid more to do something I don't like nearly as much.

I also like working in the laboratory! I like it so much I HAVE HAD THREE JOBS at a point. Little tired, stuck with two! for now.

medlabtalk

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