The true facts about MT salaries and pay

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (1 to 50 of 881)
Page:   1  2  3  4  Next »   Last »

ecrunner in Eau Claire, Wisconsin

92 months ago

Why is it that MT's specializing in Micro seem to make less than an ASCP certified MT? (according to salary.com) Shouldn't specializing increase your pay rate?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (29) / No (14) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

I think it depends on what you mean by specializing. You can be an MT(ASCP)working just in the department of micro, blood bank, hematology, etc. and get paid the same as the title MT(ASCP). You could call yourself a specialist, but that doesn't mean you have the certification. Those figures in salary.com don't really point out if they mean if you're a certified specialist or not so I'm not sure.

Between the departments you really don't get paid more or less. Pay is mostly based on how much experience you have. In larger hospitals, they may force you to specialize or work just in one department while in smaller hospitals you tend to be a generalist.

I have heard that sometimes getting the specialist certification from ASCP may help increase your pay. That is, for blood bank the SBB(ASCP) on top of your MT(ASCP) would make you an MT(ASCP)SBB, can increase your pay since you are a certified specialist in blood bank. They also have SH(ASCP) and SM(ASCP) or specialists in hematology and microbiology. I am not sure if your pay is increased if you are one of those, though, and it probably is a case by case basis and depends on the hospital.

What it may help with if anything is to get a job in those particular departments over someone that isn't a specialist, which in this economy may be an advantage seeing as how many hospitals have frozen their lab hiring. It also would probably give you the chance to become a supervisor more easily if you have the specialist certification.

One thing I would mention is if you're going to get any certification or specialize in anything get the ASCP certification, as in MT(ASCP). All hospitals in the US recognize this.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (22) / No (18) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

So you're saying on the east cost MLTs can verify and release results? Can they also issue and crossmatch blood? Can they also identify bacteria and release those results to doctors?

I highly doubt that. If they could, then there would be no difference between MT and MLTs and MLTs would get paid the same as MTs.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (14) / No (32) Reply - Report abuse

John1104 in Buffalo, New York

92 months ago

Please call any hospital in PA and ask them if they hire MLT and MT. And then call the Laboratory ask any MLT what there job duties are, they do EXACTLY the same thing as MT. That is what I have been trying to say. They can xmatch blood, issue, call results to doctors, speciate organims etc. They only have a ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN MLT. That is why I say that MT salary will never go up b/c they do the EXACT same thing as MT here in the EAST COAST. If you dont believe me call ANY hospital in PA. I work for one right now that and a majority of them are MLT. Here is the only difference, MLT CANNOT be departments supervisors or Lab Directors, and in my hospital MLT only do 15 hours of CE while me being a MT has to do 20 hours of CE. When I was looking for a job recently and I asked for 30/hour <mind you I have 5 years experience as a generalist with ascp cert> HR was looking at me like I was committing a crime. They know the pay is low for MLT so why on earth would they pay me 30/hour. Any other profession, if you have a RN degree with 5 years experience 30/hour no prob, or pharmacy, OT, PT, Respiratory, etc....

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (37) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

I've never heard of MLTs being able to release results to the floors. There always has to be an MT that checks the results and releases them. MLTs can only perform the results. PA seems to be pretty messed up in that sense.

I'm pretty sure that most of the country is like CA in that they don't allow MLTs to release results. It could be a state by state kind of thing. In CA, it's against the law for anyone other than MTs to verify and release results. An MLT can perform the results but they must always be checked by the MT before they are let go. Hence why MTs have a CA CLS license and MLTs do not.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No (28) Reply - Report abuse

Saber in dallas, Texas

92 months ago

Texas is the same way, I have worked at 3 hospitals and MLT can do everything that a MT does. The only difference is the pay, and MLT cannot be department supervisors or lab managers. Most of the MLT I work with work 3-5 years as a generalist and then take the BSMT ASCP exam when they get eligible just for higher pay. But the duties are EXACTLY the same.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (16) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

vernon in Topeka, Kansas

92 months ago

yes the duties are exactly the same.. you are trapped in your own world Mr CA...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (19) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

That is not the case in CA, and as I said I'm sure in other states. There is a critical shortage of MTs in the nation and this will drive salaries up even more. The average age of MTs is 50 and the number of edcuational programs for CLSs is going down. In 10 years labs will have a tough time filling their positions.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (15) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_technologist

"Although the Medical Technologist and the results they provide to the physician are essential to patient care, there is a crisis looming. According to an article in the October 2008 issue of "Critical Values" (Vol. 1, Issue 4), there is a swiftly approaching critical shortage of MT's. "The number of technologist/scientist and technician education programs has declined by more than 50% since 1970, with the most dramatic decline in technologist/scientist programs, 71% of which closed between 1970 and 2007. In contrast, the number of phlebotomy training programs increased sixfold from 1987 to 2003....The shortage of technologists/scientists and technicians is expected to worsen over the next decade with demographic changes and requirements." (Exerpted from "From Laboratory Medicine: A National Status Report," pg. 12-14).

The very next article "Awareness - The 'A' Factor" by P. Epner, states that "the average laboratory professional is believed to be almost 50. Given the number of new laboratory professionals needed due to increasing requirements for laboratory services and the number of employees within 5-10 years of retirement, demand is expected to far exceed the number anticipated to be available for hire" (pg. 15).

This bodes well for those seeking a career in science or allied health - there will be lots of job openings as the Baby-Boomers and Baby-Busters retire and make way in the lab for new staff. However, the burden on new inexperienced Med Tech's will worsen as the 60+ population increases and become greater consumers of health care in their "Golden Years," unless more people get trained for the profession....

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No (16) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

...The best way to minimize this problem is to make secondary and post-secondary educators and advisers aware of both the benefits and the job security of degrees from accredited Med Tech programs, and advising their students to get informed about the profession. The number of students currently in training programs will not be sufficient to satisfy the vacancies and the increased work load just around the corner.

This phenomena is not only in the United States, so students with abilities in other languages may find their dream job being a traveling Med Tech (like a traveling Nurse), and be able to work around the world, while earning an embarrassing amount of money and per diem.

Yes, the job is hard and demands accuracy and a high ethical standard. And, yes, the job pays less than others in the medical field. And, yes, there are constant changes and challenges which face staff. But a degree in Medical Technology may open doors to high wages, travel, management experience, or even pave the way to another career, such as Pharmacy or Physician."

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (13) / No (14) Reply - Report abuse

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

92 months ago

CLS48 in California said: That is not the case in CA, and as I said I'm sure in other states. There is a critical shortage of MTs in the nation and this will drive salaries up even more. The average age of MTs is 50 and the number of edcuational programs for CLSs is going down. In 10 years labs will have a tough time filling their positions.

I am glad CA is so restrictive. This is the way it should be for all 50 states. You pay indicates that they pay pretty well <i realize your in CA and the cost of living is crazy>. But you do get paid really well. Other states are NOT restrictive therefore hospitals will hire cheap labor <MLT> so they can profit and the MT will always have a lower salary. This is the problem that MT are faced with. This is why there is no interest in the field, this is why we have a shortage. There are 7 pharmacy schools here in texas and there are more opening up. Pharmacy pay there graduates well, and there is no way a hospital can pay a pharmacy tech to do the same as pharmacists. Unfortunetly this is not the case in the lab side. As the years progress people WILL get out of the profession b/c they pay is so low. With MLT in the work force doing to same duties, MT wages will never be high. So this profession is headed down a HORRIBLE path, schools are closing b/c there is NO INTEREST <LACK OF PAY>, there will be shortage, unless they make BSMT with cert manditory for the clinical lab, start paying 50K starting and increases well each year, there is no way any one would want to be in the field. This leads to hiring from OVERSEAS, so employeers will sponsor MT from other countries. So instead of PAYING WELL from the START, they would rather have a shortage IN THE US, then just give people VISA b/c they have to sign a 3 year contract to work. Probably for next to nothing....This is why we have a shortage.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (37) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

I think it should be illegal for MLTs to release results everywhere. It doesn't make sense to me since they don't have the education.

The cost of living isn't that bad in CA. It costs about $1100 in a decent area for a one bedroom apt and gas is now only $1.89 or so a gallon. I'm sure food isn't that much different. Housing is also going down everywhere with the average in some places $300,000 for a nice house.

I suppose if you can call that cost of living expensive but I think it's reasonable.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (30) Reply - Report abuse

James BS MT (ASCP) CLS (NCA) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

92 months ago

Yes unfortunetly employeers only look to save money and keep increasing every quarter. Thats why they will always hiring cheaper labor, unless the government enforces rules that mandates only BSMT work in the clinical lab this will be the trend and the lab will always be poorly paid.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

Well, salary.com has philadelphia CLSs making on average 60K. I think if you start at a job that pays low, you're kind of stuck there. The key is to try and start at the highest pay possible per hour. Then when you move to a different place they either give you a $1 raise or stay at your level. Rarely, will a new job offer you lower for the same level of position.

I probably make $2 more an hour than my classmates since I started higher than them and moved around to increase my pay. Stay away from reference labs and recruiters because they will just put a lag on your hourly rate. The real money is in the large hospitals.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No (13) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

92 months ago

If you start at an hourly rate lower than other CLSs, when you ask a new employer for a $2 to $3 increase in your hourly pay, they would probably laugh at you. Your new pay has to be on par with your old pay. The only reason why you would want to start at a low rate is if you can't find a job. However, if CLSs are scarce in your area then you probably can negotiate a higher pay.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (12) Reply - Report abuse

mlt in Zanesfield, Ohio

92 months ago

In Ohio, mlts can release and verify information to the floor. Granted it depends on what kind of facility you work at: large hospitals vs small rural hospitals, who owns the hospital and where to cut corners etc. on the varying degree like some hospitals wont hire mlts in microbiology but let them hand out blood and blood products down the hall in immnohematlogy. From my experience in the mlt program I completed I'am scared to let some of my classmates that charm their way through the program work in a laboratory and most of the ones that charmed their way didnt cut it in a 4 year setting. While the ones that are the less charming and outcast but knew what they were doing in the program didnt get recommendations for positions before/during/after clinicals.
I myself would love to see the laboratory industry get their communications together and their egos out of the way to implement the following:
Licensing for all states
Limitations depending on MLT/MT staus and experience
One or no certification agency
If you are MLT but have a four year degree and a certain amount science credits after a year of experience sit for mt license and certification.
Pay must be addressed in ohio long term care lpn with no college degree makes more than an mlt with an associates....thats dishearting.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (17) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

92 months ago

I worked at 3 hospitals here, and no MT makes 60K base salary. Maybe after shift diff and OT. Most hospitals here pay between 21-23 with 5 years experience.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Ben in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

My last job I applied to, I asked for 30/hour, the HR was looking at me like I was crazy. Apparently there was no way to much than they would like to offer. I ask them what the base pay for MT with 10 years experience with ASCP. They said 23-25. I found out that most of the lab had MLT working in there, so there was the reason I never was offered what I asked for.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

91 months ago

Cost of living is also higher.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

tashapastory in Blountstown, Florida

91 months ago

I'm now studying to become a MLT; I plan to move to California when I done and continue study for MT program online or off-line. Is there is any good school for MT in CA? I also want to know what all the big major hospitals starts for new MLT graduate. Please list names some of the Hospitals? I have never been to California; I want to know what is the best area to live with low crime. And do you think the salary I will make in CA will be enough compare to the cost of living there even If I will have a roommate?
Thanks!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

91 months ago

California just started licensing MLTs. Their pay is generally $14 to $18 an hour. As for CLS schools in southern CA there is only Loma Linda and Cal St. Dominguez Hills. In northern CA I believe there are a bit more. As far as area it all depends. You probably can do research on which areas have lowest crime. The metropolitan areas like around LA and around San Francisco would pay the most.

I know that UC Davis Medical Center starts new grads at $33 an hour. UCLA and UC Irvine medical centers both start their new grads at $31.40 or something like that. Northern CA does pay more than southern CA. Kaiser Permanente is generally thought to pay the most because their CLSs are unionized. A CLS who I know that works at Kaiser says she gets $51 an hour plus $6 differential for night shift but she's been working for 20+ years. I've also heard from others that with experience the CLSs are getting in the high 50s.

As far as living expenses I'm not sure if it is all that expensive as people think. Depending on location a one bedroom goes for $900 to $1600 for rent. Even two bedrooms in different areas go for $1400. With a roommate you probably would pay $700 for rent.

With housing prices down you can get a 3 bedroom house for 200K in a decent area. If you make $31 an hour which is like 65K a year, you can easily pay $700 rent and live comfortably.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (11) Reply - Report abuse

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

91 months ago

They have to get rid of these MLT programs! I wish I can do 2 years and become a pharmacist or PT

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (17) / No (11) Reply - Report abuse

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

91 months ago

I also wish I can do 2 years at a community college, become a pharmacist tech, then do a 2 year online course to become a pharmacist, PT. But I guess that is possible for MT.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (9) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

91 months ago

Tasha Pastory in Blountstown, Florida said: Thanks for all the info. I think the pay for MLT in Ca is a little bit low compare to Arizona. I saw that the Yuma Regional Medical Center started MLT 19.66-29.49 and MT $22.76-34.13.

That is pretty good pay if a technician could hit $29. Way too overpriced in my opinion. The thing is, in CA anyone can be a "technician". A high school graduate with not even an associates can be a "lab technician" so their pay is low. The sad thing is, I know of people with bachelors degrees also working as technicians getting paid as low as any other technician without a bachelors.

As I said though, they just came out with the official medical lab technician licensure last year in CA where if you have a degree you can be certified in it. However, I think it will take awhile to raise the pay of technicians because hospitals are slow in that sense. Maybe 10 to 20 years down the road, there pay will also increase.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (11) Reply - Report abuse

Rus in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

91 months ago

Wow, you guys sure do whine about MLTs a lot. I find myself wondering how many of you have ever considered that many MLT students use their Associates as a stepping stone to become an MT?

MTs here in Oklahoma get paid roughly what most of you have said (25-30 bucks an hour) while MLTs get paid anywhere from 16-20 per hour. MLTs can report results and do so competently. As a matter of fact, Mr. CLS48, the MLTs that I know here tend to be as competent as the full techs. They run the same tests, take care of the machines, deal with doctors, field ridiculous requests/questions that notoriously dotty nurses, etc...

There is some kind of weird bitterness and a strange hostility toward MLTs here. If this is the world of health care, especially that in a clinical laboratory, I feel for patients that count on people that behave in such a fashion.

And that, friends and neighbors, is what our respective fields are really about; patient care. Seriously, get it together and put aside your pettiness. This is supposed to be a team endeavor.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (54) / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

91 months ago

In CA, you can be a lab technician with just a high school degree and no training or classes in hematology, blood bank, micro, or chemistry. Personally, I wouldn't want such a technician to crossmatch a unit of blood for me much less release results out to the floors. This is why technicians aren't allowed to do so in CA.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (17) Reply - Report abuse

Rus in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

91 months ago

CLS48 in California said: In CA, you can be a lab technician with just a high school degree and no training or classes in hematology, blood bank, micro, or chemistry. Personally, I wouldn't want such a technician to crossmatch a unit of blood for me much less release results out to the floors. This is why technicians aren't allowed to do so in CA.

Which is also why in most other states we have to go through at least two years of college, including a whole bunch of clinicals overseen by techs. I wouldn't want someone with only a high school diploma running tests either, but it's not like that in most places.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (24) / No Reply - Report abuse

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

91 months ago

The shortage of MT, I have heard that for quite some time. In the meantime, 2 year degree nurses pay have bypass us starting 5 dollars more straight out of school with less education. And believe me, you can tell by the questions or demands they have. They have lower student loans to pay off and less knowlegde. The MT shortage is answered with more computers and automation and less MT's per shift. This is possible because we do not have direct patient contact. I would not recommend anybody to enter the field of MT unless you don't mind to make less money for the amount of science you need to know, long hours standing in noisy environment due to all of the equipment and get lower raises, otherwise I advise you to pick a profession that has patient contact and make more money with 2 year degrees. I myself like my profession but it is a slap in the face where we stand compared by other medical professions.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (27) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Saber in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

Flint let me ask you this, if employers had no option but to hire BSMT (ASCP) reguardless of the automation, dont you think MT salaries would have to be higher? If there are 2 year degree that can do the same thing as 4 year degree, employeers will always hire the lower pay to increase their bottom line. That is why PT, OT, Pharmacist have a set degree level to get into their field. PT have PT aides, Pharmacists have pharmacy techs, neither of those field have a associate degree so they can get into the field entry level "and move up as a stepping stone" in essence lowering people with higher degrees pay. That is why there is a shortage, noone wants to get into a field that someone with a 2 year degree can do the same job.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No Reply - Report abuse

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

91 months ago

You are right,that is why some hospitals here in Michigan started to set boundaries for MLT and MT. MLT's can't work in bloodbank in a hospital in Detroit and here in Flint they cannot work on antibodies identifications and in micro they can't read plates. They shortend the education of RN from 4 to 2 year degree due to lack of nurses. There is no difference in starting pay between associate and bachelor RN degree, but there is with MLT and MT. At our place MLT starts around 17 dollars and MT around 23 dollars. Our lab hires mainly MT because of bloodbank but argues that our pay is lower because there is no patient contact, we are not in view or as much in demand as nurses, but they do close ER when our instruments are down, or longer TAT's, so can they still use that argument to justify our pay?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No Reply - Report abuse

Saber in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

Flint,in PA MLT can do EVERYTHING except as the role of department manager or laboratory director. We have a senior tech in our BB now that is only a MLT. These are the issues we are facing. You said a MLT makes 17, so if a MT with experience asks for 30, there is no way that the MT will get that salary b/c at least here, MLT can do everything so they would rather save money rather than paying someone with more experience and a higher degree. On the other hand if you have a pharmacist that asks for 50 per hour or a PT that asks for 35 per hour they have no other choice but to pay the qualified individual b/c in those careers that do not have lower degree that can fill the position.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No Reply - Report abuse

Saber in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

Flint, that agrugemtn on patient contact is BS. Pharmacist have little to no patient contact and they get paid 40-50 per hour.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No Reply - Report abuse

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

91 months ago

Saber your right, I have 6 years experience with ascp cert and our salaries are not increasing b/c of asscociate degree techs that run the same testing as me. Pharmacy when it was a BS degree the salaries have always increased. The MT salaries will never increase b/c you have the 2 year degrees in the field. That is why people looking into allied health will always use this as the LAST OPTION. There will always be a shortage until something is done with regulation about working in the field and only one licensure or certification. Why would someone want to spend 4 hard years working for a BS MT degree when you can get a BS PT degree and not worry about having someone with a associate degree doing the same job as you with lower pay.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Rus in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

91 months ago

So why don't you guys go get 2-year RN degrees or PT or pharmacist degrees?

Or here's another idea; ask those MLTs you dislike so much how many of them had Bachelor's degrees in addition to their Associates? 90% of the people I'm going through the MLT program with already have a Bachelor's in something or other.

I'm not sure why I'm bothering to argue this anymore. This is obviously a forum for bitter people to voice their displeasure at me and my fellow MLTs, not a place for real people to have real questions answered in a fair, mature, and unbiased manner.

Please continue.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (30) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

91 months ago

Rus that is the point I am trying to make there is no 2 year PT or pharmacy degrees. Those professions have set standards to work in the field. They have ONE LICENSURE and specific credentials in order to work in the field. In the clinical lab there is alot of grey areas were you have a many certifications and different degrees. How can anyone respect that? There has to be standards set fourth in order to have increase pay, all these other options are causing people not to get into the field b/c all the grey areas in the field.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Rus in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

91 months ago

Okay, a question I pose to all you BSMTs; how many hours of clinical rotations were you required to perform in order to gain your all-important degree that makes you so much more educated than MLT grads? I did a search of three different MT programs locally and they all three came up with 30 hours of clinicals, compared to the 21 in my program. Is that a huge difference?

The degree requirements (broken down on an hourly basis) are as follows:

MT- 124 hours, 50 of which are general education (History, English Comp, Humanities, etc...) [74 related to field]

MLT-73 hours, 15 of which are gen ed. [58 hours related to field]

So let's hear again how much more educated in the clinical laboratory an MT is than an MLT. 74 hours compared to 58 hours. Wow, 16 whole hours difference...

So what exactly do you all think? Is it all the art classes or philosophy classes or music appreciation classes that mean you all are so much more qualified to work in a laboratory environment than me?

You all need to get over your own delusions of grandeur. I would be willing to bet that every one of you that complain about MLTs lowering your pay make your workplace a miserable place to be.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (22) / No (14) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

91 months ago

I did one whole year of rotations, about 13 weeks in each of the major departments, much more than a technician who only did 21 hours. I'm glad CA is one of the states that understands the value of a licensed CLS.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (26) / No (12) Reply - Report abuse

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

91 months ago

I am not bitter about MLTs. They are victims too with their pay. Like I said, associate RN make the same as BS RNs, why, because they do the same work, but they are licenced, but they cannot become manager or supervisor. I feel that MLTs should make the same as MT. I have used this argument many times with our Administrator. When they increased the pay range, we did not move within. New hires would come in with higher pay. After a whole year arguing with him, we MTs got a 5% adjustment pay raise but MLTs did not, so that is what we as a team are working on know. We only have 4 MLTs and they are very much a part of us. The real problem is that we are not licenced. Here in Michigan, it has failed many times by our politicians. The hospitals have strong lobbyist working for them with the argument that if we would be licenced there will be a shortage and a increase in pay demand which healthcare can't affort. (you do have to have a licence to be a proffesional dogwalker). They feel that taking the BOR exam (ACLS) is enough, but I know that in hospitals in Detroit, we have MTs and MLTs that never took the exams. In this case MTs get MLTs pay. We need to get licensure.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Rus in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

91 months ago

CLS48 in California said: I did one whole year of rotations, about 13 weeks in each of the major departments, much more than a technician who only did 21 hours. I'm glad CA is one of the states that understands the value of a licensed CLS.

Why do you continue to intentionally misconstrue what I say?

21 college hours, sir. That equals two full semesters (16 weeks each) and one summer semester (8 weeks) of clinical experience, rotating through each department. That adds up to one year of clinicals. It seems to me that I will have as much clinical experience coming out of my program as you did coming out of yours. Interesting.

And I'm not sure about anywhere else in regards to licensure, but I will be required to sit for the ASCP Board of Registry exam when I am finished with school. And I will be required to keep up with my Continuing Education through ASCP throughout my career as an MLT.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (12) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

91 months ago

No I had 1 full year of just CLS classes. That includes hematology, biochemistry, microbiology, blood bank, immunology, and urinalysis. My second full year was rotating in all classes. Before that I had a 4 year bachelors degree. Your education was not equivalent to mine which is why I do think CLSs should get paid more.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (22) / No (9) Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

91 months ago

That is my 2nd year was rotating in all the clinical departments. The point is MTs do receive much more education then MLTs which should be justification for the increase in pay.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (16) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

91 months ago

Freshman year

Fall Semester
Credits Spring Semester Credits
Rhetoric & Composition I 3 Rhetoric & Composition II 3
General Chemistry I 4 General Chemistry II 4
General Biology I 4 General Biology II 4
College Algebra 3 Religious Studies 3
Med. Lab Techniques 4 Med. Lab. Techniques 2
Med. Lab. Techniques 4

Summer Session I

Med. Lab. Practicum I 1

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits
Clinical Microbiology I 4 Clinical Microbiology II 4
Anatomy & Physiology 4 Sociology or CO200 3
Intro. to Psychology 3 Humanities/Soc. Science Elective 3
Med. Lab. Techniques 4 Med. Lab. Techniques 4
Med. Lab. Practicum II 1.5 Med. Lab. Practicum III 1.5

This is the normal MLT cirriculum. Where is the calculus? Where is hematology? Where is the coagulation? MLT are eligible to take their own ASCP, where as RN reguarless of a associate or BS degree have to take the NAPLEX. There is a MLT ASCP and a MT ASCP, there is a big difference in the depth of knowledge on those exams. There is no way a MLT would pass the MT ASCP coming out with a 2 year degree. This is why we need standards in the clinical lab.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (21) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

John1104 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

That is correct a associate level RN has the same pay as a BSRN b/c they take the SAME NCCLEX. Where as a MLTs and MT take two DIFFERENT tests for the ASCP. MT ASCP is much more difficult and in depth. Your college or university has to teach you well to prepare for the MT ASCP because its a difficult test, so the amount of extra years does make a SIGNIFICANT difference in passing for the certification for a BSMT ASCP.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

91 months ago

That is why we should write our government and tell them that we want licensure. As long we don't do anything to get our profession recgonized, we always will be underpaid.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

I think licensure is a state by state issue. When I was working in florida last year, I just had to give them my ascp cert and I was licensed in the state of FL. I think that is the way it should be state by state. If you want to work for that state you just need to fill out a application and give them your ASCP or NCA cert. The FL board said that they recognize ASCP or NCA so I did not have to take a additional test. So if they did that for every state they would have qualified individuals working. The only downfall of that is they have to make a gold standard certification so students and employeers only can look for that one cert.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

IF there is only one certification there would not be the question out there about what type of qualifications people need. There has to be only one cert which would be eqviliant to licensure.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

CLS48 in California

91 months ago

Before this year, CA required all CLS applicants to take the CA CLS test to have a license to practice as a CLS in CA. This increased the shortage of CLSs because this test was only offered once a year. This meant you didn't even have to be ASCP or NCA certified to work here you just had to pass the CA test. Just this year they changed that. You either have to pass the ASCP or AAB test and pass a small online test about CA state law regarding labs to get your CA CLS license.

All CA jobs require that you have this state license or else they won't hire you. For this reason, the pay for CLSs is decent since there is a shortage of licensed people and too many hospitals. I am not sure how it is in other states. I assumed that each state required a state license to work whether you are ASCP or not.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

91 months ago

That is pretty similar in florida, there use to be a seperate test. Now they are taking ASCP or NCA. I just applied to the state board, had ascp send the offical cert, had to give them my offical college transcripts and pay a intial fee for the state license and that was it. Every state should do it this way, and not give a state specific test anymore. Just give your ascp or nca to your state your working in and you are set.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

91 months ago

On top of the general requirements for graduation our program required A&P I and II, Diagnostic Microbiology, Special Micro (Parasitology/Fungi), Hematology I and II, Urinalysis and Body fluids, Immunology, Immunohematology, General Chemistry, a Biochem/Organic Chem morph designed especially for the program, Clinical Chemistry, Coagulation, Statistics, Professional Issues I and II, and Theory. I am still currently in school and will start my Micro rotation on Monday. I have already completed my Blood Bank, Serology, U&A, Hematology, and Coag practicum rotations. The two practicum semesters, combined, are a year long. The academic portion is 1.5 years long and although it is only "strongly advised" that you do ALL general coursework before you apply, your chances of getting in without having completed all but the program curriculum is slim to none. So you have a year of general coursework before you ever begin. When I am finished this summer I will have spent 2.5 years on schedule in the MLT program. I spent 1 year doing generals before I applied. That’s a 3.5 year total for the 2 year degree you keep whining about.
We get the best and brightest in the program here and with a starting class of 33 we will graduate 9 this summer. 9! It is an extremely rigorous academic program and one that will weed out all but the most talented and committed. If you’re not putting in 30-50 hours a week studying, you’re not passing.
There are not enough slots in MT programs around here and I am not far from Wake Forest, the only university within 75 miles to even offer BSMT. Even with agreements with UNC-G, Guilford College, and High Point University there are not enough slots to go around because practicums are still coordinated by Wake which has 30 slots per semester (including 12 for MLT-MT) and gives favor to WAKE students.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

91 months ago

Part 2:

I have not posted here before because of the MLT hate, but I absolutely refuse to sit here any longer and have my profession smeared by individuals who are to ignorant to look up info for themselves. If you don't like the fact that I got a quality education, one in high demand, for $30,000 less than you paid so be it. But please sulk to yourself. Your ignorance is obvious to many who are far too nice to call you out in front of your peers. Yes, there are major issues within the field that need to be dealt with. I believe whole heartedly that the governing bodies are brainstorming and advocating relentlessly on our behalf. As a student member of the ASCP I make sure my voice is heard in every appropriate venue. But decreasing the number of programs, MT and MLT, is what got the profession into this fix. Systematically doing away with more than half of the laboratory staff will not fix the problem.
I have every intention of finishing the Bachelors of Science degree I started before the kids arrived. I have every intention of applying to the MLT to MT program at a nearby Uni. Hell…… to be honest I have every intention of seeking a Masters at least, if not Med school. But in defense of those who have chosen MLT not as a jumping off point but their chosen career, I feel I must say….. What if I don’t? What if I don’t go any further? You will think me less a Laboratorian; cheap labor is the term some of you like to use. Like it or not nearly everything in the lab requires exactly the knowledge and skill set that CAN be acquired in an Associate degree program. MT’s are still necessary for Lab management /Administrative duties and generally get far more Molecular/Genetics, Theory, and Management preparation than MLT’s but unless you get your cans back into the classroom or shell out big dough for training, soon your 4 year degree will be worth exactly what my “2 year” degree is worth. And like it or not, that is the truth.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (20) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Page:   1  2  3  4  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.