I will be getting BS in Biology in few months. I'm confused on how to become MLT and MT.. I need help..

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j01 in Glenview, Illinois

19 months ago

I will be getting BS in Biology in few months.
According to ASCP web site, I have to complete 2 year MLT program to be become
certified MLT.
So, if I follow "Route 2", I have work as MLT for 2 years to be eligible to take MLS exam?
What do they mean by "two years of full time acceptable clinical laboratory experience in Blood Banking, Chemistry, Hematology, Microbiology, Immunology, and Urinalysis/Body Fluids in the U.S., Canada or an accredited laboratory?"
If I work as MLT for 2 years, would it satisfy this requirement?
(or do I have to work in a specific lab?)
I'm looking for MT program in the Chicago area.
Other than Rush University and Northshore Medical Center, are there any other MAACLS accredited schools in the Chicago area?
I will be graduating college in few months, and I'm really worried about my future.
Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
Thank You!

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Riot in Ware, Massachusetts

19 months ago

I'm neither a MLT nor a MLS, but I also looked into that route before deciding on grad school in biology. I think the most straightforward route for you is to find a 1-year post-bacc that is NAACLS accredited. Though I don't know what's available in the Chicago area, there is one of these programs in Western Massachusetts, so they are available. Route 2 may work for you, especially if the MLT program will let you transfer in some courses from your BS, but might still take two years to complete due to how pre-requisites might work (but you'll have more time to work if you cut out stuff from your Bachelor's). This will only work for you if you can find employment as an MLT though, so you should check that local facilities hire MLTs. Route 4 seems to be your last option, because I haven't heard of many people getting hired to do medical lab work with just a Bio degre.

Good Luck!

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David in Miami, Florida

19 months ago

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Randy in Lincoln, Nebraska

19 months ago

j01 in Glenview, Illinois said: I will be getting BS in Biology in few months.
According to ASCP web site, I have to complete 2 year MLT program to be become
certified MLT.
So, if I follow "Route 2", I have work as MLT for 2 years to be eligible to take MLS exam?
What do they mean by "two years of full time acceptable clinical laboratory experience in Blood Banking, Chemistry, Hematology, Microbiology, Immunology, and Urinalysis/Body Fluids in the U.S., Canada or an accredited laboratory?"
If I work as MLT for 2 years, would it satisfy this requirement?
(or do I have to work in a specific lab?)
I'm looking for MT program in the Chicago area.
Other than Rush University and Northshore Medical Center, are there any other MAACLS accredited schools in the Chicago area?
I will be graduating college in few months, and I'm really worried about my future.
Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
Thank You!

Sounds like you have alreaady been to the ASCP web site. That is a good place to start. Since you will already have a BS degree, your best option is option 1. I wouldn't mess around with Option 2. It would be too much of a time commitment and the pay off would not be there when you are done. MLTs typically make about five dollars per hour less (where I come from) than Med Techs. Plus they can't perform some higher levels of testing and release patient results unless a Med Tech or Pathologist signs off on it first. Don't let the lab experience requirment confuse you. It just means you have to be working in a CLIA certified lab with a licensed Pathologist on staff. You can be working in any clinical area for it to count. Make sure you do your research for this career. It is not for everybody. you could be working all hours of the day, week ends and holidays. The pay is not that great concidering what you have to go through to get your certification and it truely is a thankless job. But, on that note, I would do it all over again.

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KizzyAspiringCLS in Brooklyn, New York

19 months ago

You can either go to school and become a certified Medical Technologist at a school that offers the program and recieved NAACLS certification.
Or, you can work full-time and gain experience in that field, enough years that the ASCP said is mandatory.
It really is your choice. You know your options but you seem like you just want us t tell you where to go.
Me personally, I would go to a BS program accredited by NAACLS and get a second degree in MED TECH, just in case I wnated to switch careers, I could say I have both. And since you have a dgree in bio, you completed most of the pre-reqs and gen ed.

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KizzyAspiringCLS in Brooklyn, New York

19 months ago

www.naacls.org/search/programs.asp

That is a link for the programs accredited by the NAACLS. When you click it, choose your state (IL) and the type of program (MLS).

Those are the schools that offer certification in medical Technology, or some offer a BS degree.

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KizzyAspiringCLS in Brooklyn, New York

19 months ago

For what its worth, I am a current Medical Technology student. I am pursuing my BS in this field. I was a Biology major, but I didn't see any job prospects for this field right after graduation other than bummy research jobs, so I changed in in time.
My school is accredited by NAACLS so I don't have to waste another year after graduating to begin working in the labs.

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David in Miami, Florida

19 months ago

Next year I will complete my BS in Biology.

The issue with me is that I'm not willing to relocate to get into one of those CLS 1 year programs.Also there is no way im wasting my time and money getting another bachleors. Luckily route 2 is a great option because my community college (which is also pretty close to where I live) has an MLT program which costs about $8,600 total. I will graduate with no loans so if I don't get any scholarships or grants that should be payed off in a decent amount of time. Also, I dont mind working a few years to qualify for the MT test. Eventually after I move up from technician to technologist I may consider getting an MBA/MHA/MPH but I'll deal with that when the time comes

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Clinical Intern in SE, Michigan

19 months ago

David,

You are ridiculous if you think you will get MLT experience just because you have a bachelors in Biology.
Hospitals hire MLT (ASCP) to do MLT work, not bachelor in biology students.

So yes, you can go to a community college and waste your time. Even with your transfer credits, you will only meet the pre-req to the program and they will still make you do 1 year of MLT schooling, + a 6 month clinical internship.

Now you are looking at 1.5 years before you even begin to get hired as an MLT and get your experience.

They actually have MT programs like Beaumont in Royal Oak, MI where the internship is only 6 months, most full programs are 10.5 months.

Don't be foolish and cost yourself double the time and settle for a lower position because you don't want to rent an apartment for 10 months somewhere and do things the right way.

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David in Miami, Florida

18 months ago

Yea if I wanted to do a 1 year MLS internship I would do it. But I feel route 2 works out better for me even though its the not the easiest or direct route. The only thing I wish I did different was realizing I wanted to be an MT in high school so I could do the program first and then transfer to finish my BS in Biology. I appreciate the advice but I'm aware of the consequences of my decisions (:

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APP in York, Ontario

18 months ago

(Read this)

www.indeed.com/forum/gen/Career-Advice/Bachelors-degree-Biology-can-you-do-it/t132436

In short, GO TO TECHNICAL SCHOOL AND GET SPECIFIC TRAINING

i said SPECIFIC training in certain techniqus and fields (such as MLT, biotech , etc.

GRAD SCHOOL WILL NOT HELP YOU
DON'T fall for master's degree they will not lead to entry level jobs

if by any chance if you alreayd have a msters degree....
apply to med school it's YOU'RE ONLY HOPE

don't go for a ph.d you'll screw your self financially if you do!

OR

if all fails apply to med school =D

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njbiodude in New Jersey

18 months ago

APP you're right

If you want to be a MLS getting a biology degree won't exactly hurt. Even though I technically go to a BSMT program, all but one student in my class either had a BS in bio or took 4 years to get in (internships only offered once a year). Of course with the insane cost of university these days, the more direct path you can take the better.

Even when applying for entry level QC/lab tech jobs in biotech a MLS will fare much better than a bs in biology. MLS' have a very defined skill set that is known and if hired have to be offered wages competitive to what the hospitals will offer.

Don't do grad school in bio. I almost did a PhD as I enjoyed research but found out THE MAJORITY of biology PhDs are either low paid postdocs working 75 hours a week, or adjuncts with no job security (think 50k or less). As for the biotechnology industry (which I worked briefly in), there is AN EXTREME glut of PhDs due to overproduction and recent mass layoffs. As such the job ads only show companies only accepting people with a very specific skillset with years of experience in one tiny niche field. Typical molecular biology Phds will enjoy a life of extreme poverty until they get a teaching degree and teach high school. At the BS/MS science level, you can expect temp agency jobs for $12-20/hr w' no benefits.

If you aspire for a research career go for the MD/DO. Academic positions have to compete for you and actually pay, and you will have access to patient samples needed for research. And Pharma/Biotech hires these people to run clinical trials. Way more $$ & stability than drug discovery.

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