Best Route to take to get into PET Scan.

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Mitch M. in Bellevue, Nebraska

64 months ago

How do you Nuclear Medicine Technologists get paid? (annually)

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hunkaburninlove in Austin, Texas

64 months ago

Mitch M. in Bellevue, Nebraska said: How do you Nuclear Medicine Technologists get paid? (annually)

zero, unless one is collecting unemployment benefits.

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jlillygr in Ellicott City, Maryland

55 months ago

dual licensed tech in Brooklyn, New York said: I just wanted to clarify a little about what nukesem is saying. And for all those reading this post, I'm ONLY referring to NY State!! Every state is different. In order to work in NY, as any kind of radiology tech, you MUST apply for radiation license from NYSDOH. There are separate licenses for Xray and Nucs. NY state says that CNMT and/or ARRT(N) can operate a PET/CT scanner only if they take the accredited school at SUNY Stonybrook which allows nuc techs to sit for the CT exam. The limitation is that this is ONLY for LOW DOSE non-diagnostic PET/CT scans.

Here are two obstacles: 1) If the place does high dose (aka diagnostic PET/CT scans using high KV and high mA), then CNMT and/or ARRT(N) CAN NOT operate Pet/CT scanner.
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Hi there,

I know this post was from 2 years ago - I just can't seem to find this information many places and am having a hard time getting in touch with the right person at the DOH.

I've been working in PET/CT for a long time in the DC area, and have Nuc Med & CT certifications (RT(N) and RT(CT)) but I do not have an RT(R). Does this mean I could definitely not get an injection license in NYS? I saw this on a job posting, and assumed they were talking about a license to inject IV materials like radiopharmaceuticals, then started reading this thread and felt silly, realizing they were probably referring to contrast.

Do you know, for a diagnostic license to perform PET/CT, would having gone to an ARRT accredited school for nucs, then passing the CT exam make me eligible? Or only if I went to a CT program?

Basically, I'm trying to figure out if I have any chance getting a PET/CT job in NYS - I haven't worked in general Nucs for over 6 years, and feel so out of place anywhere else!

;) Thanks

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Bells in Atlanta, Georgia

46 months ago

Chris in Wichita Falls, Texas said: I am currently Active Duty Air Force working as an X-ray tech. I am about 1 month from taking my National Registry and have no worries about passing it. My question is concerning PET Scan. I have decided that I would like to persue a career in PET Scan but have had a hard time finding information about how to start and what path to take. The only credits I have towards a degree are the ones I've gotten from my rad training in the AF (About 60 Credits) so my degree path is still wide open to change. I leave the AF in about 2 years, but while I'm in I can still take a few classes per semester. I was wondering if anyone has any information about the best way to gear up for a career in PET Scan. What type of degree would be best? Do I need to get registered in CT, MRI, or NM? Anyone been in my shoes and have advice? I'd greatly appreciate any help I can get.

I work for a staffing firm and am currently looking for a PET/CT Technician for an opportunity in TX. Please let me know if you would be interested in finding out more. Thank you

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Radchill in Midlothian, Virginia

41 months ago

Chris in Wichita Falls, Texas said: I am currently Active Duty Air Force working as an X-ray tech. I am about 1 month from taking my National Registry and have no worries about passing it. My question is concerning PET Scan. I have decided that I would like to persue a career in PET Scan but have had a hard time finding information about how to start and what path to take. The only credits I have towards a degree are the ones I've gotten from my rad training in the AF (About 60 Credits) so my degree path is still wide open to change. I leave the AF in about 2 years, but while I'm in I can still take a few classes per semester. I was wondering if anyone has any information about the best way to gear up for a career in PET Scan. What type of degree would be best? Do I need to get registered in CT, MRI, or NM? Anyone been in my shoes and have advice? I'd greatly appreciate any help I can get.

I took the same career path as an RT serving in the Air Force. I'm also looking toward a career in PET since I'm fascinated by the developments in the field. See the article for CE credit on the eradiming web-site where I do a lot of my CE. The article was about a study which documented visible differences on scans between subjects lying and telling the truth. Fascinating stuff.
If you don't have it already, the best tool to prepare for your RT is Correctec. It has questions that are similar to what you see on the registry and is invaluable for test prep. I didn't want to just pass it. I received a 84 on my QC and 92 on my registry. Of couse our AF training is excellent but the Correctec was recommended to me, and I'm sure helped me to achieve those numbers.
As for PET, most techs I know did nuclear medicine first. There are a lot of cross applications that function toward understanding the technology. I'm still researching but try to find someone in the field, as I have, and ask away. It seems to be the best way to answer all your questions. Best of luck!

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Hertenstein in Findlay, Ohio

37 months ago

In full disclosure, I am an instructor at the University I am about to mention. That being said, there is a new degree program in PET/CT at the University of Findlay in Findlay, OH. The class can be taken online and grants the graduate with a certificate, Associate's degree, or Bachelor's degree, depending on their education history. Students must be certified in nuclear medicine before beginning the program however, since most states require NM certification to work in PET. The first semester of didactic teaching is asynchronous online work, done at the student's pace. The following two semesters require clinical work in PET and in diagnostic CT, either at the student's place of employment or an affiliated clinical site. This allows the student to sit for the NMTCB PET registry board and the ARRT CT registry board upon completion. I personally took the program and was able to pass both boards on my first try. Having those certifications opened up doors for me. Some states will even allow you to work in diagnostic CT with CT credentials, though most require certification as an RT.

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Nuclear1 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

4 months ago

Laz in Sarasota, Florida said: I guess I'm lucky because I just graduated from Nuc Med school and inmediately found a job as a PET/CT tech. I think that what helped is that I already had my RT(R) certification. Few people in my class have found jobs, and PRN only; and the class before mine is in the same situation. For those thinking moving into NM, think again. Don't get me wrong, it's a beautiful profession, but there's absolutely no demand for nuc med techs at this moment. I think schools need to start decreasing the number of students accepted into their programs to level the field out there.

They will not cut the number of students entering Nuc Med School, or close them, they would be cutting their paychecks. People have to start investigating what they want to go to School for before taking the plunge. Is there enough jobs? And so on. Other colleges don't close down or eccept less students, so why should they.

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wkristen16 in Baltimore, Maryland

2 months ago

bizznonya in Texas said: This is not techically correct. There is a pathway that has been established by which CT techs can become certified in PET without becoming a fully certified nuc tech first.There is also a pathway for nuc techs to become CT certified without becoming RT's first. The pathway for the CT tech to become PET certified is longer and more difficult than the one for the nuc tech to become CT certified, so most places strongly prefer a nuc tech, or even better, a dual certified tech. The details can be found on the NMTCB site.

This is incorrect information. A CT can not do PET/CT without being a nuclear medicine technologist anywhere in the united states. Depending on the state. A nuc med tech can become a CT tech, but may or may not be able to run a stand alone ct scanner.

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bizznonya in Dallas, Texas

7 days ago

Ummm, actually, no it is NOT incorrect information. You do not know what you are talking about. First of all, in some states, like Texas as just one example, nuclear and radiological technologists hold the EXACT same state license. The NMTCB has very specific guidelines on how a CT technologist can go about taking their PET/CT exam...additional training is involved, but you DO NOT have to be a nuclear medicine technologist.

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