Knowing the risk of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist

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Lily in Hampton Bays, New York

81 months ago

Hi, I would like to ask about the health risk of being a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. I just got accepted into a program that would offer me certification of nuclear medicine. But I'm also concern about the health risk. Also, as a female, I am interested how would it effect pregnancy. Thank you!

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Derek in Aston, Pennsylvania

81 months ago

I can't understand that with the selective criteria used for admission into nuclear med. certificate programs a person who has been selected would even ask this question. The radiation levels a tech is exposed to are very low, far lower than the accepted upper limit range of safety. As for pregnant women, there is *probably no need to do anything different on the job. If a woman wanted to cut her exposure in half (roughly), she might just scan during pregnancy and let another tech inject. I'm sure you have a super fantasitc GPA though.

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L in Stony Brook, New York

81 months ago

Thanks for your comment. I been doing research and asking other students about this concerns. I just wanted different feedback to learn more. I'm very excited and eager to learn more about this field.

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kelly in Springfield, Pennsylvania

80 months ago

Lily in Hampton Bays, New York said: Hi, I would like to ask about the health risk of being a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. I just got accepted into a program that would offer me certification of nuclear medicine. But I'm also concern about the health risk. Also, as a female, I am interested how would it effect pregnancy. Thank you!

i wouldnt do it no nuc jobs!!!

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Jay Hoey in Hayward, California

80 months ago

Lily in Hampton Bays, New York said: Hi, I would like to ask about the health risk of being a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. I just got accepted into a program that would offer me certification of nuclear medicine. But I'm also concern about the health risk. Also, as a female, I am interested how would it effect pregnancy. Thank you!

Hi, don't do it. I have been a tech for 37 years. I got so much radiation my Thyroid was radiated with no compensation and denial from the work place. It definitely will harm your fetus. Hi stress with no recognition and no respect from patients. It has ruined my livelihood. Do not go for it

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Jay Hoey in Hayward, California

80 months ago

Derek in Aston, Pennsylvania said: I can't understand that with the selective criteria used for admission into nuclear med. certificate programs a person who has been selected would even ask this question. The radiation levels a tech is exposed to are very low, far lower than the accepted upper limit range of safety. As for pregnant women, there is *probably no need to do anything different on the job. If a woman wanted to cut her exposure in half (roughly), she might just scan during pregnancy and let another tech inject. I'm sure you have a super fantasitc GPA though.

Do not believe it.

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Jay Hoey in Hayward, California

80 months ago

L in Stony Brook, New York said: Thanks for your comment. I been doing research and asking other students about this concerns. I just wanted different feedback to learn more. I'm very excited and eager to learn more about this field.

Do not be eager. you will be sorry from 37 year of experience and no respect.

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Lila in Yonkers, New York

79 months ago

I am a female nuclear medicine tech. Jobs are scarce unless you are willing to travel. I already have a family with two teenage children. I would never recommend this field to a young woman without children. The field has changed, techs are expected to do so much more now, you need to lift patients who are immobile and the radiation exposure can be high and new techs are expected to do a lot of injecting initially, getting a lot of radiation exposure. Also there are a lot of technological advances being made and nuclear medicine is changing dramatically. There is very little respect from others. I have known techs who were pregnant and were still forced to inject, even if you are not you are still around patients and it is the patient who is the radioactive source. I know of a tech who lost her baby and another who gave birth to a child with severe birth defects. Think very carefully before you go into this field as a young woman who may later want to have children. I would recommend MRI or mammography, which do not involve radiation. Good luck

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kjh in Tyler, Texas

79 months ago

I know many people who work in a much higher radiation environment and still maintain within ALARA level II limits of exposure...the birth defects and such you talk about happen in MANY pregnancies...

If you declare pregnancy to your RSO as you have the option to, you can be put on strict principles that if you go over a certain exposure in a month (less than 50mrem), you can opt out of injecting. I'm pretty sure this is by law.

Lila in Yonkers, New York said: I am a female nuclear medicine tech. Jobs are scarce unless you are willing to travel. I already have a family with two teenage children. I would never recommend this field to a young woman without children. The field has changed, techs are expected to do so much more now, you need to lift patients who are immobile and the radiation exposure can be high and new techs are expected to do a lot of injecting initially, getting a lot of radiation exposure. Also there are a lot of technological advances being made and nuclear medicine is changing dramatically. There is very little respect from others. I have known techs who were pregnant and were still forced to inject, even if you are not you are still around patients and it is the patient who is the radioactive source. I know of a tech who lost her baby and another who gave birth to a child with severe birth defects. Think very carefully before you go into this field as a young woman who may later want to have children. I would recommend MRI or mammography, which do not involve radiation. Good luck

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ftespp

79 months ago

Is there any sort of *documented* evidence that working as a nuclear medicine tech has EVER led to serious health problems either for a tech or the fetus of a pregnant tech? Not anecdotes or speculation, but *documented* evidence? Any techs ever filed suit against an employer, for example? I did a lot of research before entering the field and found NOTHING that would indicate the alarmism with regard to exposure in a few posts in this thread to be warranted. Perhaps I have overlooked something?

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NMT in Gainesville, Florida

79 months ago

Derek in Aston, Pennsylvania said: I can't understand that with the selective criteria used for admission into nuclear med. certificate programs a person who has been selected would even ask this question. The radiation levels a tech is exposed to are very low, far lower than the accepted upper limit range of safety. As for pregnant women, there is *probably no need to do anything different on the job. If a woman wanted to cut her exposure in half (roughly), she might just scan during pregnancy and let another tech inject. I'm sure you have a super fantasitc GPA though.

Wow, what a nice person you are! you should think about becoming an NMT and working with the public!

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former nmt in Grass Valley, California

77 months ago

I would also think twice about this industry. Dual licensure is preferable when operating Pet/Ct. You have the same politics and work issues as with any job or corporation in addition to being exposed to radiation, especially FDG. Do you really want to be on-call? You can work in an out patient settiing but benefits (health insurance 401k) tend to be less attractive. I worked in it for about 28 years. I wish that I would have followed other graduates who only worked a year in the field and went into corporate. Sure there are layoffs but they don't have the assault to mind and body that being a nuclear tech has. Get a business degree or go into business for yourself or do something that you really enjoy even if it's less money whether it be music or art!

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Rdoactv in Newport News, Virginia

77 months ago

Lily in Hampton Bays, New York said: Hi, I would like to ask about the health risk of being a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. I just got accepted into a program that would offer me certification of nuclear medicine. But I'm also concern about the health risk. Also, as a female, I am interested how would it effect pregnancy. Thank you!

I wouldn't be as concerned about health risks. With technology and proper training, exposure is minimal.
Your main concern should be the lack of jobs in the field. I'm a single mom, who wasted my time...3 years of it, even left my son for a year to get my education to better our lives, and even though I am rt, nm, pet/ct, ct...still no NM jobs available ANYWHERE. Good luck...go into nursing, it's the only thing anyone finds important in the medical field.

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NMTNortheast in Concord, New Hampshire

77 months ago

I cant agree more with what people have said....

THERE ARE NO JOBS!

I have a B.S and prior experiance as a tech aid (did a lot of admin and assisted with QC stuff, started IVS) and I cant even get an interview. Im talking about all sorts of jobs even the per diem ones that want a B.S. The market is saturated.

The worst parts about this are not only will it be hard to land any job, but the jobs you find will have low pay and bad benefits. I know someone who just started in new york state for $19 an hour!

I feel bad for all the new graduates.

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MANup in Houston, Texas

76 months ago

Geez! it seems like everyone is just lazy and were spoiled in the field. Of course you have to look for a job, it is like that with almost all health fields except for nursing. I wonder if maybe those who are complaining about NO JOBS are not getting hired for other reasons. I think that if there is a shortage it is regional.

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Rdoactv in Newport News, Virginia

76 months ago

That's a pretty arrogant, judgmental comment, don't ya think? Are you currently looking? Have you spoke to any national recruiters..whom, by the way are crying the same blues to their NM and PET techs in need. Have you researched at all? If you had, then you would know there are few jobs, and too many techs. As for not being hired for other reasons, that may be the case for some, but I'm sure not all. I am a highly qualified (5+ years), excellent tech, trained and cross trained in several modalities..but a NM, and PET/CT at heart. I interview very well and present in a very professional manner. I have patient care skills that would rival most in the health care field. So, before you start insulting those of us who have had to jump back into the job search arena for one reason or another, or those of us who may be new graduates..take a look and back it up with real information. Texas and Cali are the two states that seem to not be hurting in the job area by the way...my recruiters have tried to send me to both for 6 month stints each..but, I'm a single mom and will only leave for no more that 13 weeks... and only if I have to. They can't seem to get anyone to go to either place.

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Rdoactv in Newport News, Virginia

76 months ago

Oh, and BTW...I have put out 80+ apps and resumes in the past 3 1/2 months..even if the company wasn't currently hiring...so, even if you are actively looking it isn't easy to find anything beyond the occassional PRN.

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Kevin in Steamboat Springs, Colorado

76 months ago

Jay Hoey in Hayward, California said: Hi, don't do it. I have been a tech for 37 years. I got so much radiation my Thyroid was radiated with no compensation and denial from the work place. It definitely will harm your fetus. Hi stress with no recognition and no respect from patients. It has ruined my livelihood. Do not go for it

Dude that is a silly and really irresponsible post. Just because you hate your job and your employer you should not offer lies and generalizations about the filed that helped you live a comfy life.

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Cynthia in Yonkers, New York

75 months ago

MANup in Houston, Texas said: Geez! it seems like everyone is just lazy and were spoiled in the field. Of course you have to look for a job, it is like that with almost all health fields except for nursing. I wonder if maybe those who are complaining about NO JOBS are not getting hired for other reasons. I think that if there is a shortage it is regional.

How rude...You're probably one of those people that lack any degree of professionalism or sensitivity in dealing with others. I hope you are not a tech because I would feel sorry for your patients as you rank them off the imaging table and tell them to get the hell out. People are neither "lazy" nor "spoiled in the field"; people are scared because of the general economy and the inability to find a job after months of looking in a field that many trained for years to get into and spent thousands of dollars to better their lives. You have some nerve!

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Wendy in Polk, Ohio

75 months ago

Maybe I'm an optimist but I've benefited very much from Nuclear Medicine. An associates degree and a little determination can net you more job satisfaction and salary than many careers that require much more expensive education and are much more difficult to find a rewarding job. My first "foot in the door" at a hospital required taking on the staff techs call duties. It took 5 months until something opened full time. That was 21 years ago and have been a FTE since. I wish all who are looking good luck in their search.

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Lisa E in Scarsdale, New York

71 months ago

I too am concerned with pregnancy on the job. I have been a tech for 1 year in a nuclear cardiology lab in a medical center (non hospital job), my monthly WB exposure is about 25mrem , im the only tech and i inject (Tc99m only) and image about 20-25 patients a week. I sit behind a shield when imaging and use a syringe shield for injections. Would the fetus be safe?- I thought it would be since i know other femeale techs who have gone through entire pregnancies with no problems.Legally, since its a private practice can they try to replace me while on maternity leave? Private practices can be a little shifty at times. Any advice will help thanks!

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

71 months ago

Lisa E in Scarsdale, New York said: I too am concerned with pregnancy on the job. I have been a tech for 1 year in a nuclear cardiology lab in a medical center (non hospital job), my monthly WB exposure is about 25mrem , im the only tech and i inject (Tc99m only) and image about 20-25 patients a week. I sit behind a shield when imaging and use a syringe shield for injections. Would the fetus be safe?- I thought it would be since i know other femeale techs who have gone through entire pregnancies with no problems.Legally, since its a private practice can they try to replace me while on maternity leave? Private practices can be a little shifty at times. Any advice will help thanks!

I don't know of anyone whose had any problems when pregnant. You seem to be doing all the right things. As far as them laying you off, I would think they would just hire a temp to replace you while on maternity leave. If you're doing a good job you have nothing to worry about....

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Carolyn in Dallas, Texas

71 months ago

I worked in a Nuclear Cardiology Dept. as the only tech for my first pregnancy. Everything was fine. Just try to keep your distance from the patient as much as possible. If the camera is really close to where you sit, you may actually want to move out of the room and watch the patient from a distance. If you get a patient that has high needs, see if your office manager, nurses or med techs in the office can assist you. If you have someone who helps you with the stress part of the test, see if it is possible for them to help you here and there. I would have someone to put the patient on the table for me, and help sit them up etc...to reduce exposure time with a patient. I also wore a lead skirt but you may want to check with your physcist to see what their opinion is, some say it causes more scatter. If you are really uncomfortable, you do have the right to say so, depending on your company, you may want to suggest you could be more productive if you had someone to assist you and you could crosstrain that person to help you with things.....I worked at many facilities and so I am aware in some your are replacable they don't care and in others esp. when you are the only tech, you opinion does matter. Congratulations and good luck!

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Lisa E in Astoria, New York

71 months ago

Carolyn in Dallas, Texas said: I worked in a Nuclear Cardiology Dept. as the only tech for my first pregnancy. Everything was fine. Just try to keep your distance from the patient as much as possible. If the camera is really close to where you sit, you may actually want to move out of the room and watch the patient from a distance. If you get a patient that has high needs, see if your office manager, nurses or med techs in the office can assist you. If you have someone who helps you with the stress part of the test, see if it is possible for them to help you here and there. I would have someone to put the patient on the table for me, and help sit them up etc...to reduce exposure time with a patient. I also wore a lead skirt but you may want to check with your physcist to see what their opinion is, some say it causes more scatter. If you are really uncomfortable, you do have the right to say so, depending on your company, you may want to suggest you could be more productive if you had someone to assist you and you could crosstrain that person to help you with things.....I worked at many facilities and so I am aware in some your are replacable they don't care and in others esp. when you are the only tech, you opinion does matter. Congratulations and good luck!

i reported the pregnancy to the nuclear cardiologist/rso and business manager of the facility and both prefer i get relocated for the remainder of the pregnancy and do something in a non radioactive area, i agreed and a temporary tech was hired. the only disadvantage is my employer explained to me since im temporarily changing job titles my salary is being compromised to far less that fits the average salary for the work i am doing. getting a cut in salary at this sensitive time is such a burden because i need to save money and i am now only earning less than half of what i was making as a tech. i feel i am being discriminated against or punished b/c i am pregnant can they do this....?

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Carolyn in Dallas, Texas

71 months ago

Hi,

Section 20.1207 of 10 CFR Part 20 reviews all the detailed risks as a pregnant worker ...I'm sure youv'e already looked it it. Your company and the people involved should have referred to this, but ultimately as a pregnant worker it is your decision. I am not sure if it is ok for them to cut your pay. I would call other facilities and hospitals in your area (like you have the time) and ask them what their declared pregnant worker policy entails, including reduction of pay.(some may have policy online) I'm sure there is probably some loophole in which they can. What stinks is in the long run, it may be more cost effective to hire a med tech to assist you until your leave then they could hire a temp. Temps are so $$$. A lot of the private groups are so about $$$$ they don't care about the employer. I have worked many places where it was all about "how many did you get done today?" I had a unique and rare experience of working for a DR. that was genuine. He let me have a tech to stress and help with patients and garnished part of my salary but only b/c he wanted to put it aside and be able to keep paying me while I was on leave..... Anyway, good luck and don't let this situation ruin the awesome experience of having a baby. Things will all workout.

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

71 months ago

Lisa E in Astoria, New York said: i reported the pregnancy to the nuclear cardiologist/rso and business manager of the facility and both prefer i get relocated for the remainder of the pregnancy and do something in a non radioactive area, i agreed and a temporary tech was hired. the only disadvantage is my employer explained to me since im temporarily changing job titles my salary is being compromised to far less that fits the average salary for the work i am doing. getting a cut in salary at this sensitive time is such a burden because i need to save money and i am now only earning less than half of what i was making as a tech. i feel i am being discriminated against or punished b/c i am pregnant can they do this....?

It's a shame and I certainly don't agree with it, but I think they can get away with it.

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Abby Sprague

71 months ago

I am currently in school to become a Nuc tech and the last graduating class of 18 ppl were all placed in nuc med jobs after graduation. One was lucky enough to find a job in Brandon, FL making 92 a year, not too bad to start. Although that is not the norm it is out there. The jobs are growing in this field as more and more uses for this type of procedure are found. I have recently searched locally for myself and found a few postings although I will not be graduating until 2010. I have also done research and found florida is the leader in these jobs so that may be why we have more luck. Good luck with your search.

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Saly in Charlotte, North Carolina

71 months ago

Lisa E in Astoria, New York said: i reported the pregnancy to the nuclear cardiologist/rso and business manager of the facility and both prefer i get relocated for the remainder of the pregnancy and do something in a non radioactive area, i agreed and a temporary tech was hired. the only disadvantage is my employer explained to me since im temporarily changing job titles my salary is being compromised to far less that fits the average salary for the work i am doing. getting a cut in salary at this sensitive time is such a burden because i need to save money and i am now only earning less than half of what i was making as a tech. i feel i am being discriminated against or punished b/c i am pregnant can they do this....?

Lisa, it is sad to say, but it sounds like they will get away with it. You do have unions up in NY. Is your facility non union? I would not worry about the baby, if you are using only Tc, and utilizing the apron. Keep your distance and make sure you get your badges read on time and keep track to see what yours and the baby exposure is.

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ATL in Marietta, Georgia

71 months ago

I have been recently accepted in a NMT program in Atlanta GA, I have noticed that the job openings are scarce in Georgia but I was wondering if it would make it easier to find a job after graduation as long as you're willing to relocate anywhere in the nation.

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

71 months ago

ATL in Marietta, Georgia said: I have been recently accepted in a NMT program in Atlanta GA, I have noticed that the job openings are scarce in Georgia but I was wondering if it would make it easier to find a job after graduation as long as you're willing to relocate anywhere in the nation.

Sorry to say but the job openings are scarce everywhere. Most hospitals won't pay for relocation and it's doubtful they would be willing to interview a recent graduate. I know thats the case here. If it's not too late I would switch to Ultrasound....

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Indeed Admin in Stamford, Connecticut

71 months ago

Hi Everyone, Thanks for joining the Indeed forums! I was curious about the job market for nuclear medicine techs so I did a quick search using the Indeed Job trends tool. Check it out http://www.indeed.com/jobtrends?q=%22nuclear+medicine+technologist%22&l= That chart does show a general decline in the number of listings that contain the term "nuclear medicine technologist", but at least the Salary tool showed some promising information. http://www.indeed.com/salary?q1=%22nuclear+medicine+technologist%22&l1= Indeed Admin

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ATL in Marietta, Georgia

71 months ago

Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas said: Sorry to say but the job openings are scarce everywhere. Most hospitals won't pay for relocation and it's doubtful they would be willing to interview a recent graduate. I know thats the case here. If it's not too late I would switch to Ultrasound....

What do you think about radiation therapy?

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

71 months ago

ATL in Marietta, Georgia said: What do you think about radiation therapy?

I'm not sure about radiation therapy, there is a forum on here and doesn't sound too encouraging. If you want a guaranteed job I reccomend nursing. If I had it to do over again, thats what I would do....

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gigi in Toledo, Ohio

70 months ago

Derek in Aston, Pennsylvania said: I can't understand that with the selective criteria used for admission into nuclear med. certificate programs a person who has been selected would even ask this question. The radiation levels a tech is exposed to are very low, far lower than the accepted upper limit range of safety. As for pregnant women, there is *probably no need to do anything different on the job. If a woman wanted to cut her exposure in half (roughly), she might just scan during pregnancy and let another tech inject. I'm sure you have a super fantasitc GPA though.

This is not nice. You're just jealous.

Congrats to Lily for your acceptance to the program. I know techs make good money ! Yes, the health risk is my concern, also. Because, I got into the program.

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Newbie

69 months ago

Hello everybody. I am in Rad Tech program now and I am doing a little research over Radiation Therapy and Nuk med. As I read these replies, someone had said that job market for Nuk Med is still good in Texas. I just wanna know if it is true since I am from Dallas Texas. I intend to go ahead and apply for either Rad Therapist or Nuk Med right after Rad Tech. My GPA is ok up to this point, I don't know if I will do good in the interviews but I don't think it would be a problem. I only worry about the job market out there.
Thank you

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Carolyn in Dallas, Texas

69 months ago

I live in the DFW area and am currently not working only b/c I am at home with babies for now. But, I do know that there is local certificate program that is turning out a handful of students once a year. There is also a school in Houston , San Antonio and 2 schools in neighboring Arkansas, so you may want contact the program directors to see how successful placement has been lately. For private practices, usually it's word of mouth within the local community so it's hard to tell. When there are a lot of schools/ certificate programs, the markets tend to saturate. Nuclear Medicine tends to cycle with over-saturation and job availability every few years. I graduated from a program in Buffalo N.Y. in 96.' Jobs were easy to come by then and when I moved to Dallas but now that there is a local school, it's hard to say. Some hospitals tend to have more of a high turnover than others. You may also want to check out the local sw chapter of nuclear medicine to get some fresh views I think you can link through it at snm.org. I strongly advise if your (rad program doesn't do this ) to contact one of the larger hospitals nuc department and see if there is a way to spend a day or 2"observing" to make sure it may be right for you. Whatever you choose, good luck and I hope it makes you happy!

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

69 months ago

Newbie said: Hello everybody. I am in Rad Tech program now and I am doing a little research over Radiation Therapy and Nuk med. As I read these replies, someone had said that job market for Nuk Med is still good in Texas. I just wanna know if it is true since I am from Dallas Texas. I intend to go ahead and apply for either Rad Therapist or Nuk Med right after Rad Tech. My GPA is ok up to this point, I don't know if I will do good in the interviews but I don't think it would be a problem. I only worry about the job market out there.
Thank you

There are no jobs in Texas, from what I hear California has a few. You may want to check out hospital websites before you waste your money. I just recently found a FT job, it took 6 months and I have 10 years of experience. Sorry but that is the reality....Good luck

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Newbie

69 months ago

Thanks so much Marie Dunn for the reply. It is off course about the more money I can make. Let's be honnest here, who would want to go to school and have no job after graduation. Still, years down the road, I can still have a job in Rad Tech and keep hanging on until I can find a job in the radiation therapy area, or I can do both job at the same time. My grandaunt passed away from lung cancer years ago and I was there with her most of the time. I do know how painful it is to have cancer. Radiation therapy is one of the tools to kill cancer cells (to my knowledge). Despite of my broken English speaking ability, I think I can comfort these people and hopefully to extend their existence in this world.

Carolynn, thank you for your reply. At the hospital where I am rotating through right now for my Rad Tech clinic, I get to see what the nuk med tech does. I absolutely love it. Therefore my number 1 choice was Nuk Med. As I digged into sources, I'd found out that Nuke Med market is so saturated every where, and I got very discouraged.
I didn't know anything about radiation therapy until couple months ago when our class made our first trip to the local hospitals where we will have to rotate through. We visited the radiation therapy room and the tech introduce us this 3 million dollars piece of equipment and I just got so hooked to it. Again, I have no problem working with patient who are dying. Where else can you get to comfort dying people and get paid for doing it? I like to plan things ahead of time and I still have a year and half to make my decision. If I head for nuk med and have no job, i can be PRN (if someone is willing to hire me). If I head for rad therapy and don't have a job after graduation, I hope the hospital where I rotate through will let me hang out and help until there is an opening (again, I am still new to the clinical environment and I still don't know how things work around the hospital)

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Newbie

69 months ago

Anyways, I was borned and raised in Asia where I was taught to respect and listen to the seniors. I'd like you thank you all for putting time and effort in giving us these feed backs. Any negative or positive feed back would be deeply appriciated. Thanks again

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Mark DeVos in Irvine, California

69 months ago

Lily in Hampton Bays, New York said: Hi, I would like to ask about the health risk of being a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. I just got accepted into a program that would offer me certification of nuclear medicine. But I'm also concern about the health risk. Also, as a female, I am interested how would it effect pregnancy. Thank you!

The risk of being a Nuc. Med. Tech. is only as bad as the technologist. In the program you will learn how to safely handle radiation. Although, the Nuclear Medicine field has shrunk emmensely, and if you are not sure of what you are doing I would advice you to follow a different path.
Mark-CNMT

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

69 months ago

Mark DeVos in Irvine, California said: The risk of being a Nuc. Med. Tech. is only as bad as the technologist. In the program you will learn how to safely handle radiation. Although, the Nuclear Medicine field has shrunk emmensely, and if you are not sure of what you are doing I would advice you to follow a different path.
Mark-CNMT

Considering there are no jobs, your probably not going to be exposed to it. So I wouldn't give it another thought....

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Saly in Charlotte, North Carolina

69 months ago

Newbie said: Anyways, I was borned and raised in Asia where I was taught to respect and listen to the seniors. I'd like you thank you all for putting time and effort in giving us these feed backs. Any negative or positive feed back would be deeply appriciated. Thanks again

Newbie, I will repeat here once again, that the reality for the NMT job market is very sour. Even if you want to relocate there are no chances for you to find a job. In 1 or 2 years things will only get worse. If you like it and you can afford to spend the money and time, go for it, but do not expect to find a job upon graduation in NM. Here is a link recently published article - Supply and Demand: imaging-radiology-oncology-technologist.advanceweb.com/Article/Supply-Demand-reaching-a-balance.aspx. This article talks about how bad it is, but in reality things are much worse in NM. They just do not want to admit it.

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Newbie

69 months ago

Thanks Sally. I'll take that into consideration. You know how it is when you get your foot step into the medical field. There are so many directions to go from here and as a newbie I don't know which way to turn. Anyways, I am very excited of learning to be a Rad Tech already. Another specialty added under my belt would be nice. Just to look good you know ***GRIN***

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lily in New Hyde Park, New York

69 months ago

Wow, I didn't know that my question would be such a big hit. Whoever is interested, I did accept the acceptance to the Nuclear Medicine Program and I started my clinical rotations. I do love it, and I don't regret. Yes, I heard about the job shortage, but be positive. No one wants to be a Nuc Tech for the rest of their lives, so there will be opening. Just have to find the right time and place. But goodluck to all the new students like me and remember to stay positive!

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Cat in Tifton, Georgia

69 months ago

Saly in Charlotte, North Carolina said: Lisa, it is sad to say, but it sounds like they will get away with it. You do have unions up in NY. Is your facility non union? I would not worry about the baby, if you are using only Tc, and utilizing the apron. Keep your distance and make sure you get your badges read on time and keep track to see what yours and the baby exposure is.

NO, No, No apron! your better off without it, it only causes more brems!

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Cat in Tifton, Georgia

69 months ago

Newbie said: Hello everybody. I am in Rad Tech program now and I am doing a little research over Radiation Therapy and Nuk med. As I read these replies, someone had said that job market for Nuk Med is still good in Texas. I just wanna know if it is true since I am from Dallas Texas. I intend to go ahead and apply for either Rad Therapist or Nuk Med right after Rad Tech. My GPA is ok up to this point, I don't know if I will do good in the interviews but I don't think it would be a problem. I only worry about the job market out there.
Thank you

mostly PRN (part time, or as needed) even in Texas.

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newbie

69 months ago

Thanks Cat

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

69 months ago

lily in New Hyde Park, New York said: Wow, I didn't know that my question would be such a big hit. Whoever is interested, I did accept the acceptance to the Nuclear Medicine Program and I started my clinical rotations. I do love it, and I don't regret. Yes, I heard about the job shortage, but be positive. No one wants to be a Nuc Tech for the rest of their lives, so there will be opening. Just have to find the right time and place. But goodluck to all the new students like me and remember to stay positive!

Your wrong I want to be a NMT for the rest of my life, as do most of the Tech's I know. I hope you find a job when you graduate, but be prepared NOT to. It's going to take years before the job shortage corrects itself. Keep in mind after a year or two out of school with no job your degree is useless. I agree be positive, but also have a back up plan...

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Marie Dunn in Houston, Texas

69 months ago

Cat in Tifton, Georgia said: mostly PRN (part time, or as needed) even in Texas.

Cat in Texas the PRN jobs are non-existent. You see a few advertised, but they are from a couple of years ago, don't know why the keep getting reposted....

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Saly in Charlotte, North Carolina

69 months ago

lily in New Hyde Park, New York said: Wow, I didn't know that my question would be such a big hit. Whoever is interested, I did accept the acceptance to the Nuclear Medicine Program and I started my clinical rotations. I do love it, and I don't regret. Yes, I heard about the job shortage, but be positive. No one wants to be a Nuc Tech for the rest of their lives, so there will be opening. Just have to find the right time and place. But goodluck to all the new students like me and remember to stay positive!

It is your choice. But do not complain when you graduate and you can not find a job, and do not dare to say that no one told you so, cause this forum is full with positive "old dogs" NMT's that have been laid off due to cuts and now can not find a job... Good luck!

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