DWI and CORI check

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SHANTEL in Brooklyn, New York

67 months ago

This is to all the people who thinks that making a mistakes in life is only for certain people . i want to know what would you do if some one or some thing place you in the wrong place at the wrong time and you get convicted not planed. what would you do if you have a long life dream of becomming a nurse or christian or a police officer or a soilder, what would you do? would you quit and forget evert thing of good character? or would you prove to the world that it was just a mistake and second chances are worth while. my to all is thrust in the LORD be of good couragr and he will direct your path. 27th Pslam. Glory be to the Lord thy God.

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Timmy in Binghamton, New York

66 months ago

If you are convicted of a felony......give up a career in healthcare because you wont get licensed. If you were convicted of a DWI, you have a shot in getting licensed but its hard to get a job.....there has to be a gap of some yrs in order to get jobs at certain hospitals. Forget what some ppl have to say.....show them how you changed and how you pulled thru against all odds to accomplish what you did.

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nurse info in Sudbury, Massachusetts

66 months ago

i was arrested for getting into a fight but never convicted will this stop me from becoming a nurse

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nurse info in Sudbury, Massachusetts

66 months ago

by the way ive never been arrested before and i dont even have a speeding ticket on my record and the fight was extremely personal and may have a chance for explanation with a panel

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PotentialNurse in Indianapolis, Indiana

66 months ago

After reading some of the stories / responses, it seems that these sorts of things are not worth the effort or time if you've had problems in the past. I work at a hospital and wanted to become an RN, but have had two DWI's. They are both Misdemeanors, but it seems that is enough to keep you from getting a license.

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Good girl in San Marcos, California

65 months ago

Evan in Levittown, Pennsylvania said: "You have a person's life in your hands @ all times. This is not a job to play around with. Sorry if I upset anyone."

You only upset me because you sound like an idiot. Clearly we all feel the job is important and I would assume that we all understand someone's life is nothing to toy around with. Once again, most of the people here on this board are looking for advice on how to overcome mistakes they have made in their PAST. Thanks for the holier than thou commentary though, I'm sure you've never done anything wrong in your life...

Seriously though, here is an example of our horrible "justice" system at work. One of my closest friends does the hiring (of Therapeutic Staff Support) for a company that helps children with autism. She interviewed a candidate who was practically perfect for the job. She was excited to get him on board and excited that he was even more qualified than the people she usually hires. However, when her company ran a background check, he failed because in 1972 he was arrested for possession of a small amount of marijuana. He could have been the best TSS ever. Helped hundreds of kids all over the autism spectrum. Changed and potentially even saved lives. BUT company policy prevented her from hiring him (because they are a bunch of closed minded idiots.)

These types of situations are heinous. Sad. Unjust.

If he was hired, I don't think he would have "played around" with his job either.

This same closed minded logic is keeping me and many others from advancing our careers. Can anyone justify this ridiculousness??? I'd like to hear you try.

What a well written comment. Thank you for being one of the only people here with a working brain stem. And I agree with you!

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karen in Crown Point, Indiana

64 months ago

to telisha in gary and all who are interested, a dwi/dui is not automatically charged as a felony in Indiana. I'm sorry to say that I was convicted in 03 and then in 08 with a dui. I'm currently not working, and reading this blog is very frightening. I am not planning on alerting the BON.. and I am not planning on ever drinking alcohol again either! From what I am reading here,it seems those who have not yet received their licenses ie new grads, state transients are the ones who surely are checked out by the board. I too regret my stupidity in choosing to take those 2 drives, but know that I am a dedicated and caring nurse. I'm prepared to do some serious talking once I begin interviewing for nursing jobs. To say the truth, I'm concerned if I'll even get as far as an interview with all I have been reading..

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screwednursingstudent in Apalachicola, Florida

64 months ago

NursingStudent said: I had a similar situation. I was arrested for misdemanor possesionof marijuanna in the state of Fla and believe me this will haunt you! I didn't get booked or anything and I was not convicted but the medical profession will treat any arrest as a conviction. Unless you get your record sealed/expunged you will not be allowed into clinicals and will be unable to complete your program requirements. I had my record sealed and I am now in my last semester of nursing school but the battle is not over. I have to make a special appeal to the board of nursing complete with notarized sealed copies of all documents pretaining to this arrest to have the priviledge of sitting for the boards. I have been on the dean's list since I got into college and will graduate with honors but that doesn't mean anything if I can't take the NCLEX. Dot your i's and mind your q's YOU HAVE TO ADMIT ANY/ALL ARRESTS to the board of nursing.

Guess what the state of Florida just passed a new law for some that went into affect last month for anyone applying for a health license that fall under certain categories that can't qualify until 15 years later!!!

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screwednursingstudent in Apalachicola, Florida

64 months ago

FL is very strict

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TImmy in Kirkwood, New York

64 months ago

screwednursingstudent in Apalachicola, Florida said: FL is very strict

Damn that sucks....I realy don't understand how your past affects your present and future? Maybe you and and others should file a lawsuit?

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recovering RN in Rising Sun, Maryland

63 months ago

I am an RN with a narcotics addiction that I developed during nursing school. Unfortunately, entering the field in the ER put me in the worst possible environment for my addiction. After two years my employer found out I was taking narcotics from the dispenser, and they very kindly allowed me to resign and report myself to the Board of Nursing (Maryland). The Board in my state is very compassionate, in my opinion, although I was placed on a standard 5-year contract with them. I could work with no public mark on my license, however, I was restricted from working anywhere with access to dispensers where any mind-altering substances are distributed, including all narcotics and all mood-alternating drugs such as those in a psychiatric setting. This greatly limited the field to work. Many nurses in my state work in dialysis, a job which fits the restrictions, which include not only the medication restriction, but also restricts you from working in a school, for any travel or contract nursing agency, in any critical care or ICU, in pediatrics. Also, you cannot work more than 40 hrs/wk and cannot work night shift. You must remain in treatment for a minimum of 2 years and be subject to random urine testing the entire 5 years. You must show any potential employer the contract, and they must report quarterly to the Board on your progress. After 5 years all restrictions are lifted. Of course, you must follow the contract and can lose your license if you stray. Fortunately for me, they do kick you out when you screw up. They are very forgiving if you continue to earnestly attempt to maintain a good recovery program.
I thank God for the opportunity the MD Board of Nursing has given me to continue working as a nurse because I am otherwise an excellent nurse with great compassion. I suggest any addicted nurse out there do the right thing and seek help/advice from other nurses in your state. You'd be surprised how many of us are out there.

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MujerNica in Dallas, Texas

63 months ago

After reading all these comments I'm pretty discouraged. I am getting ready to apply to our RN program here in Dallas. However I have a record. In 1999 I was court martialed from the military and sent to a military jail for 6 months for various drug charges (about 9 of them). I'm not going to sugar coat it...it was pretty bad and I ruined my career in the military. Also after that in 2001 I was arrested on a possession of marijuana charge and got deferred adjudicated after being on probation for 1 year.
Since then my life has completely turned around. I've called the TX Boards and they said they really couldn't say whether or not I'd be allowed to test. They told me to just try and submit all my paperwork but it will take up to a year based on my situation.
Has anyone met or known someone in this situation?
I've already come up with a backup career doing Sonography which I think I'd be happy with just in case.
Thank you.

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byling in Portland, Oregon

63 months ago

I just graduated from nursing school and getting ready to take my boards. I think it's pathetic how people want people to change but continue to throw the past at them. How can people change if people continue to label people?

In my case, 14 years ago, which were juvenile days, I've been arrested once with a friend for shoplifting (not convicted because my friend did the shoplifting) and once for wrongfully accused of unlawful possession of a firearm (not convicted because I hung with the wrong crowd, being at the wrong time & wrong place). I don't have paper works of the court dates and stuff like that. If the boards wants prove, I probably would have to go to the courthouse or police station. I don't even know how to go about it. But since then I've stopped hanging with that crowd and completely changed my life around. I haven't been in trouble with the law since, besides a terrible car accident and a minor traffic ticket recently. I'm still afraid these 2 incidents, 14 years ago, will hunt me for the rest of my life just because I chose to go into this profession. So my question is, do the boards really do background checks all the way back to juvenile days? I thought juvenile files are closed once a person reach 18, in some states. Then why do the boards want to dig it up again? If 14 years is not change than I don't know what change is. Will the boards stop me from taking my NCLEX? In my opinion, they shouldn't. People do stupid things when they're young and NO ONE IS PERFECT! By the way, I was never convicted so I never had to do any community services, etc. I'm from OR, but looking to license in CA. Anyone with similar experience would like to share some light. Comment is appreciated.

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jeanette in Santa Barbara, California

62 months ago

Isabel in San Bruno, California said: Yes 1mrnurse. That is why I listed that fact. California is that strict. Even if my DUI was dropped, which I doubt will even happen, my arrest for the DUI would need to be disclosed to the California Boards. I am totally aware of this. Any arrest even if NOT convicted MAY hold me back from being licensed in California. That is why I am terrified that I may never become licensed in California. I have never been so devastated. :(

Advice anyone? I am still losing sleep over this dilemma.

I know this was written awhile back but I have some "issues" and was hoping you may have some advice from your experience in the last few months

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1mrnurse in Corpus Christi, Texas

62 months ago

HellO: As I said earlier, do your best to have Legal Respsentation (i.e.), despite the cost, to represent you in a DWI CHARGE & COURT APPEARANCE. They may for example get a DWI pleaded down to a lessor conviction such as Reckless Operation of a motor vehicle.

Also note, that you shgould have an attorney handle any communication or appearance with the Board of Nursing there.

1mrnurse

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ralph in Clifton Park, New York

62 months ago

person in Winston Salem, North Carolina said: I'd pull out of there. Nursing Boards need reform on their punishment of these offenses, but its not going to happen anytime soon. Many people have blown a lot of money trying to repair their lives after dwi. The Board will encourage you to continue the courses, but they will require you to pay a lot of money in random urine checks for a year, and having mentoring about your "problem." You'll be expected to label yourself as an alcoholic for the rest of your life. Trust me, nursing is not worth all that!

contact the PAP- professional assistance program. they will give you the best advice. also, urine screens arent always expensive- your employer may pick up the tab.

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Isabel in San Francisco, California

62 months ago

Jeanette from Santa Barbara - What are the "issues" you say you are having with your nursing license? Do you already have your nursing license? I will try my best to answer any questions you may have...

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

recovering RN in Rising Sun, Maryland said: I am an RN with a narcotics addiction that I developed during nursing school. Unfortunately, entering the field in the ER put me in the worst possible environment for my addiction. After two years my employer found out I was taking narcotics from the dispenser, and they very kindly allowed me to resign and report myself to the Board of Nursing (Maryland). The Board in my state is very compassionate, in my opinion, although I was placed on a standard 5-year contract with them. I could work with no public mark on my license, however, I was restricted from working anywhere with access to dispensers where any mind-altering substances are distributed, including all narcotics and all mood-alternating drugs such as those in a psychiatric setting. This greatly limited the field to work. Many nurses in my state work in dialysis, a job which fits the restrictions, which include not only the medication restriction, but also restricts you from working in a school, for any travel or contract nursing agency, in any critical care or ICU, in pediatrics. Also, you cannot work more than 40 hrs/wk and cannot work night shift. You must remain in treatment for a minimum of 2 years and be subject to random urine testing the entire 5 years. You must show any potential employer the contract, and they must report quarterly to the Board on your progress. After 5 years all restrictions are lifted. Of course, you must follow the contract and can lose your license if you stray. Fortunately for me, they do kick you out when you screw up. They are very forgiving if you continue to earnestly attempt to maintain a good recovery program.
I thank God for the opportunity the MD Board of Nursing has given me to continue working as a nurse because I am otherwise an excellent nurse with great compassion. I suggest any addicted nurse out there do the right thing and seek help/advice from other nurses in your state. You'd be surprised how many of us are

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

I have been an RN for 27 years, practicing exclusively in Fl. I find myself in a similiar situation as Recovering RN in Rising Sun, Maryland. Had a script for Percocet following root canal work. Didn't have med on me while across town and with an intense headache, accepted offer of Fiorcet figuring a cet is a cet. Very stupid on my part. Tested positive on random drug screen and have entered uncharted waters. Fl has agency formed in 1983 from legislative action called IPN ( Intervention Project nurse. ) Voluntarily entering into contract with them prevents State Board involvement provided one complies 100%. Requires nightly check to see if drug testing required the next day, 3 AA of NA meetings/wk, one IPN meeting/wk, full disclosure to employer of contract and controlled substance restriction for a year. Contract is 5 years. Also restrictions as to where nurse can work. Which leads to my current problem. I have been actively seeking employment for 2 months without success. I am not sure if it is my disclosure of IPN monitoring, the fact that I was terminated from my last job or the economy. Maybe all. Anyone else in similar situation with advice?? Sure could use some. Thanks in advance.

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screwed nursing student in Apalachicola, Florida

62 months ago

Do you know if the IPN can help if you are not licensed yet? I've been in nursing school and will be finished after this May. When I was younger and hanging with the wrong crowd I got a drug possesion charge and now FL just passed a law saying that if you've had such a charge with in 15 years you can't get licensed. It's horrible this is the only thing that's ever happened to me not even a speeding ticket, I've spent all these past few years working on my career for them to say you don't deserve a second chance for 15 years. The other bad thing is I'm the top student in the class and can't be a nurse!

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

IPN is a State monitoring agency for CNA's, LPN's and RN's who have a physical, mental, emotional or drug/alcohol impairment. If you currently do not have one or more of those problems, IPN would not be the way to go. It is costly !! To begin the process you have to be evaluated by an IPN approved doc, which cost me $400.00. From there you must enter into his recommended program of treatment. For me this was 26 sessions of out patient treatment and cost around $5000.00. The requirements go on.

If your offense did not lead to a felony conviction, you need not worry. The proposed 15 yr rule would not apply. I stress proposed, because it has not passed leglisation as of yet.

If you were convicted of a felony, I suggest you contact a law firm that specializes in Health law.

Good luck and congrads on being one of the top of class.

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Mary 1Nurse in Louisville, Kentucky

62 months ago

byling in Portland, Oregon said: I just graduated from nursing school and getting ready to take my boards. I think it's pathetic how people want people to change but continue to throw the past at them. How can people change if people continue to label people?

In my case, 14 years ago, which were juvenile days, I've been arrested once with a friend for shoplifting (not convicted because my friend did the shoplifting) and once for wrongfully accused of unlawful possession of a firearm (not convicted because I hung with the wrong crowd, being at the wrong time & wrong place). I don't have paper works of the court dates and stuff like that. If the boards wants prove, I probably would have to go to the courthouse or police station. I don't even know how to go about it. But since then I've stopped hanging with that crowd and completely changed my life around. I haven't been in trouble with the law since, besides a terrible car accident and a minor traffic ticket recently. I'm still afraid these 2 incidents, 14 years ago, will hunt me for the rest of my life just because I chose to go into this profession. So my question is, do the boards really do background checks all the way back to juvenile days? I thought juvenile files are closed once a person reach 18, in some states. Then why do the boards want to dig it up again? If 14 years is not change than I don't know what change is. Will the boards stop me from taking my NCLEX? In my opinion, they shouldn't. People do stupid things when they're young and NO ONE IS PERFECT! By the way, I was never convicted so I never had to do any community services, etc. I'm from OR, but looking to license in CA. Anyone with similar experience would like to share some light. Comment is appreciated.

I don't understand, you said you were not convicted. So exactly what is the problem. That's like saying I was pulled over and charged with drunk driving but was not convicted. No conviction...no problem.

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Mary 1Nurse in Louisville, Kentucky

62 months ago

nurse info in Sudbury, Massachusetts said: i was arrested for getting into a fight but never convicted will this stop me from becoming a nurse

An arrest is not a conviction. A conviction goes against you anyone can be arrested for anything.

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

I had a prescription for Percocet ( not on me at the time) and a friend could tell I had a headache from root canal work. She offered me a Fiorcet which I took, thinking a cet is a cet. Huge mistake. Percocet is an opiate, Fiorcet a barbituate. Therefore on a random urine screen, I tested positive for a med not precribed to me. Although no law involvement, I was in violation of breaking company policy of a drug free work place. Bottom line, I was also stepping on the Nurse Practice Act. Any employer has the right to report a nurse to IPN or even the State Board on "a suspision SP?)

Thanks though, for trying to stick up for me.

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

I am not familiar with the laws in Mass. Here in Florida, as I understand it...no conviction..no problem.

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screwed nursing student in Apalachicola, Florida

62 months ago

I think legislature has passed it. And it's not only felony conviction it's also nolo contere bc I was young and had a sucky lawyer that told me it didn't matter what degree or charge I took there was still the arrest record and that's what they would see and so I was screwed either way so I took his advice add did a year of probation with no felony charge record, so from what I've read so far I'm still screwed because I plead no content. idk i'll have to contact someone else. Thanks.

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screwed nursing student in Apalachicola, Florida

62 months ago

I from Fl and what I've been told and understood if you've been arrested you've got a problem even if not convicted.

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shanedawg in New Bern, North Carolina

62 months ago

wookieyear in boston, Massachusetts said: I was in the process of changing career paths and have signed up for a ASN at a local college. This past semester I began taking some academic requirements for the program (A&P I & Human Development), then towards the end of the semester, I received a DWI. The charge is pending, and I have a lawyer. I am strict about drinking and driving, but this was purely impulse, and I don't believe it's a detriment to my moral character. It's a decision I regret immensely, and needless to say, lesson definitely learned.

However, if I am charged will this result in a failed CORI check? I live in MA (not sure if it varies from state to state).. I've been searching online for this answer weeks, but to no avail. Also, my court date is scheduled after the start of the Spring semester. I had planned to take A&P II a Microbiology, but if I have no shot at becoming a nurse (or even working in allied health in general), then I would like to drop said classes before being charged for them.

ANY input would be greatly appreciated!

Most background checks are based on a whole person concept. The fact that the offense is so recent will probably affect the outcome of your background check. Had it been years ago and your only offense you would probably be ok. Hopefully your lawyer can work wonders and you'll be ok.

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

screwed nursing student in Apalachicola, Florida said: I think legislature has passed it. And it's not only felony conviction it's also nolo contere bc I was young and had a sucky lawyer that told me it didn't matter what degree or charge I took there was still the arrest record and that's what they would see and so I was screwed either way so I took his advice add did a year of probation with no felony charge record, so from what I've read so far I'm still screwed because I plead no content. idk i'll have to contact someone else. Thanks.

Because I am under IPN and meet with other nurses who have been referred to them for one reason or another ( some do have felony convictions), weekly, we receive the latest news coming from the Board. So I am sure that the 15 rule is not in effect yet. No reason to take my word for it however.

In checking with someone else, I suggest George F. Indest III attorney for Health law. They spoke to me for about 45 minutes, free of charge.

Good luck

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1mrnurse in Corpus Christi, Texas

62 months ago

hellO; Of course you should check with the local police department by requesting your own "arrest record" from them. This will be the same information given to a licensing board and EACH prospective employer for the rest of your work career. Arrest records ALWAYS show what you have been arrested for; NOT what you have been convicted for, or had expunged. You must request yourself your conviction record in that applicable court.Even if as you say "it was expunged," tou need to have your documentation ON-HAND IN ADVANCE if questioned by a licensing board or prospective employer. 1mrnurse

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scared in Youngstown, Ohio

62 months ago

question: i just got picked up last night for a DUI, and cocaine/paraphenalia possession. I am already a licensed RN. Will I lose my license if convicted? And if not convicted, is the arrest itself enough to make me lose my license?

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Mister Tee in Binghamton, New York

62 months ago

Hey Scared in Ohio, get a lawyer fast! Your arrest record won't matter as much as your conviction record, so though you were arrested for the mentioned charges, your conviction on on these or lesser charges is what will affect your Nursinng License. You'll have to report this to the board. More than likely, you will have to be placed on some sort of probation or suspension. Your job will also have to be notified, but before you do any of this, talk to a damn good lawyer. Best of Luck. By the way, I think it would a good time to quit your alcohol/drug habit. Most boards will require drug testing that comes out of your pocket.

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GardenGirl in Forked River, New Jersey

62 months ago

OMG. I've been out of nursing for 15 years and now have to retake the boards to get licensed here in NJ. I can't believe you can lose your nursing license for a DUI. I am 50 and things have sure changed. Back when I was working this sort of thing would never have made it to the employer's desk, or, if it did, she'd just offer you a ride home.
What has happened to nursing? No wonder there's a shortage. No wonder no one wants to do it.
This forum is an eye-opener and I'm glad I found it, but now I really am reconsidering medical coding and billing.

GG

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

scared in Youngstown, Ohio said: question: i just got picked up last night for a DUI, and cocaine/paraphenalia possession. I am already a licensed RN. Will I lose my license if convicted? And if not convicted, is the arrest itself enough to make me lose my license?

I agree with those who have responded. Get a lawyer. I suggest looking for one who is in Health Law. And be pro-active. Start looking for and attending either Narcotics anonymous or AA meetings. This will not only serve as a support group but will also show your willingness to receive help.

In my State, which is Florida, they have a State group called "Intervention Project Nurse". It is a program in which the nurse is monitored after voluntarily signing a contract to obstain from using drugs or alcohol. They do monitor the nurse with drug/alcohol testing. There are other parts of the program I will not get into right now. This program does not offer legal advice which should be your #1 priority, but it does, if followed, prevent State Board involvement.

Good luck and stay clean.

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1mrnurse in Corpus Christi, Texas

62 months ago

HellO: Unfortunately when one is young there is a greater chance of "Failing to link the behavior with the later consequences."
As much as it distresses me those kinds of safe guards are there for valid reasons having to do with the general good for society as opposed to the benefit of the individual. 1stevenlg

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

GardenGirl in Forked River, New Jersey said: OMG. I've been out of nursing for 15 years and now have to retake the boards to get licensed here in NJ. I can't believe you can lose your nursing license for a DUI. I am 50 and things have sure changed. Back when I was working this sort of thing would never have made it to the employer's desk, or, if it did, she'd just offer you a ride home.
What has happened to nursing? No wonder there's a shortage. No wonder no one wants to do it.
This forum is an eye-opener and I'm glad I found it, but now I really am reconsidering medical coding and billing.

GG

Oddly enough, and I am willing to be wrong, but your letter seems to reflect that you are blaming other things, not owning up to you being the one who got a DUI. However, if this is your first and you are 50 yrs old, then perhaps your drinking is not such a huge problem. Driving after drinking though is not a good idea. Be grateful you didn't harm yourself or another.

I am glad to hear that your eyes are being opened by landing on this forum. Nurses are people too and experience pain and suffering in their own life. However I think that the public needs to be protected from those who are impaired. I also think that if the human/nurse truly has "turned" from unhealthy habits and cleaned up their act, they should get a second chance.

I understand coding and billing is a good field and with your knowledge of medical terms, you could be top notch!

The best of luck.

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1mrnurse in Corpus Christi, Texas

62 months ago

HellO: Well stated! 1mrnurse

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GardenGirl in Forked River, New Jersey

62 months ago

O! I've never had a DUI or any sort of arrest at all, and I'm sorry if I gave off that impression. I am trying to find out how nursing has changed in these past 15 years I've been out of it raising children, and it appears it's less forgiving of human failings than it once was. I have no recollection of RN's going through these problems, but I do know some who had DUI's and there was no punishment with the board of nursing, it was simply a personal issue that would involve trouble getting to work for awhile.
Drugs, that was another story, but many nurses did drugs they stole from the workplace etc, but they were usually just let go.
That was the early 80's tho........I was licensed in 1983.
Retaking the board is a lot of studying, and I'm tired and sometimes wonder if what I'm getting back into is anything like what I left.
This forum is showing me that nursing has changed with regards to compassion and second chances given to those trained to be impartial caretakers.
GG

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GardenGirl in Forked River, New Jersey

62 months ago

P.s. What is CORI??
GG

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worried in Gillette, New Jersey

62 months ago

Does anyone know for sure, based on personal experience or personally witnessing it happen to someone else, whether juvenile charges come up on the NJ Board NCLEX Background check? I'm talking about one minor drug charge.

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reba in Alexander City, Alabama

62 months ago

When I was 15 I was p/u for public intoxication and when I was in the nursing program I ask my instructor about it and I was not affected. You may want to ask just to be sure because that was a long time ago. Just be honest about it. You should be okay.

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

GardenGirl in Forked River, New Jersey said: O! I've never had a DUI or any sort of arrest at all, and I'm sorry if I gave off that impression. I am trying to find out how nursing has changed in these past 15 years I've been out of it raising children, and it appears it's less forgiving of human failings than it once was. I have no recollection of RN's going through these problems, but I do know some who had DUI's and there was no punishment with the board of nursing, it was simply a personal issue that would involve trouble getting to work for awhile.
Drugs, that was another story, but many nurses did drugs they stole from the workplace etc, but they were usually just let go.
That was the early 80's tho........I was licensed in 1983.
Retaking the board is a lot of studying, and I'm tired and sometimes wonder if what I'm getting back into is anything like what I left.
This forum is showing me that nursing has changed with regards to compassion and second chances given to those trained to be impartial caretakers.
GG

Sorry I misunderstood.

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BabyFuzz in Southfield, Michigan

62 months ago

I'm curious about something. I have been out of nursing for almost 13 years now--yiii!! Since that time, I have managed to acquire some very painful arthritis and am on medications prescribed for me by a doctor at a well-known, above-board pain clinic. I realize that there will be u/a's done. I will fully and honestly disclose everything I am taking--It's not that much, but one is a Schedule II med and one is a Schedule III med. If I fully disclose prior to the testing what I am taking, LEGALLY can they stop me from being employed as a nurse? I have been on these meds now for years, have not increased any dosages (have had u/s's done at the pain clinic and everything comes out as it should). I'm concerned about this but because I have been on them for years, I feel only better pain-wise after taking the meds as prescribed and have never (not even in the very beginning) felt any excitation or any other "feeling" from my meds. What do you think? I think I am a really good nurse and these meds will hopefully allow me to work again. Without them, I might as well just watch TV all day as I am good for nothing. I have recently taken a refresher course (CEN) for my speciality area which is the ER and got my BLS which is good for two years. I am hoping to get a job where ACLS is required of course but that the institution I work for will pay for it. (hopefully). That's my story, what does anyone think? Thank you, Fuzz

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

BabyFuzz in Southfield, Michigan said: I'm curious about something. I have been out of nursing for almost 13 years now--yiii!! Since that time, I have managed to acquire some very painful arthritis and am on medications prescribed for me by a doctor at a well-known, above-board pain clinic. I realize that there will be u/a's done. I will fully and honestly disclose everything I am taking--It's not that much, but one is a Schedule II med and one is a Schedule III med. If I fully disclose prior to the testing what I am taking, LEGALLY can they stop me from being employed as a nurse? I have been on these meds now for years, have not increased any dosages (have had u/s's done at the pain clinic and everything comes out as it should). I'm concerned about this but because I have been on them for years, I feel only better pain-wise after taking the meds as prescribed and have never (not even in the very beginning) felt any excitation or any other "feeling" from my meds. What do you think? I think I am a really good nurse and these meds will hopefully allow me to work again. Without them, I might as well just watch TV all day as I am good for nothing. I have recently taken a refresher course (CEN) for my speciality area which is the ER and got my BLS which is good for two years. I am hoping to get a job where ACLS is required of course but that the institution I work for will pay for it. (hopefully). That's my story, what does anyone think? Thank you, Fuzz

From my experience, if you have a valid prescription, you need not worry about a drug screening. Do not be caught off guard should the testing sight not be interested, up front, in seeing you prescriptions. It is only after the test has been run, and something shows, that they will call you to verify what you are taking.

If it has been 13 years since you practised, I would re-think entering the ER. Bearing in mind that it is fast paced and there have been many changes in 13 years.

Cont..

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida said: From my experience, if you have a valid prescription, you need not worry about a drug screening. Do not be caught off guard should the testing sight not be interested, up front, in seeing you prescriptions. It is only after the test has been run, and something shows, that they will call you to verify what you are taking.

If it has been 13 years since you practised, I would re-think entering the ER. Bearing in mind that it is fast paced and there have been many changes in 13 years.

Cont..

When you state that the meds keep you going and without, you would remain on the couch, it raises some concerns on my part. Not that you are taking meds you need for pain control, but that it sounds as though you are either stop or go. Again, bare in mind that the ER is fast paced.

Perhaps a job in home health or Hospice care would be more suited for you. You can control your own schedule.

Questions: Have you had you medication regime re-evaluated lately? Do you have any concerns about addiction? I was prescribe Valium for over 5 years, and although I did not consider myself addicted it turns out that I had become such. Some clues for me were feeling anxious when my new PCP wanted to switch to Ativan and reduced the frequency. When I descided to wean, I went through withdraw. I spent many sleepless nights, but am now completely off and able to sleep and am feeling much better.

Whatever path you choose to take, I wish you the best of luck. We can use some good nurses practising.

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Mary 1Nurse in Louisville, Kentucky

62 months ago

GardenGirl in Forked River, New Jersey said: OMG. I've been out of nursing for 15 years and now have to retake the boards to get licensed here in NJ. I can't believe you can lose your nursing license for a DUI. I am 50 and things have sure changed. Back when I was working this sort of thing would never have made it to the employer's desk, or, if it did, she'd just offer you a ride home.
What has happened to nursing? No wonder there's a shortage. No wonder no one wants to do it.
This forum is an eye-opener and I'm glad I found it, but now I really am reconsidering medical coding and billing.

GG

What do you mean "what has happened to nursing" If you don't use good judgment and restraint and refrain from putting others lives at risk by drinking and driving and/or using/abusing drugs, then you should not be a nurse!! Sure, you can get a ride...straight to a treatment center.

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tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida

62 months ago

Mary 1Nurse in Louisville, Kentucky said: What do you mean "what has happened to nursing" If you don't use good judgment and restraint and refrain from putting others lives at risk by drinking and driving and/or using/abusing drugs, then you should not be a nurse!! Sure, you can get a ride...straight to a treatment center.

I misunderstood what GardenGirl wrote, as I think you did. She corrected me by stating that she has not had a DUI or any other charges. She put nursing on hold to raise her kids and now wanting to re-enter, she came across this forum. From this forum, her eyes were opened to the substance abuse going on with nurses today.

I stand with you in your righteous anger towards nurses who put others at risk if they are impaired. With recogition can come successful treatment.

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Mary 1Nurse in Louisville, Kentucky

62 months ago

My response was stemming from her comment " what ever happened to Nursing, no wonder their is a shortage, no wonder no one wants to do it". I took this as, she felt nurses are being monitored too strictly and where now they are being punished, before they were just sent home, or possibly terminated from one job but allowed to apply elsewhere. Why else would she write "no wonder no one wants to do it". Go back and read her comments, she tried to clean it up, but the damage was already done.

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Danelle in Charlotte, North Carolina

62 months ago

MrT in Binghamton, New York said: The problem is many people seem to automatically assume that once you get a dwi, you are an Alcoholic. This could further from the truth depening on the case...

Thank you so much for that response. I get so sick and tired of people stating that once you get a DUI you must assume the label of alcoholic for eternity. It is an unfounded and ridiculous false statistic trumpeted by the ignorant and the reactionary unthinking MADD followers. (Remember the founder of MADD left the organization.) It is absolutely insanity that the crime is based on the possibility of an outcome. That is like convicting someone for owning a pool under the assumption that a child may drown. We all know that it is illegal to drink and drive. That said we also know that it is illegal to SPEED. Speeding kills more people than any other vehicular violation. However when you speed you are given a ticket and can move on down the line with no further consequence. What is the incentive for non-recidivism oh holier than thou speeders who tell anyone with a DUI to just go ahead and dig a hole? Why should a person who received a DUI not just drink themselves into oblivion if regardless of the frequency, severity or situation we are treated worse than murderers. You cannot charge someone for committing murder solely based on the possession of the weapon. DUI offenders are charged as though they killed someone (even though in the vast majority of the cases they do not) and while people making the far more reckless conscious decision to speed are given a pass. If as you say all DUI offenders are alcoholics and if, as the medical profession deems, alcoholism is a disease...how can you possibly say that someone recovering should be denied a position based the possibility of a disease? Could you deny a position to someone who was recovering from any other disease? Is it not a discriminatory practice to deny a position on such terms? Hmmm...

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Danelle in Charlotte, North Carolina

62 months ago

tuscand@netzero.com in Saint Petersburg, Florida said:

I stand with you in your righteous anger towards nurses who put others at risk if they are impaired. With recogition can come successful treatment.

However even with successful treatment the person is to be humiliated, discriminated against and alienated for the remainder of their life. Now you tell me how a person who has committed murder has a better chance with the right attorney of having the charges reduced or dropped than a 1st time simple (meaning no other offenses involved) dui offender? That is the fact. I understand if a person is drunk on the job. If a pilot is flying drunk if a nurse is found under the influence while taking care of patients there is every reason to use the full force of the law against those individuals and make it very clear from the outset that committing such actions will result in permanent revocation of a persons license. Again...speeding kills, pools kill, obesity kills (especially parents who allow their children to become obese). You have an obligation to allow people to heal and move on with their lives. You are nurses. You are medical professionals. I would have expected more from you.

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