Is Nursing right for me???

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MaleNurse in Perth, Australia

41 months ago

Nursing isn't rocket science: all it takes is a never give up attitude and you will pass your training. Kids or no kids, but there is a price to pay for job security.

After 10 yrs in the game, working medical wards, adult & peadiatric emergency. - you learn to ignore the things that rattle you to some extent. be it vomit, sputum, faeces or blood. Most nurses have one thing they find hard to "handle".

Personally - my recommendation would be do something else, even if it pays less. Society is changing and respect towards healthcare workers is rapidly deminishing. Don't be fooled into thinking that your patients or there families will be grateful, reg nice -as most now days are indifferent at best ( though there is always a execption)

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veronica in Saint Catharines, Ontario

40 months ago

Hi, everyone. I'm a 25 year old, looking into going back to school. I'm really interested in becoming a nurse, and am very curious about the school work load involved. I have no kids, just pets, but I'm really nervous, and I don't have a lot of confidence in myself. I know people who have done it in more difficult situations, but I fear that I'm not cut out for the school work (I slacked off a lot in highschool and feel ill-prepared).
If someone could just tell me what the school work is really like.. for someone of average intelligence.. and some strategies that worked for you.
-It'd be much appreciated! Thanks.

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Emily in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

40 months ago

veronica in Saint Catharines, Ontario said: Hi, everyone. I'm a 25 year old, looking into going back to school. I'm really interested in becoming a nurse, and am very curious about the school work load involved. I have no kids, just pets, but I'm really nervous, and I don't have a lot of confidence in myself. I know people who have done it in more difficult situations, but I fear that I'm not cut out for the school work (I slacked off a lot in highschool and feel ill-prepared).
If someone could just tell me what the school work is really like.. for someone of average intelligence.. and some strategies that worked for you.
-It'd be much appreciated! Thanks.

Hi, I can relate. A few things... you aren't in highschool anymore so don't compare your study habits then to now. You are no longer that distracted teen.
I suggest looking into your local colleges and see what the course load is for a nursing degree <ADN vs BSN or LPN vs RN> and how their program works. Each college program is different.
When you enroll in college, there are seminars available that will help you learn what study approaches will work best for you, how to effectively read college material, how to test take, how to manage your time, etc. Being a nontraditional student myself, I have used all tools available to me in helping me succeed in becoming a RN. I am currently and proudly rocking a 4.0 GPA. They are my prereq's but those grades will determine if I get accepted into the nursing clinical program. So far, so good.
Before you commit to college and a nursing degree, I recommend you going to your local hospital to inquire about shadowing a nurse and see what you think. There are many areas you can work in nursing such as a hospital, Dr's office, school, prison, home health care, etc etc!
Good luck on your journey and be confident in your abilities! You can do anything you put your mind to!

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Leah in Spring, Texas

39 months ago

Jessica said: Says the person that writes they'd in their reply...

Sorry, as an English major, I have to point out that they'd is grammatically correct. It means "they had, they would".

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veronica in Saint Catharines, Ontario

39 months ago

Emily in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania said: Hi, I can relate. A few things... you aren't in highschool anymore so don't compare your study habits then to now. You are no longer that distracted teen.
I suggest looking into your local colleges and see what the course load is for a nursing degree <ADN vs BSN or LPN vs RN> and how their program works. Each college program is different.
When you enroll in college, there are seminars available that will help you learn what study approaches will work best for you, how to effectively read college material, how to test take, how to manage your time, etc. Being a nontraditional student myself, I have used all tools available to me in helping me succeed in becoming a RN. I am currently and proudly rocking a 4.0 GPA. They are my prereq's but those grades will determine if I get accepted into the nursing clinical program. So far, so good.
Before you commit to college and a nursing degree, I recommend you going to your local hospital to inquire about shadowing a nurse and see what you think. There are many areas you can work in nursing such as a hospital, Dr's office, school, prison, home health care, etc etc!
Good luck on your journey and be confident in your abilities! You can do anything you put your mind to!

Thanks very much! The encouragement means a lot. I've made an appointment for next week to meet with a college adviser to figure out the best way for me to reach this goal. I'm nervous and excited! :)

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Angeltots in Quincy, Massachusetts

39 months ago

Hmm... I finally finished reading everyone's postings, and I'm so glad to see this thread is still alive. I am 28f and had a Masters Degree in Music and of course that field is very profitable *note sarcasm*. Hehe.

I am looking into a more stable job. I can say I have really good memory, and studying might not be so hard for me. What my bf is worried about, is how I am going to be once I get the job. Would I be able to handle it? I am not really that good when making decisions (like which college to take and comparing pros and cons of each issue). I have thought that in nursing, I would be dealing with facts that I have studied, and would be making decisions based on that, and not about what I personally think, which might be an easier task. I am compassionate, and can make people around me feel comfortable. Cons for that is I might get too attached and that's what I need to watch out for.

My bf is also wondering what I think about OTA. So we are both looking into those two degrees. I am thinking of getting an associates in either of the degrees. Another possibility is PN too.

Is anyone familiar with the colleges and schools around the Massachusetts area? Also, I am interested to share insights with anyone that's a current nurse in the area (or not, I'd take it still).

I'll write back if anyone has any questions so that I can be given a clearer advice.

Thanks! =)

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NotsureinPA in Coatesville, Pennsylvania

39 months ago

I have been debating nursing school for a while. I graduated with a Sociology degree and took mostly history classes as my electives. I took 4 yrs of biology but that was in high school. I make a lot of money in the finanical industry but I HATE it. I cannot seem to find any fulfillment. I like helping people and I am looking for more flexiblity (& a job that I can leave at work). I work 6 days a week right now and I am required to keep my blackberry on 24/7. My husband and I are trying to start snowbirding (living in the north from May to Oct, South from Nov to Apr). His job would allow it but mine doesn't. Travel nursing seems to be a good fit. Has anyone had any experience in that?

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408 San Jose in San Jose, California

39 months ago

Hi Maritza,
I think the nurse is right. If you have the time to commit to a longer and harder program, you will regret it if you don't just do it now. You will be the MA taking orders from RN's, low man on the totem pole, and for way less than half the money. Being a single mom, nursing school will be hard, but also, being a single mom, making way less money will be harder for longer for both you and your child. You have to be able to support yourself and your child without any assistance, especially in this day and age. I say go for it. You'll regret it if you don't.

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Angeltots in Quincy, Massachusetts

39 months ago

Hi Maritza,

Yes. I know someone who is a medical assistant and she said she had finally landed a job after a year of searching. That friend is going back to school to take up RN. I knew a new friend just this week and she happens to be a nurse. I asked her about the hiring opportunities in the medical field. She said there are tons of medical assistants and they don't really need any. What the hospitals need nowadays are RNs and LPNs. So it's better off getting a RN degree instead of a medical assistant degree.

On another forum that my bf has forwarded me, he said a 4 year degree is better than a 2 year associates because they get hired easily, especially there will be a lot of new graduates from a 4 yr degree nowadays. What was adviced to do was that if you're set on getting just an associates degree like me (to save 2 yrs time and still take the NCLEX exam to be an RN), once we look for a job, we should consider ones that would sponsor us to continue onto finishing a 4 yr degree at our own pace, when needed. So maybe a lower pay, but they will sponsor the rest of the degree until you get a bachelors.

There's also a certificate for LPNs. Licensed practical nurses. They're in demand too. It's around 10 months of schooling.

Good luck to us!

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Michelle Tram in Rosemead, California

38 months ago

Desperate help..): I'm 20 years old & I'm currently attending a community college & should be able to transfer soon. However, for so long i didn't know what i wanted to do. My parents kept pressuring me to go into nursing. But honestly, I can't handle blood or looking at anything disturbing such as changing someones diaper or seeing someone thats ill. But a few years ago, my brother overdosed on cocaine & is now brain damaged. After seeing how much it has affect my parents & family I know more than anything they want me to get into that field and be successful. Making my parents proud is what i want more than anything in this world. I have thought about other career choices but the pay is just so much less. Awhile back, my dad's friend's daughter was talking to me & asking me what I'm going to do & she was telling me what she has done with her life. I explained to her that i really don't know if i can handle being a nurse & she simply said to me that if you just go and try it, you will seriously learn how to deal with it & like it. Plus back then in high school my worst subject was science WHICH is what the medical field is all about. The horrible thing is I haven't even volunteered at a hospital yet to witness if thats what i would really be able to do. But i feel like i have no more time to waste. Like i mentioned earlier my brother who is the oldest is now brain damaged. i also have an older sister who is the middle child she had a kid young and is jst being a housewife now till she figures out what she wants to do (i suppose) this leads me to be the youngest of the family first generation going to college..i really don't want to disappoint my parents.

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Melissa Rothstein in Riverside, California

38 months ago

In my opinion if nursing is something you really, truly feel passionate about then I think it is probably a good choice for you.

It is true that there is a nursing shortage in most areas of the country, so there can be job security in knowing you are in high-demand and that there are wide variety of places that nurses can work like hospitals, home care, schools, teaching, ER, Doctor's office, ect.

On the other hand, I would definitely not recommend it if you are just going into nursing because of the money. If you do it for the wrong reasons you probably won't be very successful. Nursing can be a very stressful environment to work in and it is not unusual for nurses to burn out.

A good place for you to start would be to go online and find out what nursing school programs are available in your area. Be sure to check out the admission criteria, length of program, cost of tuition. There are some programs or scholarships that I have seen where a student's tuition will be paid for if the student agrees to work a designated length of time in an certain area or hospital.

You also need to figure out what type of school and classes are best for you, whether you take an online school, night classes, community college, or university. Figure out your options and what's best for you and if you are really passionate about it, go for it! If you give it your all you should succeed! Best of luck!

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H.S student in Caledonia, Michigan

38 months ago

I am a male and I'm thinking about going into the nursing feild. I want to end up being a CRNA. I am about to finish high school and I need to know if I should go to a community college or a university right off the bat. I know some have pre required classes to take but do all? Can I work as an RN while still going to school? I have around a 2.8-3.0 GPA in high school am I smart enough to pass nursing school ?

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buckeyes suck in Cary, North Carolina

37 months ago

A2girl in Ann Arbor, Michigan said: I'm thinking about going to nursing school, however, I'm not sure if it would be right for me. My background is in Business Banking and I lost my job almost 4 years ago due our bank headquaters relocating elsewhere. I've been trying to find a banking job ever since and during that time I've noticed that the nursing field is in very high demand in my area. I've looked into schools like Ross Tech but there class schedules just aren't right for me right now (8:30am to 3:30 pm or 4:30pm to 10:30pm at what point do I spend time with my 2 kids on either schedule). So there's the problem. If I can't deal with the class schedule will I really be able to handle a nurses schedule. I hear they work really weird long hours. I am a newly divorced mother of two(my youngest is mentally disabled)and I really feel drawn toward this line of work, because there are so many jobs open in my area. Even working part-time in a small doctors office would require me to have some knowledge of medical terminalogy. I feel this is what I need to be doing but is it right for me.

The hours are dependent on your experience, the type of area you decide to work in (ICU, ED, Peds, etc.), the location you work at (hospital, clinic, etc.) and the region you work in. The earlier on in your career, the longer your hours will be. Many of the places I know of have you work early in your career 3 days of 12 hour shifts per week- so your fears concerning the hours may be justified.

I do know, though, that I had A TON of people who came back to school to complete a BSN after being involved in banking, etc. It's a fantastic profession to go into- you just have to have the right drive and personality for it!

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buckeyes suck in Cary, North Carolina

37 months ago

H.S student in Caledonia, Michigan said: I am a male and I'm thinking about going into the nursing feild. I want to end up being a CRNA. I am about to finish high school and I need to know if I should go to a community college or a university right off the bat. I know some have pre required classes to take but do all? Can I work as an RN while still going to school? I have around a 2.8-3.0 GPA in high school am I smart enough to pass nursing school ?

CRNA takes a lot of drive and ambition, as does nursing school. The nursing degree, you will find, is the hardest program offered at many universities- it is essentially medical school compacted into 2 years after 2 years of general classes. Obviously, med students get more training later on- yet our undergraduate years are tougher.

Your high school GPA will not reflect your college GPA if you learned from what you did wrong in high school. If you are driven, personable, and willing to stay in while your friends go to the party of the year here and there, you CAN DO IT!

There are plenty of students in college who come in with high school GPAs that end up being lower than their college GPAs- if you are passionate about the degree you want, you will find your GPA will be great- IF you put your mind to it!

Therefore- you ARE smart enough for it!

BTW- I am a male as well and already went through it all- it is well worth it!

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daisy in Rockford, Illinois

37 months ago

hey im in the same shoes as you! im 20 years old and music is my love! unfortunately it is not a career that will make you successful in a short time :( I want to be finished at school in 2 years. I also want to be self sufficient before im 25. I want to be able to take care of myself and not have to rely on my parents anymore. If you want to do nursing you have to be really dedicated to it. It is definitely not easy to get into. Im still trying to get into a nursing program. it is very competitive, but if you truly want it, you will find a way! best of luck to you!

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Cindy in Alexandria, Virginia

37 months ago

Hi I have a question about the kind of nurse I can be for working with old people toddles?

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anon in West Chester, Pennsylvania

37 months ago

Just adding to the thread here... SO I graduated with my associate degree in nursing and passed NCLEX in the fall. I am enrolled to start studying for my BSN, and recently landed my first full time nursing job in a LTC facility. My background is insurance and business, so becoming a RN is a career change for me (I've always been interested in the medical field and am kind, caring and compassionate...but the change was really brought on by layoffs at my old co.). After a week on the job I am seriously questioning this decision. I was always an anxious mess through my clinicals but I did well and figured it was just the school jitters, I mean, we were all nervous so it was normal, right? Now since starting the new job I have been having massive anxiety and panic attacks and I'm really wondering if this is for me. I am not bothered by any of the gross stuff, hell I'd be a great CNA cause that stuff doesn't bug me at all. But something about all the added responsibility and the LTC atmosphere has me spooked and I'm seriously considering abandoning this. Does anyone have any advice? I'm trying to stay positive... I know I CAN get the hang of the job and maybe eventually be comfortable with it, but I really don't know if I want to anymore. Any suggestions from anyone? Are there other avenues I can go with the associates in nursing and the RN besides direct patient care (this early on in my career)? A business side to nursing maybe. I don't know what to do.

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Melissa Rothstein in Riverside, California

37 months ago

I see many confused nurses, students, etc. on this thread. This is a common theme with all people looking into nursing. Nursing is a rewarding career with many options. You can do many things in nursing. This website is very helpful when researching schools, programs, certifications, and when needing questions answered. If you are questioning if nursing is right for you, I suggest you check this out www.nursingschools.net/articles/how-to-know-if-nursing-school-is-right-for-you/ .

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cowgirl1 in missouri, Texas

36 months ago

I am very interedsted in becoming a nurse. It's something ive always been interested in. I went to college but my major was undecided at the time, even though I knew in my heart I wanted to be a nurse. I was scared to pursue it because I did'nt think I was smart enough. Well, im 32 now and I want to go back to college to get my nursing degree. I checked transcript and im classified as a sophmore. I had ok grades, they were'nt great. My gpa was'nt that high either. I really want to get my BSN in Nursing, but I dont know how to get into nursing. Well, what I mean is, I dont think they will accept me, because I believe you have to have a 3.0 gpa. I think. Can somebody please respond back & let me know the best route to take or what it is I need to do to pursue my dream. Please, I really would appreciate it.

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Angeltots in Quincy, Massachusetts

36 months ago

anon in West Chester, Pennsylvania said: Just adding to the thread here... SO I graduated with my associate degree in nursing and passed NCLEX in the fall. I am enrolled to start studying for my BSN, and recently landed my first full time nursing job in a LTC facility. My background is insurance and business, so becoming a RN is a career change for me (I've always been interested in the medical field and am kind, caring and compassionate...but the change was really brought on by layoffs at my old co.). After a week on the job I am seriously questioning this decision....

Your post has really been an eye-opener to me. I am like you: kind, compassionate, caring, and not afraid of those icky stuff. What got me into thinking that maybe nursing isn't for me is the way you described the stressful environment. Reading your post is like looking into my own future. Thank you so much for this insight. I feel like I would be a really good nurse, but if it's in an environment that would make me feel extremely nervous and unstable all the time. If I started nursing, it would be a total career change for me too. I graduated with Masters in Music in Vocal Performance last May, and thought of a more stable job. Nursing came to mind because I like helping people. But I don't think I can work well in a stressful environment, plus added responsibility. Can you tell me more about the LTC or the working environment? ..Maybe another option you could do is apply at a private doc's office? How difficult is it really when working? Can you be more specific? I'm afraid to get into it and then scare myself too.

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golfergirl91 in New York

36 months ago

I am 20 and currently in a criminal justice program, which I have decided is not the right choice for me. I was originally thinking of becoming a K9 officer but I could not picture myself actually being a cop.I was thinking it would be better to major in veterinary technology to know more about the animal part of it instead of knowing the criminal justice part. Anyway I am torn between getting a nursing degree(RN) or taking online classes at Penn Foster for an Associates in veterinary technology to one day become an animal control officer. I love animals and would like helping animals but am also very interested in the nursing field. I know its not the same but I enjoy watching trauma life in the ER. I am interested in either working in the ER or the OR. Blood doesn't bother me, but vomit is another thing, but hopefully something I would get used to. I want a career that I love but I also want to make a decent living. Any advice on what I should do would be greatly appreciated.

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anon in West Chester, Pennsylvania

36 months ago

Angeltots in Quincy, Massachusetts said: Your post has really been an eye-opener to me. I am like you: kind, compassionate, caring, and not afraid of those icky stuff. What got me into thinking that maybe nursing isn't for me is the way you described the stressful environment. Reading your post is like looking into my own future...

@angeltots, to me, the working environment in LTC is very stressful. Its a lot different that hospital nursing. We have a ratio of 1 RN:20 patients, which I was shocked to learn is LOW for LTC facilities. In a hospital you would never have a ratio like that. It would be more like 1:6 or less. Since the people live in the LTC facility, they are residents and not patients, so they don't wear any proper identification bracelets (unless the state is coming to audit of course), so until you really get to know all the residents, the fear of making a med error is huge (for me anyway). And with all the dementia and strokes and other illnesses of the aging population, most of them can't ID themselves for you. I also feel like in a hospital you get to see your assessments and your interventions making a difference and the goal is for the patient to get better and go home. In LTC, most are there until the end of their life. Its like all we do is crush up tons of meds, mix them in applesauce or pudding, and feed it to resident after resident. So far none of my preceptors have done a single full head to toe assessment. To me, it is a very stressful and depressing environment and not the kind of nursing I want to do. I hope my post doesn't scare you off from nursing. I still think its a good career choice, and there are sooo many different areas to special

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anon in West Chester, Pennsylvania

36 months ago

(cont) I still think its a good career choice, and there are sooo many different areas to specialize in. If you go for it, pay attention in your clinical rotations and make sure if something isn't for you, you don't go that route. Especially as your first job.

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Angeltots in Quincy, Massachusetts

36 months ago

anon in West Chester, Pennsylvania said: (cont) I still think its a good career choice, and there are sooo many different areas to specialize in. If you go for it, pay attention in your clinical rotations and make sure if something isn't for you, you don't go that route. Especially as your first job.

Ohh.. That doesn't sound so bad for me. I think I'd be more anxious though if everything is very fast-paced and people are not nice. I sound very naive just saying that, but I'm afraid that I really am so.

I did get spooked. I might need to find something else.. ..How much does a fresh graduate make? Is it possible to get $20/hr or that'd be me dreaming?

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anon in West Chester, Pennsylvania

36 months ago

Angeltots in Quincy, Massachusetts said:
I did get spooked. I might need to find something else.. ..How much does a fresh graduate make? Is it possible to get $20/hr or that'd be me dreaming?

No that's not just you dreaming. Starting pay for an RN in LTC is around $25/hr (in PA anyway), and then if you take a later shift you should get shift diff and weekend bonuses on top of that. From what I hear, the pay is better in a hospital setting.

As far as things being fast paced, its definitely fast paced, but everyone keeps assuring me that as you get used to it and get into your own routine, you pick up speed.

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anon in West Chester, Pennsylvania

36 months ago

Angeltots in Quincy, Massachusetts said:
I did get spooked. I might need to find something else.. ..How much does a fresh graduate make? Is it possible to get $20/hr or that'd be me dreaming?

No that's not just you dreaming. Starting pay for an RN in LTC is around $25/hr (in PA anyway), and then if you take a later shift you should get shift diff and weekend bonuses on top of that. From what I hear, the pay is better in a hospital setting.

As far as things being fast paced, its definitely fast paced, but everyone keeps assuring me that as you get used to it and get into your own routine, you pick up speed.

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PJ in Tampa, Florida

36 months ago

Hey everyone. Great posts on here. I am taking my pre-reqs at a Community College for my RN. I already have a BA in an unrelated field and am also EMT/Firefighter certified. I love the medical field and have been waiting 2 years for a fire job. When 500 guys apply for 8 positions it's almost impossible. My question is about the hiring process for an RN? Does it matter where you get your RN certificate from? I hear new RN grads arer waiting 6 months for a job b/c they have no experience. Anybody a graduate RN in the interviewing process??

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wizzywoo in United Kingdom

35 months ago

hi, i am 38 and since i was at school i wanted to be a nurse, through my adult life something has always got in the way of me achieving my dream career, first it was my abusive husband and then i had a child who has severe learning difficulties. during this time i have done a under-graduate and post-graduate degree in science. i'm now ready to try to enter nursing again, but am now worried i'm too old! i have 9 years experience as a health care assitant in teaching hospitals so i know how demanding the job is. i'm interested in the nurse earlier in this threat who said she is a respiratory floor nurse and earning a killer wage. i don't know what a floor nurse is, i'm guessing its different in the USA from the UK, but i'm interested how any nurse gets a high wage! thanks

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brambleton in Arlington, Virginia

35 months ago

wizzywoo in United Kingdom said: hi, i am 38 and since i was at school i wanted to be a nurse, through my adult life something has always got in the way of me achieving my dream career, first it was my abusive husband and then i had a child who has severe learning difficulties. during this time i have done a under-graduate and post-graduate degree in science. i'm now ready to try to enter nursing again, but am now worried i'm too old! i have 9 years experience as a health care assitant in teaching hospitals so i know how demanding the job is. i'm interested in the nurse earlier in this threat who said she is a respiratory floor nurse and earning a killer wage. i don't know what a floor nurse is, i'm guessing its different in the USA from the UK, but i'm interested how any nurse gets a high wage! thanks

I'm in a central float pool and I get $55/hr plus shift differentials as well as overtime when applicable. That's over 100k a year, so I guess that would be considered high wage. I have no benefits with my hospital though.

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wizzywoo in United Kingdom

35 months ago

which hospital? what grade are you? what do you do? so that's 63,000 pounds, are you on call all the time? can you get a mortgage being on an agency without a guaranteed income? questions, questions!

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brambleton in West New York, New Jersey

35 months ago

wizzywoo in United Kingdom said: which hospital? what grade are you? what do you do? so that's 63,000 pounds, are you on call all the time? can you get a mortgage being on an agency without a guaranteed income? questions, questions!

The George Washington University Hospital in Washington DC. The other hospitals in the district are also comparable. I don't have a grade and I work whichever floor they need for me to work, hence 'float pool'. More in a few hours...for a run.

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brambleton in Beltsville, Maryland

35 months ago

wizzywoo in United Kingdom said: which hospital? what grade are you? what do you do? so that's 63,000 pounds, are you on call all the time? can you get a mortgage being on an agency without a guaranteed income? questions, questions!

Continued...
I'm hardly ever on call since there is usually a spot for me somewhere in the hospital. I don't work for an agency, I'm an employee of the hospital-- I just don't belong to any one unit. Mortgage in the DC area on my salary alone is feasible but it would be a condo or townhouse in the suburbs. I also fly for an airline and am married. Together, we are able to afford a nice house 35 miles outside of the District. This area has many dual income professional couples to make ends meet.

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wizzywoo in United Kingdom

35 months ago

ah, i see, so you're the equivalent to a bank nurse here. so what grade nurse are you? how long have you been doing it? do you enjoy it? do you work in all areas/wards? how are you treated by the other staff as you are not a permanant member of a team on a ward, are you given all the rubbish jobs? is your wage before or after tax? i'm guessing a condo is like an apartment or a flat?

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brambleton in Ashburn, Virginia

35 months ago

wizzywoo in United Kingdom said:

Hi Wizzywoo,
I am a relatively new nurse, having graduated in 2008. I have been flying for my airline for 25 years and went back to school after 9/11 due to the aviation industry being in crisis after the event, followed immediately by the fuel crisis. To be a bank or agency nurse, you have to have at a minimum two years of experience. I started as a trauma/critical nurse with intentions of going to post-graduate school in anesthesia. Unfortunately, the economy took a dive and I was unable to go to Georgetown University for 3.5 years without working, which is a requirement. So, as soon as I got my two years in, I transferred to the central float pool where I can go to any unit in the hospital except for the operating room, Labor and delivery or Neonatal intensive care. My starting salary in 2008 was $25/hr (before tax) and more than doubled when I went to the pool. Since I know many people all over the hospital, I don't always get the crap assignment, but in general, you can expect to receive the sickest, most demanding patients who are spread out as far as possible on the unit. You also have to maintain competencies on all units at all times whereas a regular nurse only has their specialty to keep up with. Nurses also don't like the idea of not knowing in advance where they will be working for the day, and also having to be pulled to another unit as the need arises. You have to be flexible enough to work in the psych unit and jump to mother/baby, followed by neuro/ortho/post-surgical or wherever. For me, I like not being a part of a unit because you avoid all the office politics and the strict scheduling requirements. The scheduling for the pool has a requirement of only four shifts in eight weeks, you pick the days, but you can sign up for every single day if you wanted without restriction. There are also bonuses offered such as the recent $200 extra per day since they were extremely short, and...

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Nurse2B in Carlisle, Pennsylvania

35 months ago

brambleton in Ashburn, Virginia said: Hi Wizzywoo,
I am a relatively new nurse, having graduated in 2008. I have been flying for my airline for 25 years and went back to school after 9/11 due to the aviation industry being in crisis after the event, followed immediately by the fuel crisis. ...
I really appreciate your posts and insight! Thanks :)

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brambleton in Ashburn, Virginia

35 months ago

this is offered only to the pool nurses due to the flexibility. Health care in the U.S. is extremely costly for employers as well as employees, so the high hourly pay is probably a wash for the hospital, not costing them anymore on the bottom line. Agency and travel nurses get paid a higher hourly too, less than float, but have the option of getting health insurance. Do I enjoy nursing? The answer would be 'NO'. It's a very demanding job with little support from above or below. My dream job is my flying and nursing is my second, back-up career. I still have hope that I will find my place within nursing and find it more enjoyable and rewarding. I believe that place is in the operating room and I am working towards moving in that direction. Hope my rambling gave you some insight!

Bram

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wizzie in Bognor Regis, United Kingdom

35 months ago

brambleton in Ashburn, Virginia said: this is offered only to the pool nurses due to the flexibility. Health care in the U.S. is extremely costly for employers as well as employees, so the high hourly pay is probably a wash for the hospital, not costing them anymore on the bottom line. Agency and travel nurses get paid a higher hourly too, less than float, but have the option of getting health insurance. Do I enjoy nursing? The answer would be 'NO'. It's a very demanding job with little support from above or below. My dream job is my flying and nursing is my second, back-up career. I still have hope that I will find my place within nursing and find it more enjoyable and rewarding. I believe that place is in the operating room and I am working towards moving in that direction. Hope my rambling gave you some insight!

Bram

yes, that's been great, thanks Bram, hope you find your dream job :))

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Unconvinced in Laurel, Maryland

35 months ago

cmoody in Lawrenceville, Georgia said: I love your advice! It's amazing what the human spirit can overcome once determination kicks in.

What does she consider "killer money?" $30/hr? Or $40/hr after over time?

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deannagray1 in Dallas, Texas

32 months ago

Maritza Garcia in Louisville, Colorado said: hey guys,
im maritza i am a high school senior and have a one and a half old baby boy and i was thinking of becoming a medical assistant BUT the other day that i took my son to the doctor i told a nurse that that i wanted to become a medical assistant and she said that i would be better to just jump into becoming a nurse because medical assistant is just going to waste my time do you guys think its true??? im really confused as to what i want know i dont want to waste my time and money in something that later i will regret.

You would absolutely be wasting your money with medical assisting. It is a crap job. I am an admissions counselor that is charged with pulling students in on a daily basis and that is one of the programs we offer. Believe me, it is not worth it. Go straight into nursing, lean on your family as much as you can because it is a hard career as far as the schooling goes but will be totally worth. That or dental hygiene. The hours are also flexible there and the money is good. It will provide you and your baby lots of opportunities. It is good that you are doing your research. I would suggest getting your prereqs out tf the way because they are primarily the samew for both careers, apply to both programs and see which one you get into.

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Rose in Arlington, Virginia

32 months ago

I am 30 and I have a four months baby. I have graduated in business.I am planning to start nursing program and become a RN. But I am very soft heart person. I am very emotional too. I can't see blood even. Nursing is very prospective field now a days and that is the main reason for me to select RN. I like babies a lot and I enjoy taking care of babies also.And I am thinking to become pediatric nurse. Does anyone advice me should I go for nursing?

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T-1 in Fayetteville, Pennsylvania

32 months ago

I think you should contact your local hospital and see if you can shadow some nurses. During nursing school you will go through clinicals - that is wher eyou will be on different floors, OB, Psych, Med-surge etc. You need to see if you can handle the secretions, speed and stress before starting your schooling. Plus, you will be able to talk to some nurses on how they handle their emotions and perhaps even meet someone who overcame their blood phobia.
Good Luck!

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NurseJackie in Troy, Michigan

32 months ago

brambleton in Ashburn, Virginia said: this is offered only to the pool nurses due to the flexibility. Health care in the U.S. is extremely costly for employers as well as employees, so the high hourly pay is probably a wash for the hospital , not costing them anymore on the bottom line. Agency and travel nurses get paid a higher hourly too, less than float, but have the option of getting health insurance . Do I enjoy nursing? The answer would be 'NO'. It's a very demanding job with little support from above or below. My dream job is my flying and nursing is my second, back-up career. I still have hope that I will find my place within nursing and find it more enjoyable and rewarding. I believe that place is in the operating room and I am working towards moving in that direction. Hope my rambling gave you some insight!

Bram

Hi, Brambleton-

Thank you for your post. You are right: there are options. I transitioned out of the traditional setting (e.g., floor nursing) years ago, working in various areas of employment (e.g., medical aesthetics) to self-employment (e.g., publisher of CEU courses). It was, no doubt, a difficult change, as I was broke, single, and physically ill. The first step in the process was to realize that I needed to stop complaining about my situation and start focusing on the solution. Congratulations! It appears you are already there.

I offer a lot of FREE advice to my nurse colleagues on how to make the transition and explore the possibilities via weekly email tips. Anyone in need of help can find me on LinkedIn as Jackie R.

I wish everyone on this thread much happiness and success.

Jackie

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Fan in Yorktown, Virginia

31 months ago

Hey i know your comment is like 2 yrs old, so im hoping you get this. im 20 and im kind of in the same situation as you were in. i was just wondering how things turned out for you. did you decided to go to scholl and become a nurse. if you read this please respond.

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JB in San Francisco, California

31 months ago

I just graduated from a certified nursing assistant program about 6 months ago and was lucky enough to find work pretty quickly. I am thinking of going to be RN as my next step. I guess I am one of the lucky ones that have a high tolerance for bodily fluids and such. I owe a big thanks to www.cnatrainingdotcom.com for turning me onto the nursing field though.

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sil2012 in Miami, Florida

31 months ago

I got into the accelerated RN program in MDC...Yay!! I am so happy...it will be hard but I am very determined to get to the finish line...Good luck to everyone with their application process!!

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NurseJackie in Detroit, Michigan

31 months ago

Hi, Sil-

I also went through an accelerated nursing program back in 1989/1990. It took us 12 months. Whew! I don't know if i could ever do that again. What do you want to do with your nursing degree when you get out?

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sil2012 in Miami, Florida

31 months ago

Hi NurseJackie,
I know it will be a brutal long year ahead...I am so determined to finish;)...I am not so sure how I would use my degree yet...If I get burnout from nursing I will be pursuing my Masters on Occupational Therapy...what area of nursing did you practiced in?

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NurseJackie in Detroit, Michigan

31 months ago

sil2012 in Miami, Florida said: Hi NurseJackie,
I know it will be a brutal long year ahead...I am so determined to finish;)...I am not so sure how I would use my degree yet...If I get burnout from nursing I will be pursuing my Masters on Occupational Therapy...what area of nursing did you practiced in?

Hi, Si-

See above for an answer to your question. However, I started out on a med-surg floor.

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Darwin Moore in New Britain, New York

26 months ago

Nursing is a great and honest profession, it is good to be a nurse. Becoming a nurse in profession is not only for earning money it is also to help people when they need a person to help them from their heart.I am a owner of a old care home ,you can visit my site..www.ctc9.com

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RAFFMAN in Red Deer, Alberta

26 months ago

Nursing is a very rewarding career. Besides from being a stable job and one of the highest paid job in medical field, you can also work in a different areas of practice. You can become the following:

1. Hospital Staff Nurse in Renal, Cardiology, Pediatrics, Orthopedics, Oncology, Palliative, Critical Care, Rehabilitation, Mental Health, Surgery, Operating Room, Emergency, Burn Unit, Neonatal ICU, Maternity, and Neurology

2. Educator

3. Home Care Nurse

4. Case Coordinator

5. Occupational Health Nurse

6. Military Nurse

7. Correctional Nurse

8. Primary Care Network Nurse

9. Genetic Nurse

10. Research Nurse

and so on ........... and most of all working with healthy and sick people.

I am Physiotherapist and an RN from Canada.

Male Nurse, BSPT, BSN

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