Nutritionist jobs in Mo.

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Alisa in Columbia, Missouri

84 months ago

I am very interested in training to be a Nutritionist. I am curious however, after calling a hospital, several day spas and gyms in my area because they told me that they hire dietitions instead, saying that they must have a bachelor's degree and be certified dietitions. I live in a small town in Mo. and am curious if anyone else has run into this?

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Annynonamous in Troy, Michigan

73 months ago

It's national.

To practice Nutrition you must have a degree, be registered with our national organization plus licensed in your state. The registration and licensure are annual fees. That's the minimum. Then you must complete 75 hrs of education each 5 yrs thereafter.

There are advanced speciality qualifications if you'd like to specialize in a Clinical area once you've managed to get through the first two.

To become registered is usually a 5 yr course. 4 yrs for a BS, 1 yr of internship or in some educational systems you can get all 5 in four years.

State Licensure boards will not allow you to practice Nutrition without the above qualifications.

Every professional health care job is a speciality field with credentials required.

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Carey in Huntington Beach, California

72 months ago

I'm a Certified Holistic Nutritionist and practice in Southern California. I did not go the traditional RD route, because that model never helped me, personally, lose weight or feel better. It was only when I worked with a holistic model that I discovered food sensitivities, lost weight, had more energy and realized that food is only half of the wellness equation.

I created a website for people who are nutrition and wellness coaches or counselors - check out my bio and you can learn about my school. The site is www.coachtoolstogo.com.

Best of luck to you!
Carey Peters

Annynonamous in Troy, Michigan said: It's national.

To practice Nutrition you must have a degree, be registered with our national organization plus licensed in your state. The registration and licensure are annual fees. That's the minimum. Then you must complete 75 hrs of education each 5 yrs thereafter.

There are advanced speciality qualifications if you'd like to specialize in a Clinical area once you've managed to get through the first two.

To become registered is usually a 5 yr course. 4 yrs for a BS, 1 yr of internship or in some educational systems you can get all 5 in four years.

State Licensure boards will not allow you to practice Nutrition without the above qualifications.

Every professional health care job is a speciality field with credentials required.

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Reg Dietitian in Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

62 months ago

The WIC program hires degreed nutritionists who do not have the RD credential. They usually have to have a B.S. in Nutrition from an accredited reputable school. This can be the path of folks who got the degree but don't go on to the dietitian internship

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A. in Fullerton, California

47 months ago

All hospitals, and some places that deal with nutrition prefer those candidates who have the BS degree in nutrition, and Registered Dietitian (RD)qualification because these individuals have a safe and sound,comprehensive science background that will make sure that nobody gets killed by an individual who may have inadequate knowledge or experience with dealing with patients. Like the individual said above, continuing education keeps them up to date. Most people out in the public don't know what a dietitian does in a hospital. It includes evaluating laboratory work from blood samples, knowledge of medications, knowledge of food-drug interactions, chemistry, biology, anatomy, physiology, nutrition science, counseling, psychology, Diet therapy, etc. There has to be some form of uniformity in the field to have the field become credible. Even the language is standardized. That is why they make the process so rigid, and require that all individuals have a degree so they are educated and trained the same way. That way one guy doesn't know more than the other. It requires the 4-year education and the experience, gained through a dietetic internship process, and further, certified through the exam. Hope that helps your understanding

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