What are the best nutritionist qualifications and training to get ahead?

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What is the best training for becoming a nutritionist? What types of ongoing training or certifications are necessary to be an effective nutritionist?

What do non-traditional career paths look like?

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J in San Marcos, Texas

72 months ago

The best way to start is with a bachelor's degree in nutrition from an CADE accredited program in a university. While in school, you should be involved within your community. For example, volunteering for Meals on Wheels, a local food bank, hospitals, and anywhere food and nutrition are involved...even hotel resorts. You should build up as much relevant work experience as you can while enrolled in school. Be prepared for chemistry and biology courses! After graduating and if you decide to seek an RD certification (registered dietitian) you need to enroll in a dietetic internship which last anywhere from 6-12 months without pay. Following the internship you are prepared to take the examination that is required to become a Registered Dietitian by the American Dietetic Association standards. You can also get a license (LD) but that depends what state you live in.

As far as ongoing trainings, you can attend conferences in your state or anywhere in the U.S. I strongly recommend becoming a member of the American Dietetic Association because they update you with lots of important information as well as upcoming events and conferences.

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jenna in San Diego, California

48 months ago

Do you have information about integrative medicine and nutrition? I want to transition from a career in teaching to the medical field in the area of holistic health/nutrition. I am the sole supporter and must have a reliable career to support myself and child in SD. Nursing seems the most reliable however I don't have 4 yrs. to get my RN, nor am I sure I want to go that route. Any advice? I love physiology, health education, diabetes educator..

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A. in Fullerton, California

38 months ago

j in San Diego, California said: Any info. on nutrition counselors w/o a BSN or RD? I am very interested and passionate about health/nutrition. What is a good way to break into this field and be able to make a decent living?

Bad news: being in the field of dietetics does not equate with decent living. they make the least of all medical 4-year degree professions for all the paperwork and pt. assessments that they do. They make about 50% less compared to RN's with bachelors, physical therapists, and speech therapists who have an equivalent years of education. I recommend you assess how much you love the field before you get into it.

Unfortunately, the process of becoming a dietitian is very rigid. I know, because I am a recent graduated who has a bachelors degree from a CADE accredited program, and no dietetic internship-yet. I hope I get into one. I've been scraping by and I am living with my parents because I cannot practice the career I went to school for. However, I've been working in food service for close to minimum wage and a few bucks more for a food service supervisor position :/ Due to the nature of the field which mainly consists of health and medical, there is no shortcut route to being a dietitian. There are other options out there though: A 2 year A.S. program at a local community college that is CADE accredited for a "DTR" credential=Diet technician. They shadow dietitians. Doesn't involve as rigorous science and diet therapy courses, and affordable. they also have more limited responsibilities compared to a dietitian as far as Dietary Medical Recommendations are concerned. They are more important for quality assurance, pt. screening, and educ. They make a lot less than dietitians, however you seem passionate enough, that I would recommend you pursue it. There is also a Dietary Manager certificate if you are interested in dietary management. Most people who graduate in this field work conventional jobs related to institutional food

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Chilli dog in Columbia, Missouri

23 months ago

this doesnt help its suposed to be high lighted

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michael in Atlanta, Georgia

21 months ago

i was thinking about getting my bachelor's in nutrition and then pursuing a masters in public health or physiology? any thoughts? initially, i've factored income into which career i wanted to choose... but in the end I'm feeling like money isn't everything and I believe i could still be somewhat successful as a nutritionist. thoughts and suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

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