OT burnout

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (1 to 50 of 409)
Page:   1  2  3  4  Next »   Last »

Mitzie in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

83 months ago

Steph in Houston, Texas said: Any OT's experiencing burnout? Does anyone know of any job alternatives outside of clinic/hospital settings?

If you want to move to Huntsville AL? We are looking for a occupational Health Specialist for a large manufacturing company. Do you have a LPN or RN certificate? email me if you want details mitzigreenhaw@spherion.com

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Bob in Portland, OR

83 months ago

Check out the forum on indeed.com under "Occupational Therapy Assistant". I think you will find it very interesting. Very lengthy though.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

discouragedOT in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

82 months ago

I am also in the OT assistant forum. I have burnout to the nth degree. I dread going to work.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (25) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Matt in New York, New York

82 months ago

How about home health? The money is great and the schedules are very flexible -- at least here in NYC.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

julogan in ypsilanti, Michigan

82 months ago

You could look into psychosocial applications of OT, such as working in a PSR clubhouse. It would be a real change of pace and I think a cure for your burnout.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

discouraged in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

82 months ago

I googled PSR clubhouse. It seems that it is very limited and the pay scale for the O.T. manager is $20,000 to $29,000 a year. It would be great but just don't know if I could live on that.
Just guess I may have to go back to diapering and toileting old people if I want to make a living.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Ann in Charlottesville, Virginia

80 months ago

discouraged in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania said: I googled PSR clubhouse. It seems that it is very limited and the pay scale for the O.T. manager is $20,000 to $29,000 a year. It would be great but just don't know if I could live on that.
Just guess I may have to go back to diapering and toileting old people if I want to make a living.

This is very interesting to me as this is a field I have been considering going back to school for, but I suppose I fear burn-out as well. It seems that the job can be incredibly rewarding, but can also exhaust you. Any ideas about how to handle that?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

jurden in Cleveland, Ohio

80 months ago

Steph in Houston, Texas said: Any OT's experiencing burnout? Does anyone know of any job alternatives outside of clinic/hospital settings?

just curious. i've just started working and i'm already stressed out. what causes the burnout for you? the ethical dilemmas? treatment planning? please let me know so i would know what to watch out for.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (17) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Emily in Alhambra, California

80 months ago

What about pediatric practice, you may have to take some refresher CE units to find an area that would spark your interest but there are OT positions in schools, in sensory integration focused clinics, in pysical disabilities settings. Or maybe mental health, OTs sometimes work in acute hospital settings as well as in clubhouses and community models. Also, refresh your thinking on what you are doing. Are you up to date on the latest research? Are you being as client and occupation centered as you could be? Are there continuing education units you could take to get you excited about a population or treatment modality again? Are you a member of AOTA and involved in their special interest forums? You can join email lists and bounce ideas off OTs from all over the country. Best of luck. What you do matters, try and reconnect with the power of occupations for yourself and your clients.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (11) Reply - Report abuse

rose in New York, New York

80 months ago

discouraged in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania said: I googled PSR clubhouse. It seems that it is very limited and the pay scale for the O.T. manager is $20,000 to $29,000 a year. It would be great but just don't know if I could live on that.
Just guess I may have to go back to diapering and toileting old people if I want to make a living.

hi, i'm considering going to school for OT (instead of RN) but I was surprised to read your saying you may 'have to go back to diapering and toileting old people'. is that expected of OTs also? Please say no. Do you know if it's easy finding a job (i'm sure not like a nurse) or hard to come by? I'm planning to relocate to florida and i want to make sure i will be able to find a job down there. anything you can share is greatly appreciated! :>

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Heather in Madison, Wisconsin

80 months ago

"hi, i'm considering going to school for OT (instead of RN) but I was surprised to read your saying you may 'have to go back to diapering and toileting old people'. is that expected of OTs also? Please say no. Do you know if it's easy finding a job (i'm sure not like a nurse) or hard to come by? I'm planning to relocate to florida and i want to make sure i will be able to find a job down there. anything you can share is greatly appreciated! :>"

Hello Rose: I have been an OTR for 7 years. I have a specialty certification in pediatrics, however, and am now working at a SNF as a traveler (my travel assignment is with a contract company that also does out-patient therapy and has some school & Birth to Three contracts). I do work on functional transfers with toileting and ADLS; however, not on a daily basis; just to assess the patient and establish plans for the CNAs to follow to maximize patient independence. I love working as an OT and am constantly educating myself and the professionals I work with. I think variety and seeking out new learning opportunities has kept me loving OT. I also like switching between different settings; i.e. when I take my "permanent" job, I plan to work 4 days at my regular job and have one day off to fill in at other settings, volunteer, or do continued ed stuff. As for jobs, I have traveled all over the country and the shortage of OTs is getting more extreme. You will be able to find a job! Especially in Florida. Most important, seek out excellent mentors!!! For your fieldwork experiences and first job. It is better to make less money the first year or two out and work someplace with awesome mentorship. Best wishes and good luck! Heather =)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (37) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

rose in New York, New York

80 months ago

Thanks Heather, you're the best! :>

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

KristyC in Davenport, CT

80 months ago

There will always be more jobs for OTRs then COTAs. There are also more opportunities and room for advancement for OTRs than for COTAs. Looks like the NBCOT and state/federal governments have failed to recognize the need for COTAs in specialty areas. I retired from OT five years ago as a COTA... I don't regret it.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (14) / No Reply - Report abuse

Danielle in Northern Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio

80 months ago

I am proud to say I have worked as an OT for a hospital for 13 years(primarily outpatient, but inpt. and SNF as well). I have always loved my work. However, a year ago I quit my hospital job which had a rigid schedule for family reasons and began working PRN at a SNF. However, now that my family situation has resolved I am shocked to find that even as an experienced Outpatient OT I can't find an outpatient OT job in a hospital anywhere. (I have looked for a year!) Currently, I work at a private PT practice which has very little equipment and I dream of the day when I can work for a well established hospital rehab department with fellow OTs, OT equipment and an established referral base again! AM I going crazy or is the market for experienced Outpatient OTs suddenly flooded? I would love to hear from other OTs. Proud to be and OT in Ohio.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (13) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Brian in Los Angeles

80 months ago

Danielle... what you may be seeing is what has been happening her in California. More and more hospitals are doing away with their inpatient and outpatient programs and sending them to SNF/LTC facilities. It's just more cost effective to place a patient in a nursing home for therapies then the keep them in a hospital. Yes, outpatient clinics are being flooded by OT/COTAs because everyone is burnt out on all the politics of SNFs where productivity rules the kingdom. I am not sure how long you have been out of the mainstream, but many things have changed over the last several years. I lost my job in a hospital here in So. Cal. a year ago because so many hospitals are closing their doors. The SNFs here are horrible, but I have to have a job so I just deal with it. Most OTRs here are starting their own practice or going to the school system where the money is much better.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Heather in Madison, Wisconsin

80 months ago

Brian, I have noticed the same thing with hospitals pushing patients out quickly & sending them to SNFs. I began working as a traveler in 2004 and noticed then the SNFs in AZ were getting younger & more acute folks and more insurance vs. MCA. I then worked overseas for 18 months in pediatrics; when I returned I accepted another travel assignment in Seattle, WA for 4 months (this past summer). I was amazed at the number of patients, whom I considered "traditional acute care/hospital patients", being admitted to the SNF I was was working at. Most of my patients at the SNF were NOT Medicare Part A; many were in their 50's however, I had several in their 30's & 40's and 2 in their 20's (severe MVAs). My patients generally were in car accidents, work accidents (construction workers), amputees, shoulder, knee, & hip fractures, acute TBIs... many times in traction, with halos, IVs, etc. I only had one patient over the 18 months over 90! It was a great experience and I learned a lot this past summer. I think many insurance companies prefer to pay the SNF rates vs the hospitals and they are a big part of why people get D/C'ed from the hospital so quickly.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (16) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Jan in South San Francisco, California

77 months ago

Hi OT's,

Is anyone out there working in as school based OT? I was working in a SNF and transferred to school based a couple of years ago. I am getting burnout working with the a group of unhappy parents who want OT to cure their child. The area where I work has many litigious cases. Does any one else want to share their thoughts, feelings?

I have been thinking of working with TBI patients. There are not too many jobs in the area in this field. Does anyone have experience with this population? If so, did you enjoy it?

Thank you.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

S in Los Angeles, California

77 months ago

Jan,

Sorry to hear the you're feeling so burnt out. I've worked in a county hospital outpatient TBI/SCI clinic in the so cal area and it's great. I started out in the acute section, but requested a transfer. I think that TBI patients in an outpatient setting are both challenging and rewarding. Not to mention, the stress level and workload are much more manageable than what I've heard about school based OTs. From what my friends who work school based say, you gals (and guys) are expected to do way too much.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No Reply - Report abuse

Jan in South San Francisco, California

77 months ago

Dear S,
Thank you for your feedback. The main stress is the many litigious cases. It's good to know that TBI/SCI is rewarding. It seems with TBI patients you can work on many areas, ADLs, BADLs, cognitive skills, etc.

Jan

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Kidspace in San Francisco, California

77 months ago

Hi Jan,

If it's the parents you're burning out on, and not the kids, have you considered the possibility of working as a private practitioner? Please forgive the self-serving plug here, but I am the business manager for Kidspace ( www.KidspaceTherapy.com ), a San Francisco-based pediatric therapy facility. We have a long waiting list of families seeking treatment and we're always eager to talk to experienced therapists who are interested in the flexibility and income potential of private practice. My wife (who is an OT) and I started Kidspace as an alternative to the paperwork/productivity/bureaucracy headaches of hospital or school-based practices. Please feel free to call or e-mail for more info. (See website for contact info.) Thanks and good luck with whatever direction you choose to go in.
-- John

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Sharon Handley in Akron, Ohio

76 months ago

I am working in School based OT. and have been for may years. I am however thinking of doing some PRN private practice OT if poassible ijn part to help me with my income tax, and in part to earn extra money over the summer. Is there a legal requirement(besides qualifications) to taking on private patients, or working as a private practitioner at a Skilled NUrsing Facility? Also, would it be a big stretch to re educate myself for that population? Thanks Sharon on NE OHIO

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jan in South San Francisco, California

76 months ago

Sharon Handley in Akron, Ohio said: I am working in School based OT. and have been for may years. I am however thinking of doing some PRN private practice OT if poassible ijn part to help me with my income tax, and in part to earn extra money over the summer. Is there a legal requirement(besides qualifications) to taking on private patients, or working as a private practitioner at a Skilled NUrsing Facility? Also, would it be a big stretch to re educate myself for that population? Thanks Sharon on NE OHIO

Hi Sharon,
I don't know anything about private practice OT at a SNF, I have always worked for them directly as a per diem therapist. As a private practice therapist you need insurance which is only $100-$200 per year.

Do you have alot of litigious cases doing school based practice? Or is it mostly in California?

Jan

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Sharon Handley in Akron, Ohio

76 months ago

Jan: Thnaks for you rcomments. No, we do not have a lit of litigation in school base paractice, ie none that I am aware of. Sharon

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

OT08 in Orlando, Florida

75 months ago

Hi John and wife at Kidsspace,

I am an OT looking to start private practice in Florida and I need some advice. Would you and your wife be kind enough to answer some questions related?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

OTinNJ in Englewood, New Jersey

73 months ago

Steph in Houston, Texas said: Any OT's experiencing burnout? Does anyone know of any job alternatives outside of clinic/hospital settings?

I am so burned out that I cry every night. I was able to take a break from the OT field but I ran out of savings and now I have to find work.I have been in the field for 23 ears. I hate it I hate it I hate it but I have no motivation to change because going back to school after 40 is not appealing to me. I would rather live in a cave, off the grid with grizzly bears...maybe that's what I'll do. I do have to say, burn out is an insidious creature, it catches you and it just seemed to creep in and rob me of my passion. See ya in a cave.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (32) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

OTGURu in Saint Louis, Missouri

73 months ago

OTinNJ in Englewood, New Jersey said: I am so burned out that I cry every night. I was able to take a break from the OT field but I ran out of savings and now I have to find work.I have been in the field for 23 ears. I hate it I hate it I hate it but I have no motivation to change because going back to school after 40 is not appealing to me. I would rather live in a cave, off the grid with grizzly bears...maybe that's what I'll do. I do have to say, burn out is an insidious creature, it catches you and it just seemed to creep in and rob me of my passion. See ya in a cave.

What caused you burn out? Is the job physically demanding like PT? I am 35 with a masters degree in nutrition planning to go back to school next fall for an MOT. But I am so scared that I will not like that job either after spending $70,000 in student loan and 2 years of school without pay.

Do nursing homes contribute to the burn out or do find burn out even in hospitals and home health? I am just confused and I am wondering if there is one area with less burn rate, pediatrics, hand therapy, school based, agency etc.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

OTinNJ in Englewood, New Jersey

73 months ago

I do not know exactly what caused the burn out that I experience, I only know that so many of us "get it". I have had students who have affiliated with me and they last less than an average of 5 years in the profession. I think it has to do with the what they have termed "compassion fatigue". It comes to a point in many of us in the health care profession where we just can't "muster" up the compassion needed to help our fellow humans. I graduated in 1984 and I have seen the profession change. Most jobs are in nursing homes and pediatric. There is big money to be made in nursing homes. I think that is why OT's do it. It's sad. The patients are sicker and come to OT with tubes coming out of every orifice. I am not being obnoxious here, its just true. I think health insurance changed the profession with all those rules and "CPT" codes and all the crap you have to write these days and how you have to write it in order that the facility gets "paid". Its like anything else corrupted by humans and greed. Personally, I was an idealistic kid from the "70's who wanted "to help people", sometimes we just grow up and become cynics.I feel like crap that I am so cynical. I struggle inside and wonder "where did the idealistic kid go? Where is she? Can I find her again amoung the middle age madness and the disappointments of life. I think that it is really important that if you really want to get a masters in OT, to find some OT's who are still fired up about their jobs. THEY are out there. Then really make the life decision for yourself. Any healthcare job takes it's toll...it's just part of it. It's really, really sad. Good luck to you, I hope you find your way.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (28) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

OTdude in Piscataway, New Jersey

73 months ago

OTinNJ in Englewood, New Jersey said: I do not know exactly what caused the burn out that I experience, I only know that so many of us "get it". I have had students who have affiliated with me and they last less than an average of 5 years in the profession. I think it has to do with the what they have termed "compassion fatigue". It comes to a point in many of us in the health care profession where we just can't "muster" up the compassion needed to help our fellow humans. I graduated in 1984 and I have seen the profession change. Most jobs are in nursing homes and pediatric. There is big money to be made in nursing homes. I think that is why OT's do it. It's sad. The patients are sicker and come to OT with tubes coming out of every orifice. I am not being obnoxious here, its just true. I think health insurance changed the profession with all those rules and "CPT" codes and all the crap you have to write these days and how you have to write it in order that the facility gets "paid". Its like anything else corrupted by humans and greed. Personally, I was an idealistic kid from the "70's who wanted "to help people", sometimes we just grow up and become cynics.I feel like crap that I am so cynical. I struggle inside and wonder "where did the idealistic kid go? Where is she? Can I find her again amoung the middle age madness and the disappointments of life. I think that it is really important that if you really want to get a masters in OT, to find some OT's who are still fired up about their jobs. THEY are out there. Then really make the life decision for yourself. Any healthcare job takes it's toll...it's just part of it. It's really, really sad. Good luck to you, I hope you find your way.

That pretty much sums up life or work in a SNF. It's all about the money....salary and reimbursement. I did get into this field wanting to help people but agree that healthcare has changed and its difficult to adapt.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (18) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

wornoutOT in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

73 months ago

OTinNJ in Englewood, New Jersey said: I am so burned out that I cry every night. I was able to take a break from the OT field but I ran out of savings and now I have to find work.I have been in the field for 23 ears. I hate it I hate it I hate it but I have no motivation to change because going back to school after 40 is not appealing to me. I would rather live in a cave, off the grid with grizzly bears...maybe that's what I'll do. I do have to say, burn out is an insidious creature, it catches you and it just seemed to creep in and rob me of my passion. See ya in a cave.

Oh my. You sound so exactly like me I cannot believe it. I actually do not cry every night anymore because I think I am numb to to situation. I try to think about the money only and not the degradation of the job, but that is more difficult than I imagined it would be. I am also older and have tried other jobs but with an OT degree you are not prepared for any other job except OT. When people ask me what I do, I just say I am in health care because I do not and cannot describe what I do, and nobody believes me when i try. This field is OK for young girls who want to save up some money and then quit when they have babies. They are propably the majority of people in this field from my experience. At the end of the day I am so tired I just eat dinner and go to bed. What a life is that?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (20) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Heather in Manitowoc, Wisconsin

73 months ago

Wow, you both feel this down over your job? I am an OT, and it can be a challenge at times, however, is also very rewarding and fun. I work in a SNF and am learning new things all the time. Yes, there are things I don't like (insurance, billing, RUG levels, internal politics of the facility), however, the patients make it worthwhile, as do my co-workers. My question is to you: have you had a depression screening done? You may be suffering from depression. Hormone level change as we age and some women suffer from major depression episodes. Your writing sounds more than job dissatisfaction. It sounds like someone suffering from depression. Best wishes to you. Be kind to yourself and take care of YOU first. =)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (17) / No (16) Reply - Report abuse

OTGURu in Saint Louis, Missouri

73 months ago

Heather in Manitowoc, Wisconsin said: Wow, you both feel this down over your job? I am an OT, and it can be a challenge at times, however, is also very rewarding and fun. I work in a SNF and am learning new things all the time. Yes, there are things I don't like (insurance, billing, RUG levels, internal politics of the facility), however, the patients make it worthwhile, as do my co-workers. My question is to you: have you had a depression screening done? You may be suffering from depression. Hormone level change as we age and some women suffer from major depression episodes. Your writing sounds more than job dissatisfaction. It sounds like someone suffering from depression. Best wishes to you. Be kind to yourself and take care of YOU first. =)

Thanks for replying and saying something posotive about OT. I am determined to make a career change to OT no matter what. There will always be people dissatisfied withtheir careers. I will work hard when I am young such that by the time I am in my 50s I don't have to work too hard hence avoid the burn out.

How long have you been working in OT?

I am also wondering which is the best area to start out so that you get the best orientation and build skills. I would finally like to go into hand splitting.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Heather in Manitowoc, Wisconsin

73 months ago

Best wishes on becoming an OT! I have been an OT for 8 years. My mom is an OT assistant and has been one for 34 years. You will have several fieldwork experiences in school and will be able to try various treatment settings. There is no one perfect first job. It is whatever you are interested in. The most important thing is for the first year or two make sure you have strong mentorship from 1 or 2 people you respect and trust. Best regards, Heather =)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

anonymous in Huntsville, Alabama

67 months ago

OTinNJ in Englewood, New Jersey said: I am so burned out that I cry every night. I was able to take a break from the OT field but I ran out of savings and now I have to find work.I have been in the field for 23 ears. I hate it I hate it I hate it but I have no motivation to change because going back to school after 40 is not appealing to me. I would rather live in a cave, off the grid with grizzly bears...maybe that's what I'll do. I do have to say, burn out is an insidious creature, it catches you and it just seemed to creep in and rob me of my passion. See ya in a cave.

Yes, I've been thinking the same thing, just praying, Lord, I'll do anything, I'm even jealous of the ladies who work at the mall. Thankfully, my husband supports me, but I'm about to leave the field, I think that I am finished, have to do something that pays less. Don't worry, it's probably not depression, you're just tired of obnoxious smells, physically straining situations, unrealistic expectations for productivity, and being totally wiped out after work every day oh yes, and feeling bad about somebody having paid 120$ an hour for your service (of which you receive less than 1/3). You're OK, I'm OK, it's just that after 23 years, it's about all we have in us. The OT's who are happy now, when they hit 23 years... we'll see what they have to say.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (28) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

moved and am trying a new job in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

66 months ago

anonymous in Huntsville, Alabama said: Yes, I've been thinking the same thing, just praying, Lord, I'll do anything, I'm even jealous of the ladies who work at the mall. Thankfully, my husband supports me, but I'm about to leave the field, I think that I am finished, have to do something that pays less. Don't worry, it's probably not depression, you're just tired of obnoxious smells, physically straining situations, unrealistic expectations for productivity, and being totally wiped out after work every day oh yes, and feeling bad about somebody having paid 120$ an hour for your service (of which you receive less than 1/3). You're OK, I'm OK, it's just that after 23 years, it's about all we have in us. The OT's who are happy now, when they hit 23 years... we'll see what they have to say.

Thank you so very very much for you comment. I used to be "burned out in Englewood,NJ"....however, I moved to PA and I accepted a position working with Autistic children and teens.Now, I would say I am "trying in PA". First I would like to say that you are the most understanding comment I received. Thank you for saying that 23 years is a long time and that we both are OK! I was so insulted when I was told by one comment to get a depression screening. For goodness sake, OFCOURSE I WAS DEPRESSED, I'm a 23 year veteran OT in the field of psychiatry. I also was told to "stop whining". These comments are not at all helpful and very discompassionate. And to those who think I am a whiner or depressed, I am a fighter. I may feel sad about my job, but I hired a recruiter, moved to another state, got a new job in a different area of OT and I am trying.It is not about whining, it is called "compassion burnout" and if you google "compassion fatigue" or "compassion burnout" you will find that it is real and it is depressing. So, to you, anonymous in Huntsville, Alabama, I wish the best, and bless you for your compassion.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (19) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

OTdude in Piscataway, New Jersey

66 months ago

Don't worry, that depression screening comment was probably from a new grad.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (21) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

otstinks in Richmond, Virginia

66 months ago

Heather in Manitowoc, Wisconsin said: To "Moved On": Best wishes for your new job and great job taking care of yourself.

I did not suggest a depression screening to be insulting. I know what depression feels like and have dealt with situational depression and depression secondary to deeper biological reasons; my job sometimes triggers my depression, however, typically, the root cause is greater than my work environment (usually a bunch of factors coming together in the "perfect storm"). You said: "For goodness sake, OF COURSE I WAS DEPRESSED, I'm a 23 year veteran OT in the field of psychiatry." As you know from work, not everyone who is depressed is aware of it; including those of us who work in the field of psychiatry. A depression screening is a good step and a valid suggestion; it is also a good first step in figuring out if depression is situational or biological. I wrote my original suggestion with the sincerest of intentions... I did not intend to be insulting or patronizing. I am glad you were aware of your depression and found a way to remove yourself from the situation. Best regards with your new life journey.

Well at least you did comment on your remard, thanks. I do not think you realize how many people you insult though when you make comments like that. We are not stupid enough to know what is involved in depression. We are in this forum to vent on how depressing this job makes us. And of course we are depressed because the job is depressing. Any normal person would be. The worst thing anyone can say is "take a pill" to someone when they express how they feel about a terrible job rather than keeping feelings to themselves and pretending everything is wonderful. We would not be depressed if we had a great job. I know because I have had good jobs that were not OT, and even working psych OT was not as depressing as SNF OT. So pills and psychologist do not work in this situation. Thanks for caring except you are wrong.

f

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

Heather in Manitowoc, Wisconsin

66 months ago

You have a right to your opinion and I respect that. Obviously you need to figure out your own path. For someone else depression may have been an issue and should be a consideration.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Dolphie57 in Phoenix, Arizona

66 months ago

Heather: I appreciate your comments and suggestions, thank you! I struggle with burnout working at a SNF and can relate with people/comments here, I do not have depression. However, in my 25+ year career as a OTA, I have seen co-workers struggle at work and appear "burned out", and then enjoy work once getting treated for depression. Anyway, even though I struggle with burnout and not depression, I can understand your viewpoint and thank you for adding it to the conversation.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

MaggieinNC in charlotte, North Carolina

66 months ago

I'm a burned out SLP who after 14 years would LOVE to get out of this field and do something, anything else. I found this OT thread and so many comments are exactly how I feel.
SLP is my second career, first I was a copy editor, and actually that looks better right now. I got into this field to help people to communicate not, swallowing, but that is all there is to it in healthcare. The public schools are hell, won't even consider that. Health care has changed so much since 1995; it is too depressing. I give 110% to my patients and am SICK of being browbeaten for "productivity", as none of the other things you do with patient care count. AT times, I feel like I'm working on an assembly line at a factory.

Unfortunately, my husband has been unemployed since May and I have to pay the bills and my student loan, so right now I don't have any choice. If I had a crystal ball and could have seen the future, I would not have picked this career. Thanks for listening.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (22) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Ruby in Lindsay, California

66 months ago

Maggie: Can you explain in further detail why public schools are hell? I am interested in working in schools.

Also, with hindsight, what career would you pick now?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

L in Fayetteville, North Carolina

66 months ago

I absolutely love working in the public schools! If you are tired of being browbeaten for productivity, then the schools are for you! I'm a PT in the schools.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

MaggieinNC in charlotte, North Carolina

66 months ago

Ruby in Lindsay, California said: Maggie: Can you explain in further detail why public schools are hell? I am interested in working in schools.

Also, with hindsight, what career would you pick now?

In the public schools, your caseload can exceed 70 kids. Expect mountains of paperwork that you will probably take home, (each child will have a 15+ page official therapy plan). You must attend individualized education plan meetings with often angry parents who want more therapy for their children. They can and will sue and take the school district to court. More children with severe disabilites are mainstreamed and you must see them. Because of the high number of kids on caseload you must group them together thus you feel like you don't make a real difference. You cannot exercise professional judgment about whom to see and whom not to see because everyone qualifies for services.

That's my 2 cents; I'm sure you can find people who love to work in this setting, which is great and it is sorely needed. But it's not for me. I would suggest that you shadow a few SLPs who have worked in this environment for several years (not new graduates) and get a clear picture of what it is really like, before you invest time and money. There is a reason that there's a severe shortage of SLP's in the schools (and SNF's too.)

In hindsight, I would have gone to veterinary school, since I love animals and you can see the results of your intervention. Good luck to you.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (16) / No Reply - Report abuse

Struggling in Carlisle, Pennsylvania

66 months ago

MaggieinNC in charlotte, North Carolina said: I'm a burned out SLP who after 14 years would LOVE to get out of this field and do something, anything else. I found this OT thread and so many comments are exactly how I feel.
SLP is my second career, first I was a copy editor, and actually that looks better right now. I got into this field to help people to communicate not, swallowing, but that is all there is to it in healthcare. The public schools are hell, won't even consider that. Health care has changed so much since 1995; it is too depressing. I give 110% to my patients and am SICK of being browbeaten for "productivity", as none of the other things you do with patient care count. AT times, I feel like I'm working on an assembly line at a factory.

Unfortunately, my husband has been unemployed since May and I have to pay the bills and my student loan, so right now I don't have any choice. If I had a crystal ball and could have seen the future, I would not have picked this career. Thanks for listening.


I am totally relating to you, you are not alone. I do not know what to do either. I just am so frustrated. You are so right about how health care as well as working in schools has become like an assembly line. The work load is unreal. Creativity is not valued as much as charts and graphs and "productivity", I feel sometimes like I am in an alternate universe! In my "universe" I come to work to help people, in this universe charts and graphs are more important,,,it weird and insane...to quote from the x-files.."you are not alone" I am sorry you are so frustrated...but you are "not alone"...take care.....

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

MaggieinNC in charlotte, North Carolina

66 months ago

L in Fayetteville, North Carolina said: I absolutely love working in the public schools! If you are tired of being browbeaten for productivity, then the schools are for you! I'm a PT in the schools.

The difference is that PT's are treated with respect in the schools, as healthcare professionals whose professional judgement is not questioned. SLP's are usually paid on teacher's scale, are given little respect, and are often called "speech teachers."

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

OTorSLP in London, United Kingdom

66 months ago

I have been following this forum for a while now. I always thought I would get into OT but over the past year and after a few positive job shadows I have focused my interest on SLP. I have never heard any negative comments from SLPs until now (but have heard many from OT's). It's really good to hear the other side. I am just trying to get an overall feel for the two fields. I have shadowed and volunteered in both fields and I have always had a great experience... just thinking about when and if the bubble will burst...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Heather in Manitowoc, Wisconsin

66 months ago

Dear "OTorSLP in London",

Please don't let the comments on this forum dissuade you from either OT or ST. They are both wonderful professions; that have challenges like every other profession. It is about the best match for you. People have stated they use this forum to vent, and to relate with each other; which is good and needed. And their viewpoint is an important consideration when considering the fields. I am glad you have had great experiences in OT/ST job shadows. The people you meet volunteering and job shadowing are the best to talk to. They know the reality of the professions in your area and the pros and cons. The USA health system and education system has many flaws, and many things it does well too. My friends in the UK tell me the working environment is not as productivity related in the UK as it is the USA. I personally think the rehab bubble with not burst for a long time; I think we will have job security for some time to come, on either side of the ocean. Best wishes!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Marie in Denver, Colorado

66 months ago

Does anyone have any inside info or opinions about the OT profession in the future? I am hearing that Medicare will be bankrupt by the year 2019. I work for a major for profit corporation in SNF's. My job is OK; we are overstaffed and I am searching for increased hours in "sister" facilities to maintain over or at 30 hours per week. OT is a great field; however I think its important to not let the workplace get to you. SNF's are wrought with problems and we are trained to be goal setters and idealists to help patients achieve a better life; it really is taking the high road to do this kind of job. I don't know how long I can continue in this field; but these days I guess we need to be thankful we have a job at all.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (13) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

burned out in Clayton, North Carolina

64 months ago

I am in the "beginning" of my career. I'm just finding that I dread going to my job a lot. I've tried different settings, but I just feel like I don't like the field anymore. I was just wondering if anybody knew of different areas of OT or something outside of OT be related that might be a better fit. Any suggesstions are welcome.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (12) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

lady N in Brooklyn, New York

64 months ago

"burned out", if you dont mind, how old are you and is this your first career? I am just asking because I am trying to change careers from fashion design to OT and I will start my undergrad course work in the summer. What is it that you dread about your job. I know I dreaded going to work in fashion many times, I even lost patches of hair from stressing about it. I loved what I did but I hated the politics and the fact that my employers actually wanted me to lie about profits and act fake!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

power for a purpose in Franklin, Tennessee

64 months ago

burned out in Clayton, North Carolina said: I am in the "beginning" of my career. I'm just finding that I dread going to my job a lot. I've tried different settings, but I just feel like I don't like the field anymore. I was just wondering if anybody knew of different areas of OT or something outside of OT be related that might be a better fit. Any suggesstions are welcome.

I love what I am doing and if you are looking for a change I have a great position for you. I have partnered with the same doctors that created Proactiv, the #1 acne regimen and we are looking for people that would like to spread the word about a new business opportunity and product line. This is in the direct selling arena and it is about to explode! If you want more information, please feel free to contact me. Hope I can help.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (30) Reply - Report abuse

Page:   1  2  3  4  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.