The Best and Worst thing about Being an OT

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notmonday

86 months ago

As an OT I can say that there is nothing good about this job. It is a dreadful way to make a living and makes absolutely no sense at all. All day I am thinking what is this all about. I come home so beat both physically and emotionally that I feel as though I am spending the day in prison and am just released to go to bed and come back and repeat the same nonsense the next day, and over and over again. It is totally disgusting and nonsensical. I don't tell anyone what I do all day because no one would believe me.
Why oh why would anyone willingly commit themselves to such a silly job is beyond imagination, but then again I foolishly went into it, so I understand. I just never imagined the degradation that it would entail. If you don't know specifically what I am describing read the earlier posts on this forum... so many. Like 1. No intellect involved just physical work. 2. Being bossed around all day and treated so poorly and working in a fish tank atmosphere(everything you say and do is on display) 3. no down time 4. smells and dirty diseased atmosphere. 4. Lifting lifting and lifting resulting in extreme soreness. 5. writing the silly documentation and repeating it over and over and over with no originality just learning to use the correct words they want. 6. most all jobs in nursing homes working with the lowest level of patients, and working with them over and over and over as long as they still have some money coming to suck out of them.
Have I said enough? Please don't bother writing to tell me to get out of this field. Beleive me I have tried very hand and am resigned now just to do this because I cannot do anything else. OT is not a transferable field to other professions unfortunately.

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Tim Dueck in Owensboro, Kentucky

86 months ago

Hi I am a COTA/L I do much the same work as an OT with some differences. I don't do evaluations, and usually an OT signs off on the assessments I do and discharges. And I usually consult with an OT about splints or protocols relevent to the client. But one comment I did want to make is that yes there are times that an OT may clean diapers. Especially in a skilled nursing home or hopital type setting. Yes that is the nurses job but there are times when you are working with a patient and accidents happen. And you would not be much of a therapist if you make them wait for nurse to clean them up especially when they are busy and may not be able to get to them right away. I love my job but it is not always pleasant. Our profession is important and does make a difference in many peoples lifes, it could mean the difference in someone being independent or having to depend on others or be stuck in a nursing home.

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kcfutureot in Kansas City, Kansas

86 months ago

ok who cares how people spell. geez people on here can be real critical and its ridiculous. Let people say what they want without criticizing them. It just makes you look like an unhappy person

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kcfutureot in Kansas City, Kansas

86 months ago

cool go on with your bad self then! Ha! I guess I didn't realize that we are in a extremely professional setting and had to worry about people laughing behind our backs, real world and all. Lighten up, this is just an OT forum.

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kcfutureot in Kansas City, Kansas

86 months ago

Ha ha this is funny. You have no idea who you are talking to. I work in a very professional University Hospital setting alongside Psychiatrists, Psychologists, OTs, BSNs and hospital administrators ect and I am educated with my bachelors degree (in the real world by the way)so please save your time. So I know plenty about how to speak in complete sentences and spelling skills and work in a team of professional people. So I guess I will say it again. Save your time a quite criticizing people. People are on here for advice and support so get off your high horse

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kcfutureot in Kansas City, Kansas

86 months ago

Are you serious! Get a life. I can't believe you are serious! Im sorry you are such an unhappy person. Good luck to you and your future English proofreading skills. You must have OCD! Its not by osmosis...give me a break! Don't bother writing back because this is just making me laugh!! Peace out you unhappy person!

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BigRoy in Los Angeles, California

86 months ago

kcfutureot in Kansas City, Kansas said: cool go on with your bad self then! Ha! I guess I didn't realize that we are in a extremely professional setting and had to worry about people laughing behind our backs, real world and all. Lighten up, this is just an OT forum.

but DUDE... UR AN OT?!?! i gots QUESTIONS for you... SO basically Im about to start OT school in like a month and Im wondering about graduation. I wanted to know if theres any room in my newfound passion to research anything that will benefit amputees. I think I heard of an OT doing so SOMEWHERE but im not sure if this was just a independent kinda thing or if opportunities for research are widespread.

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PrOuD To Be An OT! in Las Vegas, Nevada

85 months ago

Charlie Smythe in Dallas, Texas said: Don't project your own feelings on me --- just because I'm not an OT fan nor a fan of ignorance should mean that I'm (and it's not Im) unhappy - was just unhappy having to associate with OT and OTs alike. Yes, I'm serious -- anyone reasonable person in the real world would not tolerate such ignorance coming from a perceived "professional" - the real world has much higher expectations - unlike OT world. So, for the reason you're comfortable in OT world -- you don't have to rise to any standards since their are very few if any. If you can sign your name and bill with a license, you're in!!

With all due respect, Mr. Smythe, I'm not an expert grammarian nor a former Spelling Bee champ like yourself, but in reading your somewhat ardent criticism of "OT and OT's alike", I couldn't help but notice that you used "anyone" instead of "any" ("...reasonable person in the real world...) and "their" instead of "there" ("...are very few if any."). Compared to you, I'm just an "ignorant" OTR with limited "standards" so please do not take this as an insult. In behalf of my "professional" colleagues, I will strive to be the very best OTR that I can be for my clients and, hopefully, meet your "much higher expectations" someday. In the meantime, please work on your social skills, or better yet, attend one of my group sessions this week. For you, I would do it pro bono!

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OTstudent in Mesquite, Texas

85 months ago

Has anyone else noticed? The title of this forum indicates,"the best and the worst". Equal representation is certainly present. Nothing is perfect, no one is perfect. Life is what you make of it and how exciting to be in a profession where you aren't locked into one specific arena! The options are endless for those who choose to pursue them. Fortunately, when the angry and disenfranchised post, as they have been in the recent past, they successfully negate any points they may have presented as legitimate with their highly critical manner. The same tactics are used in all walks of life but one common thread runs through them all. If one feels the need to incessantly point out all of the flaws of another, their need to present themselves as superior to others shines a light right on the very insecurities they are trying to mask. When I first found this forum it was another tool used in making my career path choice. For that I am very thankful. I'm not going into OT thinking that it is the only profession on the face of the earth that has surpassed room for improvement. I am not going into the profession with the mentality of "what is in it for me". I am excited to go into a profession where I can make a decent wage and help individuals find their way back to an operative way of life, in as much as it is possible for them. In my humble opinion, that is the "best"! It may not always be an easy road for client or practitioner, but working towards making things better for the client as well as the profession is far more productive than criticizing others. I've been thinking about sharing it for a while. I'm not claiming I am right, just claiming it's my position.

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PrOuD To Be An OT! in Las Vegas, Nevada

85 months ago

sparky in Spartanburg, South Carolina said: Even though I am not the person you were writing to I will answer.

Uh... how many people have you cured in your "group sessions". Oh puleez... Group sessions are just a way to bunch lots of people so you can justify the high amounts of billing. Don't talk down to people so much. You high and mighty OT can attend my group session also. Maybe with enough time I can cure you pro bono but it would have to take lots and lots of work, and I may have to isolate you from your peers to re-condition you. It may be too late though.....

Really I would think there are better ways to make a living in Las Vegas. I would respect you a lot more if you did the prostitution bit. At least you would be giving a needed service and not billing the taxpayers for it.

Are you hiring or looking for a date? I guess prostitution is now a "needed" service (for some people) but like the ad says: "What happens in Vegas..", well you should know the rest since you're the one who has to pay for it. Although if that's an area that you feel you need help with, I'm sure I can bill that under self-care or ther-ex (I'll let u decide on that one). Just don't expect me to "cure" your problem because that's not what I do. I can only help you learn how to "cope" with your own issues (or inadequacies) and implement adaptive strategies so you wouldn't have to pay in order to get laid. "High & mighty", you say? Hardly! You would laugh if I told u what I do on a daily basis, but every time I patient comes over to me and says, "thank you, you've really helped me today", it makes me that much more immune to imbeciles like you. You may find this hard to believe but there are therapists out there who actually value what they do and got into this profession believing that they can make a difference in someone else's life. Yes, there are those who abuse the system but give credit to those who, as impossible as it may seem to you, choose to abide by it

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alissaMSOT1 in Plainview, New York

85 months ago

I LOVE OT!!!!

I'm in an accelerated 5-year BS/MS OT program, and in one week I'll be starting the Masters portion of it. I couldn't be more excited to enter this absolutely amazing field! I agree that it is indeed broad beyond belief, and I want to congratulate anyone who is thinking of switching over. Great choice =)

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xbritt02x in Batavia, Ohio

84 months ago

does anyone know how long it takes to finish the program to work in a school based position?

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ashley28 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

80 months ago

Despite all of the bickering, pros, and cons of being an OT, I am still interested in the program. I am in my first year at UWM. I had confusion on what path I wanted to take for college. At a point, I was interested in being a COTA at a tech. school and then transferring over to a university, but soon found out that there was only one school on the state that would transfer my credits (because I wanted to continue on to be an OT). I know you need an associates degree to be a COTA, but what about when I get my bachelors at UWM? I know I've read you need a 2 year degree, but can you be a COTA with a bachelors degree without an associates degree? It probably sounds like a stupid question, but I just want a better idea of my future. Ideally, I would like to at least try to find a COTA job in case I am not accepted into the masters program for OT. I would hate to back track, but if I had to, I guess I would..it just doesn't seem to make sense that you could be a COTA with an assoiates degree and not with a bachelors...but I am probably missing something. Anyways,I figured I would ask here and hear from real therapists. I have job shadowed OTs and am excited and confident this is what I want to do....it's just the education process seems to be extrememly confusing at times! Does anyone have any suggestions or answers to these questions? THANK YOU! :]

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Glenn in Bonney Lake, Washington

80 months ago

Associates Degrees : 2 year degrees offered at a Technical, Vocational or Community college with the intent to either transfer to a university, or prepare you for a skilled trade.

This is the best explanation I could find....

"I believe the associate degree is an appropriate level for OTAs. It is accessible to many well-qualified students through the community college delivery format. As well, ACOTE ensures rigor in the curriculum through standards that balance well with OT entry-level practice.

There are many OTAs who already have a bachelor's or master's degree, but purposefully choose the role of the OTA. For example, I have been a COTA for over 17 years, with a master's degree in special education. I completed this degree after becoming a COTA, with a previous BS in printing management. I am now the program director for the OTA program I graduated from many years ago. In our current first-year class of 30, we have two students with master's degrees, and 12 with bachelor's. Yesterday I was contacted by a prospective student with a PhD and MFT who clearly articulated that she understood she was educationally over-prepared, but was very clear she did not want the case management responsibilities of the OT. She is moving towards the end of her career and wants to simplify her daily contacts with clients through the role of the OTA.

The 2006 AOTA Workforce and Compensation Survey indicates that the median age of today's OTA is 45 years old. These are not practitioners who want lengthy degree programs in order to bring their valuable life experience and passion to practice. The associate degree level facilitates their entry into the profession. I am a firm believer that the associate degree is the just-right fit for the OTA and their role within the profession.

Respectfully,

Ada Boone Hoerl, MA, COTA/C"

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Glenn in Bonney Lake, Washington

80 months ago

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C.J. in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

80 months ago

Can anyone describe the general coursework for a Master's level OT program? (aside from the required fieldwork...)

And thank you to everyone writing in to this forum, it's always helpful to read personal accounts of what it's like in the OT field.

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Tori in Davison, Michigan

80 months ago

I am a senior in high school and i will be going to college this fall to do my studies in Occupational Therapy. Does any one have any advice that they can give me? Im kind of nervous but excited. I love working with people and stuff like that, but advice would really help! So, please help me..
Thank you!

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Glenn in Bonney Lake, Washington

80 months ago

maltilda in Arizona said: OK here is one way to look at the situation. What could possibly be the worst, the very worst job to have to do on a daily basis. I would say wiping the assses. Yes that is horrible. And guess what. That is what an OT does. OTs do a lot of other things that are equally as bad, but to take in the whiff of this is enough to sicken a person and make their day oh so unpleasant.

Why would anyone decide to do this career? Because like me and lots of others just downright sheer stupidity. I had no idea about this as there were no internet forums before I went to school, just the sugar coated stuff from AOTA. Of course the self care was not mentioned. (Not even in school, as they were to busy teaching theory nonsense).

For your own good just know that it sure isn't whatever the brochures tell you it is. Anyone that goes into this career is just stupid now that they know what it involves.

You wipe that ass!

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byc in Richmond Hill, Ontario

80 months ago

common people.. it was YOUR decision for choosing this career, nobody mislead you, nobody lied to you so stop crying and complaining for helping people live life.

i bet your not wiping @ss 8 hours straight in a workday, but its one of those dirty parts of the job. everyones job out there has some dirty aspects to the job..

be proud of your profession, do it with some heart peeps. you are contributing to the greater good of mankind.

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thinking about it OT or PT in Skokie, Illinois

80 months ago

FGT in Simpsonville, South Carolina said: BYC,
You obviously are not in the field of OT and did not go through OT school. Maltilda is right, they do not give you the full scope of what OT really is. If they did, no one would go into the field.

Plus the field will soon be going away. Thank goodness - at least Medicare will not be wasting money on this ridiculous field.

FGT, is the field really going away? How did you know? I didn't see it on the news or anything. Any suggestions on a field in healthcare that I should get into? It'll be a second career for me.

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ANIMALLOVER in Glendale, California

80 months ago

Wow, everyone. I would like to say after reading this, I see how people become OT's and feel disillusioned. But I have one thing to say for certain: If you don't wanna ever go back for more education after OT school, OT is not for you.

Generally, going to OT school will require you to specialize as soon as you get out. For instance, if you want to be a PEDS OT, you may want to get your certificate in dysphagia (if you want to work in a hospital and outpatient) or Sensory Integration and assistive technology (if you want to work in school based).

If you are sort of the type who became an OT and regrets it because you envy the PT job, you may want to check out CHT (Hand therapy) and do more the physical disabilities aspect.

There are other specialties: Low- vision (for peds or Gero), driving rehab, rehab engineering, and sports medicine (may fall under hand therapy for the most part).

Also, if you work in adult physical disabilities, you will STILL need to have more continuing education in order to get your physical agent modalities certificates or joint mobilization continuing education.

I didn't even mention about getting more CE (continuing education) units for something like home adaptation, which may help for home health practitioners.

ALL IN ALL, the beauty of OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY is that you can decide and choose where you wanna go. Occupational therapy is so holistic, that you have KNOW who you are and you can add or switch to any specialty as you change throughout the years. Maybe you decide that you want something predictable: Try SNF. If you enjoy unpredictability such as myself : School based OT.

One thing is for sure: if you're the type to love exploring who you are and what you can do to help others, OT may be for you. If not, I suggest you choose a career that requires more Continuing education units.

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ashley28 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

80 months ago

I feel horrible reading that people dislike there job and that some discourage it to everyone interested. I am not an OT, but I plan on being one in many years to come, but I wouldn't say that in being an OT you have to wipe butt, because it depends on the environment you work in. What about OT's that work in schools? I know the majority of OT jobs are in a hospital setting, but I believe OT's have plenty of options. Also, I would think you would have known ahead of time you would have to wipe butt at times...and honestly wiping butt doesn't sound like the funnest thing of course, but at least you should feel satisfaction in helping someone. Idk, that's my opinion, but OT is helping people with daily living things, so of course you would have to wipe butt...Anyways, anyone who has positive feedback about the OT field I would like to know. This forum is the best and worst things, and all I've found is the worst things. Does anyone have rewarding stories? Thanks :]

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ANIMALLOVER in Glendale, California

80 months ago

I'm a new graduate in Occupational Therapy, and things didn't really "click" until I did my intership/fieldwork. Like I've said, ashley28, the beauty of OT is that it is holistic. It's not true that Physical therapy can do a better job than us when it comes to Upper Extremity treatment... because we are trained the basics of Upper Extremity treatment; it's just up to you if you want to take more continuing education courses to focus on it.(please read on top of different specialties)

thing is, not everyone will specialize in physical disabilites. some might want to specialize in home health, or pediatrics. even within pediatrics; there's hospital based, outpatient, and school based. and there are plenty of jobs as a school based OT.

Here's a bit of an insight on how a true Occupational Therapist will assess someone who "needs buttwiping". Ready?

Let's say you enter a room and the patient has weakness in her arms/hands/upper body. she can't manage to toilet herself or even wipe herself in bed. you ask yourself: why? why can't she not wipe herself even as she lay down?

Different answers to assess the situation: Cognition- is she aware? Range of Motion - is she contracted.. therefore does she need stretching or splinting? hand/ arm Strength/grip- is she strong enough? if not, are there any exercises you can give her in the meantime to make her strong enough to pull herself up.. or wipe her but while lying down. What Adaptive equipment can you give her so she can do it herself in the mean time while she's learning to do it on her own? How can she position herself so she can wipe herself?

Of course, while doing all this, she's not going to do it right the first time, so most OT's have to help. I'm sorry you hear a lot of trash about OT, but it's a great profession and one of the greatest secrets.

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Jason in Roslyn, New York

80 months ago

If there are any OTs looking for work in NY State please email me. Jniad@execu-search.com

My company has positions available in all healthcare settings throughout NY.

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futureOT in Wilmington, Delaware

79 months ago

so I really read every bodys post! Im 19 years old and thinking about becoming a OT in the future & I was wondering after I graduate .... will I be financially stable with this job ? Will I have enough money to pay the bills and still enjoy myself ?

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BigRoy in Los Angeles, California

79 months ago

futureOT in Wilmington, Delaware said: so I really read every bodys post! Im 19 years old and thinking about becoming a OT in the future & I was wondering after I graduate .... will I be financially stable with this job ? Will I have enough money to pay the bills and still enjoy myself ?

I like your enthusiasm but don't you think it would be better to get that info from a simple google search? I mean anything you get here is just an opinion... I mean this is a forum so you shouldn't take anything as absolute... Just go to www.bls.gov or salary.com bro...

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Russ Delaney in Marietta, Ohio

79 months ago

xbritt02x in Batavia, Ohio said: does anyone know how long it takes to finish the program to work in a school based position?

It takes the same amount of education to work in a school as it does any other setting. You need a Master Degree in OT. Unless, you want to be an Occupational Therapy Assistant. That requires an Associates Degree.

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andrea in Portland, Oregon

79 months ago

Ran in Chicago, Illinois said: Is there a lot of lifting in general in OT? I am thinking about switching careers from Law to OT but have a bad back.

Depends on what particular area of OT you would like to enter into. OT is a very diverse field from pediatrics to mental health to physical disabilities. I pediatrics school OT very little if any lifting. Hospital/SNF you will be lifting. Mental health very little lifting.

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prospectivestudent in Dublin, Ireland

79 months ago

First of all I would just like to address the issue of the apparent 'simplicity' of an OT program. In Ireland entry is extremely competitive. I have a friend who got the top results in her entire year at secondary school(aka highschool) and is now doing an OT program. She has more school hours than all of her friends (especially when self directed learning is included) and is says the course is very hard work. In Ireland - it ain't easy!

Now... the heart of the matter. For all you bitter OT's out there, I can see a pattern in your threads. Phrases like 'you'll never get rich on that salary' or 'it isn't as respected as...'.If money and respect are what motivate you then why don't you give organised crime a go. Was facilitating growth or living ever an attractive prospect to you?

Nomorepoopjob I find some of your posts simply deplorable. For example, declaring OT only suits feminine men. That is not only discriminatory but fundamentally ignorant on your part. Caregiving may be historically a 'female' activity but please try and locate the nearest exit to your cave! Welcome to the 21st century :D

I know I'm not even a student OT and therefore will my opinion will be ruthlessly belittled. However I THINK some of you guys have chosen the wrong profession, try something which simultaneously satisfies your greed and insecurity.

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futureOT in East Meadow, New York

79 months ago

if you plan on becoming a ota first... how much schooling after that would it take to become a OTR?

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Happy COTA in Evans, Georgia

79 months ago

OT is great. Money can be made by both the COTA and OTR. Job satisfaction is wonderful. If you're not intent on improving someone's life and making a significant difference, by all means look elsewhere for your chosen "occupation". Kudos to the folks in the field. Thanks for your hard work.

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Cackalacka in Chevy Chase, Maryland

78 months ago

I think some of the greatest vitriol leveled at OT here, is actually coming from a handful of people and in particular one person with multiple screen names. If these people really think they have it bad, they ought to imagine a career, where co-workers are so prestige driven they ask about GPA and pedigree; working at least 70 hours a week, pushing paper, kissing the asses of SEVERAL neurotic bosses breathing down their necks, crazy cut throat co-workers, constant pressure to bill services, and a workplace environment dominated by a baseline level of depression, fear, jealousy, and resentment. On a good day they might be lucky to not get yelled at and belittled by a higher up. And that is if they are "fortunate enough" to find a job in that field. Compare this to the very worst OTR job out there and the OTR job market. Case closed. Be thankful. Be very thankful OTRs.

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justme in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

78 months ago

Cackalacka in Chevy Chase, Maryland said: "pushing paper, kissing the asses of SEVERAL neurotic bosses breathing down their necks, crazy cut throat co-workers, constant pressure to bill services, and a workplace environment dominated by a baseline level of depression, fear, jealousy, and resentment. On a good day they might be lucky to not get yelled at and belittled by a higher up. And that is if they are "fortunate enough" to find a job in that field. "

Funny and interesting that you say this. Because it does sound like OT to me.

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toddlpn in Marietta, Georgia

78 months ago

carrie prejean in Joshua Tree, California said: Actually, you would write,..."There is no better feeling 'than'..." - not "then."

Wisdom would tell anyone considering this "profession" to do their homework extensively - ask those in other rehab professions (PT and SLP for instance) - visit/shadow - it's foolish to just jump in head first and invest years of time of money to be sadly disappointed. For many, too many, the downside doesn't make up for any upside to the "profession."

Did you jump in head first? Are you admitting to being "foolish"? Just curious...we all have some kind of regret/s in our past.

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ashleigh in Enterprise, Alabama

78 months ago

Happy COTA in Evans, Georgia said: OT is great. Money can be made by both the COTA and OTR. Job satisfaction is wonderful. If you're not intent on improving someone's life and making a significant difference, by all means look elsewhere for your chosen "occupation". Kudos to the folks in the field. Thanks for your hard work.

do u know of any openings for cota's in georgia? thanks!

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LL in Augusta, Georgia

78 months ago

ashleigh in Enterprise, Alabama said: do u know of any openings for cota's in georgia? thanks!

Try the below link. The company is UHS-Pruitt. Great organization. Several opportunities in Georgia.

Good luck.

www.uhs-pruitt.com/Content-3Col.aspx?id=191

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ashleigh in Enterprise, Alabama

78 months ago

thanks sooooo much!!! do u happen to work for them?

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LL in Augusta, Georgia

78 months ago

I do. Two years in a SNF. 130 beds w/a 30 bed rehab unit.

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ashleigh in Enterprise, Alabama

78 months ago

wow u answered that quick! there is a facility in augusta, ga looking for a cota. do u happen to know anything about this facility? how many patients do u c a day, what are your minutes like? how productive do u have to be a day? thanks. if u want to u can email me at ashleighmccullough@hotmail.com thanks again!!!

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Daisysnf in Auburn, Michigan

78 months ago

maltilda in Arizona said: OK here is one way to look at the situation. What could possibly be the worst, the very worst job to have to do on a daily basis. I would say wiping the assses. Yes that is horrible. And guess what. That is what an OT does. OTs do a lot of other things that are equally as bad, but to take in the whiff of this is enough to sicken a person and make their day oh so unpleasant.

Why would anyone decide to do this career? Because like me and lots of others just downright sheer stupidity. I had no idea about this as there were no internet forums before I went to school, just the sugar coated stuff from AOTA. Of course the self care was not mentioned. (Not even in school, as they were to busy teaching theory nonsense).

For your own good just know that it sure isn't whatever the brochures tell you it is. Anyone that goes into this career is just stupid now that they know what it involves.

You obviously went to a horrible school for OT. I had a job waiting for me when I graduated with my masters. Ps. I have never wiped an ass before :) You should probably get a job that fits you.

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Daisysnf in Auburn, Michigan

78 months ago

FGT in Simpsonville, South Carolina said: Tori,
Stay away from the OT field. You will get sick of it after about 6 months and realize how much of a joke the field is. Try PT, NSG or Speech Therapy. They're much more respectable professions.

I love OT. Its only a joke because you chose a profession that doesn't fit your mind set. :)

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Daisysnf in Auburn, Michigan

78 months ago

maltilda in Arizona said: I don't know if the field is going away or not. Hopefully it will be because it really serves no purpose. I know it has made a lot of people rich but I feel they do not deserve it. (No the OTs do not become rich of course, but the corporate managers that milk insurance money from OT slave labor.) OT is such a sad job to do. It just is. Why would a young person go into this is beyond my imagination. Do they not know what they are getting into? Please do not believe it if you are told it is a growing field and it is a pleasant field. It is very difficult presently to find work in this field unless you want to be a glorified toilet and dressing person in a smelly nursing home. Believe me I wouldn't lie to you about this.

I had a job waiting for me when I graduated. I have never dealt with any "smelly nursing homes." Good luck finding a job that fits your idea of a job that is capable of your imagination :)

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roaming in Colorado Springs, Colorado

78 months ago

If you are unsure if OT has the full scope of what you want to do, but would like to working in the healthcare industry and spend lots of time with your patients consider being a PT. Everything that is within the OT scope of practice is in the PT scope of practice as well, plus a whole lot more and not limited to the upper extremity! It's easier to change it up going from inpatient acute, inpatient rehab, outpatient, consulting, home health, orthopedics, neurology, equipment specializations.....etc.

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ToddLPN in Atlanta, Georgia

78 months ago

Daisysnf in Auburn, Michigan said: I had a job waiting for me when I graduated. I have never dealt with any "smelly nursing homes." Good luck finding a job that fits your idea of a job that is capable of your imagination :)

Matildawhoever in whereeversville is a flat out idiot.

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curiouspotential in Englishtown, New Jersey

70 months ago

Daisysnf in Auburn, Michigan said: You obviously went to a horrible school for OT. I had a job waiting for me when I graduated with my masters. Ps. I have never wiped an ass before :) You should probably get a job that fits you.

What graduate school did you attend?

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Sarah in Perth, Australia

68 months ago

Wow, this is certainly and interesting and informative thread. I have just finished a Bachelors' degree in Biomedical Science, but am considering the commencement of a Masters' in OT. Why? I don't want a lab job. I enjoy interacting with people, feel compassion towards those who are suffering and I want a fufilling job where you can make a difference. There is just one thing that worries me; do I have what it takes to be a good OT? To be honest, I don't consider myself a particularly apt problem solver. I mean, given time I can think up reasonable solutions to problems, but I'd consider myself better at learning a certain way of doing something and sticking with it. Also, I am a naturally messy person and have not always been the most efficient organiser. Are both these qualities absolutely necessary for an OT to have, can they be learnt over time, and if you thing not... any ideas about a job that could suit me better? Thanks in advance, helpful advice is what I really need at the moment.

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jj in Knoxville, Tennessee

68 months ago

if you have a pulse and genuinely try to help the people you work with, you can do it

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trylife in Oroville, Washington

68 months ago

Cat in Albuquerque, New Mexico said: I am currently living in New Mexico and I am a freshmen at UNM. I want to become a Pediatric OT but I also want to move to Southern Oregon. Do you have any recommendations for good OT schools up there??

I went to school in SO. ORE for my pre-reqs and transferred to University of Puget Sound in Washington....great OT school....i was well prepared for my reg exams and passed the first time while many folks were re-taking the exam to get a passing score.

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Sarah in Perth, Australia

68 months ago

jj in Knoxville, Tennessee said: if you have a pulse and genuinely try to help the people you work with, you can do it

Haha, I think I can at least achieve that :)

As for 'there's more to it', who's post seems to have been deleted, I can see you're feeling very negative towards OT, but that's ok 'cos even though I do know people who seem to love their profession as an OT, I need to get both sides of the argument. There's a couple of points I'll bring up; patience. You make a good point; I THINK I'm reasonably patient, but am hoping to get some work experience or a job in an area that would really test that. You say there's 'more to it' than helping people, and for you the negatives outweigh the benefits. What job then would you consider for someone like me?

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Wendy in Mesquite, Texas

68 months ago

Sarah in Perth, Australia said: Wow, this is certainly and interesting and informative thread. I have just finished a Bachelors' degree in Biomedical Science, but am considering the commencement of a Masters' in OT. Why? I don't want a lab job. I enjoy interacting with people, feel compassion towards those who are suffering and I want a fufilling job where you can make a difference. There is just one thing that worries me; do I have what it takes to be a good OT? To be honest, I don't consider myself a particularly apt problem solver. I mean, given time I can think up reasonable solutions to problems, but I'd consider myself better at learning a certain way of doing something and sticking with it. Also, I am a naturally messy person and have not always been the most efficient organiser. Are both these qualities absolutely necessary for an OT to have, can they be learnt over time, and if you thing not... any ideas about a job that could suit me better? Thanks in advance, helpful advice is what I really need at the moment.

Sarah, I'd consider any job in the medical field a job that requires problem solving skills. Part of my application process for the master's program required observation hours. I would suggest observation hours of any field prior to making a commitment to a program. Reading & researching is good, but the lived experience is better! Perhaps observation hours would provide you with the perspective that you need to make your decision.
Good luck!
Wendy

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