Paralegal Interview

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Dalene in Charlotte, North Carolina

77 months ago

In January, I began taking paralegal courses at a local college. For my Intro to Paralegal Studies class, I am required to interview a practicing paralegal (the interview consists of about 20 questions). Is there anyone out there willing to be interviewed? If so, please let me know. Thanks.

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dh in Northern CA, California

77 months ago

Dalene in Charlotte, North Carolina said: In January, I began taking paralegal courses at a local college. For my Intro to Paralegal Studies class, I am required to interview a practicing paralegal (the interview consists of about 20 questions). Is there anyone out there willing to be interviewed? If so, please let me know. Thanks.

Yeah... me,too. I'd love to answer some questions.

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Dalene in Charlotte, North Carolina

77 months ago

Thanks for the suggestion, but I am supposed to do the interview via telephone with only one person. I am a stranger, so I guess it's asking a bit much, but if anyone is willing to talk to me, please send me an e-mail at dalenecm@lycos.com

It's due April 12th.

Thanks!

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dh in Northern CA, California

76 months ago

Dalene in Charlotte, North Carolina said: Thanks for the suggestion... It's due April 12th.

Thanks!

I'll send you an email later. I would, however, strongly recommend AGAINST this line of work. I'm a former legal secretary w/my paralegal cert from UCLA. I never worked as a paralegal because when I graduated, they were starting at a little less then the cust. svc/collection job I already had, then I took a word processing position in a law firm that gave me a $4/hour raise, and from there I transitioned into secretarial work, which I thoroughly hated, and there's not much difference between a paralgl & legal sec.

If you get the chance to interview a lot of paralegals who've been in the field a while, I'd be willing to bet my life that they would strongly urge you to consider another line of work. I am almost 43. I left the legal field at 39 to go back to school to finish my degree so that I could change careers. I graduated in Dec w/Economics degree. I have worked part time the last 3 years; so I've depleted my entire life savings not to mention accrued hefty school loand debt. A bad thing at my age, but I was desperate so therefore willing to give up everything to get out of law.

On top of that is the economy. when I made my decision to return to school, it wasn't this bad. Had I been able to see into the future and saw this coming, I still would've made the decision to get out. I'm networking, going to meetings and doing all the things I should be doing but can't even get an interview. I have no regrets that I left law.

You can't get promoted - it's dead end. The local paralegal school here charges $25k for their program, and on Craislist I saw a paralegal job that wanted 1-2 years' exp paying $10/hr. This is California. And law firms are hostile environments with terrible morale. If you've ever seen the Tudors, working for attys is like serving Henry Viii, but your atty can't order your beheading if you make him mad.

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D in Charlotte, North Carolina

76 months ago

Thanks for the advice. Actually, my questions can be answered via this forum or e-mail, so any help in this regard is appreciated. After reading some of the posts(which is helpful), I think that I decided that I didn't want to pursue being a paralegal. I think that I would enjoy some aspects, but that overall, it's just not worth it. Thanks to everyone!
Here are the questions I had:
1. Why/how did you become a paralegal?
2. How long have you been working as a paralegal?
3. What is the area of law you work in?
4. If you could work in another specialty besides the one you’re in, what would it be?
5. What do you most enjoy about being a paralegal?
6. What is most challenging about paralegal work?
7. Do you still find your job challenging in general or does it feel more like routine?
8. What skills would you say are most important to being a paralegal?
9. What is a typical day like?
10. What kind of experience do you think is most useful for people who are starting a paralegal career?
11. Do you think that working as a paralegal is stressful?
12. What type educational background did you have before entering the paralegal field?
13. What type of work experience did you have before entering the paralegal field?
14. Are you happy being a paralegal or would you choose something else if you had to do it all over again?
15. What advice would you give someone who wants to become a paralegal?
16. What are some of the greatest challenges in dealing with attorneys?
17. In your experience, have the attorneys generally treated you well?
18. Do you spend a lot of time working together with the attorney or do you mainly work independently?
19. Do you think that the average pay for paralegals is generally good considering the duties of the position?
20. Do you think that it is worth it getting a certificate in paralegal studies or would it be more useful to just get experience?

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D in Charlotte, North Carolina

76 months ago

Yes, please! I guess at some of the answers, but I would appreciate it if you could answer. Thanks!

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D in Charlotte, North Carolina

76 months ago

D in Charlotte, North Carolina said: Yes, please! I guess at some of the answers, but I would appreciate it if you could answer. Thanks!

Oops...I meant "I CAN guess at some of the answers."

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D in Charlotte, North Carolina

76 months ago

Thanks so much for your input - you are awesome! I can't tell you how much I appreciate that you took the time to answer. Thanks again.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

D in Charlotte, North Carolina said: Thanks for the advice. Actually, my questions can be answered via this forum or e-mail, so any help in this regard is appreciated...

I emailed responses to you but meant to also post them online. So here they are: I hope people will think twice before entering this field.

My opinion is that paralegal is a terrible career choice. I am sorry in advance for having nothing nice to say about this line of work. I don't want to burst your bubble, but I do wish I had this info so many years ago when I, too, made the decision to go to paralegal school. I've made a lot of mistakes in life as we all do, but chosing to work for attys has by far been my biggest mistake, one that has taken the greatest toll on me both financially and emotionally.

1. Why/how did you become a paralegal?

I was passionate about law. Growing up I was "addicted" to true crime books. They always say to do what you love. Paralegal schools sell you on the idea that it's good pay, and I believed it. I got my paralegal certificate from UCLA, then got an AA in Criminal Justice from Los Angeles Community College, then transferred to UC Irvine as a Criminology major. By the time I got to UCI, I had been working in firms for 2 years and grew to hate it. I realized my mistake and dropped out of UCI after the first quarter. I transferred in with a 3.83 GPA. I maintained that GPA with 15-unit class load and working 32 hours a week.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

2. How long have you been working as a paralegal?

I never worked as a paralegal. They were starting at $12/hour at the time I graduated (this was Los Angeles), and I was already making $14/hr in another field. I soon got a word processor job in a firm starting at $18. I eventually transitioned into secretarial work, which I hated, because of the attorney interaction. Word processors just sit at a computer wearing a headset, listening to tapes all day, transcribing whatever letter or report the attorney dictated onto the tape. I liked that because you never had to deal with the atty, only the secretaries, and they were usually nice despite the hostile environment.

3. What is the area of law you work in?

I started out in civil litigation (mostly medical malpractice). My last firm was a real estate transaction firm. The attys represented the buyer or seller of large pieces of land or commercial buildings. They negotiated. There was no court stuff involved.

4. If you could work in another specialty besides the one you’re in, what would it be?

I never did work in criminal law. My plan was to transition into that area while at UCI, but very soon my focus changed to just get out of law altogether.

5. What do you most enjoy about being a paralegal?

As I said before, I was a legal secretary, and I hated every minute of it with every ounce of my being.

6. What is most challenging about paralegal work?

Dealing with attys. An overwhelming majority of them are spiteful, mean, nasty, vindictive. They are very unhappy people. They, too, are under a lot of pressure either from senior partners to bill an impossible amount of hours or from clients who want everything done now now now. They grow to hate their jobs - I've had them tell me that - and their anger and unhappiness manifests itself in how they treat staff. Law is a very hostile environment. The severe morale problem is industry wide.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

7. Do you still find your job challenging in general or does it feel more like routine?

Attys are very unpredictable. You try to be strategic and try to avoid getting yelled at or humiliated but it's impossible to predict what mood he or she will be in on any particular day. Dealing with the attys is the challenging part, the job itself is the routine part.

8. What skills would you say are most important to being a paralegal?

Be able to multitask in a big way. If you can't walk and chew gum at the same time, this really is NOT for you. Also, be willing to be a doormat. If you are outspoken and are the type of person who will stand up for herself and then find that you have to bite your tongue in order to avoid being fired, your resentment and hatred will grow inside to a point that you won't know how much longer you can stand it. If you are an ambitious, career minded goal oriented person, this job is not for you. If you value professionalism, honesty, and integrity, you will be severely disappointed.

9. What is a typical day like?

IF your attorney is in trial and therefore will spend very little time at the office or not even come in at all, then you might have a good day. Other attys who know your atty is out will try to put their work on you because they know that they've already overloaded their own secretary or paralegal with work. On a typical day, you will feel overwhelmed with the workload and wonder how you will keep up. A great majority of paralegals are expected to work overtime. With some attys, it's impossible to keep up with the workload if you don't. Another major cause of overtime is attorney lack of time management. They don't respect the time of staff beneath them. It is VERY common for an atty to drop a large project on your desk late in the afternoon and tell you that it needs to be done "before you go." They DO NOT care whether you have a family at home.

Also, on a typical day, during the entire period you spen

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

Also, on a typical day, during the entire period you spend in the office, your heart is beating at a constant elevated level, and you will feel the adrenalin in you continuously as you work thru the day. You are a constantly on edge and sometimes just plain nervous. It's embarrassing when you are trying to keep your cool, and as your attorney stands over you at your desk, he can see your hands shaking as you handle the paperwork. And sometimes you get so flustered that you have to stop and take a deep breath because you forgot for a moment how to do simple task.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

10. What kind of experience do you think is most useful for people who are starting a paralegal career?

I honestly don't think there is anything useful that would help you in this field. Maybe a back-up plan??

11. Do you think that working as a paralegal is stressful?

It is extremely stressful. I've had 2 former coworkers go out on stress leave, one of them returned to work, the other went out on permanent disability.

12. What type educational background did you have before entering the paralegal field?

AA in Criminal Justice and a full time Criminology student. I also had my court reporter's license in WA state.

13. What type of work experience did you have before entering the paralegal field?

I worked in retail management, was an underwriter for an insurance company, and did customer service and collections (not in that order). I was also in the military. If I could go back and do it over. I would have stayed in insurance. That is one of the few industries where you can start at the bottom and work your way up to a pretty well-paid position, even if you don't have a degree. I made a mistake by leaving that field. I was 19 when I started.

14. Are you happy being a paralegal or would you choose something else if you had to do it all over again?

See above. I really loved that job but had a sense of adventure so I took a big paycut by going into the military. There was a time when I was passionate about learning about criminal law and working in that field. Now I want NOTHING TO DO WITH IT.

15. What advice would you give someone who wants to become a paralegal?

DON'T DO IT!!

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

16. What are some of the greatest challenges in dealing with attorneys?

Their holier than thou attitudes. They have a false sense of entitlement. They blame their staff for their mistakes. There are a lot of deadlines in civil litigation. Attys are notorious for waiting til the last minute, despite your reminding him repeatedly. You continuously remind him for 2 reasons: 1) you are hoping to get off work on time, and the later he gives you what you need to get started, the later you will finish; 2) if the document doesn't make it to the courthouse before they close, he will blame you for it.

17. In your experience, have the attorneys generally treated you well?

At the small real estate transaction firm at which I worked, most of the attys there were pretty nice. By far the worst of the worst are the civil litigators in law firms, and this is where, until the economy crapped out, the largest demand is.

18. Do you spend a lot of time working together with the attorney or do you mainly work independently?

It depends on the size of the firm, the type of law, and whether the atty as a secretary in addition to a paralegal. You have a lot of projects on which you work independently, but your atty's office is usually stationed right outside your cubicle, and he's always calling out to you to bring him this, bring me that; so you don't feel like you're very independent.

I had a female atty ask me to go get her a glass of water. I thought that was inappropriate and complained about it to the administrator, and I was reprimanded for complaining.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

19. Do you think that the average pay for paralegals is generally good considering the duties of the position?

NO, my God, NO. This is a dead-end job. There is no room for advancement, no opportunity for growth. You can't get promoted anywhere. You will spend the rest of your work life at the bottom of the totem pole if you chose to make a career out of this. It's bitchwork. You are a puppet on strings. You will never get any management or leadership experience because those positions don't exist in law firms. Large corporations have, for example, a marketing dept, accounting dept, operations dept, transportation dept (if manufacturing firm), customer service, etc. These types of companies have room for growth; therefore, you can be promoted if you work hard. Legal secretary and paralegal professions require all of the same hard work and dedication required to get recognized for promotion in a corporation; yet, unlike a corporate job, there is no long-run payoff because as a paralegal or legal sec, you don't have a ladder of success to climb.

There are the attys and then the staff consist of paralegals and legal secs, file clerks, and a receptionist. File clerks are usually part time college kids who most likely getting a degree unrelated to law. There is the administrator who manages - hires and fires and does employee reviews - for all of the nonattorney staff. The administrators are almost always hired from the outside, never promoted from the inside. Most staff don't have degrees - that's why they are just staff. Administrators usually have at least a bachelors and some office mgmt experience that doesn't necessarily have to be in law to get hired by a firm.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

20. Do you think that it is worth it getting a certificate in paralegal studies or would it be more useful to just get experience?

Many states require the paralegal certificate; otherwise, it's illegal for the firm to charge the client for your billable hours. However, you can't get anywhere without experience. In the states the require the cert, I think both are equally important. If the state doesn't require it, then I would think that experience is more important.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

It would be a mistake for you to think I am an isolated case and that most paralegals and legal secretaries like their jobs. They don't. Attorneys were difficult at every firm at which I worked, and an overwhelming majority of my coworkers would chose an entirely different line of if given a chance to start over. During my last two years in the industry, I started asking trusted coworkers in confidence questions: How did you get into this? Why do you stay (because I knew they were really unhappy). What would you do if you could start over?

There reasons for staying pretty much fell into one of the following 3 categories: They felt they were too old to make a change; they were afraid to do something different; they're going to get out when ____. Those who fell into the last category were procrasinators or maybe they, too, were afraid and didn't want to admit it. They supposedly had plans to get out but never followed thru. Once close coworker, for example, got her real estate license when RE was hot but never did anything with it. I had another former coworker her planned to leave the field once she got her boyfriend to marry her, but he wasn't aware of her plan.

Attys who treat their staff well, and secretaries and paralegals who are happy with their jobs, are the exception and not the rule.

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D in Charlotte, North Carolina

76 months ago

Thanks for the warnings. I liked the idea of being a paralegal, but I agree with you that happy paralegals seem to be the exception rather than the rule. From what I could gather, it seems like you are required to have high skills, but the pay, respect, and opportunities aren't there. I do have a 4 year degree, so I am lucky in the respect that I have the option of doing something different, so back to the drawing board for me.

Good luck to you in your job search - I hope you find something soon!

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

D in Charlotte, North Carolina said: Thanks for the warnings. I liked the idea of being a paralegal, but I agree with you that happy paralegals seem to be the exception rather than the rule. From what I could gather, it seems like you are required to have high skills, but the pay, respect, and opportunities aren't there. I do have a 4 year degree, so I am lucky in the respect that I have the option of doing something different, so back to the drawing board for me.

Good luck to you in your job search - I hope you find something soon!

One more thing, Dalene, is that the legal depts of corporations are probably not bad but extremely difficult to get into. I work p/t in a corp now and have been there nearly 3 years while I finished my degree as a full time student. The attys represent the corporation itself. They don't have clients and therefore are not pressured to bill for hours. They have salaries that are very high.

They had an opening for a full timer right after I started, and this was about a year before the fall of the economy; yet we had SO MANY applicants - I think they had over 120. I believe this is because there were so many legal secs and paralegals who were desperate to get out of the law firm environment and into corporate.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

To give you an idea how burnt out I am on law, a young woman in our department was fired early this week. Now they have an opening for a position that I have been helping out with for 3 years. I am searching for a job, focusing on the fed govt and am finding out - when I follow up on my applications - that I am being squeezed out by veterans who have service connected disabilities and therefore are allotted 10 preference points. I get 5 preference points. They rate your apps between 70 and 100. All of my ratings have been between 93 and 101 (including my 5 points); yet I have been under the cutoff, even at 101 because someone with a service connected disability scores something like a 98 then gets 10 points.

My money is running out. I need to get creative. Not only am I applying for jobs in rural cities in North Dakota (advice from a fed HR person in another state was to apply in small areas), but I am working with a recruiter with the Army because now the Army is now allowing vets to return to the military at age 42+ - as long as we can finish a total of 20 years by age 62, including the time we've already served.

I hated the military. I was in the Air Force, and THEY chose your job for you. I am willing to re-enlist if I get chose my own career path. AND they pay off a huge chunk of school loan debt.

My point is that I am willing to do just about anything and relocate anywhere to find full time work, but I won't consider a legal job right here in my hometown.

Sorry for the diatribe.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Great responses, dh! Truer words were never spoken are an understatement. I incorporate your responses within my responses by reference.

Thank you, DLP. I thought I considered emailing this survey to another former coworker - a paralegal for 15 years. I think the more people we get with responses like these, the more likely that those considering the profession will reconsider and think of something else.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

76 months ago

To give you an idea how burnt out I am on law, a young woman in our department was fired early this week ---

Why did she get fired? What was the reasoning?

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: To give you an idea how burnt out I am on law, a young woman in our department was fired early this week ---

Why did she get fired? What was the reasoning?

She was young, almost 26, and was nice, took direction well, and caught on to the job quickly. She was also at least 10 minutes late almost every day, often called in sick on Mondays, would leave for a Dr. appt. and come back 3 hours later. The straw that broke the camel's back? She called in sick the day after Easter. Last Mon morning, she called in at 8:50 to say she would be late (her hours were 8:30 to 5:30) because she overslept. Tuesday she called in saying that she might come in later but that "my boyfriend was sick last night." Then she called back later and said she wasn't coming in at all.

She came in Wed morning, and she was told right away that they were letting her go. I was told afterward that once she had come in late then sent out an email asking to go home early to help decorate for her mom's 5th bday. She was a really nice girl with the lowest self-esteem of any young woman I'd ever met. She had been with her boyfriend for 8 years, and supporting him all that time. He's 28, and she told me he has never supported himself since leaving home. He has not had a job the entire nearly 2 years she worked there with us.

Her salary was $38k/year. Not bad for a somewhat entry level job, especially considering the benefits this co has AND it's here in town and not down in the metro area. Even in a good economy, it would take an act of God for her to get a comparable job.

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D in Charlotte, North Carolina

76 months ago

Well, I hope things work out for you and you find something soon. Sorry to hear that things aren't going well, but hopefully things will start turning around. The general consensus is that being a paralegal is a bad job, so I'm glad that I haven't gone through too much time or money pursuing certification. I really had no idea that the competition was fierce for paralegal jobs, but I guess that's true in just about everything these days, unfortunately.

Thanks again to all for answering my questions.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: By no means would I defend lawyers and law firms in any way for their treatment of staff. However, in fairness, the gal was almost begging to be fired with an attendance record like hers. Her work was counting on her. It doesn't matter how bright or capable one may be and it doesn't matter if we're discussing law firms, accounting firms or WalMart - one still has to be dependable, punctual and show up for work.

She'll realize later she blew it. $38K isn't chicken feed for any legal job in nearly any locale these days - especially considering firms have advertised insulting $10/hour pay for five-year paralegals.

Hi DLP - I absolutely agree with you. That $38k was an outstanding salary for her age and this economy. And as much as we all liked her, she brought it on herself. Maybe that's why they put up with it for so long. The office mgr commented to me that they did allow it to go on for too long. As she walked away from my desk, she said, "I am so exhausted," meaning that she didn't like firing this girl. These people where I work are the nicest, caring people. I am so burnt out on law though. I pray for this girl that got fired. If she wants to stay in law, what are the chances she finds an environment as nice, even in a good economy? fat chance.

I am so blessed to have this job because they know i'm looking and allow me to take time off for an occasional job fair or networking event. Potential employers can call my current supervisor, and she has already written me a letter of recommendation.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: And your employer is a legal department or other outfit in which lawyers work??

Some rules have exceptions; in your case, dh, a rare one. Still, I support your plan to escape law. Also proves the bad judgment and immaturity of that young secretary in blowing a nice situation for which some dispirited legal pros would kill.

Yes, DLP. I work part time in the legal dept. Shocker, huh? I almost have to pinch myself, and I am thankful to God every day. I am an assistant to one person, and I back up the secretaries and paralegals when they need it. Now with this girl fired, I'll have more responsibilities. The extra hours = extra money, and that will be nice. The hiring process is a long one - they do a very thorough background check; so my extra hours could possibly go into the summer. With the economy, I'm wondering if they will hire a replacement if we can absorb the work with my extra hours.

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former legal secretary in California

76 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: For your sake I hope they will. Take it from me, you do not want to fall into the ten hour-plus a day abyss. At least you'd be paid for it; I wasn't.

HI DLP - I am paid by the hour. They wouldn't have me work overtime unless there was a severely urgent deadline. I have never been asked to work late, not once, and I've seen a few of the salaried girls get off late 20 minutes or so on a very rare occasion.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

76 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: And your employer is a legal department or other outfit in which lawyers work??

Some rules have exceptions; in your case, dh, a rare one. Still, I support your plan to escape law. Also proves the bad judgment and immaturity of that young secretary in blowing a nice situation for which some dispirited legal pros would kill.

I bet that girl is kicking herself in the butt now, thinking, what did I do. She was probably relying on her youth and looks to carry her through. She might get another job quick. I've seen MANY attorneys hire a "paralegal" simply because of her looks and youth. - Only to have a bunch of attorneys laughing at him later.

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fedgov in Alexandria, Virginia

74 months ago

Become a career paralegal for the Federal Government. The attorneys are generally very nice and pleasant to work with. I've never had any problems. Once you're in on a career track, it's hard to get fired and you'll receive entitlement pay increases every year. If you get overtime, you'll be making more than most of the junior attorneys in the office. If you're ambitious, you can apply to advance and become a paralegal supervisor. If not, just sit back and coast... Granted, it may be hard to find such a position. DOJ quit hiring career paralegals in Antitrust and other divisions because of problems with performance and inflated salaries.

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dh in California

74 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Yeah, right. Getting ANY government job is like pulling the proverbial hens' teeth.

Yeah, DLP, it is very hard. I focused on nothing but Fed jobs since graduating last Dec. There is a contact name and # at the end of every job announcement. I followed up on every job for which I applied by calling that person. Surprisingly, these HR people were very friendly, seemingly unrushed, and very generous with advice. I learned something valuable from each person with whom I spoke.

They rate apps from 70-100. “Regular” vets (that’s me) get a 5-point preference; vets with a service-connected disability get 10-point preference. I started out focusing on Economist positions, scoring a 93 WITH my preference points. Advice I received was to apply for anything and everything for which I’m qualified, including legal sec and paralegal (God forbid). Perhaps I could get a higher score on another position, get hired, then retrain into something I want to do after my foot is in the door.

I scored a 101 for an admin asst job (with my points) but was still under the cutoff because service-connected vets are scoring higher than that on their merits alone then add 10 points on top of that. The HR contact for that job told me stay away from admin jobs – this is where the app pool is the largest – and focus on anything else that requires a specific skill set for which I am qualified. She also told me any job in a large metropolitan area would be very tough, that being willing to relocate to a rural area would increase my chances. She said that Indianapolis doesn’t have as large a job pool as one would expect and guessed it was because of the cost of living there (??). She also suggested applying in El Paso, TX (I did).

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dh in California

74 months ago

I attended many job fairs in my area, focusing only on booths set up by govt agencies. At one job fair, there was only one govt agency with a booth set up. I got in line and had to wait 20 minutes to get to the table to meet the HR lady and hand her my resume. Little did I know she’d be calling me about 3 months later with an offer.

In the meantime, I noticed about a month after that job fair that the agency had 2 open positions in the Bay Area; so I applied. A week later, I received an email from them with yet another position for which I could apply. Recipients of the email were told not to share the info with others because only those contacted by an agency recruiter could apply. It is that job for which I was hired. I did get contacted for interviews for the other two positions, however. One of them I declined because it was too far. The other, I'd scheduled an interview then later cancelled it because I accepted my offer two days before the interview.

Honestly, I consider this a blessing from God. I just spoke to my agency and let them know I was leaving - remember I'm a temp?? And my contact there, who has been with them since the 80's, has been let go because they are downsizing. Not enough companies using temps nowadays.

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kaylaw in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

73 months ago

I'm beginning to think taking up paralegal studies was a mistake. When u go into job search i find it difficult with no hands on experience. Every firm wants omeone with some experience and this sucks if u are just leaving school.

What do u do with no experience as a paralegal student? I'm quickly realizing i need a career change and i have two week of paralegal training left.

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kaylaw in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

73 months ago

getting your foot in. thats what i thought when i first got hired at a law firm and of course the job had nothing to do with paralegal but i took it as a means of getting my foot in. until after a few months i was let go with a few other just has i purchase my car. now i'm home applying to every and every where with no luck. so maybe i need to consider going back to past work experience fields.

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tornadoday in Brentwood, Tennessee

73 months ago

I am helping my daughter with an assignment. Would it be okay with you if she used your interview response? If so, could you provide me with some basic contact information that she can submit along with the assignment? You've given a lot of time and some great responses here. I can't imagine she'd find better input.......

Thanks.

B

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tornadoday in Brentwood, Tennessee

73 months ago

I understand. Would it be possible for you to send me contact info at tornadoday@hotmail.com? Regardless, she will use this information as I have yet to find anything quite as informative and detailed. Thank you.

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tornadoday in Brentwood, Tennessee

73 months ago

Sounds perfect.......... Thank you (again).

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