Autopsies only??

Comments (12)

PA hopeful in New York, New York

81 months ago

Does a PA work mainly with autopsies. I'm thinking of becoming an MT or a PA. I don't like the idea of working with corpses. Can a PA work on the clinical side as well? Thanks

Kyle in Jacksonville, Florida

80 months ago

PA's do a lot more than just autopsy work. In fact, I'd be willing to guesstimate 95% or more of the work they do is Clinical related versus autopsy. Obviously you don't want to apply for a job at a medical examiner's office, but even Clinical PAs in the hospital setting do some autopsies - not all, but most. I'd just recommend you going and getting your PA degree then when going to an interview tell them you don't want to do autopsies. You will of course have to learn how to do them in school, and who knows, you might end up enjoying that part of the job. Don't let that detour you though - its such a small part of the job.

Nick in Oakland, California

80 months ago

There certainly are PA jobs where you don't have to do autopsies but you part of our training does involve doing autopsies. My advice would be if you don't like the idea of working with bodies then you should pursue being an MT. Our job involves blood, guts, and dead people and if you aren't comfortable with that then quite frankly its best to not pursue it!

APA in Detroit, Michigan

66 months ago

Nick in Oakland, California said: There certainly are PA jobs where you don't have to do autopsies but you part of our training does involve doing autopsies. My advice would be if you don't like the idea of working with bodies then you should pursue being an MT. Our job involves blood, guts, and dead people and if you aren't comfortable with that then quite frankly its best to not pursue it!

Hi Nick,
I am in a ASCP certified Pathologist assistant program and want to know if I will need a CA state license of some sort to be able to work in CA. Your response will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
SK.

Rio in Temecula, California

66 months ago

Nick in Oakland, California said: There certainly are PA jobs where you don't have to do autopsies but you part of our training does involve doing autopsies. My advice would be if you don't like the idea of working with bodies then you should pursue being an MT. Our job involves blood, guts, and dead people and if you aren't comfortable with that then quite frankly its best to not pursue it!

What PA programs are well known in CA? or is it true that there are no accredited programs west of Illinois?

sandy in Sterling Heights, Michigan

65 months ago

Hello, I am interested in becoming a pathologist assistant and I wanted to ask is it easy to find a job after graduation?
thanks for your time

PA Student in Chalfont, Pennsylvania

65 months ago

Rio -- there are currently no accredited programs west of Rosalind Franklin in Illinois but I'm sure that will change in a few years.

sandy -- all graduates I've spoken to have had jobs secured months before they graduated. I was also once told by a credible source that there are roughly 10 job openings for every graduate in a pathologists' assistant program. So, the question is more 'where do you want a job' and less 'are you going to have a job'. Good luck with everything.

jwrjrw in Cooperstown, New York

54 months ago

PA hopeful in New York, New York said: Does a PA work mainly with autopsies. I'm thinking of becoming an MT or a PA. I don't like the idea of working with corpses. Can a PA work on the clinical side as well? Thanks

No, a PA actually works mainly with surgical specimens. You would receive mainly tissue and portions of organs. Occasionally entire organs. You will however have to be trained to do autopsies if you attend a program. You also may be required to do autopsies at your job, but you can apply to surgical positions only. I think it is important to learn how to do an autopsy. I was a little concerned about doing them myself. Now, I enjoy them very much. Also, don't think of them as corpses, think of them as loved ones. They are someone's family member and are to be respected as such. Also, if you want to work on the clinical side, why don't you try for a Physician's Assistant program.

jwrjrw in Cooperstown, New York

54 months ago

JW

jwrjrw in Cooperstown, New York

54 months ago

jwrjrw in Cooperstown, New York said: JW

No, a PA actually works mainly with surgical specimens. You would receive mainly tissue and portions of organs. Occasionally entire organs. You will however have to be trained to do autopsies if you attend a program. You also may be required to do autopsies at your job, but you can apply to surgical positions only. I think it is important to learn how to do an autopsy. I was a little concerned about doing them myself. Now, I enjoy them very much. Also, don't think of them as corpses, think of them as loved ones. They are someone's family member and are to be respected as such. Also, if you want to work on the clinical side, why don't you try for a Physician's Assistant program.

codyrecoulac in Creedmoor, North Carolina

46 months ago

what if i want to work just in the morgue?

artmanatyale in Hamden, Connecticut

45 months ago

PA hopeful in New York, New York said: Does a PA work mainly with autopsies. I'm thinking of becoming an MT or a PA. I don't like the idea of working with corpses. Can a PA work on the clinical side as well? Thanks

Hi, I'm a PA that has an Autopsy only position but this is very rare. Some PAs gross Surgicals and have some Autopsy responsibilities. Then again, there are plenty of PA positions where you would have little to no autopsies.

Art

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.