Alternative Careers in Pharmacy

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akshay in Calgary, Alberta

77 months ago

iam a bpharm graduate from india.i have 7 years experience in working as a pharmacist .i came here in april.what jobs i get here without getting licence.how to get certificates from alberta college of pharmacy.

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trc in Fairport, New York

62 months ago

just wondering what you are opting to do at this point. I am an RPh in retail thinking (at age 54) of getting a pharm d in order to (hopefully) stay competative. But, with the glut of pharm-d''s being predicted, am I just wasting my time??? Kind of hard at my age to get out of retail completely!

mred in Morrisville, Pennsylvania said: I am in a situation similar to your moms. I took a retirement from my government job 2 years ago, then worked as a pharmacist in a mail order pharmacy for almost 2 years. Worked like a machine, but for good pay. Despite all that is said to the contrary almost all pharmacy jobs are "lick and stick" dispensing jobs. I don't want any part of them. Pharmacy is one field that experience and background counts for next to nothing. You essentially are a licensed robot, and that's it. The reason there is a current shortage in most areas is that the chains have been expanding, and they need human fodder for their operations. With the greatly increased number of pharmacists who will be graduating within the next few years, you can expect a glut on the way in 3-4 years. All this nonsense about increased demand due to aging population is a lot of bull. Vastly improved technology is on the way as well as licensed technicians. The role of the pharmacist is more easily delegated to other disciplines than almost any other health care field !!

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

62 months ago

trc in Fairport, New York said: just wondering what you are opting to do at this point. I am an RPh in retail thinking (at age 54) of getting a pharm d in order to (hopefully) stay competative. But, with the glut of pharm-d''s being predicted, am I just wasting my time??? Kind of hard at my age to get out of retail completely!

Dear trc. I have worked as a pharmacist for many years in upstate NY(Rochester, Syracuse, Albany) and worked for the State of New Jersey as a quality of care inspector for long term care facilities. I am telling you this-regardless of what schools like Wegman's @ St. John Fisher say- there will be a glut of pharmacists nationwide, and this is alreaday occurring in major Metro areas such as NYC, Philadelphia, Boston, etc. It may not have hit Monroe County, NY yet- but wait till the new graduates get out from the new schools! The schools have been feeding the students a lot of half truths about what they can do when they graduate, but the sad reality is that many of these new roles have yet to develop, and lick and stick pharmacy is where the money is right out of college. I worked part time in mail order pharmacy and have seen the future. machines do it all pharmacists just scan. Yes, you will need pharmacists for clinical support- but how many? The schools talk about the aging population, which is garbage, as the elderly will have so many tools for knowledge support without using the pharmacist. Rapidly advancing computer systems and better trained technicians will accelerate this. Pharmacists may have great skills for their profession, but it is a small divided profession with very poor political skills. Would be glad to confer any time. ed RPh

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EyesNowOpen in Denver, Colorado

62 months ago

The glut is already here!!

The recruiter for the Rocky Mountain Poison Center tells me that (Aug 11, 2009) 6 months ago a posting for a pharmacist position would generate 3 to 4 applicants. Now he gets 20 to 30 applicants. One hospital position at a major Denver hospital generated 40 applicants, according to the hiring manager (if you’re still interviewing for a pharmacist job, and I’m sure many of you are, just ask how many applicants this year compared to last). Schools continue to open, and class sizes are continually increased. In metro Denver, the number of new grads has gone from 120 four years ago to 170 new students in the state school and 60 more at the new private school. That’s almost twice as many!

Schools generate revenue by making PharmDs. There is no incentive for schools to consider their students’ employment prospects. An east coast recruiter tells me that all major metropolitan areas are totally saturated for hospital pharmacists and he’s now placing only in rural Maine. A major chain that has been opening 500 stores per year is done with that and enhancing services at their extant stores, which does not require additional pharmacists. There still is no viable model for covering expenses for Medication Therapy Management.

With this glut, qualification inflation has set in. A hospital in Denver posted for a pharmacist, accepting only applications for PharmDs and strongly preferring a residency. Many good, experienced RPhs will be locked out. As the engineered glut continues, the “clinical” pharmacists driving pharmacy education will get their wish to have all PharmDs complete residencies. But will residencies be available? And afterwards, will jobs be available? Many pharmacists have postponed retirement, having seen over ½ of their retirement wiped out by the stock market crash.

Approximately 30% of my class could not secure employment as of graduation (Informal survey—representative of class in terms of academic

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trc in Pittsford, New York

61 months ago

Seems as though upgrading to a pharm-d seems pointless in light of the predictions I am reading and, with which I pretty much agree.
Who, reading this ,if you planned to stay in retail and had about 12 yrs to retirement would puruse upgrading from an rph to a pharm-d? Something I've been struggling with and would be interested in how some others see it.

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Edward Giacoia in Little Neck, New York

60 months ago

I have not worked in Pharmacy for 9 years while I tried alternative employment opportunities. Unfortunately could not find anything as lucrative as Pharmacy. Do not want to go back to working in a hospital. Would like to try an alternative medical career. Anyone know of any medical careers a Pharmacist could pursue without requiring too much more schooling (and therefore money). Can't believe I went to school for 5 years and am limited to working strictly as a staff Pharmacist!

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trace in Forest Hills, New York

59 months ago

trc in Pittsford, New York said: Seems as though upgrading to a pharm-d seems pointless in light of the predictions I am reading and, with which I pretty much agree.
Who, reading this ,if you planned to stay in retail and had about 12 yrs to retirement would puruse upgrading from an rph to a pharm-d? Something I've been struggling with and would be interested in how some others see it.

i think it is useless for retail possiton to study 2 more years.

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pharmd718 in Brooklyn, New York

59 months ago

I work at a hospital as a staff pharmacist and have a pharmd. I don't see any reason why you would need a pharmd for retail. currently they are pushing a one year residency as mandatory for a pharmd (which will make the pharmd a 7 year program instead of 6). If you get your pharmd you will soon need to do a 1 year rotation to keep up with the new program.

trc in Fairport, New York said: just wondering what you are opting to do at this point. I am an RPh in retail thinking (at age 54) of getting a pharm d in order to (hopefully) stay competative. But, with the glut of pharm-d''s being predicted, am I just wasting my time??? Kind of hard at my age to get out of retail completely!

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kirs in Vancouver, Washington

57 months ago

I graduated in 2007 and have had the same retail experience as most of you have described.. with the occasional robbery! I felt frustrated with working evenings and weekends.. I am now working in mail order.. which I find very boring, but its a day job and much less stressful. I spent time looking at other careers and was considering a PA license.. the program is 1 year and would probably not be too difficult to get in after having a pharmacist license. I am also considering a residency, but am unsure of the hospital pharmacist needs in my area.. I can't believe how dissapointed I am with my degree..

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Lovely Irene Garcia in Davao, Philippines

57 months ago

kirs in Vancouver, Washington said: I graduated in 2007 and have had the same retail experience as most of you have described.. with the occasional robbery! I felt frustrated with working evenings and weekends.. I am now working in mail order.. which I find very boring, but its a day job and much less stressful. I spent time looking at other careers and was considering a PA license.. the program is 1 year and would probably not be too difficult to get in after having a pharmacist license. I am also considering a residency, but am unsure of the hospital pharmacist needs in my area.. I can't believe how dissapointed I am with my degree..

You shouldn’t be disappointed because according to an article I read the pharmacist pay rate based on experience ranges from:

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE SALARY RANGE
Less than 1 year $67,659 – $99,926
1-4 years $68,613 - $101,073
5-9 years $83,439 – $101,601
10-19 years $87,746 – $109,413
20 years and above $93,475 – $118,965

Now the top 3 cities that give high paying rate to pharmacist are
• Houston
• Dallas
• Los angeles

With regards to different state, the top 3 highest are the following
• Texas
• Illinois
• Florida

You should check your State Department of Labor for job opportunities and if there are none, may be it's time to leave home and go somewhere else to establish a career.

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DHEM in West Hartford, Connecticut

56 months ago

Any one out there? Some one who can sponsor my H1B. I am licensed in USA to practice and will work anywhere in the USA. I am very flexible and will look to covering all costs on behlaf of the sponsor.
Please any one, i really need help in this.

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rph4u in Tampa, Florida

56 months ago

You can apply to a major chain CVS/Walgreens etc.. If you can find one that is hiring and explain your situation. A friend of mine works for them in order to be sponsored as well. She said it takes a while though apparently they are back- logged and she's been on the list for 2 years.

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DHEM in West Hartford, Connecticut

56 months ago

Thank you for your comment. I have tried both if not most chain stores. Still waiting. But should anyone else know i would appreciate any openings or leads.

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Farm Girl in Manchester, Iowa

56 months ago

Hi!
I'm a senior in high school. I will be a certified Pharmacy Tech this spring after high school graduation. I will be attending a four year college this fall. I'm considering a degree in marketing/business with the plan to work part time at a pharmacy near college, and then at graduation to get a job in pharmacy sales. My question is this: Is this a good career path? With college costing so much I want to make sure I'm making the best choice. Thanks for any input!

P.S. I'm also ranked nationally in speech and business speech

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kirs in Vancouver, Washington

56 months ago

I don't know much about the marketing world.. but you are a very inteligent senior for asking your question! I would say.. see what the job market is like... Are there many positions available if you were to graduate tomorrow? How much would you make? What would your hours be? Could you work full or part time? Does it suit your personality? Is it a growing feild? Are you limited to one type of position with your degree? These are some of the things I would ask myself.. Good luck to you!

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High School Girl in Manchester, Iowa

56 months ago

I don't know (about pharmacy sales). After searching this site I've noticed that there aren't a lot of postings for jobs or or for that matter postings by people involved in pharmacy sales. I don't know what that means. BUT here in Iowa Pharmacy Techs must be certified by July, and there's a bunch of older women working at pharmacies that are either unable or unwilling to certify. My mom, a teacher, encouraged me to take the 95 hour Pharmacy Tech class while taking a full college prep course load in high school. The idea is to have a better paying part time job than college work study. From watching TV and listening to my mom, if an employer can replace a professional with a technologist (pharmacy tech vs a pharmacist) they will. After doing my clinicals the top salary for a Pharmacy Tech is $16; (not enough to pay off student loans). When I mention Pharmacy Sales to people, their eyes get wide and they say, "Those people make the BIG bucks!" Is this true? They say the same about Pharmacists, but there is also the $200,000 student loan and this site is saying that the doors are closing for that path. Most of the posters on these sites say Nursing and Teaching are wide open. In Iowa, schools are laying of 10% of all teachers and I have friends that have just graduated with bachelors in Nursing without jobs. I realize that the economy is wierd right now, but as a soon to be college freshman about to encounter tens of thousands of dollars in student loans, and if you change your major too many times you will have to take another year of study (and debt), I just want to make a good choice at the beginning...

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sp in Oroville, California

55 months ago

i'm a retail pharmacist, working for one of the major chain. i can't express how much frustrated i'm with my job. I feel that i don't need that much education for practicing pharmacy in a retail store helping in the drive through , ringing up a patient.........just a clerical job ......what a wastage of my hard earned education.

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patriciagala in Herndon, Virginia

55 months ago

your mother cant do anything else, once a pharmacist always one, and that isnt true anymore either, since even pharmacist jobs are going away, so tell mom just be glad she has a job and keep working- there is nothing out there for her- priscilla gale, rph, mba

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tayo830 in Smyrna, Georgia

55 months ago

I just received my PCAT scores to get into pharmacy school. This is third attempt taking this exam and just about tired of it all! I noticed there are many new pharmacy schools opening up each year and always wonder if the career will get saturated. After reading all the posts, I was right. Maybe this is a sign for me to do something else? I am currently a pharmacy tech and pharmacy as a career seems boring but thought there were plenty of jobs and opportunities available. However, I don't know what to do now. Has anyone heard of Health Informatics? I took one semester of it before going back to pursing pharmacy. uggh

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tom in Penfield, New York

55 months ago

yes--take it as a sign--pharmacy schools are intersted in your money--not your career. The new schools opening up are taking advantage of the misperception held by many applicants that there are still and will remain to be many opportunities for graduates--this is not true. Store consolidation, automation, lower reimburement rates that continue to be cut, increasing reliance on technicians--these will reduce opportunities available in the future. (Do they even tell you any of these things when applying???)Many of the clinical roles that are promised have yet to be developed. Granted there are opportunities in pharmacy and it can be a great career if you can land the right position but it is sad to see so many applicants mislead into thinking that opportunities abound like they did before the market became saturated.

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tayo830 in Smyrna, Georgia

55 months ago

tom in Penfield, New York said: yes--take it as a sign--pharmacy schools are intersted in your money--not your career. The new schools opening up are taking advantage of the misperception held by many applicants that there are still and will remain to be many opportunities for graduates--this is not true. Store consolidation, automation, lower reimburement rates that continue to be cut, increasing reliance on technicians--these will reduce opportunities available in the future. (Do they even tell you any of these things when applying???)Many of the clinical roles that are promised have yet to be developed. Granted there are opportunities in pharmacy and it can be a great career if you can land the right position but it is sad to see so many applicants mislead into thinking that opportunities abound like they did before the market became saturated.

Thanks Tom for the quick response. They don't inform the applicants of jobs availability or anything for that matter when applying. I do agree they are in for the money since it is about $60 to $70 plus to apply to each schools. The newer schools are sometimes $100.00 (non-refundable). I believe they make their money through applications...anyhow, I will be looking into other health care professions. I won't want to go into pharmacy school and be in debt for the rest of my life!

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blackbird in Port Carbon, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

As a retail pharmacist for 25 years, I can honestly say this to prospective rx students--become a general practice doctor..tons of jobs, more money, prestiege and respect...

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ckirs in Vancouver, Washington

55 months ago

I agree.. i would also recommend becoming a general practice doctor..

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lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina

54 months ago

I graduated from pharmacy school in 2008 and still have not found a job in pharmacy. Since I entered pharmacy school, so many more schools have popped up because of the "demand." Just like other posts have said, the schools won't tell you that there is no longer a demand for pharmacists. Yes, pharmacists get paid well, but you only get paid if you have a job. I have a huge amount of debt ($20,000/year=$80,000++) and no way to pay it off. Many sites claim studies show that the need for pharmacists is rising, and is one of the best professions to go into. I don't know where they are getting their information from-probably just the fact that the baby-boomers are aging. If they ask pharmacists, they would disagree. If you are looking at other avenues, I'd highly recommend those. Any suggestions for someone like me, a PharmD with an undergraduate Biology degree?? At this point, money is not as big an issue. I need something!!

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purple76 in Dover, Delaware

54 months ago

I graduated pharmacy school in 2005 and has worked for the same retail chain since. I am miserable at my job and so frustrated with the way things are. Because of the economy I am forced to stay put. I know one thing for sure, there is no way I can stay in this field for 30 years. I simple won't make it. I owe $120,000 in student loans just to lick and stick and be nothing more than a customer service representative. That is the entire focus of my company: customer service index and of course getting prescription ready in 10mins. It seems like because we are paid well in retail,they expect us to be super human. How can I work for 12 hrs, no schedule lunch or break, 1 or 2 untrained help, high volume rx, phones ringing off the hoke, drive thru, counceling,free advice to anyone who calls or walks in,10min wait time, insurance issue, rude customers, and the list goes on. There is no more respect for the pharmacist any longer. This is so sad.

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lore2400

54 months ago

I started out as a nursing major, planning to be a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist. I had been working as a CNA (certified nursing assistant) and thought I would not be able to handle some of the things nurses have to deal with, so I changed my major. Now I wish I had stayed with nursing or had done something other than pharmacy school after my undergraduate. It remains to be seen how the new health care bill will affect practitioners such as primary care physicians, PAs, and NPs. All I know is that I regret taking out all the loans for a degree I cannot use. I hate that just after 5 years, pharmacy is already so old for you, purple 76. I interned at a chain store while I was in school, and I can definitely see how it would get old really fast. No matter what goes wrong with a prescription during filling, it's the pharmacist's fault. It could be the MD office, the MD, the insurance company, the patient, etc...but people don't want to hear it. They don't realize there's a process you need to go through before giving their meds at their copay. It is very sad that things like this are happening in a profession you have to go into so much debt to pursue. Thanks and good luck to you Tayo830!

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

54 months ago

It is interesting to see that so many good people are getting wise to what pharmacy work is really like. The schools are totally full of it! Let these "professors" work for 3 months in a busy city chain store and see what comes of their ivory tower professionalism. I say pharmacy is bad and will definitely get worse. As pharmacists become a "dime a dozen" salaries will recede, and the chains will try to get more bang for their buck by making staff work harder. Some stores are already developing workload quotas--is this the profession you went to school for? What schools will not tell you is that as the supply become greater than demand, quality of work environment suffers drastically. By the way, why don't you check out how much chain pharmacies have provided for your schools. No doubt they are only interested in the "excellence" of the profession. RIGHT! The small badly divided profession of pharmacy has no leadership, no organization fighting for improved work environments , job opportunities and incomes. If anyone can contradict my statements, please get back to me. Respectfully, Ed

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lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina

54 months ago

Ed, it sounds like you have experience in the field. I cannot contradict anything you have said, and don't get me started on some of the self-righteous "professors" who are no help whatsoever. I am pretty sure I will be looking for a job outside of pharmacy now. Do you have any advice/ideas whatsoever to help me find a job in a different field? I am not interested in going back to school, and I have an undergrad Biology degree. It makes me sick that I have all this debt to pay off and I've been unable to make even a dent in it so far. I realize I won't get close to the pay I could make as a pharmacist, but anything using the bio degree would be better than nothing at all. I would greatly appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you.

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murray in Oradell, New Jersey

54 months ago

I know that there is a glut of pharmacists in this tri-state area. If I were just getting out of school in this economic climate, I would try to go for extra training/ specialization by doing a residency or specialty. At least you are getting paid while you learn (maybe not as much as you would otherwise, but it beats not working at all). Also, this gives you a chance to feel out a place. You may even be able to get a job at the same place when your residency is done--they don't have to train you. It seems like such a waste to go to pharmacy school and not find a job and get the decent pay (compared to a lot of other professions). These economic times are VERY discouraging for everyone. I am also feeling that way. There is no perfect job! A lot of us work just to get the health insurance, especially if you are the one who provides it for your family.

If I were able to move, I'd look around for places that have a good quality of life-- and get out of this rat race in the NJ/NY area. Some places seem to have more openings than others. It seems from the postings that retail has a very high burnout rate. I've mostly worked in hospital. Every place has its pros and cons. Sometimes, it's just time to move on to something else.

Good luck!

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undecided and stressed in Glenview Nas, Illinois

53 months ago

since high school i've wanted to become a pharmacist. I work for a great pharmacy company now but def not sure what will happen in 5 years. I got accepted into chiropractic school (duo degree in chiropractics and naturopathic medicine) and also pharmacy school. i do not know which decision may be a better choice in 10/20 years. i do not want to have debt from pharmacy school nor a career that has no job openings. any advice on what may be a better career will be helpful!

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PharmD in Parsippany, New Jersey

53 months ago

I was fired from a large retail phamacy in New York a month ago by a witch of a DM
I think they are trying to unload their older pharmacist I worked for them for a year and a half without incident then this new DM
absolutely created the worst envirnonment and use so called company policies to write you up --she wrote you up for not answering the phones within 3 rings, and when there was a custome complaint even if the customer was totally out of line you got written up (eg following state laws)
I have a PharmD from Rutgers 2007 before that stay at home mom and didn't practice for over 8 years then divorce brought me back into the field==
I can't believe how unprofessional some of these new managers have become I know of another pharmcist who is getting sick bc she is being harrassed by this same manager (she is also older) Has anyone else felt discriminated against due to age by these large retail companies?

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

53 months ago

I sympathize w you very much. I have said for the last year, that with the ever tightening pharmacist market, employers will do all they can to get rid of older pharmacists, and higher younger ones. The Pharmacy schools are actually encouraging this to make room for their new graduates who are seeing an oversupply developing. The schools want to show employers that the new graduates have skills that the old "dinosaurs" do not have.

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

53 months ago

undecided and stressed in Glenview Nas, Illinois said: since high school i've wanted to become a pharmacist. I work for a great pharmacy company now but def not sure what will happen in 5 years. I got accepted into chiropractic school (duo degree in chiropractics and naturopathic medicine) and also pharmacy school. i do not know which decision may be a better choice in 10/20 years. i do not want to have debt from pharmacy school nor a career that has no job openings. any advice on what may be a better career will be helpful!

My vote is for Chiropractic. Pharmacy is being oversupplied with a ton of new graduates and the job market will not be that good. Most pharmacy work is monotonous counting and pouring and will be greatly mechanized and taken over by lower paid professionals. Chiropractic is"hands on" and not as readily delegated to others. The level of satisfaction of pharmacists who have been in the field for a while is also rather low.

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

53 months ago

RPh in River Edge, New Jersey said: You can go to the following website: www.bls.gov/oco/oco2003.htm (cut and paste it). It is the Bureau of Labor Statistics website. That's probably the best projection for any job you are looking at. Good luck.

I disagree. The Bureau changes its profile every year, and they get their information from pharmacy schools and organizations in whose best interest it is to embellish to opportunities. Pharmacy job opportunities are drying up rapidly, especially in the Northeast. The Bureau is not as sensitive to the real market as many people might think

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

53 months ago

murray in Oradell, New Jersey said: I know that there is a glut of pharmacists in this tri-state area. If I were just getting out of school in this economic climate, I would try to go for extra training/ specialization by doing a residency or specialty. At least you are getting paid while you learn (maybe not as much as you would otherwise, but it beats not working at all). Also, this gives you a chance to feel out a place. You may even be able to get a job at the same place when your residency is done--they don't have to train you. It seems like such a waste to go to pharmacy school and not find a job and get the decent pay (compared to a lot of other professions). These economic times are VERY discouraging for everyone. I am also feeling that way. There is no perfect job! A lot of us work just to get the health insurance, especially if you are the one who provides it for your family.

If I were able to move, I'd look around for places that have a good quality of life-- and get out of this rat race in the NJ/NY area. Some places seem to have more openings than others. It seems from the postings that retail has a very high burnout rate. I've mostly worked in hospital. Every place has its pros and cons. Sometimes, it's just time to move on to something else.

Good luck!

Before you move, I think you should look at the fact that the pharmacy job market is saturating rapidly in many other areas, too. unless you are willing to relocate to a small town in the middle of nowhere, you will find a job market that is becoming increasingly tough. As the job markets become tighter, jobs become less pleasant as the employer then has the upper hand. If you can't fill prescriptions rapidly enough, you are out!!

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

53 months ago

lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina said: Ed, it sounds like you have experience in the field. I cannot contradict anything you have said, and don't get me started on some of the self-righteous "professors" who are no help whatsoever. I am pretty sure I will be looking for a job outside of pharmacy now. Do you have any advice/ideas whatsoever to help me find a job in a different field? I am not interested in going back to school, and I have an undergrad Biology degree. It makes me sick that I have all this debt to pay off and I've been unable to make even a dent in it so far. I realize I won't get close to the pay I could make as a pharmacist, but anything using the bio degree would be better than nothing at all. I would greatly appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you.

lore, depending upon your age, you might look at the pharmaceutical industry, and try to get into a large company. I think that you may have to re-consider getting some additional education, and try teaching- the pay is lower but it can lead to greater security and satisfaction. You could also consider going on a fast tract and quickly get an RN. With your background you could rise rapidly in that field. You could also look at insurance companies. It wont be easy, but you can transfer your skill elsewhere! wish you all the best! Ed

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High School Girl in Manchester, Iowa

53 months ago

Wow! I'm Farm Girl, the one that asked about debt load and pharmacy two months ago. After reading all of the comments after my posting, I won't touch Pharmacy with a ten foot pole. I did get into my first choice for college. I will manage my debts with a Pharmacy Tech job and major/minor in Business/Marketing/PR. I'm so sorry that everyone older than me is facing such difficulties. After careful research I know your course of study was difficult and should have paid off. I hope not to encounter what you have encountered upon graduation. I will continue to keep up with this posting.

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SARFARAZ in Clementon, New Jersey

52 months ago

DHEM in West Hartford, Connecticut said: Hi

Can anyone help me to get sponsorship in the USA as i am already a registered Pharmacist in NJ, PA, and Delaware. Salary is not an issue for me providing a company can sponsor my H1 visa. I can relocate anywhere.

hello i am looking for an rph in nj plesase call me at six zero nine two three four zero five six seven or email me at sahmedrph@gmail.com

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sophia77 in Parlin, New Jersey

52 months ago

lore2400 said: I started out as a nursing major, planning to be a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist. I had been working as a CNA (certified nursing assistant) and thought I would not be able to handle some of the things nurses have to deal with, so I changed my major. Now I wish I had stayed with nursing or had done something other than pharmacy school after my undergraduate. It remains to be seen how the new health care bill will affect practitioners such as primary care physicians, PAs, and NPs. All I know is that I regret taking out all the loans for a degree I cannot use. I hate that just after 5 years, pharmacy is already so old for you, purple 76. I interned at a chain store while I was in school, and I can definitely see how it would get old really fast. No matter what goes wrong with a prescription during filling, it's the pharmacist's fault. It could be the MD office, the MD, the insurance company, the patient, etc...but people don't want to hear it. They don't realize there's a process you need to go through before giving their meds at their copay. It is very sad that things like this are happening in a profession you have to go into so much debt to pursue. Thanks and good luck to you Tayo830!

hi!!!
I have a bachelors of Pharmacy from a foreign country and changed my career to nursing after moving to US. The thing is that I did not like nursing much and want to move back into pharmacy school and have my Pharm D. After reading all these coments, i am really surprised. I was thinking if I complete my nursing bachlor and have pharm d, will it be helpful to get job if not in retail, may be in pharmaceutical company. I am wondering if it right decision at this time to back into pharmacy school cuz i really wanted to have my pharmd. Although I am nursing school, I have wished i were in pharmacy school.
can u suggest me what would be right option for me right now?

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lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina

52 months ago

I don't know how much longer you would have to go to school here in the U.S. for a PharmD, and I understand that you want to get that degree. I don't know what the job market is like with pharmaceutical companies where you are, but where I am, it is impossible to get in with them. If I was in your position, I would strongly consider completing nursing school (pharm background will really help you in that program) and looking at becoming a nurse practitioner or other master's degree level position. You'll have to weigh the demand for each position against how much you think you'll enjoy each. Right now, I wish I would have stuck with nursing and just furthered my education with some type of master's degree. But, the job situation where you are living might be different. Hope this helps some. Good luck.

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sophia77 in Parlin, New Jersey

52 months ago

lore2400 in Mooresville, North Carolina said: I don't know how much longer you would have to go to school here in the U.S. for a PharmD, and I understand that you want to get that degree. I don't know what the job market is like with pharmaceutical companies where you are, but where I am, it is impossible to get in with them. If I was in your position, I would strongly consider completing nursing school (pharm background will really help you in that program) and looking at becoming a nurse practitioner or other master's degree level position. You'll have to weigh the demand for each position against how much you think you'll enjoy each. Right now, I wish I would have stuck with nursing and just furthered my education with some type of master's degree. But, the job situation where you are living might be different. Hope this helps some. Good luck.

thanx for ur reply,..
I was thinking to take this fall sem off to complete my pre-req for pharmacy and then comtinue with my last sem of nursing next year spring. It was cuz I want to apply for a pharmacy school next year. It is a 3 year long program, but really expensive. I am not much interested into nursing, and master will take a long way including the experience that I need to get into masters. Do you think in terms of job for pharmacists, its gonna continue like that?

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yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

51 months ago

Sophia, you can bet that the pharmacy job market will continue to get worse for the middle term future. The schools are bursting at the seams with new pharmacists, and the jobs are not available, especially if you want to live within 100 miles of a large city. The schools have blown it! They have based enrollment on wild predictions based on the needs of the chains to have a ready supply of pharmacists available. Be willing to move, or consider changing your career. Good Luck!

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Omo in Kenmore, Washington

50 months ago

yardleyed in Morrisville, Pennsylvania said: Dear trc. I have worked as a pharmacist for many years in upstate NY(Rochester, Syracuse, Albany) and worked for the State of New Jersey as a quality of care inspector for long term care facilities. I am telling you this-regardless of what schools like Wegman's @ St. John Fisher say- there will be a glut of pharmacists nationwide, and this is alreaday occurring in major Metro areas such as NYC, Philadelphia, Boston, etc. It may not have hit Monroe County, NY yet- but wait till the new graduates get out from the new schools! The schools have been feeding the students a lot of half truths about what they can do when they graduate, but the sad reality is that many of these new roles have yet to develop, and lick and stick pharmacy is where the money is right out of college. I worked part time in mail order pharmacy and have seen the future. machines do it all pharmacists just scan. Yes, you will need pharmacists for clinical support- but how many? The schools talk about the aging population, which is garbage, as the elderly will have so many tools for knowledge support without using the pharmacist. Rapidly advancing computer systems and better trained technicians will accelerate this. Pharmacists may have great skills for their profession, but it is a small divided profession with very poor political skills. Would be glad to confer any time. ed RPh

Glut is already here in Seattle, save your money- stay out of pharmacy school!

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Omo in Kenmore, Washington

50 months ago

sophia77 in Parlin, New Jersey said: thanx for ur reply,..
I was thinking to take this fall sem off to complete my pre-req for pharmacy and then comtinue with my last sem of nursing next year spring. It was cuz I want to apply for a pharmacy school next year. It is a 3 year long program, but really expensive. I am not much interested into nursing, and master will take a long way including the experience that I need to get into masters. Do you think in terms of job for pharmacists, its gonna continue like that?

Yes. Jobs now are very scarce in the NW. Pressure is on to fill scipts very rapidly. Choose another career option unless you want to live in a very very small town.

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Liloo in Trenton, New Jersey

50 months ago

Alexandra in San Diego, California said: I have been helping my mom search for an alternative job in pharmacy. She no longer has her license as a pharmacist, but has 30 years of experience. Is there any careers in the pharmacy feild that she could work in. I am having trouble with this and desperately need some guidance.
Thank You,
Alexandra

Did you get some real advice?

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John in Lake Zurich, Illinois

50 months ago

Do you guys think that this field will be saturated by 2016? 2016 is when i will be graduating if i decide to pursue pharmacy.

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omoplata66 in Bothell, Washington

50 months ago

John in Lake Zurich, Illinois said: Do you guys think that this field will be saturated by 2016? 2016 is when i will be graduating if i decide to pursue pharmacy.

Go to medical school, ARNP, PA-C, if healthcare is your choice. Pharmacy is already saturated and gettting worse.

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modell23 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

49 months ago

kirs in Vancouver, Washington said: I graduated in 2007 and have had the same retail experience as most of you have described.. with the occasional robbery! I felt frustrated with working evenings and weekends.. I am now working in mail order.. which I find very boring, but its a day job and much less stressful. I spent time looking at other careers and was considering a PA license.. the program is 1 year and would probably not be too difficult to get in after having a pharmacist license. I am also considering a residency, but am unsure of the hospital pharmacist needs in my area.. I can't believe how dissapointed I am with my degree..

Amazing we sing the same song. I graduated in 2003 though. What a waste. PA is a 2yr masters program. Lets get in asap b4 PA gets saturated as well.

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nfm in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

49 months ago

PharmD in Parsippany, New Jersey said: I was fired from a large retail phamacy in New York a month ago by a witch of a DM
I think they are trying to unload their older pharmacist I worked for them for a year and a half without incident then this new DM
absolutely created the worst envirnonment and use so called company policies to write you up --she wrote you up for not answering the phones within 3 rings, and when there was a custome complaint even if the customer was totally out of line you got written up (eg following state laws)
I have a PharmD from Rutgers 2007 before that stay at home mom and didn't practice for over 8 years then divorce brought me back into the field==
I can't believe how unprofessional some of these new managers have become I know of another pharmcist who is getting sick bc she is being harrassed by this same manager (she is also older) Has anyone else felt discriminated against due to age by these large retail companies?

YES

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omo in Snohomish, Washington

49 months ago

nfm in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania said: YES

I think pharmacist should unionize, then some of the issues would be taken care of. Does anyone know if that is already happening? The chains love to have that "3 phone ring" policy. They are so afraid of any patient comments that they have departed from reality.

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