does a radiation therapist get paid during the year of training for dosimetrist certification?

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daredevil in Rome, Georgia

26 months ago

I'm currently going to school for radiation therapist and have my sights albeitly a couple years down the road for becoming a dosimetrist. I have noticed through intensive research that the programs are very few and are 40 hr per week courses , which at least for the school I want to go to @ UNC is intensive. Now the tuition isnt much , only 800 for class and books. That isn't bad yet as an non traditional student, I would have to borrow more money just to help support my family . yet If they do pay a salary, then I can manage. There seems to be no information available on this subject so im asking here.

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MMBB243 in Illinois

26 months ago

I've been a therapist for a few years now. After graduation, I was awarded a full-time radiation therapy job. I OTJ train for dosimetry. I keep my normal salary and train in dosimetry in my spare time throughout the day and after most leave the clinic. Its long hours, but you get trained/paid/and become fully certified by the MDCB in 3 years. There are a few "iffy" things though. 1. You have to have a bachelors degree to do this. 2. You have to do dosimetry CE's (easy stuff) 3. After 2017, you are no longer able to do OTJ training, and have to go through an accredited school. If you graduate soon and get a job at one of your clinical sites and their dosimetrist and physicist takes you under their wing; you could do it this way. I know a few people in dosimetry school. Depending on where you go to do your clinical rotations at determines if you get paid. I know a few students who get paid 14 an hour for doing Map checks ( not a lot, but better than nothing). However, they are at much bigger clinics. Basically, the availability of OTJ training depends on if you have a physicist and dosimetrist that like teaching. However, after a year and a half of teaching/training, the student ends up helping them out a lot, so it evens out :D. I hope things work out for you.

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