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warning in Cleveland, Ohio

58 months ago

lets not forget:

4.) The advent of DR technology
-These systems work much faster than CR and what does that mean for x-ray techs? that's right our jobs will be able to be done more quickly and that means more exams will be done by the lucky employed. jobs that would have existed with CR films are erased. Even technology is against you if you decide to become an x-ray tech.

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Sharon Tuten in Melbourne, Florida

58 months ago

Your right it is bad I'm a graduate from April and I had to go back into Medical Assisting for a job. Why can't the schools recognize that it is going to hurt the economy even more if they keep doing this because how are these graduates going to pay back there student loans. Next big thing besides the housing going down hill it will be student loans not being paid back!!!!Then what next after that!!!! We need to get this out and circulating so people know not to get into the field.

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warning in Cleveland, Ohio

58 months ago

Sharon Tuten in Melbourne, Florida said: Your right it is bad I'm a graduate from April and I had to go back into Medical Assisting for a job. Why can't the schools recognize that it is going to hurt the economy even more if they keep doing this because how are these graduates going to pay back there student loans. Next big thing besides the housing going down hill it will be student loans not being paid back!!!!Then what next after that!!!! We need to get this out and circulating so people know not to get into the field.

The schools don't care. They are only about money. The ARRT does not care, the more registered techs, the more cash in their pockets.

This will not stop. I am sorry for your misfortune, as you were most likely fed a steady diet of lies about job availability throughout school, but make no mistake, nothing we are going to do is going to make this any better...

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warning in Cleveland, Ohio

58 months ago

here is a best case scenario...

The economy recovers, people begin landing non-radiology jobs. This will stop some people from applying to tech school, but consider this, there are still years-long waiting lists to several places and many of those people on those lists are going to want the program they waited for. The schools will meanwhile keep spreading the lies open jobs.

-Slowly, little by little enrollment will hopefully drop but it is too late for that NOW, let alone then.

-The overflow of techs will continue to leave this nightmarishly flooded field for at least the next 10 years in the best case. Gosh I hope that technology doesn't find a way to improve in that time thus eliminating the jobs of even more x-ray people.

What I'm trying to say is there is no best case here. The schools got way to many people going through now and for the next 5+ years. Technology will eliminate the need for us. Pray that the basic operator tech license doesn't become much more popular. Jobs created will in no way shape or form keep up with students produced or the 7 out of 10 unemployed graduates of now.

If your smart, you'll get out of this ASAP.

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Magnus

58 months ago

just wanted to thank you for the heads up[memo] ooh and i know this might sound gay[my apologies for those who are]. but, if i was an RT student? i would have loved to have you as a teacher ^ ^ you know, it definitely seems dark through out the med. field. but,like you said? "keep applying". who knows eh? you just might get lucky alot sooner, than later ^ ^ *g00d luck everyone!!!*

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warning in Cleveland, Ohio

58 months ago

the point is that you shouldn't have to get insanely lucky to get a job. you shouldn't be lied to about job availability by schools. The massive overflow of students should not exist.

I would be fired if I were a teacher cause I would do something they aren't allowed to....

TELL THE TRUTH.

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rgood1970 in Clovis, New Mexico

55 months ago

So true cleveland it is not only xray that is flooded I am a radiation therapist and the jobs outlook in our field is no better. The reason is the schools putting out way too many students than jobs. We have students rotating through our center and they teel that their instructor tells them that there are still jobs out there but what they aren;t telling them is that for every one position there are at least 50 applicants. And they try to blame the economy too but that is bull these filds started tghtening up back in 06 and 07 and it has reached the over saturation point.

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Heather in New Haven, Connecticut

55 months ago

It's apparent that you all haven't been around all that long.

Apart from the current recession, our profession has always been cyclical. Here's how the scenario works.

Media trumpets the news that the population is aging and that the need for healthcare professions far outstrips the potential workforce. Prospective students with dollar-signs in their eyes flock to radiography programs leading to multi-year waiting lists. Current radiography programs answer that need by expanding their enrollment to include more students and new programs (same dollar signs) open - some motivated by a need to address the healthcare needs of an aging population and others by $$ (just like students).

Fast forward several years, and all those thousands of students have graduated/are graduating - all feeling 'entitled' to a job. A tighter economy and restrictions in reimbursements from the insurance industry prevented hospitals/clinics from expanding to the expected degree.

But this is not news.

This exact process has been happening every eight-ten years for the thirty years I've been an RT.

I'm sorry that experienced and graduate RT's are out of work. But imaging is not a dying profession, radiography is still a vibrant and necessary field.

If you entered Radiography with the promise of high wages after "only" two years of school? Looks like the bubble has burst. If you entered Radiography to make a difference and put patients first? Stick it out. Recovery will take longer - the current recession has crippled every industry and healthcare is not immune.

Good luck

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Nan in Grangeville, ID in Genesee, Idaho

46 months ago

Heather, your comments are absolutely Right On! I worked as a radiologic technologist for approx. 34 years (including ultrasound, Ct, and mammography), and have been teaching for the past 7 or 8 years. I was a manager through two of the "droughts" where you couldn't find a tech if your life depended on it.

Entry-level jobs may be a bit hard to come by this year, but medicine is not going to go away. The Baby Boomers lost half of their retirement money and are slowly trying to re-build, but they aren't going to hang around forever. And as soon as they start retiring, there will be anouther "drought".

Someone will have to care for all of those retired boomers............ medicine may change its structure, but it's not going away. There will always be a need for technologists.

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Nan in Grangeville, ID in Genesee, Idaho

46 months ago

Heather, your comments are absolutely Right On! I worked as a radiologic technologist for approx. 34 years (including ultrasound, Ct, and mammography), and have been teaching for the past 7 or 8 years. I was a manager through two of the "droughts" where you couldn't find a tech if your life depended on it.

Entry-level jobs may be a bit hard to come by this year, but medicine is not going to go away. The Baby Boomers lost half of their retirement money and are slowly trying to re-build, but they aren't going to hang around forever. And as soon as they start retiring, there will be anouther "drought".

Someone will have to care for all of those retired boomers............ medicine may change its structure, but it's not going away. There will always be a need for technologists.

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csims in San Antonio, Texas

45 months ago

Nan in Grangeville, ID in Genesee, Idaho said: Heather, your comments are absolutely Right On! I worked as a radiologic technologist for approx. 34 years (including ultrasound, Ct, and mammography), and have been teaching for the past 7 or 8 years. I was a manager through two of the "droughts" where you couldn't find a tech if your life depended on it.

Entry-level jobs may be a bit hard to come by this year, but medicine is not going to go away. The Baby Boomers lost half of their retirement money and are slowly trying to re-build, but they aren't going to hang around forever. And as soon as they start retiring, there will be anouther "drought".

Someone will have to care for all of those retired boomers............ medicine may change its structure, but it's not going away. There will always be a need for technologists.[/QUOTE

I'm working toward entering the field not for the money but to actually do something I'm passionate about. I'm mid-thirties and figure I have at least another 20 years of work ahead of me so I've decided to go back to school and do something I'm actuall interested in after 15 years of property management. My question to you is; how do you get the experience that everyone is saying is required while your in the program? Does it help to put in volunteer hours or get any type of job in the hospital to start the relationship? How would someone like me who has no medical background gain experience that will help my chances of getting a job when I graduate?
Also- is the job outlook as grim as everyone here is saying it is?

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

38 months ago

Heather in New Haven, Connecticut said: It's apparent that you all haven't been around all that long.

Apart from the current recession, our profession has always been cyclical. Here's how the scenario works.

Media trumpets the news that the population is aging and that the need for healthcare professions far outstrips the potential workforce. Prospective students with dollar-signs in their eyes flock to radiography programs leading to multi-year waiting lists. Current radiography programs answer that need by expanding their enrollment to include more students and new programs (same dollar signs) open - some motivated by a need to address the healthcare needs of an aging population and others by $$ (just like students).

Fast forward several years, and all those thousands of students have graduated/are graduating - all feeling 'entitled' to a job. A tighter economy and restrictions in reimbursements from the insurance industry prevented hospitals/clinics from expanding to the expected degree.

This exact process has been happening every eight-ten years for the thirty years I've been an RT.

I'm sorry that experienced and graduate RT's are out of work. But imaging is not a dying profession, radiography is still a vibrant and necessary field.

If you entered Radiography with the promise of high wages after "only" two years of school? Looks like the bubble has burst. If you entered Radiography to make a difference and put patients first? Stick it out. Recovery will take longer - the current recession has crippled every industry and healthcare is not immune.

Heather you are absolutely incorrect. I've been a tech for 20+yrs and I've never seen this field have any sort of cycle. For my entire career I've been able to find any job I wanted wherever I've wanted to go. I was in on the ground floor of MRI in my area.

If you could please point out the specific periods of time for these cycles I'd really to hear about them.

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student in Canton, Massachusetts

30 months ago

DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska said: Heather you are absolutely incorrect. I've been a tech for 20+yrs and I've never seen this field have any sort of cycle. For my entire career I've been able to find any job I wanted wherever I've wanted to go. I was in on the ground floor of MRI in my area.

If you could please point out the specific periods of time for these cycles I'd really to hear about them.

Can you say negative?

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Drones in Omaha, Nebraska

30 months ago

student in Canton, Massachusetts said: Can you say negative?

I can say truthful.

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SaveMeFromRadiology in Kansas City, Missouri

30 months ago

Of course medicine is not going to go away. But the way in which *medicine* (Health Care) is administered going forward is going to change drastically and indeed, you are already seeing the fallout. When I graduated in 1981, Radiologic Technology was not a hot career field so to speak. It was still primarily a female profession with a small percentage of males. Ladies would enter and then eventually leave or go PT as they had children and the Husband became the primary earner. There was a natural turnover of staff. MRI and other modalities didn't exist. Outpatient Imaging was a small player in the grand scheme. Most young people were interested in the fast growing IT Field. The education of RT's was mostly done by local community Hospital's to supply the natural attrition, it was not a business. Class sizes were limited. Reimbursement was high for Radiology. There was a period of explosive growth fueled by OEM's (GE, Siemens, etc.) seizing the opportunity to drive CT and then MRI into ever smaller Community Hospital's and RT School's not being able to maintain the supply / demand ratio as X-Ray Tech's upgraded their knowledge and cross trained by the thousands into these new modalities. The advent of Open MRI's, believe it or not, was a huge source of employment for RT's as the equipment became cheaper to own and operate as *Outpatient Imaging* grew exponentially to accommodate the ever increasing demand for services.

Look around now and what do you see ? All of the above in a huge reversal. It's not some cyclical event that is going to be repeated. The thought process that *retiring baby boomer's* are somehow going to reverse this trend is a fallacy. Every Western Country on Earth is grappling with the same problem. An aging population and diminishing financial resources. If anything, it will get worse.

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SaveMeFromRadiology in Kansas City, Missouri

30 months ago

You should pay attention to Drones in Omaha.

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Drones in Omaha, Nebraska

30 months ago

SaveMeFromRadiology in Kansas City, Missouri said: Of course medicine is not going to go away. But the way in which *medicine* (Health Care) is administered going forward is going to change drastically and indeed, you are already seeing the fallout. When I graduated in 1981, Radiologic Technology was not a hot career field so to speak. It was still primarily a female profession with a small percentage of males. Ladies would enter and then eventually leave or go PT as they had children and the Husband became the primary earner. There was a natural turnover of staff. MRI and other modalities didn't exist. Outpatient Imaging was a small player in the grand scheme. Most young people were interested in the fast growing IT Field. The education of RT's was mostly done by local community Hospital's to supply the natural attrition, it was not a business. Class sizes were limited. Reimbursement was high for Radiology. There was a period of explosive growth fueled by OEM's (GE, Siemens, etc.) seizing the opportunity to drive CT and then MRI into ever smaller Community Hospital's and RT School's not being able to maintain the supply / demand ratio as X-Ray Tech's upgraded their knowledge and cross trained by the thousands into these new modalities. The advent of Open MRI's, believe it or not, was a huge source of employment for RT's as the equipment became cheaper to own and operate as *Outpatient Imaging* grew exponentially to accommodate the ever increasing demand for services.

Look around now and what do you see ? All of the above in a huge reversal. It's not some cyclical event that is going to be repeated. The thought process that *retiring baby boomer's* are somehow going to reverse this trend is a fallacy. Every Western Country on Earth is grappling with the same problem. An aging population and diminishing financial resources. If anything, it will get worse.

Extremely well said SaveMeFromRadiology. Heather you should listen to SaveMeFromRadiology.

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Drones in Omaha, Nebraska

30 months ago

I just want to add onto the wonderful post by SaveMeFromRadiology.
Radiology or Medicine for that matter has never been cyclical. Up until 10yrs ago there was always a great demand for all the various technologies. Not only has radiology been growing and progressing since its discovery but so has the rest of medicine. This has resulted in creating more jobs including new ones that never existed before. All through this time medicine has stayed relatively stagnent on the technology front. It wasn't until 10yrs ago or so that the EHR started to gain footing, digital radiography, pet scan, MRI etc are less than a generation old. The problem is that no one ever asked how we were going to pay for all this technology or what it was going to do to medicine. Despite what many would like to be believe medicare, social security, medicade are not money trees. People are now living well past the time when they are taking more than they gave. Now they are taking from their children and grandchildren. These exams are extremely costly. Insurance companies are cracking down on these advanced studies. Now we are starting to see a shrinking of the market combined with needing fewer technologists to do the same job, and piling on top of this is the over estimation of job need by the BLS which is still pumping out factually incorrect statistics. Neither the ARRT or ASRT care so long as the continue to increase membership despite the lack of jobs. All the professional magazines and journals don't even talk about it. One white hand washes the other.

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Buck in Phoenix, Arizona

25 months ago

In case it isn't obvious to everyone reading this thread, "Drones" and "SaveMeFromRadiology" are the same person. That's one of many reasons you shouldn't rely on internet postings to decide your own direction in life. If you want to work as a rad tech, go for it! There are now and always will be openings far into the future.

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

25 months ago

Buck in Phoenix, Arizona said: In case it isn't obvious to everyone reading this thread, "Drones" and "SaveMeFromRadiology" are the same person. That's one of many reasons you shouldn't rely on internet postings to decide your own direction in life. If you want to work as a rad tech, go for it! There are now and always will be openings far into the future.

Buck is apparement not observent enough to notice that "SaveMeFromRadiology" and I are listed under 2 different cities. We are not the same person. This forum does not allow you to choose your city. Buck is correct that you shouldn't rely on the internet alone, for instance the bureau of labor statistics,BLS,still lists radiology as a growing field. My advice is to job shadow, talk techs, outside of the confines of their work environment so you will get some honest answers. Talk to hiring manager and ask them how many positions they hired for last year, what those positions where, how much a starting technologists should be expected to make, HOW MANY APPLICANTS THEY HAD FOR EACH OF THOS POSITIONS. Also, check out the various job forums. This is where you will get an idea for the current job market.

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Richard Lumpkin, R.T.(R) in Richmond, Virginia

25 months ago

You are correct. Just one other observation...I wonder if such a glut of health care workers/professionals is part and parcel of a coming massive military need (?)

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SaveMeFromRadiology in Kansas City, Missouri

24 months ago

Buck, I can assure you Drones and I are not one in the same. We do both however share a common view on the current state of the RT job market. No one ever said there would never be job openings either present or future. However, if you are considering entering into a profession for a lifetime career then you should take into consideration every fact of information about the positives and the negatives. I've been an RT (R) (MR) since 1981. I currently manage an OPT MRI Clinic and have worked as a Technologist, OEM Applications Specialist, and Regional Manager of a National Mobile provider. I converse with my fellow Technologist's in the city which I reside and I have some knowledge and insight into the local job market.

Please note I have never been unemployed since I graduated in 1981. Indeed, for most of my 30 + year career I had more job opportunities than I knew what to with. Same for my fellow classmates. Every year without fail I received substantial pay raises often exceeding the national average and bonus money as an incentive to NOT leave. Hiring bonuses were the norm for most of my career.

Here is the new reality. I have not hired a new RT in over 6 years. The people I have currently have no possibility of leaving even if they were so inclined. None have had a significant pay raise in 4 years and all bonus money was suspended. And, we are profitable. There simply is no where for them to go. The job market is that bad at least locally in a City of over 1 Million + people. If they were to find a better position, I would wish them luck and thank them for their loyal service but, the new hire (if there was to be one) would be coming in at a pay rate that I would have offered someone 10 years ago. And I would have probably 50 + applicants for the job. My career is soon to end and I have to say it was much better than I could have ever hoped for, I get to retire, comfortably.

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SaveMeFromRadiology in Kansas City, Missouri

24 months ago

(continued) I wonder if my junior staff will be able to do the same ? My youngest Tech (with a BSRT) I have been pushing to explore the opportunities in the field of EMR. I would hate to see her leave as she has been one of the best RT's I have known. However, I can tell you that given the changes I KNOW are coming in our OPT world, she will be lucky to have employment in 3 years time.

I tend to be an optimist by nature but a realist as well. You have an enormous glut of folk's who have graduated just in the last few years. You have the OPT Radiology world which is a large employer of RT's facing a bleak future with decreased reimbursement and additional regulation (oversight) and Hospital's which have seen their Radiology Department go from traditionally being a high margin profit center that augmented the losing ER's, etc. to a break even proposition thanks to declining reimbursement from Medicare and a lack of people with good health benefits. Have you seen the deductibles these days for most health coverage ? Think it's going to get better in the future ? What does that portend for our profession ?

If you choose to go forward as an RT, great ! I wish you the best and hope it turns around some day. That would be great for all of us. If it were me and I was 18 and coming out of HS and looking for a future again would I choose to be an RT ? No, I wouldn't knowing what I know now. That's just my perspective.

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mattiemjk in Marco, Florida

24 months ago

@SaveMeFromRadiology,

Well written and informative post.

Too bad unsuspecting and naive students are still lining up on waiting lists for Radiology Programs(flushing their money down the toilet) with graduates having less than a 1 percent chance of finding employment.

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

24 months ago

Well said @SaveMeFromRadiology.

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isonthejazz in Independence, Missouri

19 months ago

I am planning entrance into FHSU's Bachelor of Science in Medical Diagnostic Imaging program next year. What separates this program from the other schools is that after your associates in RT, you can continue to learn another modality such as; computed tomography (CT), cardiovascular-interventional technology (CVIT),mammography (M), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone densitometry (BD). Wouldn't this give me an advantage on getting an entry level job and how much of one? Also, of all of the secondary modalites listed above, what would have the best job prospects? I am very passionate about my career choice after years of looking into the best career fits for me and I am 100% certain that I would be successfull at it.

Thanks,

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

19 months ago

isonthejazz in Independence, Missouri said: I am planning entrance into FHSU's Bachelor of Science in Medical Diagnostic Imaging program next year. What separates this program from the other schools is that after your associates in RT, you can continue to learn another modality such as; computed tomography (CT), cardiovascular-interventional technology (CVIT),mammography (M), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone densitometry (BD). Wouldn't this give me an advantage on getting an entry level job and how much of one? Also, of all of the secondary modalites listed above, what would have the best job prospects? I am very passionate about my career choice after years of looking into the best career fits for me and I am 100% certain that I would be successfull at it.

Here's the rub, there aren't any jobs. You are being fed a line of BS by the school that is trying to lure you in. These people only care about getting bodies in the door. I realize that most instructors don't think this way, however recruiters don't care. You may be the second coming of Wilhelm Röntgen and it isn't going to help you if there are no jobs available.

For a bit of perspective the hospital that I used to work at just laid off 8 X-Ray techs spanning every modality. That's great that your passionate about this field because you are going to need to survive the disappointment that is in front of you. Once you graduate and time has gone by and you still haven't found your first job you will look at these posts and be extremely mad at yourself for not listening to seasoned x-ray techs.

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MRI Technologist in Irvine, California

19 months ago

I finally was offered a part-time MRI Technologist position. I'm so excited, but at the same time I'm becoming overwhelmed because it's been about a year and a half since I've scanned. I have an ARMRIT license and my interview is next week. I had a phone interview last week where I submitted all my credentials. Does anyone know what a typical interview is like? This is my first MRI interview right out of finishing my clinical hours at my site. The machine I will be working on is a Siemens Closed MRI. How easy is it to learn this machine? How long can I fully be comfortable scanning on this machine without having to seek help? They're offering me one week of training before I am on my own. Is that enough time? Thanks guys.

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MRI Technologist in Irvine, California

19 months ago

I was hoping for a response regarding my questions above. Looks like I'm still in the running for this position. I received a phone call from this imaging center today and my interview has been changed to tomorrow. I'm sort of nervous because when I was doing my clinical hours (1000 hrs.) there was a tech. present to answer any questionsI had. My biggest fear is if one week training is enough for me to go at this alone. They know exactly what kind of experience I have. I just don't want to mess things up. Thanks to anyone who can reply back.

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Drones in Omaha, Nebraska

18 months ago

MRI Technologist
You say you were offered a position so why did you have to interview again?

"I finally was offered a part-time MRI Technologist position."
"I had a phone interview last week where I submitted all my credentials. Does anyone know what a typical interview is like? "

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MRI Technologist in Irvine, California

18 months ago

Drones in Omaha, Nebraska said: MRI Technologist
You say you were offered a position so why did you have to interview again?

"I finally was offered a part-time MRI Technologist position."
"I had a phone interview last week where I submitted all my credentials. Does anyone know what a typical interview is like? "

I initially did a phone interview, but the manager at this site wanted to meet me, so the supervisor and manger interviewed me again (in person). The interview went great!!! They offered me the position right there and then. The site is very nice. Nothing like where I did my externship. I was offered a part-time job. I started my training last week. They're allowing me to train for one month - paid training, to get familiar with the machine and their office procedures before going solo. I was so nervous because it's been 1 1/2 years since I touched a machine during my 1000 clinical, but after my first 3 days, I got a good feel for the Siemens. The guys that trained were all cool and they had me scan immediately my first day. I hope this opens more opportunity for me.

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

18 months ago

Congrats MRI Technologist.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

18 months ago

I wish you the best, MRI Tech in Irvine, I really do. I hope you've got another part time job or an SO or a spouse that can help pay the bills--because those jobs rarely turn into anything. In MRI, in my 12 years of experience, either you're hired FTE or they are using you for some reason--a vacation, an employee that is giving them trouble but may come back to boot you out, crap hours that nobody wants and you'll never have a life--but it's experience, and you're employed. Good on ya. Just watch your back. Always. Always keep your eyes open and your ear to the ground listening for the rumblings. Last hired, first fired. And they never tell you the truth. It'll be all smiles and unicorns--until it isn't. That's the way radiology is, for some reason.
Best of luck to you.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

18 months ago

And no. One week is pathetic for training, particularly if you haven't done Siemens or it's been more than a year for you. If their patient base is ortho--then perhaps you can pick up the protocols pretty quickly...bone isn't that bad, but there are tricks that the seniors know that the MDs love to see--and you'll get jammed. They'll blame you.
If you are doing anything like dynamics, multi exams (C-T-L spines with and without, for example), run offs, and even some of the more complex body work, like livers, MRCP, renals---you are seriously in trouble. It take the above average MRI tech anywhere I've been (and I've been at Harvard, Case Western, OHSU, UNC, ORMC, and UPMC)--about two years to be comfortable doing those types of exams alone.

Contrast injections, timing, bolses--all of those things change very rapidly in MRI--some hospitals promise each and every doctor that they can demand whatever protocols they want, have the tech film or burn anything that they want--and it's all on you. ALWAYS. All of this is swimming around in your head while you're sitting there trying to keep an extremely agitated dementia patient calm in the bore...and everyone's at lunch.
Watch yourself. You can make some lethal mistakes in MRI, and they cannot be undone. If you do not feel completely comfortable with what they train you to do, or you feel that they are abandoning you---speak up. If you don't, this could end badly for you and for a patient. MRI is nothing like xray.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

18 months ago

Oh. And Siemens is the hardest---very temperamental. Crashes often. Learn the tricks to get the machine back up on it's feet. SAR is an issue (overheating due to parameters)--LEARN YOUR PARAMETERS AND THEIR EFFECTS. If you do not understand what decreasing the FOV and hiking the echo train length does to an image---you better learn quick. Siemens has a weird thing called "concatenation". Learn it. It'll make your life easier.
GE is probably the most "dummy proof" I've ever worked on, especially the 15.0 platform. If anybody wants you to work on an open, RUN. Any Philips is rubbish, too, along with Toshiba. Those are the cheap doctors' offices that can't afford a real magnet and try to get you to produce Mercedes Benz images on a Geo Metro machine. Don't do it.
Either way. One week is just ridiculous, unless they really do just want you for lunch coverage and doing basic brains and knees.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

18 months ago

Awesome, SaveMeFromRadiology. That is spot on.

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MRI Technologist in Irvine, California

18 months ago

MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina said: Awesome, SaveMeFromRadiology. That is spot on.

OMG! You just overwhelmed me. I value your opinion snd I accept every thing you just mentioned here. The Siemens is overwhelming, but I'm learning. You are so right on! I cover the techs that go on vacation and take a personal day. I don't expect to get a full-time job out of it, but I do value the experience I'm getting. The scans are basics, have yet to see liver, heart, carotids etc.

My plans is to leave MRI and Health Care completely. I didn't do my research well when going into this radiology field, so I plan to go back to the business world and rekindle what I actually do best in. I don't plan on renewing my ARMRIT license either. It's a joke and the jobs are limited. ARMRIT has done nothing to open the doors for this accreditation alone. I had to flow through and get my ARMRIT license, otherwise, I'd be thinking "what if ?". Now, I know. Thanks again for your posts.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

17 months ago

Tech in Irvine--

You're welcome for the advice, FWIW.

I hope you're okay, I recall vividly when I trained in MRI, how a few of the seniors who were not exactly "competent" would gaslight me. They do it to make themselves look better, or if you are someone of high potential--they fear that you will surpass them and knock them out of their job. Just be careful with everything you do. It's a minefield.

I am definitely happy to hear that you are not seeing anything on the line of cardiac, because if you are, you need to run away as fast as you can. Carotids, MRAs, MRVs, renals, MRCP, livers--those are not that hard to learn, but you need about 6 months of intensive, 8 hours a day training with them to actually KNOW what you're doing and why.

I think you're doing the right thing in getting back to the business world. I just looked up what it would take for me to go back and get my degree in accounting or IT--and it doesn't seem that bad. I just might do it.

What most posters here are asking for is the same thing that every middle class worker wants to know--is there a safe haven for me?

Healthcare isn't it anymore. Healthcare costs (medicare, etc) devours a ridiculous portion of our GDP, and it's spiraling completely out of control. Insurers are cracking down dramatically on any testing such as MRI, CT and Ultrasound--we have weekly meetings on "how to squeeze one more penny" out of the exams we do. It's ugly and getting uglier.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

17 months ago

Once upon a time, and this may not be common knowledge--Radiologists/Neurologists/Cardiologists would buy into a joint venture MRI/CT free standing OP center--and self refer. This is where that whole Rad Tech Nirvana thing started. States shut them down after a few years, and then made getting CONs (certificate of need) like winning the lotto.

The big hospitals did this to shut down competition--and they won. The bad side effect was all of those highly trained RNs, RTs, even office staff--had nowhere to go but back to the hospitals...who knew that they could pick them up for fire sale prices.

I know. I was married to a Radiologist. I know the conversations and the schemes and the money making propositions. I also know it from the Tech side.

This business isn't coming back. Ever. You're on the right track by just moving on--take care of yourself first.

You will ALWAYS HAVE YOUR RT LICENSE. remember that. Just keep it current--you never know if one day, something drops in your lap. In the meantime....move on to greener pastures.

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MRI Technologist in Irvine, California

17 months ago

MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina said: Once upon a time, and this may not be common knowledge--Radiologists/Neurologists/Cardiologists would buy into a joint venture MRI/CT free standing OP center--and self refer. This is where that whole Rad Tech Nirvana thing started. States shut them down after a few years, and then made getting CONs (certificate of need) like winning the lotto.

The big hospitals did this to shut down competition--and they won. The bad side effect was all of those highly trained RNs, RTs, even office staff--had nowhere to go but back to the hospitals...who knew that they could pick them up for fire sale prices.

I know. I was married to a Radiologist. I know the conversations and the schemes and the money making propositions. I also know it from the Tech side.

This business isn't coming back. Ever. You're on the right track by just moving on--take care of yourself first.

You will ALWAYS HAVE YOUR RT LICENSE. remember that. Just keep it current--you never know if one day, something drops in your lap. In the meantime....move on to greener pastures.

Thank you. To keep you up-to-date. I trained in December and that was the last I heard of them. I made a few calls to see if they needed me and I was told they'd call me back and nada. It's okay. I wasn't expecting much from it. I don't plan on renewing my license if I don't get a job by the time I need to pay for the renewal and seminar that come along with it. I don't have a CRT or ARRT. I only have ARMRIT and it's awful that I didn't do my research beforehand. I gave it a few years and now I'm off to go back to a field I do best in. I'm done with this and I am so OVER IT!!!!! Sorry for the rant, but it was a waste of time. And I'm sorry I even followed through with it. MAJOR MISTAKE on my part. A huge price I paid for this lesson in life.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

17 months ago

Irvine--

I am so sorry that they did this, I really am. We all were actually pulling for you, you seemed so optimistic (such a rarity after Rad depts manage to grind you into dust).

Someone else I've chatted with recently said something about how his new position OUTSIDE of rad--remember, most of us seniors have spent 20+ years having our souls sucked from our bodies, so we know what we're saying--he has to "acclimate" to being RESPECTED again, that he gets a SIT DOWN LUNCH and nobody is hanging over his shoulder every second.

Anybody here thinking that it's "romantic" in some way that they can beat the world record on how fast you can eat an entire slice of $8 greasy pizza from the "cafeteria", all the while timing a bolus for a contrast injection on an ER patient---you know, because YOU are just so indescribably important, you are the center of the hospital universe, RIGHT?

It's NOT romantic. It's abuse. Sacficicing your mental and physical health is NOT a pre-requsite for employment, ANYWHERE, ANYTIME, EVER.

That Rad, people. Get used to it if you are damned and determined to land one of those "2,000 jobs" listed on indeed. Be prepared to take flex time, no benefits, no lunch because now they don't have to give you one, back to back shifts, all weekend hours, cross training because now they can pay you grad rad tech pay and make you do 3 modalities.

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MRIRTCTGirl in Raleigh, North Carolina

17 months ago

Get. used. to. it. OR NOT. You have a choice, Irvine---and I am so happy for you that you listened and believe. There are many techs cheering for you right now. I feel sad that they did this to you right out of the gate---which is a strong indicator for the rest of you guys--she barely got out of their little week long training period...didn't do anything wrong...just was "of use" to them and then they threw her away.

Learn it. Live it. And then don't let anybody make you believe that you have to do back flips while singing Dixie again.

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

17 months ago

MRI Technologist in Irvine, California said: Thank you.I'm done with this and I am so OVER IT!!!!! Sorry for the rant, but it was a waste of time. And I'm sorry I even followed through with it. MAJOR MISTAKE on my part. A huge price I paid for this lesson in life.

Best of luck to you MRI Technologist. It's always best to know when to get off of a sinking ship.

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MRI Technologist in Irvine, California

17 months ago

DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska said: Best of luck to you MRI Technologist. It's always best to know when to get off of a sinking ship.

Thanks. Here's the latest. I just got offered an MRI Tech position with a different lab. I was referred to by a friend. Similar terms as the last lab. I'm considered a relief tech for the full-timer who decides to go on vacation, take a personal day etc. What's funny is that I only trained for approximately 1 1/2 weeks at that first lab, which I never actually worked, and this new place is offering $5 more an hour. Closed MRI 1 Tesla, but not sure the name of the machine used. I start training Monday. For the record, I've accepted "ONLY" because I have nothing going on at the moment and I could use the training pay. However, I've begun looking into other job prospects in Business Admin. I gave Health Care 6 years of my life that got me no where and I don't have any further desire to waste more of my time in this industry.

I'll let you guys know how this pans out. I don't have high hopes going into this, which is the best attitude for me to have, so that I don't get disappointed all over again.

Thank you @ DRONES and @ MRIRTCTGirl

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aan idk in topeka, Kansas

16 months ago

I have been working in Nuclear Medicine for over 2 years now but there hasn't been any progress in the field or my job. My hours have been going down and now it seems impossible to live this way. I have a B.S. degree in Healthcare Management and CT certified. What can I do that will help me get a good position in non clinical area of healthcare. Is MBA or MHA a good route to take?

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

16 months ago

aan idk in topeka, look to some of the vendors who service your radiology department. you might be able to catch on with one of them as an applications trainer. these are very well paying jobs, but there is a lot of travel, however that travel is mon-fri only...usually. I always say an MBA is a better route to go because it provides enough diversity to get you in another sector of business in case the bottom falls out of healthcare. One of those 2 degrees should really help your career move forward, getting you out direct patient care. Remember that jobs are really controlled by the business side and the business side does its best to take care of its own.

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aan idk in topeka, Kansas

16 months ago

Thank you. Since I work in the mobile environment it's impossible for me get applications training. I have couple of years of experience as PET/CT now and also CT certified. I like getting an MBA degree but I don't know if anybody would hire me especially in this economy. Healthcare is such a bad place to be right now because there aren't enough jobs especially radiology. I work part time right now and there is no sign of being full time anywhere and only PRN out there. I am trying to get into a promising field that can give me job security and rising salary. Since I have BS degree in Health management I want to stay in this field but get into different area. Is there such field left in healthcare?

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

16 months ago

aan idk in topeka, yes there is. It is anything having to do with Information Technology/Information Systems. For the applications job they will train OJT. Apply for the business side of IT jobs like analyst.

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aan idk in topeka, Kansas

16 months ago

As much as i like to get a stable position i also dont want to get into IT. I would love to stay in healthcare.

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aan idk in topeka, Kansas

16 months ago

Is MHA degree valuable then MBA with health management.

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