Is a Bachelors Degree in RT necessary? What about the BS in RT that is offerred by CCSD?

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ANNIE in Oceanside, California

73 months ago

Does anyone have any feedback as to whether a Bachelor's Degree is of any benefit in the RT field? I'm attending CCSD, and they (of course) are actively promoting the Bachelor's of RT as "the way to take your RT career to the next level.' However, I have recieved different info from RTs in the field--that an overpriced BS is NOT necessary and will not be applicable unless you want to go into management. What does any currently working RRT have to share? Thank you so much!!

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omp in Skokie, Illinois

73 months ago

No, it's not necessary. I already had a bachelor's degree in another field when I went to respiratory school, but even if I didn't, I wouldn't go for one. If you want to do management, I would get a degree in health management or administration. My boss is a CRTT, but she's one of the best bosses I've had. She's had a lot of management experience.

Anyway, there will most likely be no difference in pay, and you'll be out of 2 years and $.

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Annie in Oceanside, California

73 months ago

omp in Skokie, Illinois said: No, it's not necessary. I already had a bachelor's degree in another field when I went to respiratory school, but even if I didn't, I wouldn't go for one. If you want to do management, I would get a degree in health management or administration. My boss is a CRTT, but she's one of the best bosses I've had. She's had a lot of management experience.

Anyway, there will most likely be no difference in pay, and you'll be out of 2 years and $.

Thank you for sharing your wisdom!! This helps me (and several others) a LOT! Have a great day!

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MMK in Oceanside, California

69 months ago

Annie,
Be careful with CCSD, the respiratory program is currently on probation with Co-Arc. Take your time and do some homework before deciding for yourself.

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Annie in Oceanside in Oceanside, California

69 months ago

Thanks, MMK, but I'm already 2/3s of the way through the program at CCSD already... I looking into other options when the accreditation probation began--one year ago...however, I couldn't afford all the extra money to go & start over somewhere else. Am an Associate student. I am WELL aware of the issues at CCSD. Thanks for the positive intention! Are you in RT, MMK? If so, where/what are your recommendations? Are you having a positive experience? Anything you'd like to share? Have a great weekend! :-)

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Tina in Bowling Green, Ohio

68 months ago

ANNIE in Oceanside, California said: Does anyone have any feedback as to whether a Bachelor's Degree is of any benefit in the RT field? I'm attending CCSD, and they (of course) are actively promoting the Bachelor's of RT as "the way to take your RT career to the next level.' However, I have recieved different info from RTs in the field--that an overpriced BS is NOT necessary and will not be applicable unless you want to go into management. What does any currently working RRT have to share? Thank you so much!!

An associate will get you by! But, do realize that the NBRC is working to do away with the associate program, in order to get more respect for our field. They are still passing the law for Bachelor's degree respiratory therapist to be able to perform PFTs in doctors office, without the doctor actually being in the office. So in the future, if you ever want to work PFT for a doctor's office, they probably won't hire you if they can't leave and see their other patients in the hospitals and so forth. There is no growth potential, so if you want to work the floors for the rest of your life, yes, an associates is enough!

Tina

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TRS in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

68 months ago

Eddie in Houston, Texas said: Actually, I have my Bachelors in Respiratory from UTMB. In Houston, the largest Medical Center and Research base in the world, most hospitals as a minimum are looking for RRT, other hospitals will not hire associate degreed therapists. The pay difference here is at least $2.00 per hour on base pay plus the shift differential is higher. If you wanted to ever go into management, a Bachelors degree is going to be required not preferred. And, if you are like me; and want ot go into administration on a higher level you have to have a masters degree. So a bachelors degree is a stepping stone to get there.

I have to disagree with some of this statement. I am a 9 yr seasoned therapist with ans Assoc. degree and an RRT. I am originally from TX and also worked at UTMB in Galveston. Though a Bachelors degree is a good stepping stone to further your career and most facilities require you to have a bachelors for a management position, many are not requiring you to have more than your Assoc. Degree in Respiratory Care to work as a therapist. Yes it is true, more and more facilities prefer you to be an RRT. However, you do not have to acquire a Bachelor degreee in order to become an RRT. If hospitals are not hiring any RT's with an Associates Degree, then they must be hurting for RT's since an Assoc. Degree has been the min. requirement for the NBRC for only approx 12 yrs. I am now working in OK and RT's here are just trying to transition from being an OJT (on the job training). So.....it's really going to depend on where you work and what career path you want to follow. My suggestion is to get your bachelors and that way you can either move up in respiratory or move to another field with greater ease. It makes you more marketable and will save you time later on if you want to expand your career horizons! Good Luck!

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Franco in Detroit, Michigan

68 months ago

TRS in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: I have to disagree with some of this statement. I am a 9 yr seasoned therapist with ans Assoc. degree and an RRT. I am originally from TX and also worked at UTMB in Galveston. Though a Bachelors degree is a good stepping stone to further your career and most facilities require you to have a bachelors for a management position, many are not requiring you to have more than your Assoc. Degree in Respiratory Care to work as a therapist. Yes it is true, more and more facilities prefer you to be an RRT. However, you do not have to acquire a Bachelor degreee in order to become an RRT. If hospitals are not hiring any RT's with an Associates Degree, then they must be hurting for RT's since an Assoc. Degree has been the min. requirement for the NBRC for only approx 12 yrs. I am now working in OK and RT's here are just trying to transition from being an OJT (on the job training). So.....it's really going to depend on where you work and what career path you want to follow. My suggestion is to get your bachelors and that way you can either move up in respiratory or move to another field with greater ease. It makes you more marketable and will save you time later on if you want to expand your career horizons! Good Luck!

What if you have a Bachelors in Business and an associate in Respiratory....Can you get into management?

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Scott in Santa Ana, California

68 months ago

Annie in Oceanside in Oceanside, California said: Thanks, MMK, but I'm already 2/3s of the way through the program at CCSD already... I looking into other options when the accreditation probation began--one year ago...however, I couldn't afford all the extra money to go & start over somewhere else. Am an Associate student. I am WELL aware of the issues at CCSD. Thanks for the positive intention! Are you in RT, MMK? If so, where/what are your recommendations? Are you having a positive experience? Anything you'd like to share? Have a great weekend! :-)

I am looking to relocate to San Diego and enroll at CCSD. I am concerned when you say that are are aware of the issues at CCSD. Can you e-mail me @ sxhaller@gmail.com and tell me a bit more about your experiences with the school? Thanks!

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Almost Finished (RT Student) in Vista, California

68 months ago

Scott, Just type in CCSD at the top of the page and click on "search forums"... That is a small indication of what's up... Orange Coast in OC is excellent, have you thought of them? With the cirriculumn additions to the CCSD program, the time frame would be about the same.

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Carr in san diego, California

66 months ago

Annie in Oceanside in Oceanside, California said: Thanks, MMK, but I'm already 2/3s of the way through the program at CCSD already... I looking into other options when the accreditation probation began--one year ago...however, I couldn't afford all the extra money to go & start over somewhere else. Am an Associate student. I am WELL aware of the issues at CCSD. Thanks for the positive intention! Are you in RT, MMK? If so, where/what are your recommendations? Are you having a positive experience? Anything you'd like to share? Have a great weekend! :-)

Hey, I was thinking of enrolling at CCSD. Can you PLEASE email me more information as far as your experience with CCSD. I am considering enrolling going for my Ba in Rt. One of my concerns is attending CCSD in the evening and working full-time during the day, can this be done at CCSD? Also, is the cost worth it? My email is tcarr13@gmail.com. Thanks in advance.

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Musous man in Worcester, Massachusetts

66 months ago

ANNIE in Oceanside, California said: Does anyone have any feedback as to whether a Bachelor's Degree is of any benefit in the RT field? I'm attending CCSD, and they (of course) are actively promoting the Bachelor's of RT as "the way to take your RT career to the next level.' However, I have recieved different info from RTs in the field--that an overpriced BS is NOT necessary and will not be applicable unless you want to go into management. What does any currently working RRT have to share? Thank you so much!!

GET A BS, IT IS NOT NECESSARY BUT IT IS GOOD TO HAVE. IT OPENS MORE DOORS LIKE TEACHING, MANAGEMENT. AND IF YOU DECIDE LATER YOU WANT TO BE A PA OR MD OR NP YOU HAVE THIS UNDER YOUR BELT. GO FOR IT. I BECAME A RRT FIRST..THEN WORKED AND GOT MY BS AFTER!!!GREATEST FEELING TO GET YOUE 4 YEAR!!! NOW I AM LOOKING AT PA SCHOOL.

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Scott in Santa Ana, California

66 months ago

Musous man in Worcester, Massachusetts said: GET A BS, IT IS NOT NECESSARY BUT IT IS GOOD TO HAVE. IT OPENS MORE DOORS LIKE TEACHING, MANAGEMENT. AND IF YOU DECIDE LATER YOU WANT TO BE A PA OR MD OR NP YOU HAVE THIS UNDER YOUR BELT. GO FOR IT. I BECAME A RRT FIRST..THEN WORKED AND GOT MY BS AFTER!!!GREATEST FEELING TO GET YOUE 4 YEAR!!! NOW I AM LOOKING AT PA SCHOOL.

Musous, I would love to pick your brain. My Goal is to go down the same path, RRT then eventually become a PA. E-mail me at sxhaller at gmail, if you don't mind. I would love to hear your story. Thanks!

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Michelle in Portland, Oregon

65 months ago

I've been looking at international assignments and they generally want people with Bachelors in RT for an overseas assignment.

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MandySueRRT in Tarboro, North Carolina

65 months ago

I am a RRT and am currently attending UNC Charlotte for my BSRT. Depending on the area you work in is what is expected. A four year degree is not needed for management in my area. CRT's are still hired but most hospitals are expecting more out of their therapists. If you are RRT- Eligible you are expected to obtain your registry within a set time limit. I plan on persuing my career further. Who knows where it might lead!

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t.carr

65 months ago

I am currently in CCSD bachelors RT program. Bachelor in RT is not neccessary right now, but it will be in 5-10 years. Just like Nursing RT proffesion will soon require Ba to gain my respect for the field. So if your thinkin long term go bachelors if not right now an associates will do. You can upgrade your associates later if you choose to also. CCSD is a good choice I'm a night student.

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Mark RCP in Texas

65 months ago

t.carr said: I am currently in CCSD bachelors RT program. Bachelor in RT is not neccessary right now, but it will be in 5-10 years. Just like Nursing RT proffesion will soon require Ba to gain my respect for the field. So if your thinkin long term go bachelors if not right now an associates will do. You can upgrade your associates later if you choose to also. CCSD is a good choice I'm a night student.

That's what the NBRC is pushing for, but in truth the way you get respect is your knowledge, your skill in the field. Also, yrs of experience counts more, than a piece of paper.I have 10yrs,and yes I am a CRT,AAS degree.I have gained trust, and respect, because I stand up for myself,and have gained yrs of RT skill and knowledge.Also, nurse's will always have respect, whether they have a BSN or ADN, because they will always know more about the Doctor's patients. I know for a fact, from my wife,and all the nurse's I know. When a Doctor is called late at night, who know's more about the pt, the nurse.Doctor's only see the pt, for a few minutes, vs 12hrs with nurse.Like RT's,who does the Doctor ask for changes or questions, or suggestions, in the vent management or ICU care, the RT.There are the passive and then there are the aggressive,and what is best for the pt. A BS in RT will not get you respect, nor more money, and no one cares if you have a BS, I dont care if the nurse has a BSN, I only care that he or she has the skill to do what is right for the pt.Also the title of BS is 9 out 10 not on your badge.

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tcarr in San Diego, California

65 months ago

I agree with all of your points, but again Bs will most likely be mandetory in the RT feild over the next decade. Also, If you want to go into a supervisory or management position like myself then yes the Bs is required. I like RT because its more specialized and you dont neccessarily recieve direct oreder from the doc like a nurse. The doc looks to you for suggestions or advice rather then just giving orders all the time.

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JPARS in Ashland, Kentucky

64 months ago

For those of you with a BS, how long did it take after you got the associates, and also, how much harder is the coursework? I'm in a program in Morehead, Ky to get my RRT and have really been looking toward getting a BS afterward even though i have found in my clinical rotations, there are tons of CRTs and i dont believe i've seen any with a BS.

Thanks for any info =)

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Sarah in Manassas, Virginia

64 months ago

Michelle in Portland, Oregon said: I've been looking at international assignments and they generally want people with Bachelors in RT for an overseas assignment.

I was also looking into the possiblity of an overseas job as RT, namely the Middle East. Do they all require a BS? Anyone here ever worked in that region, and if so, how are the working conditions out there?

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Mark RCP in Texas

64 months ago

JPARS in Ashland, Kentucky said: For those of you with a BS, how long did it take after you got the associates, and also, how much harder is the coursework? I'm in a program in Morehead, Ky to get my RRT and have really been looking toward getting a BS afterward even though i have found in my clinical rotations, there are tons of CRTs and i dont believe i've seen any with a BS.

Thanks for any info =)

You may not see many CRT's with a BS, it's a pesonal preferance. Like the above posted, a BS is only required for manangement. Also alot of CRT's , like me went to school, before a BS was even around. But NBRC has been pushing for a BS, and now a MS degree. But like I have said, BS is not posted on there badge, like most RN's. Remember, a BS is just more courses, not in RT, but extra english etc.I assume like alot of RT's we look at the RT, not their degree. Nor care if their a RRT or CRT,we all do the same job. I have a AAS degree, and yrs of experience weigh more, than a piece of paper. Alot of CRT's are OJT, or 1 yr degree, before the change by the NBRC.For me I am a CRT, and did not have the time or abiltity to take the RRT, due to having to support myself,and now being a traveler. So look at the RT as your collegue, not as CRT or RRT,and they have yrs of experience. And to add ,also every RT degree now requires one to get their RRT , in yrs past you graduated, then took the CRT and then could take the RRT.

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Kara C

64 months ago

I am 25, just starting my college career, and my ultimate goal is to acheive my BS in RT. I am taking the required pre-requisites, and I am concerned that next fall, there is a possibility that I may not be accepted into the program and have to wait until next year. So my question is, is it possible to take courses at a community college while working towards my associate that will apply, and/or help me in obtaining my BS. Is there another RT program that is required for the BS like there is for the AAS after obtaining my Associates? Please help, I am new to this but determined and seeking any info I can get from experienced therapists. Thank You

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fuzzy in Aurora, Colorado

64 months ago

t.carr said: I am currently in CCSD bachelors RT program. Bachelor in RT is not neccessary right now, but it will be in 5-10 years. Just like Nursing RT proffesion will soon require Ba to gain my respect for the field. So if your thinkin long term go bachelors if not right now an associates will do. You can upgrade your associates later if you choose to also. CCSD is a good choice I'm a night student.

Really.. Who cares about you having respect for a field?

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jascoman in Houston, Texas

63 months ago

Hey there Tonya,
I was looking up this topic and google took me this website. I of course figured out who was writing the comment and thought, "Oh that is my Pookie from UTMB." To the original writer, like TRS, I believe that the BS will only make you more marketable, and in todays job market where hospitals are actually laying off in some areas, it can only do you good. The NBRC is trying to eventually weed out the associate programs which would be wonderful for our field. I mean, look at the other therapy fields and see how successful they are in the job market and how they make so much more money thatn RT's do. I have 19 yrs experience and it is important for us to raise the bar for RT's.

TRS in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: I have to disagree with some of this statement. I am a 9 yr seasoned therapist with ans Assoc. degree and an RRT. I am originally from TX and also worked at UTMB in Galveston. Though a Bachelors degree is a good stepping stone to further your career and most facilities require you to have a bachelors for a management position, many are not requiring you to have more than your Assoc. Degree in Respiratory Care to work as a therapist. Yes it is true, more and more facilities prefer you to be an RRT. However, you do not have to acquire a Bachelor degreee in order to become an RRT. If hospitals are not hiring any RT's with an Associates Degree, then they must be hurting for RT's since an Assoc. Degree has been the min. requirement for the NBRC for only approx 12 yrs. I am now working in OK and RT's here are just trying to transition from being an OJT (on the job training). So.....it's really going to depend on where you work and what career path you want to follow. My suggestion is to get your bachelors and that way you can either move up in respiratory or move to another field with greater ease. It makes you more marketable and will save you time later on if you want to expand your career horizons! Good Luck![/

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Brandon in Albuquerque, New Mexico

63 months ago

I see that in most cases it is required to have a BS for dvancement in RT, I am just beginning school for a AAS and have been in retail management for the last 7 years. Will employers take that experience into account or is it stricly based on eductaion?

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goodliferotation in Sherwood, Arkansas

63 months ago

jascoman in Houston, Texas said: Hey there Tonya,
I was looking up this topic and google took me this website. I of course figured out who was writing the comment and thought, "Oh that is my Pookie from UTMB." To the original writer, like TRS, I believe that the BS will only make you more marketable, and in todays job market where hospitals are actually laying off in some areas, it can only do you good. The NBRC is trying to eventually weed out the associate programs which would be wonderful for our field. I mean, look at the other therapy fields and see how successful they are in the job market and how they make so much more money thatn RT's do. I have 19 yrs experience and it is important for us to raise the bar for RT's.

Hey
jascoman in Houston, Texas
I am relocating to Houston in December. I was referred to Inhalation Therapy Ass. It's a respiratory staffing service can you give me any information about them?

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Rt carr in Burbank, California

63 months ago

Good point, just remember when the bachelors is require the people with associates will be "grandfathered" in so to those seekin an associates now, go for it !

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jascoman in Houston, Texas

63 months ago

sorry, but no, i have no info on that agency. good luck though and welcome to houston.

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TRS in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

62 months ago

Found your comment finally. And we soooo compliment each other. 3 more years and I should hopefully be back in TX! I do believe that they will push us RRT's into getting that BA more and more as time goes on. But do I really want to do it? How you feel about getting a BA in Respiratory Scott?
Love,
Your Pookie!

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TRS in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

62 months ago

Rt carr in Burbank, California said: Good point, just remember when the bachelors is require the people with associates will be "grandfathered" in so to those seekin an associates now, go for it !

You really think they will "grandfather" us in for a BA? Doubtful!

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TRS in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

62 months ago

Kara C said: I am 25, just starting my college career, and my ultimate goal is to acheive my BS in RT. I am taking the required pre-requisites, and I am concerned that next fall, there is a possibility that I may not be accepted into the program and have to wait until next year. So my question is, is it possible to take courses at a community college while working towards my associate that will apply, and/or help me in obtaining my BS. Is there another RT program that is required for the BS like there is for the AAS after obtaining my Associates? Please help, I am new to this but determined and seeking any info I can get from experienced therapists. Thank You

Most "program" courses do not transfer over because it is built for that programs specifications. How ever, all your sciences, and other basics should transfer just about anywhere. Just be careful. Some programs require different general ed basics. I was not required to have physics or chemistry for my A.A.S. degree because it was built into my RT classes. But most BA programs will require them. I hope that is of some help. Good luck!

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tirvinal in New Jersey

62 months ago

Musous man in Worcester, Massachusetts said: GET A BS, IT IS NOT NECESSARY BUT IT IS GOOD TO HAVE. IT OPENS MORE DOORS LIKE TEACHING, MANAGEMENT. AND IF YOU DECIDE LATER YOU WANT TO BE A PA OR MD OR NP YOU HAVE THIS UNDER YOUR BELT. GO FOR IT. I BECAME A RRT FIRST..THEN WORKED AND GOT MY BS AFTER!!!GREATEST FEELING TO GET YOUE 4 YEAR!!! NOW I AM LOOKING AT PA SCHOOL.

how long did it take you to get a bachelors degree in Respiratory Therapy while working as an RRT? did u take part time classes?

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candylove in chula vista, California

61 months ago

Scott in Santa Ana, California said: I am looking to relocate to San Diego and enroll at CCSD. I am concerned when you say that are are aware of the issues at CCSD. Can you e-mail me @ sxhaller@gmail.com and tell me a bit more about your experiences with the school? Thanks!

I'm not sure about now but several months ago they were on probation because a lot of the students that graduated was not able to pass the CRT exam, and that sucks especially after paying over 40-50 thousand dollars for an AA.

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candylove in chula vista, California

61 months ago

Carr in san diego, California said: Hey, I was thinking of enrolling at CCSD. Can you PLEASE email me more information as far as your experience with CCSD. I am considering enrolling going for my Ba in Rt. One of my concerns is attending CCSD in the evening and working full-time during the day, can this be done at CCSD? Also, is the cost worth it? My email is tcarr13@gmail.com. Thanks in advance.

Try to attend a local community college because being stuck with 40-50 thousand dollars in student loans after graduation sucks.

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Almost Finished (RT Student) in Vista, California

61 months ago

candylove in chula vista, California said: Try to attend a local community college because being stuck with 40-50 thousand dollars in student loans after graduation sucks.

You are correct! I spoke with a COARC Director this morning, to find out the status of my school at this time (CCSD). I was told that the school IS still accredited, albeit still under "probationary" status. However, I was also told that the NBRC has prohibited CCSD from accepting any more RT Students as of this time; and that CCSD has petitioned this NBRC decision. No one in my program has been informed of this issue--and this information was not given out 'upon inquiry'. The COARC Director said that this information must legally be given to students/applicants 'upon inquirey.' We are not happy that we were not informed of the NBRC's decision to no longer have CCSD Students accepting into their RT Program. We are also not happy that we were not told when the school was placed into a "Probabion" status, and when we discovered our change of status on the CAAHEP site, NO information/explaination was forthcoming for several months. We recieved a substandard education there. However, in all fairness, the NEW RT Department Director and the Current Clinical Director are excellent, and the current RT Teaching Staff is exemplary...if these professionals had been in place when we initially started our RT Program, we would have positive things to say about the program. Yes, the student loans are staggering (and they are PRIVATE student loans, which have the highest interest rate!). Community College would have been the best choice. Hindsight is 20/20.

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moabalan in Tucson, Arizona

61 months ago

the issues at CCSD.

CCSD may have a more serious case, but it is not a traditional academic college, and I have never been around a nontraditional school that was any better than "just okay" overall. That means students aren't treated as well overall, and they aren't trained quite as well overall. I went to a nontraditional colleges and have taught at two nontraditional colleges (Pima and Concorde) and our students came out okay, but their experience was Just Not As Solid as a community college or four-year outfit.

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Kexy25 in Detroit, Michigan

61 months ago

omp in Skokie, Illinois said: No, it's not necessary. I already had a bachelor's degree in another field when I went to respiratory school, but even if I didn't, I wouldn't go for one. If you want to do management, I would get a degree in health management or administration. My boss is a CRTT, but she's one of the best bosses I've had. She's had a lot of management experience.

Anyway, there will most likely be no difference in pay, and you'll be out of 2 years and $.

Can some one clarify for me what is a CRTT?

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Matt in New York, New York

61 months ago

Kexy25 in Detroit, Michigan said: Can some one clarify for me what is a CRTT?

CRTT Stands for certified respiratory therapy technician.. I think they are not allowed to take the registry exam because they dont have an associate degree

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Matt S. in Clearwater, Florida

60 months ago

After completing an A.S. degree in Respiratory care and becoming an RRT, does anyone know how a person specializes in pediatric respiratory care? What education would be needed? Or is it on the job training that is really required?

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BOREDRT in Pico Rivera, California

60 months ago

Matt S. in Clearwater, Florida said: After completing an A.S. degree in Respiratory care and becoming an RRT, does anyone know how a person specializes in pediatric respiratory care? What education would be needed? Or is it on the job training that is really required?

Its really based on job experience. If you want to work in a PICU or NICU then additional trainning will be required, its usually depedns on where you work and their willingness to train you. You could get the NPS credential; which is another NBRC credentialing exam for pediatrics and neonates. Also obtain PALS and NRP.

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BOREDRT in Pico Rivera, California

60 months ago

Kexy25 in Detroit, Michigan said: Can some one clarify for me what is a CRTT?

That really is an outdated term; we are now simply CRT's (Certified Respiratory Therapist) or RRT's (registered respiratory therapist) or RCP (respiratory care practitioner). CRTT is Certified respiratory therapy technician (no longer viable)

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Matt S. in Clearwater, Florida

60 months ago

Thank you for your help. Currently, I am an undergraduate student, but I have found that I'd like to go into Respiratory care. Does anyone think it would be wise to complete my degree and then start and A.S. in respiratory care? I almost don't see the point in finishing my B.S. because it is totally unrelated. Except for the fact I've taken a lot of math and chemistry. Also what does PALS and NRP stand for?

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BOREDRT in Pico Rivera, California

60 months ago

Matt S. in Clearwater, Florida said: Thank you for your help. Currently, I am an undergraduate student, but I have found that I'd like to go into Respiratory care. Does anyone think it would be wise to complete my degree and then start and A.S. in respiratory care? I almost don't see the point in finishing my B.S. because it is totally unrelated. Except for the fact I've taken a lot of math and chemistry. Also what does PALS and NRP stand for?

I would go ahead and finish your BS degree, it will help you even after you become a RT (if you plan on becoming a manager, director, educator; you need at least a BS degree). Also, the economy is not the greatest, so by teh time you finish your BS and then AS in RT it should be improved. PALS= Pediatric Advanced Life Support; its a class you take every 2 years (kind alike a CPR class but more involved and specializing in pediatrics); ACLS is Advanced Cardiac Life Support (same idea as PALS except it specializes in adults) and NRP is neonatal resusitation program (specializes in neonatal resucitation).

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Matt S. in Clearwater, Florida

60 months ago

Thannks again for your help. Currently, I'm majoring in Environmental Science. Does just having a BS qualify you in most cases to become a manager, director or educator in the Respiratory care field? Or is it better to have a BS in Respiratory Therapy or Health Administration?

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Craig C. in San Jose, California

60 months ago

As an Assistant Manager for a fairly large (56 therapist) RT department in California I would recommend that any aspiring RT plan to to take your education as far as possible. Originally from Texas I have almost twelve years in the field and was a CRT for most of them. Some of the best therapist's I have ever worked with were/are CRT's that only completed a certificate program (15 months). The only problem is that they are generally limited to the facilities where they work because they have already established their knowledge and dedication to patient care with those facilities. Some of the worst RT's I have ever worked with were RRT's and some with BS degrees. Some facilities even limit the clinical practice of their staff based on the credentials they hold. You have to think like a hospital whose highest administration levels are usually held by persons with non clinical backgrounds. They want you to look good on paper because it limits their potential liability. I personally have recently begun to pursue my B.S. to further my career. I never thought that I would want to participate in management when I first got out of school but as I grow in my career I continue to look for ways to advance my knowledge. Also as the primary person to review resumes, interview and hire potential employees for my department the first and sometimes only thing that I see is your resume. When reviewing resumes the first things that I look at are in this order: Credentials (RRT,CRT,NPS,CPFT,RPFT,AE-C), Education (AS,BS etc.), Certifications (BLS,ACLS,PALS,NRP), Experience (Primarily the focus of facilities you worked for Trauma, Cardiac, Pediatric, Neonatal). It may be hard to understand until you are in the position of hiring and training therapist to function independently in your facility. Your level of education may not always correlate to your actual skill level but it may make the difference in whether or not you even get an interview. I hope this information help.

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Mario in Indianapolis, Indiana

59 months ago

Hey Craig,

Since you being a manager, do you know where there are any jobs for new grads? Are you offering any?

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powerpress74 in Kansas, Kansas

58 months ago

Hello, I will be starting my RT education program in August. I am wanting to relocate to Texas when I finish my education. I have looked up the salaries on a few websites of RTs in Texas, it appears that the median income for RTs in TX is about $50k a year, or $25 an hour. I was wondering if anyone can confirm that figure. (I do realize that your experience and where you work matters). Also, I have done some research online, and spoke with several people about the right path to take as far as my education goes. I have come to the conclusion that I should get a Bachelors in RT and pursue a business administration degree of some kind. I was wondering if anyone agrees are disagrees with this plan. Also, I have heard there is a position that an RT can attain that deals with surgery and anesthesiology that is a very advanced position and that is highly lucrative ($100k+ a year). Does anyone have any info on this? Thank you for all the help in advance!

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omp in Schaumburg, Illinois

58 months ago

Don't waste your time with a bachelors in respiratory. Get an associate and then you can go back and get an MBA. I don't know how it is in Texas, but here we have no job protection (i.e. RNs can give nebs and do ABGs at many instituions).

Average salary around here is 24-29 dollars an hour. A little less if you are starting out, but this also depends on the hospital where you work.

As far as I know, the only career wherre you can work in surgery would be a nurse anesthetist. If this is your goal, I would look into these programs and see what you would need to do. I had a friend who did that after getting a b.s. in nusing, but she worked in nursing for 10 years before she went back to school for this.

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Jason in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

58 months ago

I will be graduating from Kirkwood Community College's respiratory therapy program in May 2011. The program is outstanding, tuition cheap, and we are the only community college with a multi-million dollar simulation lab. My instructor told us that due to the simulation lab we will graduate knowing more than he did after 5 years as an RRT. After I finish this program I would like to attend the University of Texas and earn my bachelors in Medical Services Technology, with a minor in Spanish translation. Would this be a good path to pursue?

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ec_335 in houston, Texas

58 months ago

I am 26 years old and after the whole recession we experienced, i realized that i need to go back to school and get a degree. I was making $120k- $140k before this whole mess happened and didnt even have school in mind at the time, now income is cut more than half and working crazy hours, after talking to a friend im considering becoming a respiratory therapist. I would like some help and guidance on what schools in houston offer a career in respiratory therapist, how long would i be attending school? Is BS the way to go? Please anyone that can give me some input would be very helpful. thanks my email is ec_335@hotmail.com

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