Is RT really a good career choice?

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RT arkansas

62 months ago

optimistic in Bothell, Washington said: I am seriously contemplating becoming an RT and everyone keeps telling me are you sure? all your gonna see is people dieing and old people who cant breathe. They also tell me its not worth it and they don't even know what an RT does... So should I tell everyone to shove it?

take it from a senior respiratory study.. You may want to reconsider. in the stater where i stay respiratory is very limited and under respected>> RNs run the show. A RT with good knowledge always get put to the back compared to RNs, even when we know best. The physican doesnt want to know what the RT thinks, he will always direct his attention to the nurses. Even when the problem is related to ventilators or respiratory related..be a RN, more money, CRNA school. better oppertunities alll around

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Albuterol is the cure all drug in Mesa, Arizona

62 months ago

Very true indeed. The respiratory field is slowly seeing it's last days as a well paying profession. With the proliferation of trade/vocational schools, the job market is absolutely flooded and will only continue to get worse. It's a pure numbers game, when the supply far exceeds the demand you will now have a profession that no longer provides strong career viability.

Arizona has now turned to utter crap. New grads will not have jobs waiting for them when they graduate sorry to say. Sure a few will slip through the cracks but the vast majority will not, again, it's a numbers game and employers are now empowered to be super picky. I just recently found another job, which I felt extremely lucky to get by the way. I have 5 years of peds and adult experience with RRT.

For those that wish to consider becoming an RT, let me STRONGLY suggest that you pursue an RN program. More job opportunities, more money and more respect. What more could you want?

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optimistic in Bothell, Washington

62 months ago

well its good to see someone likes there job. So is respiratory therapy stressful? are codes scary? whats your typical day like? do you work 3 13's or what's our normal schedule?

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Rolinda in Chula Vista, California

61 months ago

optimistic in Bothell, Washington said: well its good to see someone likes there job. So is respiratory therapy stressful? are codes scary? whats your typical day like? do you work 3 13's or what's our normal schedule?

Hi Optimistic, At times it can be stressful multitasking and working with multiple inpatients within the Hospital environment. We learn to triage and help the more critical patients first. Codes can be intense!. Just remember you are never alone. It seems when a Code is called, everyone, including their brother and sister comes running!. The response is immediate. We all work together to help our patients. While working in the Hospital an RT can be assigned to work the Floors, Suctioning patients, Obtaining ABGs, ECGs...etc., Administering CPT, Broncodilator Txs...etc., Cleaning/Changing trachs/cannula, Administering Txs or Setting Up a Humidification Tent for a "little one" in Peds, Helping babies on ventilators in the NICU, Assessing patients in the ER/ED and Administering Txs, Cleaning and Setting Up Ventilators for critical patients. Every employer differs. RTs can work 12, 10, and 8 hour shifts, but typically, most RTs work 3, 12 hour shifts in the Hospital; not necessarily consecutively. While in a Pulmonary Diagnostic Lab within a Clinic setting, a RT typically works 8 hour shifts. I have worked in Hospital and Clinic environments. I enjoy the diversity my job provides me and I feel I make a difference. I wish you well. Good journey.

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moabalan in Tucson, Arizona

61 months ago

optimistic in Bothell, Washington said: well its good to see someone likes there job. So is respiratory therapy stressful? are codes scary? whats your typical day like? do you work 3 13's or what's our normal schedule?

Plain truth is that RT is stressful. Many days there is simply as much to do as you can humanly do. Doesn't mean you're not helping a lot of people, but you asked about stress. I left the field once due to stress, but came back some years later.

Codes: after you have been in about 30 codes (maybe a year), they are not scary any more. You're not afraid you will screw up, because you know mostly all you should do. You just do what you can, try to think of what else you could do that nobody is doing, which might help. You don't go crazy and move really fast. You develop the reflexes to do things smoothly (as much as possible--main problem is lack of room around the patient's bed) and quickly both. If you forget something you might have done, you remember to do it the next time. Codes are dramatic, but you don't get scared after you're used to them.

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Ray in Zephyrhills, Florida

61 months ago

Sure an RN makes a little more but they have to answer to the patients every need and the dr.s every need and so on and so on. I have been a therapist for 12 yrs and love the fact i can do my job and then say let me tell your nurse about that rash on your butt. Believe me unless you go on to become a nurse pract. or crna the 2-3 dollars more an hour are not worth the headaches a nurse as to endure

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sharon stowe in Atlanta, Georgia

61 months ago

I was a CRTT back in the late 90's for several years in a different state. I loved it. I moved back to my hometown to work for my father in his business. Needless to say I never got back into the field due to that. My father just recently passed away due to lung cancer. I dont think that his company will be able to survive with him here. I have thought about getting back into the field. I am not sure however if anyone would hire me since I have been out of the field for 10 years. DOes anyone have any input on this matter?

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sha in Benson, North Carolina

59 months ago

I've been working only a little over a year and I have gained a lot of respect from RNs and MDs as an RRT. I love my job, and have been gained the trust of a lot of doctors. At the same time, our respiratory department is very protocol driven, meaning we are given management and can mostly make our own decisions. I enjoy challenging myself and learning still. Do I want to do this for the rest of my life? Probably not, I am considering going to school for my CRNA which means I will have to give up the loogies for the poopies for a few years to gain the nursing exp required to get in! Remember that it doesnt matter what everyone else thinks, its all in what YOU decide you like and want to do

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me in Lily, Kentucky

57 months ago

RT arkansas said: take it from a senior respiratory study.. You may want to reconsider. in the stater where i stay respiratory is very limited and under respected>> RNs run the show. A RT with good knowledge always get put to the back compared to RNs, even when we know best. The physican doesnt want to know what the RT thinks, he will always direct his attention to the nurses. Even when the problem is related to ventilators or respiratory related..be a RN, more money, CRNA school. better oppertunities alll around

keep in mind this person is a senior respiratory therapist. the field has changed since they have went through school. he or she is prolly a crt and they will be limited as opposed to if you go to school now you will more than likely become a rrt which opens the door for more opportunities....

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bellanna in Kissimmee, Florida

57 months ago

sharon stowe in Atlanta, Georgia said: I was a CRTT back in the late 90's for several years in a different state. I loved it. I moved back to my hometown to work for my father in his business. Needless to say I never got back into the field due to that. My father just recently passed away due to lung cancer. I dont think that his company will be able to survive with him here. I have thought about getting back into the field. I am not sure however if anyone would hire me since I have been out of the field for 10 years. DOes anyone have any input on this matter?

omg same here I practiced 95-2000. But i got married and worked for my husbands business for 10 years. Now after business basically at a standstill I decided to get back into respiratory. Im about to get licensed in florida but there are not very many position openings for people like me. I am crt and only have 4 years experience in subacute, nursing home and home health. :(
I am about to get registry eligible so I think that will make more marketable.

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Been there, done that in New Rochelle, New York

57 months ago

optimistic in Bothell, Washington said: I am seriously contemplating becoming an RT and everyone keeps telling me are you sure? all your gonna see is people dieing and old people who cant breathe. They also tell me its not worth it and they don't even know what an RT does... So should I tell everyone to shove it?

I started my health care career as an RRT. Was bored with it by the time I graduated. RN's made more money too. I won't give you my life story, but here are my best suggestions.
Physician's Assistant or FAMILY Nurse Practitioner
Occupational Therapist/Physical Therapist

Make the effort and commitment if you can-the opportunities and salaries are worth it.

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RT girl in Roseville, California

57 months ago

I have been an RRT for about 10 years. I can honestly say it was Ok at first, but now I hate it. The job market is flooded. Hours are very long. Most places do 12 hour shifts, which really equals about 13 hours because you punch out for lunch and with a 15 minute commute it is 13. Very hard to do if you have a family. Sure you only do 3 days, but on those three days you do almost nothing else but work.

Also sick people and their families are very demanding. Other workers are overworked and avoiding a lawsuit is a motivating factor for some orders. Keep in mind being around illness, death and chronically ill people can get to be a bummer after a while.

There are a few things you can move into like a sleep lab, pulmonary rehab and asthma education, but those jobs are very difficult to get. All of those like me who get burnt-out want those jobs, so competition is tough.

Really there are so many other allied healthcare jobs that are a much better choice. X-ray and ultrasound are pretty good. You can move into an outpatient clinic if you get burnt-out. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and echo tech are better paying, less gross and have more opportunities for regular 9-5 hours.

Everyone is different, but just my experience. I am sorry I did it. Luckily I have a BS degree in another field and I am working on a masters. As soon as I earn that I am gone from here.

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RRT new grad in Goodyear, Arizona

57 months ago

I have been working registry since November, just got hired on here in the Phoenix area with a hospital. I make almost 30$ an hr for the hospital, 27$ registry (which I will still continue and pick up hours here and there) Even though I graduated last Sept., I immediately enrolled in a bachelor's program. I will be done in less than a year. What I'm saying is...30$ might not be RN pay, but it's a good living...and you don't sit tight with a CRT or even an RRT and expect the world. Even most RN's understand they need to be a BS RN for advancement. I would be bitter, too....if I were a CRT in a place like Arkansas with no other viable options. Additionally, if you don't know how to exand your scope, how are doctors and other healthcare personnel going to understand your career actually has depth? Just a thought.

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thinkaboutit in Pine Island, Minnesota

56 months ago

RRTs are very valuable, however the burnout rate is high, and the program is very stressful. RT's have much more on their plate than an RN and make about the same about of money Mayo Clinic in Rochester starts RNs at 25.77/hr entry level and RTs at 24.00/hr entry level however both RTs and RNs are required to have a 4-year education at Mayo Clinic. They are both VERY stressful jobs.

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coolchicn in Decatur, Georgia

52 months ago

Hello,
I am a nursing student and HATE it. I just feel like nurses work way too hard and yet aren't compensated enough. Besides, its just not something that am passionate about. I am looking at respiratory therapy, I have heard both good and bad about this field although the RTs seem to be MORE satisfied with their jobs than the nurses. On the other hand, there are more opportunities for advancement for nurses, and jobs seem to be more available for them.
So my questions
1. Am I making a huge mistake by leaving nursing for RT?
2. I am an international student and hope to be sponsored by an employer for a green card after I graduate. Is RT a good field for this?
Also when it comes to certification. How soon can I start working after I graduate?
3. Should I go with an Associates degree/bachelors for now? With my student status I need to get a job within a year of graduation.

Any honest opinions will be greatly appreciated! (Preferably from people who actually work in these fields.)

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B1NA2 in Alpharetta, Georgia

51 months ago

There are alot of hospital systems and subsidiaries in most urban areas of georgia and atlanta more specifically. The south was hit really hard by the recession and jobs are very hard to come by, there will be alot of competition so get ready for the possibility of 4-5 other RRT- just as competent as you, similiar lisencing, possibility of the other candidates "knowing someone" or "having someone on the inside"- for every job opening you apply to. Very sad, just the way it is down here though. I have had alot of friends move away because of the situation down here (in fact I have a gf out in AZ who has been able to get a couple of great jobs in the health services field) and I myself have struggled finding work even though I am a lisenced, competent professional. Maybe try and get to know some people in the area beforehand? Maybe you will get lucky.

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RTLPN

51 months ago

Ray in Zephyrhills, Florida said: Sure an RN makes a little more but they have to answer to the patients every need and the dr.s every need and so on and so on. I have been a therapist for 12 yrs and love the fact i can do my job and then say let me tell your nurse about that rash on your butt. Believe me unless you go on to become a nurse pract. or crna the 2-3 dollars more an hour are not worth the headaches a nurse as to endure

I agree w/ you totally. Im an LPN that went back to get my RRT. I LOVE being able to tell nurses everything from a Pts complaint to a meal request to you name it w/o having to be responsible!!!!!!!

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Jeff in Parkersburg, West Virginia

51 months ago

Been there, done that in New Rochelle, New York said: I started my health care career as an RRT. Was bored with it by the time I graduated. RN's made more money too. I won't give you my life story, but here are my best suggestions.
Physician's Assistant or FAMILY Nurse Practitioner
Occupational Therapist/Physical Therapist

Make the effort and commitment if you can-the opportunities and salaries are worth it.

Physician's Assistant programs are some of the toughest in the country to get into. Physical Therapist is at the M.D. level. OT is at a Masters, soon to be M.D.
Nurse Pract. is a masters or doctor in RN.

This doesn't help many people. Why not just tell everyone to go to med school?

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RRT in Little Rock, Arkansas

49 months ago

optimistic in Bothell, Washington said: I am seriously contemplating becoming an RT and everyone keeps telling me are you sure? all your gonna see is people dieing and old people who cant breathe. They also tell me its not worth it and they don't even know what an RT does... So should I tell everyone to shove it?

I've been a critical care RRT for 10 years now and realized a few years back that it's a dead-end field. True enough there other positions you can apply for such as the PFT lab, sleep studies, bronch lab, etc but none really pay any more than the other unless you become a director and make a few more thousands a year. If you don't want to become a physician of some sort, then the best field in healthcare these days is definitely anesthesia. Either get an RN (BSN) degree, work for a year in critical care and apply for anesthesia school (CRNA) or obtain a bachelor's in biology and apply at an anesthesiologist assistant school to become an AA and make $140,000+ working far less hours vs. $30-50,000 as a CRT/RRT. People might say that money isn't everything but it solves a lot of people's problems and allow them to do more for themselves as well as their families.

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RRT in Sacramento, California

44 months ago

coolchicn in Decatur, Georgia said: Hello,
I am a nursing student and HATE it. I just feel like nurses work way too hard and yet aren't compensated enough. Besides, its just not something that am passionate about. I am looking at respiratory therapy, I have heard both good and bad about this field although the RTs seem to be MORE satisfied with their jobs than the nurses. On the other hand, there are more opportunities for advancement for nurses, and jobs seem to be more available for them.
So my questions
1. Am I making a huge mistake by leaving nursing for RT?
2. I am an international student and hope to be sponsored by an employer for a green card after I graduate. Is RT a good field for this?
Also when it comes to certification. How soon can I start working after I graduate?
3. Should I go with an Associates degree/bachelors for now? With my student status I need to get a job within a year of graduation.

Any honest opinions will be greatly appreciated! (Preferably from people who actually work in these fields.)

I think you are making a huge mistake by switching from RN to RRT. There are no jobs for RRT and I never heard any body sponsoring RT for green card. There are tons jobs for RN and i know many employer may sponsor someone for green card. I advise to you is just complete your RN and work for a while until you get your green card then try to go back to school for RT if you do not like being RN.

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Run don't walk

44 months ago

Respiratory therapy has been a biggest mistake of my life/career. Some states are better than others however after relocating to central Florida I found that therapists here get treated like slaves I'm currently working for hospital where I'm on my feet 12 hours and most times donot take any breaks maybe it's this hospitals politics but rt are kicked around and thrown under the bus. the nurses cover their own mistakes but god forbid if yu make one. We are so disrespected and this system has made it where nurses are just as frustrated only many take it out on us and we just have to eat it from everybody. It is not what it used to be. I would advise u to stick to nursing ask urself how many happy rt are there that r actually working in the field?

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sdrrt858 in San Diego, California

44 months ago

Sounds like it's where you work and not the job that's the problem.

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RRT in Riverside, California

44 months ago

Run don't walk

7 hours ago

Respiratory therapy has been a biggest mistake of my life/career. Some states are better than others however after relocating to central Florida I found that therapists here get treated like slaves I'm currently working for hospital where I'm on my feet 12 hours and most times donot take any breaks maybe it's this hospitals politics but rt are kicked around and thrown under the bus. the nurses cover their own mistakes but god forbid if yu make one. We are so disrespected and this system has made it where nurses are just as frustrated only many take it out on us and we just have to eat it from everybody. It is not what it used to be. I would advise u to stick to nursing ask urself how many happy rt are there that r actually working in the field?

I find this post interesting because you completely contradict yourself with what you are saying. It sounds like the place you work for is a crappy place first of all. It appears this place you work for has no respect for no one regardless of position. Second, you are advising someone to go into nursing yet, the nurses are the ones walking all over you??? Do you actually recognize the logic behind your advice? I agree with sdrrt858, it's your work and not the career that is the problem. I have two jobs one full time and one per diem. I have no problems with nurses or anyone else. I work well with all my co-workers including nurses. Respiratory Therapy is not for everyone, some like it and some do not. The same goes for nurses, some like it and others hate it. What I advise anyone interested in the career of respiratory is to do the research and make a sound decision. Do not let money be the motivator because no career in medicine pays enough. Even doctors who make tons of money regret their jobs sometimes. If money is the motivator then plays sports, sing, dance, or invent something.

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jin in South El Monte, California

44 months ago

Hi RRT in Riverside, I have a question that is off topic from this post. I noticed you said you have a per diem job too. I heard that respiratory season is usually from fall to winter, and when that season pass, the RTs pretty much are not as needed in some hospitals. So I heard they actually work somewhere else, most likely per diem jobs.

I actually heard this from a friend of mine that is a nurse at a children's hospital. Are the RTs not needed throughout the whole year because it was a children's hospital? And since you said you work full time too, is it because it's a regular medical center?

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RRT in Riverside, California

44 months ago

Hi Jin,

Respiratory Therapy is year round job except for some facilities or hospitals the amount of respiratory patients decreases usually because people go away on vacation or other unforeseen reasons. Although this trend happens respiratory therapy is needed year round. It appears that fall and winter are the busiest time for respiratory therapy, but it is only because of human nature to feel sick or become sick around these times.
I work full time and per diem, not because of season change. I work per diem because I like to work and have money save in the bank for future projects or emergencies. I do not need a per diem, but I use the extra money for miscellaneous use. It feels great to have the financial stability, especially in these times.

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MM in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

42 months ago

Stick to the RN you cant loose from that. that's my honest opinion.

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brenda in Windermere, Florida

41 months ago

sharon stowe in Atlanta, Georgia said: I was a CRTT back in the late 90's for several years in a different state. I loved it. I moved back to my hometown to work for my father in his business. Needless to say I never got back into the field due to that. My father just recently passed away due to lung cancer. I dont think that his company will be able to survive with him here. I have thought about getting back into the field. I am not sure however if anyone would hire me since I have been out of the field for 10 years. DOes anyone have any input on this matter?
Sharon, I was out of the field for 10 years and did indeed get back in. I always kept my license up to date though and it was a little humiliating at times as so much had changed, but now I have been back in the field 4 years and am having no problems.

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brenda in Windermere, Florida

41 months ago

Sharon, I was also out of the field for 10 years but I always kept my license current. I did get back into the field and it was a little humiliating at first as so much had changed. Now I have been back for 4 years and am having no problems at all. Don't be afraid to go back.

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Jim in Farmington, Michigan

41 months ago

I was wondering how much I can make per hour as a PRN employee. My wife has a professional job with benefits,therefore,I wouldn't need these perks. Also, as a PRN employee,would one be able to take off more time? Thanks

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Don't do it!!!!!! in Riverside, California

41 months ago

@Jim

PRN position in California range from $28 to $40 an hour for a 12 hour shift.
PRN position just mean as needed and are used to keep overtime down. If you are lucky when you graduate you can acquire a PRN position. Taking time off will is not be necessary because you will have a lot of time off, if you are not needed as a PRN. Good luck in your journey.

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New grad in Brooklyn, New York

41 months ago

As a new grad they don't tell you how much money you need to invest just to become an RRT. The CRT costs $190 to take, they charge a 5 dollar fee to send your passing score to the state for your license. Then you pay for a first time licensing fee (depending on your state, mine was $200). Then, depending on your birthday, you get hit for another $200 for the yearly renewal. After that, the two RRT tests cost $190 each so in total that's $970. After that, there's a mandatory membership to the NBRC so tack in that amount after you get licensed. If you decide to go into respiratory, be prepared to drop some serious cash.

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lisa in Oakland, California

39 months ago

Run don't walk said: Respiratory therapy has been a biggest mistake of my life/career. Some states are better than others however after relocating to central Florida I found that therapists here get treated like slaves I'm currently working for hospital where I'm on my feet 12 hours and most times donot take any breaks maybe it's this hospitals politics but rt are kicked around and thrown under the bus. the nurses cover their own mistakes but god forbid if yu make one. We are so disrespected and this system has made it where nurses are just as frustrated only many take it out on us and we just have to eat it from everybody. It is not what it used to be. I would advise u to stick to nursing ask urself how many happy rt are there that r actually working in the field?

sounds like a bad employer to me.

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RRT girl in Raleigh, North Carolina

33 months ago

RRT in Little Rock, Arkansas said: I've been a critical care RRT for 10 years now and realized a few years back that it's a dead-end field. True enough there other positions you can apply for such as the PFT lab, sleep studies, bronch lab, etc but none really pay any more than the other unless you become a director and make a few more thousands a year. If you don't want to become a physician of some sort, then the best field in healthcare these days is definitely anesthesia. Either get an RN (BSN) degree, work for a year in critical care and apply for anesthesia school (CRNA) or obtain a bachelor's in biology and apply at an anesthesiologist assistant school to become an AA and make $140,000+ working far less hours vs. $30-50,000 as a CRT/RRT. People might say that money isn't everything but it solves a lot of people's problems and allow them to do more for themselves as well as their families.

I am a RRT and have been on the foeld for about 10 years. I started out working on the west coast in a city that did not have very strong RTs in practice. Most of them came from California because they couldn't find jobs or to make more money. Many of them were there just for the paycheck. This enviornment prompted me to seek opportunities elsewhere. I have since moved to the east coast and have gained a new respect for respiratory care. I came here with the intention of leaving the field and going to PA school. At this point, I have no interest in that. I thought of RN then CRNA school until I became an ECMO specialist. I have spent a great deal of time in the operating room and have observed the job of a CRNA. BORING!! Yes, they make a ton of money but to be good at what you do, you have to have some passion for your field. Do what makes you satisfied and market yourself so that you stand out from the crowd. I have never gone hungry as a RT and after 10 years, I still enjoy what I do.

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howard in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

30 months ago

optimistic in Bothell, Washington said: I am seriously contemplating becoming an RT and everyone keeps telling me are you sure? all your gonna see is people dieing and old people who cant breathe. They also tell me its not worth it and they don't even know what an RT does... So should I tell everyone to shove it?

anyone work in the va system as an rrt? what are the benefits and cons of the va? all info would be appreciated.

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imgonnapisspeopleoff in Phoenix, Arizona

30 months ago

im just going to say it...

Many RNs are also having difficulty finding work, for every RT there are 100 RNs, so yea, there might be more positions open but also more competition for them. Many other jobs are difficult right now not only respiratory or nursing, one that comes to mind is pharmacist for example.

About, pay, respect, and all the other "perks" .. the extra pay(2-3dollars) doesnt necessarally convince me that i want to deal with pain med seeking patients,combative patients, or confused old guys or ladies with foleys trying to climb out of bed, pulling iv's possibly slipping and breaking their leg or worse on my watch. What about feeling like a waitress by having to find them sprite, or diet coke or prune juice or whatever their hear desires, ice cream, jello, crackers, " i dont like vanilla... do you have chocolate" or having to turn big 400 lb ladies every 2 hours, unless she has dhiarrea, then its more like every 30 minutes.. oh and then having to find her a sandwich in the middle of the night. How about being screamed at by doctors at 3 am? hows that for respect?

but you say.. what about advancement? yea i can advance my ass back to school to become a nurse practitioner or anetethist. But why cant an RT also go back to school to become a PA? or even an RN if thats always their life dream?

But another option is to sit back and hate what you do, say how terrible it is but do nothing to better it, advance it or even get out entirely.

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IHATEMYJOB in San Antonio, Texas

29 months ago

I worked as a RT since 1992, I hate this job but rather do it than be a dish washer, the most I have ever made per year is 62,000, RNs that I would with make 80,000 to 110,000 and this is with shift differential. Once you become an RT there is nowhere to move up as an RN, you can work anywhere or everywhere. Why do I not change because I am old and do not feel like starting over. I feel only lazy and stupid or old people stay in this field

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Lora in La Jolla, California

29 months ago

IHATEMYJOB in San Antonio, Texas said: I worked as a RT since 1992, I hate this job but rather do it than be a dish washer, the most I have ever made per year is 62,000, RNs that I would with make 80,000 to 110,000 and this is with shift differential. Once you become an RT there is nowhere to move up as an RN, you can work anywhere or everywhere. Why do I not change because I am old and do not feel like starting over. I feel only lazy and stupid or old people stay in this field

Well, I don't know how old you are. After becoming an RT, there are some choices. Ultrasound or PA. Besides good salary, I haven't heard anything positive about nursing. Stressful, physically demanding profession.

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Jeff in Marietta, Ohio

29 months ago

Lora in La Jolla, California said: Well, I don't know how old you are. After becoming an RT, there are some choices. Ultrasound or PA. Besides good salary, I haven't heard anything positive about nursing. Stressful, physically demanding profession.

Ultrasound is radiology. PA is a Masters degree. Neither of those are choices related to respiratory. You might as well have said MD.

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Jeff in Marietta, Ohio

29 months ago

IHATEMYJOB in San Antonio, Texas said: I worked as a RT since 1992, I hate this job but rather do it than be a dish washer, the most I have ever made per year is 62,000, RNs that I would with make 80,000 to 110,000 and this is with shift differential. Once you become an RT there is nowhere to move up as an RN, you can work anywhere or everywhere. Why do I not change because I am old and do not feel like starting over. I feel only lazy and stupid or old people stay in this field

So you were so lazy and stupid you grew old in this job?! That's hardly a caution for anyone going into any profession.

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ICURRT

29 months ago

Jeff in Marietta, Ohio said: Ultrasound is radiology. PA is a Masters degree. Neither of those are choices related to respiratory. You might as well have said MD.

You are misinformed.

I know for a fact that after 2 years I can go back to earn a license in Sonography, but I am not interested.

I currently have a colleague in a PA program. He graduates this summer.

They are both options, but yes, do require more school, but then NP or Nurse anesthetist requires more school too.

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Lora in La Jolla, California

29 months ago

Jeff in Marietta, Ohio said: PA is a Masters degree.

Not always. There are some schools (in CA three schools) that require an Associate Degree, and some of them a Bachelor's Degree.

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Another RRT in Springfield, Missouri

29 months ago

ICURRT said: You are misinformed.

I know for a fact that after 2 years I can go back to earn a license in Sonography, but I am not interested.

I currently have a colleague in a PA program. He graduates this summer.

They are both options, but yes, do require more school, but then NP or Nurse anesthetist requires more school too.

You seem to know quite a bit about an RT continuing education into other fields, do you happen to know where I could get more info about changing fields (going back to school) with out feeling that all of my time in RT school was for naught? Thanks for any help!

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Cando in Saint Petersburg, Florida

29 months ago

Wanting to go into RT school..the only two accredited schools in my area are Concorde and SPC...anyone care to comment on these schools?

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HunnyBunny in San Jose, California

29 months ago

Another RRT in Springfield, Missouri said: You seem to know quite a bit about an RT continuing education into other fields, do you happen to know where I could get more info about changing fields (going back to school) with out feeling that all of my time in RT school was for naught? Thanks for any help!

How long have you been working as an RT? I may be wrong, but something in your post sounds like you might be recently out of school.
Most programs require at least 2 years of direct clinical practice and even then, the getting into a sonography or PA program can be difficult due to demand (much like everything else). I have 2 colleagues who had tried to get into programs 3 years straight, and only 1 got in on his 3rd try.
I have only looked into education possibilities in California, so might not be much of a help for you in Missouri. I think SVJC PA program grads obtain an A.S degree, and it costs over 60K OUCH!
Loma Linda's PA program is a MASTERS program, so you have to have a Bachelors degree before you start. It looks to be over 80K. Lots of variation there.

Last I heard, sonography jobs were less available than other fields. Takes about as much schooling as you put in for RT school.

Good Luck with whatever you pursue!

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HunnyBunny in San Jose, California

29 months ago

Cando in Saint Petersburg, Florida said: Wanting to go into RT school..the only two accredited schools in my area are Concorde and SPC...anyone care to comment on these schools?

Based on the fact that there is minimal data on CoArc outcomes from Concorde-Tampa, and that private tech school will probably cost 4 times61 more than community college, I recommend SPC.

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Lora in La Jolla, California

29 months ago

HunnyBunny in San Jose, California said:
I think SVJC PA program grads obtain an A.S degree, and it costs over 60K OUCH!

As I mentioned earlier, there are three PA schools in CA that require an AS degree. Yes, it's SJVC. Then Stanford and Riverside community college. Riverside is very hard to get into unless you're a resident of Riverside or San Bernardino (here I might be mistaken, don't remember exactly) counties. If you get a BS degree, you can expand your choices. Yes, the programs are very competitive and expensive. However, PA's make good money. Also there is the Loan Forgivness Program if you wish to work in underserved areas. My point is if you are sick and tired of being an RT, it's not the end of the world. There are other doors.

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Cando in Saint Petersburg, Florida

29 months ago

HunnyBunny in San Jose, California said: Based on the fact that there is minimal data on CoArc outcomes from Concorde-Tampa, and that private tech school will probably cost 4 times61 more than community college, I recommend SPC.

Yeah..cannot find much on Concorde's program and it costs over 40K! Wow!

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Tad in Dallas, Texas

28 months ago

I'm a Registered Therapist with quite a few years of experience, but I took about 10 years off and would like to get back into it. I loved it and did it for a very long time. I think a lot has to do with where you work and what they will allow you to do.
Does anyone have any suggestions on how I might get back into the field? I've kept my state license active (I'm in the Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX area), but need to get a current CPR and ACLS. Thanks for any input in advance!

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