Is Respiratory Therapy worth it?

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JRB2016 in Mobile, Alabama

16 months ago

I want to know is studying respiratory care going to be worth it in the end. Am i going to be able to make good money(upper middle class)? Is the job stressful? Or boring?

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jrmavc in you'll never know, California

16 months ago

JRB2016 in Mobile, Alabama said: I want to know is studying respiratory care going to be worth it in the end. Am i going to be able to make good money(upper middle class)? Is the job stressful? Or boring?

Good luck finding a job! It took me 2 years for a per diem job. I am an RRT-NPS with PALS.

My per diem job is 12 hour night shifts. The pay is great, but the job is less than to be desired of.

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DNA in Royal Oak, Michigan

16 months ago

I highly recommend shadowing an RT to see what an average day is like. Do this before going into RT. Personally, I would never recommend this field to anyone. If you're the kind of person who doesn't mind doing robotic duties everyday and will enjoy that in a career, go for it. Otherwise, don't bother. If you have even a tiny amount of ambition, you won't enjoy this field. A lot of people don't want to be exposed to the truth but here it is! I don't want anyone to waste their time and money, which is what many are doing since healthcare is the it field right now. A lot of older, second career people go to RT school and they're happy but this is not a job many young people will be happy in 10 years from now.

Yes, it's stressful and boring. You can make good money, but let income be one of the deciding factors, not the only one. Good luck.

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RespTherT in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

16 months ago

Dude it's a decent job. Some people stay at one crappy hospital and whine about how much their life sucks instead of looking around and exploring all possible channels. I am licensed in a pretty tough job market yet when I graduated I was offered a job at two of the three places I did my practicum at and the third interviewed me. IF you work hard on clinical and show initiative, places tend to want to find a PRN job for you. They want eager workers not bitter old farts who hate their lives and blame their job for poor decision making.

Some hospitals you are busy as hell. Other places there's plenty of downtime. You have to look around and ask around and see how things are.

Oh, and the money is ridiculous considering you can work with just an associates degree.

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Brandy Rae in San Diego, California

16 months ago

I'm getting ready to start my RT program in June and I am beyond excited! I read all of the posts from these negative people, and I can tell just by reading what you have to say, that you're not that happy of a person. If your energy translates over the internet, imagine how hiring managers are feeling when they're in your presence. I know for a fact that there are a ton of jobs to be had, you just have to go get them. Develop good relationships during your rotations, work hard, show ambition, ask questions, be excited, and you'll get a job, no problem. Mope around and complain about this or that; of course you're not going to get a job.

I just met a woman tonight who is a hiring manager at one of our largest hospitals in the county, and just by speaking with her for 10 minutes and asking her a ton of questions, she gave me her contact info and asked me to get in touch with her when I'm done with school. It's all about attitude. Attitude changes everything.

So instead of discouraging new students, new grads, or those contemplating whether or not they should give this a shot, why not just stay quiet so people like us won't lose our motivation? This is a great career. It's not going anywhere, and people are hiring. You may not get your dream job right off the bat, but you will gain work experience and climb your way up, and next thing you know, you'll have everything you've ever wanted.

So to people like me, who are just starting out, stay focused, stay on track, follow the path you've chosen and great things will happen. I have done so much research on this profession, and this field is here to stay. In fact, it's increasing. There's a growth rate that is above average, and this is all coming from reputable sources; not some burnt out crybaby.

Good luck to everyone, do your best, and you'll get nothing but the best in return!!!!

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DNA in Royal Oak, Michigan

16 months ago

JRB2016, I suggest talking to experienced RTs in person. They'll give you their honest opinions. I'm not surprised to see the student overexcited by reading school pamphlets and job stats; there's one in every thread. It's fine, but frankly, quite useless to you considering the investment of time and money. At the end, it's your decision so do what feels right, but I still strongly suggest job shadowing. Go to multiple hospitals if you must.

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mrbongeh in covina, California

15 months ago

simply put, no. rt is not a career, its a job for people looking to make a quick buck with the least amount of effort. the job is for lazy people who want to be a robot and do the same procedure over and over again. you're job will consist of neb treatments, oxygen setups and adjustments, ventilator checks, the occasional bronch, and abgs.....wash, rinse, repeat. this isnt a knock to rt's out there, i am an rrt currently working in the field, and i have been working for 2 years.....i am bored as hell. i am not one of the lazy ones, which is why i hate this field. like the previous poster said, if you have any sense of ambition, then rt is not for you.

my friends cant even get a job, much less a full time position. this was 3 years ago! all of them are rrt or nps! thats another thing....once you graduate and get a job, you will be working per diem for a LONG time unless you are lucky. sure you may get paid well, but your hours are not guaranteed! you get no benefits such as 401k, sick days, vacation, etc. thats how the hospital or facility saves money on rt's. and in hindsight, thats what the healthcare community thinks of our profession, no respect. of course there are exceptions to the rule....there are rt's out there who are very happy with what they do or maybe it just doesnt bother them one way or another....but would you really want to risk throwing away time and money to see if you will be one of the exceptions?! do yourself a favor and avoid this field like the plague. its just another way those private schools make money. screw the nbrc, aarc, coarc and all the other rt organizations that claim to help the rt field. all they care about is money and charging for pointless memberships for what? a monthly newsletter?!! please spare me.

if i was in your position, and asked your same exact question....and the responses i got were all positive except for a few negativse.....its those negative comments that would catch my eye to sway my decision.

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Student in Noble, Illinois

15 months ago

Look, if you look around this site enough, then you will see a flood of people complaining about their RT position or how they can't find a job (mostly jobless ones). I want to tell you RIGHT NOW that you should NOT listen to them. Talk to people you know that have gone through the program. Seek out the "friend of a friend" who is a respiratory therapist, or is going to school for it. I know 2 people who have had no problems finding success as an RRT and I am expecting the same.

Looking on the internet is going to greatly discourage you. You will see nothing but negativity no matter what degree you are trying to find information on. Do a Google search of literally any college degree and you will see the same thing that you're seeing now. The reason for this is the fact that people who are successful in the industry are not going to be on these websites! Why would they be on Indeed.com looking at the forums? If they have their job and have some level of success, there's no need other than boredom.

What I'm about to say is might sound mean, but it's the truth and I'm hoping people will take this as advice, because that's what it's intended to be:

Most people on here who complain constantly about how they can't find an RT job, seem to be completely illiterate. Seriously, all the people whining on here seem like they can hardly spell their own name. If I am an employer, and you can't even spell the word "career" right, then I will not hire you. Why would I put you in charge of other peoples' health and well-being?

PROOF READ your application and your resume. Make it look NEAT. MARKET YOURSELF WELL. If you have a hard time doing any of those, then you will have a hard time finding any job in any area. If you do manage to find a job and don't like it, then guess what? There's a hospital or two in NEARLY EVERY SINGLE TOWN IN EXISTENCE. You don't even have to necessarily move!

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RTstudent in San Antonio, Texas

12 months ago

It sucks that a lot of people feel bad about this profession. Majority of people who complain are those that went to crapy schools to get there degree. Anything that is worth doing is worth doing right. In everything that you do in life, you should have a plan B. What is the essence of getting a degree from a school when you will not be able to transfer to a different school or major? What do you think will happen when you want to make a career change? Well, you begin to course a profession that never forced you to be in it. I am a BS Respiratory Care student at one of the top schools in the nation. At my school, we take CRT, RRT, ECMO, and specialty exams(NPS, PFT, ACCS, and others) two months BEFORE we graduate. This is why majority of the students get jobs before they graduate. I am aware of what I am getting myself into and if I don't find a job, I will apply to a master's program and will lose nothing. My advice, get a BS degree if you love education or get an AS degree from a regionally accredited college so that you will be prepared to make a career change if things turn otherwise. I know that I will have no problem finding a job because I will do my internship and I have chances of being hired after. Besides, I will be qualified for every position.

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Mark RCP in Somewhere out there

12 months ago

Your implication that all those who do not get jobs after graduation is Sadly distorted! There are many that did graduate from top schools and still cannot find work, since work and needs are state to state and seasonal. Your still a student in which carries student RT goggles into this , your getting PFT and ACCS well is a Waste. The need for PFT techs are in many ways scarce as the ones that have experience of which you will have NONE, will always be hired over you. The ACCS cert is well a JOKE, NO hiring RT director cares nor really is concerned that you have it, this as the others like NPS is a farce set up by the NBRC. The ACCS will not get you into the Unit or as NPS and that's a good one, to work in a NICU, you have to be and have 1yr or be excepted into the NICU as this a very picky environment in which Nurse's run.
The only hospitals that would or hire as you stated will be University which will work you like a dog and then there's Methodist which has the worst reputation for bad management and high turn-over, that's why they bring in so many agency RTs and Nurse's and travelers.

I can see your already on the path of being the BSRT with attitude and like I posted on your other post, Education Does NOT make you the RT, Experience and Time and taking advice and listening to Experienced RTs meaning 10yrs plus.

This is in defense of the new Grad RTs that you called out , Remember the RT world is very small!!!

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RTstudent in San Antonio, Texas

12 months ago

Mark what you said about NPS is not true. All the students who graduated in May and obtained their NPS all got hired right way. They now work in NICU, and not at university hospital. I met them, and had the chance to talk to them. They provided salary stats to our faculty to let us know what the current pay is, and trust me most of them started at $29/hr. Two persons got ECMO positions and are making about $31/hr. If anyone graduates with BS respiratory care, she will be considered for a job that requires AS with up to 3yrs of experience. The higher your degree, the less experience required. This is why it is not difficult for BS graduates to get jobs. Don't also forget that they get some experience from internship too. YES, education also makes one a better RT because this is an evolving career. A new decade comes with new technologies and education is a way to learn all that. Experience is very important too, but 30yrs of experience as an on job trained RT will not even get you a job working on the floors. No matter how many years of experience a PTA has, he will never be given the task of a Physical therapist. Also, neither will a COTA perform the job of an OT just because he has 15yrs experience.

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PharmacistKeith in Louisville, Kentucky

12 months ago

mrbongeh in covina, California said: simply put, no. rt is not a career, its a job for people looking to make a quick buck with the least amount of effort. the job is for lazy people who want to be a robot and do the same procedure over and over again. you're job will consist of neb treatments, oxygen setups and adjustments, ventilator checks, the occasional bronch, and abgs.....wash, rinse, repeat. this isnt a knock to rt's out there, i am an rrt currently working in the field, and i have been working for 2 years.....i am bored as hell. i am not one of the lazy ones, which is why i hate this field. like the previous poster said, if you have any sense of ambition, then rt is not for you.

I am a pharmacist that has felt the same way you do about RT. I'm looking for ambitious wellness professionals like you. I found a way out and would love to talk with you about what i did. I am working with a lot of different people in the health and wellness fields all of us working from home. If interested send me your contact info keith.abell at hotmail.com

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TraumaRT in Houston, Texas

12 months ago

I could not disagree more with mrbongeh if I tried. RT is definitely NOT a job for someone looking to make a quick buck or lazy people who want to be a robot. I've been an RT now for 10+ years and have worked in everything from small rural hospitals to LTAC's to major trauma centers. Each one completely different from the others. The one thing I can say about all of them is this: If you're paying attention and you're interested enough to enquire, you will learn something new each day you show up to work. If you're simply task oriented and focused on getting through with your rounds without giving any thought to the matter then yes, you will be a robot. Sounds to me like some people who are disgruntled with the field or who are "bored as hell" after two years may need to consider a new profession. Do what feels right and what makes you happy. If you're not happy, you're in the wrong place. I love my job even though there may be days I don't love where I work or the people I'm working with. I still love what I do and I love even more the fact that I have the opportunity to impact someone's life in positive way.

Bottom line - I wouldn't discourage anyone from pursuing a career in RT. I will say this: The field is getting saturated. But that is true of many disciplines within the healthcare genre. Too many schools are pumping out too many therapists and it can be more difficult to find full time positions. BUT that doesn't mean that they aren't out there. Just as with any other profession, networking is very useful in getting you in the door! Go to seminars, continuing education sessions, state conventions.. whatever is available to you. But get out there and introduce yourself! Let them know you're motivated and engaged. You might be surprised what doors open for you.

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Robin RRT in Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey

9 months ago

Respiratory therapy is a great profession to be in .

CHECK OUT MORE ABOUT RESPIRATORY THERAPY IN THIS PAGE

www.respiratorycarebuddy.weebly.com

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RRT in Minter, Alabama

7 months ago

RTstudent in San Antonio, Texas said: It sucks that a lot of people feel bad about this profession. Majority of people who complain are those that went to crapy schools to get there degree. Anything that is worth doing is worth doing right. In everything that you do in life, you should have a plan B. What is the essence of getting a degree from a school when you will not be able to transfer to a different school or major? What do you think will happen when you want to make a career change? Well, you begin to course a profession that never forced you to be in it. I am a BS Respiratory Care student at one of the top schools in the nation. At my school, we take CRT, RRT, ECMO, and specialty exams(NPS, PFT, ACCS, and others) two months BEFORE we graduate. This is why majority of the students get jobs before they graduate. I am aware of what I am getting myself into and if I don't find a job, I will apply to a master's program and will lose nothing. My advice, get a BS degree if you love education or get an AS degree from a regionally accredited college so that you will be prepared to make a career change if things turn otherwise. I know that I will have no problem finding a job because I will do my internship and I have chances of being hired after. Besides, I will be qualified for every position.

What school did you graduate from? From my understanding you need to have 1 year working experience to even take the ACCS exam.

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jrmavc in you'll never know, California

7 months ago

JRB2016 in Mobile, Alabama said: I want to know is studying respiratory care going to be worth it in the end. Am i going to be able to make good money(upper middle class)? Is the job stressful? Or boring?

1st question, NO
2nd question, YES
3rd question, YES
4th question, depends, sometimes it's boring, sometimes it's action packed.

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Kieran in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio

6 months ago

I completely agree with the people discrediting all of those "negative nancy" comments. I graduated about a year ago, and had a position at the Cleveland Clinic waiting for me upon graduation- in fact, I started in less than a week. I work in MICU, SICU, and NICU (neuro ICU, not neonatal). My job certainly does not entail doing the exact same things as was mentioned earlier, and it certainly is not boring. I legitimately learn something new every day, and frequently get some of the most sick patients in the country (and even outside the country) flown to us, and am continually challenged in my job. I am CERTAINLY not lazy, as one person mentioned that therapists must be. Maybe those of you that only have negative comments to say are A. In the wrong field to begin with, B. In the wrong type of facility (I know I would be really bored at an LTAC or smaller hospital), or C. Are too negative in the first place to get a decent job. I don't regret going into respiratory for a second.

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HappyListener50 in Chula Vista, California

6 months ago

Kieran in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio said: I completely agree with the people discrediting all of those "negative nancy" comments. I graduated about a year ago, and had a position at the Cleveland Clinic waiting for me upon graduation- in fact, I started in less than a week. I work in MICU, SICU, and NICU (neuro ICU, not neonatal). My job certainly does not entail doing the exact same things as was mentioned earlier, and it certainly is not boring. I legitimately learn something new every day, and frequently get some of the most sick patients in the country (and even outside the country) flown to us, and am continually challenged in my job. I am CERTAINLY not lazy, as one person mentioned that therapists must be. Maybe those of you that only have negative comments to say are A. In the wrong field to begin with, B. In the wrong type of facility (I know I would be really bored at an LTAC or smaller hospital), or C. Are too negative in the first place to get a decent job. I don't regret going into respiratory for a second.

I absolutely agree. I'm proud to say I have worked as a Respiratory Therapist 17 years and continue to enjoy working in the field. Each day brings someone interesting to meet, something new to learn and the diversity of daily tasks keeps me interested. I earn a higher income as a Respiratory Therapist than I ever have in any other job. This is my second career. Due to company loss of contracts and revenue, I was laid off 3 times during my 10 year career in the Graphics field. I needed a stable career and my Mom who was a Medical Technologist suggested Respiratory Therapy. She got to see me graduate and start my new career before passing away in 1998 from cancer. Her illness gave me a desire to join the medical field. My Mom was a very wise woman. I like what I do. A patient put it all into perspective. I asked him, "How are you doing?". He said, "I'm doing great. I'm on top of the ground, not underneath it, so I'm doing great!". Love it!.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

6 months ago

HappyListner,

You have a great attitude, more folks working in healthcare need your positive outlook and energy.

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Dirk in San Leandro, California

16 days ago

You all make me want to poop.

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