Social Work in America

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Kerrin in Melbourne, Australia

79 months ago

I have a BSW with 10 years experience in Australia. I've easily located agencies to assist in working in the UK that help with getting your visa and employment, but have found it more difficult for the USA which is where I would love to start. Any advise on agencies that could assist me in working in the States?

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Hayley in Lincoln, United Kingdom

78 months ago

Mwana in Hyattsville, Maryland said: I would like to communicate with you because I am a social worker and I am looking for any opportunity to work in either Australia or UK. I think you can hook me up. Thanks.
my email adddress is mwana123@yahoo.com

Hi!
I am wondering if you could help me research into working and living in LA, CA, USA from the UK as a Social Worker?!

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Lani in Inverness, United Kingdom

46 months ago

Hi, i was just wondering what kind of job Social Working is in America, I've heard nothing but bad things about it and I can't find any information on the internet really about the experiences. I live in the UK and move to the US next year to study for that career. Is it really any different here than the US?

My e-mail address is Alana.1991@yahoo.com

I would appreciate any information you can provide, thanks. :]

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Driana in Pretoria, South Africa

42 months ago

I would like to find out what the salary is for a social worker working in america. And if I study while working.

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Rosemary in Auckland, New Zealand

39 months ago

I am currently looking to move to either the UK or I would like to work in USA however it is so hard to get into the states I am currently a supervisor in auckland NZ for Child youth and Family I have 10 years experience so any ideas would be great:

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DadMike in Maryland

39 months ago

One helpful bit of advice I can give-- EVERY STATE IS COMPLETLEY DIFFERENT. There are NO NATIONAL STANDARDS for social work. A license in one state does not necessarily transfer to another state. In other words- we have 50 different sets of laws and standards to legally be called a social worker in US; even more if you count the territories.
SPANISH is an extremely helpful second language to have; in many states, esp. California and the Southwest, it is practically mandatory you speak both Spanish and English to be considered for a job.
Local govt. child welfare agencies are almost always hiring, due to high stress of job. I love it, as a few of us hard core crazies do, but local Departments of Social Services are a great way to get started in a US social work career. You learn the system in a way no other social work job can teach you.
Many states have on-line job postings and applications; Maryland, my state of residence, is always looking for child welfare workers; it helps to have an MSW, but most counties in Maryland will hire BA's in Human Service, no license, for caseworker jobs; to be a supervisor you need an MSW and a clinical license, plus 18months post LCSW-C experience.
In US, most social worker jobs cluster in 3 big areas: Child welfare work (local govt. CPS, foster care, in-home family serices; with associated private adoption/foster care/group home/ in-home agencies); Mental Health (in-patient and out-patient, some in-home and crisis intervention), and Hospital/Medical work.

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DadMike in Maryland

39 months ago

Driana in Pretoria, South Africa said: I would like to find out what the salary is for a social worker working in america. And if I study while working.

Greatly depends on the State. In Maryland, a starting state social worker with an MSW, no license, fresh from school starts at 35,555; after one year jumps to 37,823; when State gives out steps, can be up to 39,213; with license, fresh from school- start at 37,823, jump to 40,253 or 41,739 if state gives steps after 1 year;(this is budget-based- have't gotten steps in 3 years now)- US dollars. If you have experience, you can negotiate a higher salary, usually up to low 50s.
State salary scale is online at Maryland Department of Budget and Management (MD DBAM) website.

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DadMike in Maryland

39 months ago

DadMike in Maryland said: Greatly depends on the State. In Maryland, a starting state social worker with an MSW, no license, fresh from school starts at 35,555; after one year jumps to 37,823; when State gives out steps, can be up to 39,213; with license, fresh from school- start at 37,823, jump to 40,253 or 41,739 if state gives steps after 1 year;(this is budget-based- have't gotten steps in 3 years now)- US dollars. If you have experience, you can negotiate a higher salary, usually up to low 50s.
State salary scale is online at Maryland Department of Budget and Management (MD DBAM) website.

I should add-- cost of living in Maryland is often not cheap; average 1-bedroom apartment in Baltimore runs about 800 a month in a mostly decent area; public transit it Baltimore SUCKS; around DC things are even pricier; in rural areas, cheaper; public transit everywhere in MD sucks-- you'll likely need a car. State pays the same no matter where you live; if you don't mind rural living, your check will go farther. Your pay is also docked 7% to pay for pension- a recent gift from our current governor.

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socialwkr in Missouri

39 months ago

DadMike in Maryland said: I should add-- cost of living in Maryland is often not cheap; average 1-bedroom apartment in Baltimore runs about 800 a month in a mostly decent area; public transit it Baltimore SUCKS; around DC things are even pricier; in rural areas, cheaper; public transit everywhere in MD sucks-- you'll likely need a car. State pays the same no matter where you live; if you don't mind rural living, your check will go farther. Your pay is also docked 7% to pay for pension- a recent gift from our current governor.

January 2011, state jobs in Missouri changed their pension as well. New employees now have to pay 4% for their retirement.

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DadMike in Maryland

39 months ago

socialwkr in Missouri said: January 2011, state jobs in Missouri changed their pension as well. New employees now have to pay 4% for their retirement.

Yep= we're all screwed until private industry starts picking up again--- then govt. will empty out, and the cycle will start again as they try to entice folks to stay....

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DadMike in Maryland

39 months ago

ludmila in Chisinau, Moldova, Republic of said: Hello! I'm Social Worker i need to tell me about job,not about apartament haw much.

If you're looking for jobs overseas, it helps to see whole picture. Salary alone doesn't mean much unless you look at cost of living- US is far larger than Moldova, and regional variations in the cost of food, housing, gas, utilities mean ALOT. Salaries that sound good on paper may not mean so much once you learn they will barely cover your rent; opposite is true-- you may find you're better off fiancially for working for 30grand a year in a small mid-western town than taking 60grand to work in a big East Coast city.

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Cheri in San Diego, California

38 months ago

Lani in Inverness, United Kingdom said: Hi, i was just wondering what kind of job Social Working is in America, I've heard nothing but bad things about it and I can't find any information on the internet really about the experiences. I live in the UK and move to the US next year to study for that career. Is it really any different here than the US?

My e-mail address is Alana.1991@yahoo.com

I would appreciate any information you can provide, thanks. :]

I have been a social work for 30 years and have loved it! I've worked primarily in California, Texas and Hawaii. There are many settings where social work is done, as you know. What area is your interest? There are foster and adoption places where social workers work with parents adopting children; there are schools where social workers work (Much needed for developmentally disabled children, such as Autism), medical hospitals employ social workers and nursing homes need social workers to work with the elderly and help plan their discharge and returns home. There are prisons who employ social workers (these probably pay more). I've worked in the prisons for 4 years - one of my favorite places. Many of the large churches have a counseling staff - and then for licensed social workers, private practice can be a single office with only one social worker, or a large office with many counselors of social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, etc. You only need to pick a state, and get in touch with the NASW of that state for info about jobs available in THAT state. If you are licensed you can find something quickly, if not seek jobs for MSWs and get info on license. In New York state there is much work available for BA, MSW or Licensed. Good Luck!

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M Smith in Kent, United Kingdom

38 months ago

Hi,

I'l son have an MA in social work and lots of experience of working with children. I've worked in the States before but getting a social worker job and visa seems pretty tough. Can anyone advise on how to get a social worker job - in child welfare. E.G would I have to obtain a license to practice before applying for jobs or could I apply for jobs and have the employer set up a license exam for me? It seems a little catch 22 but I really want to work in the States, I'm think ilinois of Wisconsin area.
Any comments / advice much appreciated!

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DadMike in Maryland

38 months ago

Rans in Kent, United Kingdom said: Hi,

I'l son have an MA in social work and lots of experience of working with children. I've worked in the States before but getting a social worker job and visa seems pretty tough. Can anyone advise on how to get a social worker job - in child welfare. E.G would I have to obtain a license to practice before applying for jobs or could I apply for jobs and have the employer set up a license exam for me? It seems a little catch 22 but I really want to work in the States, I'm think ilinois of Wisconsin area.
Any comments / advice much appreciated!

I can't speak for Wisconsin, but I know that in Maryland and in you don't need a license to work in child welfare. The minimal requirement to get an entry-level caseworker job is a Bachelor's in Human Services. You do need the license to get a higher pay grade and become a supervisor.
Best bet- Google the State's Personell website-- they should have the applications on line, as well as salary info and necessary qualification.

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Just lookin in Auckland, New Zealand

37 months ago

DadMike in Maryland said: If you're looking for jobs overseas, it helps to see whole picture. Salary alone doesn't mean much unless you look at cost of living- US is far larger than Moldova, and regional variations in the cost of food, housing, gas, utilities mean ALOT. Salaries that sound good on paper may not mean so much once you learn they will barely cover your rent; opposite is true-- you may find you're better off fiancially for working for 30grand a year in a small mid-western town than taking 60grand to work in a big East Coast city.

I think you maybe able to help me. Please =]

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DadMike in Maryland

37 months ago

Just lookin in Auckland, New Zealand said: I think you maybe able to help me. Please =]

I'd be happy to assist if I can--- just let me know what you're looking for.

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DadMike in Maryland

37 months ago

Rans in Kent, United Kingdom said: Hi,

I'l son have an MA in social work and lots of experience of working with children. I've worked in the States before but getting a social worker job and visa seems pretty tough. Can anyone advise on how to get a social worker job - in child welfare. E.G would I have to obtain a license to practice before applying for jobs or could I apply for jobs and have the employer set up a license exam for me? It seems a little catch 22 but I really want to work in the States, I'm think ilinois of Wisconsin area.
Any comments / advice much appreciated!

Best bet- check out the States on-line hiring. State to state, everything differs. In Maryland you can get a caseworker job with a BA or an MSW, no license. As for Illinois or Wisconsin..don't know.

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Just lookin in Auckland, New Zealand

37 months ago

ok cool is email good? r.tewhitu@hotmail.com

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DadMike in Maryland

37 months ago

Just lookin in Auckland, New Zealand said: ok cool is email good? r.tewhitu@hotmail.com

sure

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doris banji in Ireland

32 months ago

DadMike in Maryland said: I'd be happy to assist if I can--- just let me know what you're looking for.

Hi, I am currently doing my BA in social work. Pls can u advice on working visa, I am from Cyprus.

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alicenavo7@msn.com in London, United Kingdom

32 months ago

i am a qualified social worker and i want to work in USA, can someone please give ideas on how to start. my email address is alicenavo7@msn.com

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Hannah in London, United Kingdom

30 months ago

Hi,
I wonder if someone can help me?? I am a qualified social worker in London and work for a London Local Authority for Children in the Care System. I have nearly four years post qualified experience.
I am interested in working in New York and I am struggling to find out how to start the process of applying for jobs and to know how likely it is that I could gain employment. If anybody can give me any details of agencies or any advice I would be really grateful. My email is: halula6@hotmail.com

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Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand

29 months ago

Kia oro! I am an American born citizen however
I've been living in New Zealand for most of my life
At the end of this year I will graduate with a
4yr bachelors in SW. I will gain registration through
My 1st year of practice. My partner and I are planning
On moving back to California in a couple of years
I am just wanting some tips on how to be 'job ready'.
I will start by learning Spanish lol is a license the same
As registration? Any information would help.

Cheers

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DadMike in Maryland

29 months ago

Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand said: Kia oro! I am an American born citizen however
I've been living in New Zealand for most of my life
At the end of this year I will graduate with a
4yr bachelors in SW. I will gain registration through
My 1st year of practice. My partner and I are planning
On moving back to California in a couple of years
I am just wanting some tips on how to be 'job ready'.
I will start by learning Spanish lol is a license the same
As registration? Any information would help.

Cheers

Every state is different,so I don't know much about California licensing. For most states you have to meet a minimal of credentials (BSW or MSW), and pass a written test, then pay a fee to gain an entry level license. For an advanced/clinical license you usually need an MSW and several years of supervision and practical experience, then a test and fee. I'd Google up California's licensing requirements (or any other state's) so you know what you're getting into!
In US, BSW level jobs do exist- but the optimal degree for social work practice is MSW.

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Kathy in London, United Kingdom

29 months ago

Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand said: Kia oro! I am an American born citizen however
I've been living in New Zealand for most of my life
At the end of this year I will graduate with a
4yr bachelors in SW. I will gain registration through
My 1st year of practice. My partner and I are planning
On moving back to California in a couple of years
I am just wanting some tips on how to be 'job ready'.
I will start by learning Spanish lol is a license the same
As registration? Any information would help.

Cheers

If you want to work as a social worker in the US, look into getting an MSW.

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transporter in Hungary

29 months ago

Kathy in London, United Kingdom said: If you want to work as a social worker in the US, look into getting an MSW.

What do you mean" look into getting an MSW"? I am a qualified social worker from Hungary, from Budapest and i wanna go to US to work as a social worker. How can i do this? Can anybody help me? I work with homeless people for 7 years ago. Any idea would help..
thanks

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transporter in Hungary

29 months ago

oh, sorry, you mean msw=master social work?

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DadMike in Maryland

29 months ago

transporter in Hungary said: oh, sorry, you mean msw=master social work?

That's the lingo over here- "MSW" = Mastere in Social Work
BSW = Bachelor's in Social Work; "DSW"- is, well-- Doctor of Social Work!

Pretty much the vast majority of social work jobs in US, at least the ones that pay a living wage, are geared towards the licensed MSW.
Some government agencies, esp. in child welfare work, will hire folks with Bachelors in humanity-related studies like Maryland; legally, you're not considered a social worker, and the pay is alot less- but the job itself is still the same.
Many folks do this and try to get an MSW around the work schedule.

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AP in Los Angeles, California

28 months ago

DadMike - I have read your posts and they have been very information.

I have recently moved to California. I was a registered social worker in U.K before. I understand that different states in US have different requirements with some being more relaxed than the other. For instance, Maryland is flexible and does offer positions that do not require license. Any other states that are easy on their requirements? What resources can i use to identify such states?

I am flexible to move to anywhere in US as long as i can get a job.

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DadMike in Maryland

28 months ago

AP in Los Angeles, California said: DadMike - I have read your posts and they have been very information.

I have recently moved to California. I was a registered social worker in U.K before. I understand that different states in US have different requirements with some being more relaxed than the other. For instance, Maryland is flexible and does offer positions that do not require license. Any other states that are easy on their requirements? What resources can i use to identify such states?

I am flexible to move to anywhere in US as long as i can get a job.

Thank you!
I don't know which states offhand- but I would hit the Google, look up the states you're interested in, see if they're hiring and what their qualifications are. Most (I'm sure all) States should have a job listing and application website.
Hope that helps!
Some states may even honor your UK registration! You'd have to look up their licensing boards, too.

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Ajwhite in United Kingdom

28 months ago

Hey. Some really useful information here. I've been a registered/ qualified social worker in the UK now for nearly six years. Most of my experience is in statutory Child Protection. I have a masters in social work.
I maybe moving to Chicago IL next year as my partner will be undertaking post doctoral work in science.
I've looked into state licensing and it a test is undertaken. I wondered what the content? Is it around the legal and policy frameworks?

Also, does anyone know much about the visa requirements? I've read a lot about the H-1B which your employer sponsors. Is likely to happen in social work?

Thanks.

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Hanan the Netherlands in Krimpen Aan Den Ijssel, Netherlands

28 months ago

Hello, my name is Hanan and I am a student from the Netherlands. I am about to graduat for my Bachelor degree in Social work and Services. As a final assignment I have to look for international students with the same education as mine and interact with them. The idea of this assignment is to exchange ideas about certain subject concerns our profession.

Could you be so kind to answer the questions here below

What is the definition of social work in your country?
What are the tasks as a social worker?
Which normative aspects are playing a part as a social worker?

With kind regards

Hanan

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Hanan the Netherlands in Krimpen Aan Den Ijssel, Netherlands

28 months ago

Hello, my name is Hanan and I am a student from The Netherlands. I am about to graduat for my Bachelor degree in Social work and Services. As a final assignment I have to look for international students with the same education as mine and interact with them. The idea of this assignment is to exchange ideas about certain subject concerns our profession.

Could you be so kind to answer the questions here below

What is the definition of social work in your country?
What are the tasks as a social worker?
Which normative aspects are playing a part as a social worker?

With kind regards

Hanan

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Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand

28 months ago

hi Hanan,Sounds like a practical assignment, Ill try to answer your questions the best I can.

1 Social work in NZ is very broad, depending on your agencey's approach to social work (see Payne's Triangle, 1996)According to Payne there are three approaches to social work 1) Reflexive-therapeutic 2) Socialist-collectivist 3)Individualist-reformist
Unlike the USA and Canada and possibly other countries, New Zealand social work has much less of a therapeutic/counseling approach. New Zealand social worker's generally play the role of the advocate, and practice radical social work. This of course depends on the field of social work (child protection, health, family services..ect,) each of these will have a different approach. I can speak from the prospective of child protection that social workers are child advocates with a focus on the child's needs and safety, little theraputic work is done, however I think when discussing New Zealand child protection social work it is important to mention Family Group Conferences. New Zealand's development of Family Group Conferences has been admired and appropriated by other countries. If you look up Child Youth and Family Services New Zealand you can read more about FGC.

2 Again the tasks of social workers vary from agency to agency, however I can only speak about child protection. The number one task of a child protection social worker is to identify needs and risk factors to assess the safety of a child/children. There is only one agency called Child Youth and Family Services who has the authority to remove a child from their family. Child protection social workers have a very high case load with no cap on how many cases they receive. Social workers must follow the "Children Young People and their Families Act 1989" by the book as it is the legislation that guides our practice.

3 The Treaty of Waitangi

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Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand

28 months ago

Hanan the Netherlands in Krimpen Aan Den Ijssel, Netherlands said:
hi Hanan,Sounds like a practical assignment, Ill try to answer your questions the best I can.

1 Social work in NZ is very broad, depending on your agencey's approach to social work (see Payne's Triangle, 1996)According to Payne there are three approaches to social work 1) Reflexive-therapeutic 2) Socialist-collectivist 3)Individualist-reformist
Unlike the USA and Canada and possibly other countries, New Zealand social work has much less of a therapeutic/counseling approach. New Zealand social worker's generally play the role of the advocate, and practice radical social work. This of course depends on the field of social work (child protection, health, family services..ect,) each of these will have a different approach. I can speak from the prospective of child protection that social workers are child advocates with a focus on the child's needs and safety, little theraputic work is done, however I think when discussing New Zealand child protection social work it is important to mention Family Group Conferences. New Zealand's development of Family Group Conferences has been admired and appropriated by other countries. If you look up Child Youth and Family Services New Zealand you can read more about FGC.

2 Again the tasks of social workers vary from agency to agency, however I can only speak about child protection. The number one task of a child protection social worker is to identify needs and risk factors to assess the safety of a child/children. There is only one agency called Child Youth and Family Services who has the authority to remove a child from their family. Child protection social workers have a very high case load with no cap on how many cases they receive. Social workers must follow the "Children Young People and their Families Act 1989"

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Hanan the Netherlands in Zwijndrecht, Netherlands

28 months ago

Thanks a lot

I can really use this voor the assignment

Regards

Hanan

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DadMike in Maryland

28 months ago

Hanan the Netherlands in Krimpen Aan Den Ijssel, Netherlands said: Hello, my name is Hanan and I am a student from The Netherlands. I am about to graduat for my Bachelor degree in Social work and Services. As a final assignment I have to look for international students with the same education as mine and interact with them. The idea of this assignment is to exchange ideas about certain subject concerns our profession.

Could you be so kind to answer the questions here below

What is the definition of social work in your country?
What are the tasks as a social worker?
Which normative aspects are playing a part as a social worker?

With kind regards

Hanan

In the US, it's very, very broad!! 50 states plus territories, all with different rules and laws. Generally, to be a legal social worker you need to have a BSW, MSW, or DSW in Social Work, and have the appropriate license in your state. Many states have tiered licenses- one for entry level, one for clinical work, one for admin work, etc.
Generally, social work plays a large variety of support and main intervention roles.
In hospitals, social workers can do mental health work, aid indigent patients with billing and discharge plans, help grieving or worried families.
In public child welfare, social workers conduct child abuse investigations, act as foster care workers, and perform all the admin tasks that go with that. In public social service agencies they also work with elderly and disabled adults, the homeless, and people in general need, such as prisoners.
Private agencies offer similar services- foster care, adoptions, care for needy- often relying on government and private donations to operate.
Mental health agencies and hospitals employ social workers as therapists and discharge planners/case managers.
Schools hire social workers to do therapy and address issues with families and children at their school.
I'm sure I've left some out as well!
Good luck on your paper!!

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c in United Kingdom

28 months ago

AP in Los Angeles, California said: DadMike - I have read your posts and they have been very information.

I have recently moved to California. I was a registered social worker in U.K before. I understand that different states in US have different requirements with some being more relaxed than the other. For instance, Maryland is flexible and does offer positions that do not require license. Any other states that are easy on their requirements? What resources can i use to identify such states?

I am flexible to move to anywhere in US as long as i can get a job.

Could you advise how you went about applying for a job and startung a job in the USA from the UK? Thanks.

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chanelicia in Brighton, Australia

27 months ago

I am a Singaporean, will be graduating soon from a uni in Australia with MSW. I was wondering whether I can apply for a work visa to come to the US to work?

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JoshuaTodd in Oceanside, New York

27 months ago

Hello,
I have a Masters of Social Work degree in the United States and have worked with children and adolescents internationally with a strong international background. I heard awhile ago that New Zealand was lookin for social workers but can not seem to find any more information on who to contact for assistance. I would love to work as a social worker in New Zealand and would appreciate any time and assistance you could offer. Any information on the subject is truly appreciated. Thank you.

Joshua

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Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand

27 months ago

Kia ora Joshua,

Yes there are plenty of vacancies here in New Zealand (and they are very open to international workers) What is your specialized field of practice, I can give you some links to either goverment organizations or NGO's. In the meantime look up Child Youth and Family services New Zealand ( that is our statutory organization for child protection which also involves a Youth Justice sector) read up on the practice tools, as Im sure you'll be asked if your familiar with Family Group Conferences and Strengths-based practice which are central to Child Youth and Family practice.
Cheers

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JoshuaTodd in Oceanside, New York

27 months ago

Nzali,

Thanks for your response. I have worked internationally previously with children and adolescents and also worked with that population here in the USA. Ive heard there is not much counseling for social workers to do in NZ, is this correct? In the past I have worked with refugees as well but love working with children and adolescents as my main focus. Are there jobs in NZ where one works with children and adolescents using such things as play therapy, art therapy and with adolescents verbal therapy and/or games with both populations ? Thank you for your assistance. I really appreciate it.

Sincerely,

Joshua

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Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand

27 months ago

Right, that's correct, I was just having this conversation with a lecturer of mine who happens to be an American. NZ social work does not focus on counseling in the role of a social worker, this is what I am finding problematic at the moment because I would like to work in America as a sw but have not been trained in CBT, counseling, or any other therapeutic approaches per say. Sw in NZ is advocacy and resource focused (outside of child protection) Depending on what agency you are with they may have a more therapeutic approach, but your title would be "family therapist' instead of social worker. However, you have the advantage of having that knowledge which can quite possibly work in your favour. If you go into child protection as a social worker there is no way you would be doing any form of counseling or therapy, in fact you may be repromanded if you do. You would have to be a registered therapist, psychologist, or counsellor to do so in child protection. Your best bet would be to work in an ngo where the social work role can be determined by the social worker employed. Just a question but have you looked into lecturing in New Zealand? with your experience and sw approach there may be a niche for you, as there is a current debate around incorperating counseling into sw.

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JoshuaTodd in Oceanside, New York

26 months ago

Nzali,

DO you happen to know of any NGO's that may be looking for social workers ? I am not sure if I could teach as I only have an MSW though do enjoy counseling. Working with families from an NGO perhaps I could at least use a little counseling - I dont know who would be interested in hiring me as ive done most of my counseling abroad in Nepal, India and South Africa. "Family therapist " would be great though I dont know if the MSW is equivalent to the degree needed in NZ. I tried an agency that helps people from England and Australia get to work in NZ but I have not heard back from the agency and i sent another email to them asking for assistance but to no avail.

Do you have any suggesstions as to NGO's I could contact that may be interested in hiring an American ? Or any agencies that help people through the process of becoming social workers in NZ from their home country ? I appreciate any assistance you can offer.

Sincerely,

Joshua

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JoshuaTodd in Oceanside, New York

26 months ago

Where can I find these vacancies open to foreigners ? Thanks

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Nzali in Auckland, New Zealand

26 months ago

Type in "social work jobs in nz" exactly and a list of
New Zealand's top job searching websites comes up.
I find out more info from a few sources, but it won't
Be until after this Friday- so in the meantime check
Out those websites and see what you come up with
:) hope they help

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wendyharris in Glenrothes, United Kingdom

25 months ago

DadMike in Maryland said: One helpful bit of advice I can give-- EVERY STATE IS COMPLETLEY DIFFERENT. There are NO NATIONAL STANDARDS for social work. A license in one state does not necessarily transfer to another state. In other words- we have 50 different sets of laws and standards to legally be called a social worker in US; even more if you count the territories.
SPANISH is an extremely helpful second language to have; in many states, esp. California and the Southwest, it is practically mandatory you speak both Spanish and English to be considered for a job.
Local govt. child welfare agencies are almost always hiring , due to high stress of job. I love it, as a few of us hard core crazies do, but local Departments of Social Services are a great way to get started in a US social work career. You learn the system in a way no other social work job can teach you.
Many states have on-line job postings and applications; Maryland, my state of residence, is always looking for child welfare workers; it helps to have an MSW, but most counties in Maryland will hire BA's in Human Service, no license, for caseworker jobs; to be a supervisor you need an MSW and a clinical license, plus 18months post LCSW-C experience.
In US, most social worker jobs cluster in 3 big areas: Child welfare work (local govt. CPS, foster care, in-home family serices; with associated private adoption/foster care/group home/ in-home agencies); Mental Health (in-patient and out-patient, some in-home and crisis intervention), and Hospital /Medical work.

HI Im doing a BA (HONS) and am looking for information for a comparative studies essay I have chosen America and Scotland as Scotland is where I live, any information you could give me would be useful the essay looks at historical to present day social policy and residential child care, laws, changes in societies perspectives etc, any links to web sights that you think may be useful would also be appreciated. thank you, Wendy

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DadMike in Maryland

25 months ago

wendyharris in Glenrothes, United Kingdom said: HI Im doing a BA (HONS) and am looking for information for a comparative studies essay I have chosen America and Scotland as Scotland is where I live, any information you could give me would be useful the essay looks at historical to present day social policy and residential child care, laws, changes in societies perspectives etc, any links to web sights that you think may be useful would also be appreciated. thank you, Wendy

Been a long time since I did any type of research like that!! Easiest way may be to compare US Federal to Scotland; otherwise you may need to pick one state in the US to compare-- 50 different sets of regs and laws to look at!!

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wendyharris in Glenrothes, United Kingdom

25 months ago

thanks I will look at US federal and see what I can find, I was getting no where with America as a whole so heres hoping this will give me more solid info
thanks again
Wendy

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DadMike in Maryland

25 months ago

wendyharris in Glenrothes, United Kingdom said: thanks I will look at US federal and see what I can find, I was getting no where with America as a whole so heres hoping this will give me more solid info
thanks again
Wendy

Yep- there is no America as a whole when it comes to a lot of things; per the Constitution all powers not specificaly given to Feds are left to the States- which means for things like social work and child welfare, you'll have 50 different sets of rules and regs (and more, if you count DC and Territories). Federal Govt. does set some standards based on grants- i.e., if the state wants Federal money, they need to follow Federal guidelines; but the actual rules and laws are state-based.

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