Tips for sous chef interviews.

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (47)

Host

Do you have any tips to help prepare for an upcoming sous chef interview?

Are there common interview questions that come up again and again?

Reply - Report abuse

stephen Cherry in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania

75 months ago

If you have to ask this question you are not quite ready

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (34) / No (109) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

70 months ago

They will ask you about percentages for food, and labor costs. How you controlled those costs at previous jobs. If it is your first time applying for a Sous Chef position make yourself familar with the average food cost percentages that most restaurants require (30-32%) Labor costs can vary depending upon if they lump service staff with kitchen. Kitchen should be under 23% in most situations, 19-20% is great in kitchen labor costs. The best way to cut these costs is to increase sales, waste is decreased significantly when inventory is being used, labor costs dramatically decrease when employees are kept busy. Remember, your position as Sous Chef is to relieve the Chef or Executive Chef, it is your duty to step into his shoes and enforce his policies while he is away. Be loyal, and trusted to act in his behalf during his absence. Many times you are a liason between the Exective Chef, and kitchen staff, be ready to be caught in the middle sometimes as this is very common. The Sous Chef is usually alot closer to the general kitchen staff, because the Executive Chef is busy with the administrative/bookkeeping end of the business. Be able to be diplomatic, and support your supervisors, and subbordinates alike.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (122) / No (14) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

66 months ago

The Sous Chef position generally start out at between 30-40k per year, although there are a few that start out at a little higher. Performance bonuses can bring those salaries up depending on the companies structured bonus program. One place I worked I was eligable for a 12k bonus/year, there were a few months that we didn't hit our projected goals so I only recieved half of that potential bonus. Some places don't have bonuses, so be aware of this when you negotiate your salary. Bonuses are usually paid out on a quaterly basis, be aware of the ones that pay out yearly as you may not see that bonus. When figured yearly it is much harder to hit the required projections, and it is better to get the bonuses for a few months then none at all.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

65 months ago

Vegetarian is a good field to know, but don't limit yourself to that unless you want to have very few places to work at. I don't know what the percentages are of vegetarian businesses but don't become one dementional.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

ceickmey in Euless, Texas

63 months ago

Steven Troilo in Nashville, Tennessee said: I would say that comment was a little unnecessary. He was just looking for a little advice, not the answers to a test. I would say just be confident about your strengths and know what the role of Sous Chef really entails. Do you have experience with writing menus and manging food cost?

I have to say that was an appropriate comment. Sometimes we forget this a team industry and not just personal gain.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (10) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

63 months ago

ceickmey in Euless, Texas said: I have to say that was an appropriate comment. Sometimes we forget this a team industry and not just personal gain.

Hi Everyone,

It's been a while sence this forum came up on my e-mail, but I always like to contribute to this subject when someone has a question.

If you want to be a great Sous Chef, you must be loyal. It is easier to be an Executive Chef then a Sous Chef.

As Chef's we all have this deep desire to be appreciated, it's like any artist wants to be recognized for their great painting, sculpture, or symphonic orchistration.

The most important thing I can teach you is patience. Your time will come soon.

I have the feeling some people in this forum don't understand what a Sous Chef is, so I will give a short version of the job description so everyone understands. It is by far the most difficult position in the back of the house (BOH)

A Sous Chef is, by definition, Assistant to the Chef, #2 in the BOH, when the Chef or Executive Chef is absent he/she has every bit the authority the Executive Chef has. You are in charge when the Chef is off, think that's great, think again.

You need to know your Chef inside and out to do your job properly. This is not your show, it is his/her's. That is your job to promote him/her to the best of your ability.

You are in the middle of everything, so you had better have some diplomatic skills. As an Executive Chef, I don't want a yes man/women all the time. I want somebody to stand up for the line cooks, prep cooks, dishwashers, etc. to give me some firepower when I go into that management meeting. I may, and probably will challenge you, be ready for that time. Do not ever hesitate to tell me when I'm wrong as long as you do it respectfully, but when you do so you better have all your ducks in a row.

Just so you know, larger kitchens can have several Sous Chefs. I have had 3 work under me at one time, some kitchens have more depending on their size.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (39) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

63 months ago

I would just like to let all of you recent graduates of culinary schools know, don't expect an Executive Chef position upon graduation. This is very unlikely to happen unless you get very lucky.

Most likely you will start out just a little above where I started 35 years ago.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

63 months ago

As for the interview, first impressions are critical. Depending on the place, a good rule to remember is dress one level above the place you will be working in. A Sous Chef position in a large hotel requires a suit/dress. Women, the dress should come close to the knees, jewelry should be limited to a minimum. Men, have a suit and tie on. For a more casual type atmosphere remember the rule for the interiew. Dress one level above, so for a place that is mostly blue jeans and cowboy boots add your nice dress shirt to that. One thing that is critical for both men and women. Take pride in your appearence. Make sure your fingernails are trimmed, your hair is under control, etc. Good luck everyone!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

63 months ago

By the way, thank you Lauren in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Your assignment is still on my computer. It was a great research assignment and I hoped I was helpfull. I hope I helped out and got you a passing grade!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Peltier1 in New York, New York

63 months ago

You certainly did! Thank you Daniel! It was kinda pieced together, but it made it fun for me to do the research.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Director Dave in Cleveland, Ohio

61 months ago

stephen Cherry in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania said: If you have to ask this question you are not quite ready

Stephen,

I am on this blog looking for potential questions to ask a field of 18 chef candidates applying for one available position. In my years in the restaurant industry, contract food service, as well as educational dining I must say your comment sums up everything I dislike about our industry....egos that can barely fit into a room. Get over yourself already, you are giving chefs a bad name!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (19) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

61 months ago

I agree with Dave, I have worked under many Chef's like this throughout my 35 year career, and usually I don't last long working for them because I have no tolerence for such arrogence. Reminds me of the UK's supposed great Chef Ramsey, who wouldn't last a week here in the US with out getting sued for harrassment of some kind. Why Chef's think that when they finally get the title they have to turn into an arrogent jerk is beyond me.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

61 months ago

Director Dave in Cleveland, Ohio said: Stephen,

I am on this blog looking for potential questions to ask a field of 18 chef candidates applying for one available position. In my years in the restaurant industry, contract food service, as well as educational dining I must say your comment sums up everything I dislike about our industry....egos that can barely fit into a room. Get over yourself already, you are giving chefs a bad name!

Dave, the very first question I would ask would have very little to do with cooking, or the food service industry. Why? Everyone has their standard answers lined up, you want to see if they can deal with pressure and stress. In fact, I would have several questions like this lined up to throw out in the interview. I would also give situational questions like... If you saw a line cook drop something on the floor in the middle of a rush, and try to serve it, what would you do? How would he/she be disiplined? You want to find out if they lead by example or through intimidation. A chef wears many hats, the most important is he must be a leader of personnel. He/She could be the greatest cook in the world, but if he/she is unable to get the crew to follow you will have problems. I would ask, What is the most important asset in your kitchen? The ones that say my employees, I would put their resume at the top of the stack. One thing I like to do is introduce myself, hand the interviewee a menu, tell him/her to take a look at it and excuse myself for a couple of minutes telling him I have to attend to something and I'll be right back. Have a waitress offer him coffee, give him distractions. Then when you sit down to interview him ask him questions about what he thinks of the menu. Don't expect him to have memorized the menu, but it would be nice to be able to name a few dishes off it. This is an awareness type question.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (19) / No Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon

61 months ago

Dave,I ran out of space during my last post so I had to start another, sorry. Anyway, if you would like to get some more questions to ask of perspective Chef's, or if anyone else needs questions answered I would be happy to respond. Email me at dtkangiser@aol.com.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

ruchi desai in Vasai, India

59 months ago

i m lookin for a job in pastry department at commis level

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

Kavijeanne1 in Mauritius

59 months ago

Hello professionals,

I need someone to give some interview tips for a Jr Sous Chef position in a cruise ship. Thank you

Kavi

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

cateringpro in Waterlooville, United Kingdom

58 months ago

Daniel in Portland, Oregon said: They will ask you about percentages for food, and labor costs. How you controlled those costs at previous jobs. If it is your first time applying for a Sous Chef position make yourself familar with the average food cost percentages that most restaurants require (30-32%) Labor costs can vary depending upon if they lump service staff with kitchen. Kitchen should be under 23% in most situations, 19-20% is great in kitchen labor costs. The best way to cut these costs is to increase sales, waste is decreased significantly when inventory is being used, labor costs dramatically decrease when employees are kept busy. Remember, your position as Sous Chef is to relieve the Chef or Executive Chef, it is your duty to step into his shoes and enforce his policies while he is away. Be loyal, and trusted to act in his behalf during his absence. Many times you are a liason between the Exective Chef, and kitchen staff, be ready to be caught in the middle sometimes as this is very common. The Sous Chef is usually alot closer to the general kitchen staff, because the Executive Chef is busy with the administrative/bookkeeping end of the business. Be able to be diplomatic, and support your supervisors, and subbordinates alike.

Great answer i have been a head chef for 12 years and i remember being promoted above my friend, we were all chef de partie's and then i was sous chef and taking control of the kitchen on the head chefs days off, catering profiles online has the mosted asked interview questions in their profiles and help with costings, it's not every chefs dream to do the books, when cooking is most important, catering profiles online also have a gross profit calculator that is fast and simple and makes you look good in front of a new head chef.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

pedro diaz in Brooklyn, New York

57 months ago

Kavijeanne1 in Mauritius said: Hello professionals,

I need someone to give some interview tips for a Jr Sous Chef position in a cruise ship. Thank you

Kavi

well by junior sou chef i would have to believe that you mean chef tournant that's what ship board culinary positions goe by anyhoo i would say get ready for a very very bussy contract i hold a possition on the norwegian crusie line in Hawaii my contrack is 4 months on 2 months off vacation paid, i work 7 days a week 12 to 14 hour shift unlike regular cooks they have a day off chef tournants or soue chef ar recognised as managerial staff holding a higher pay with vacation pay involved and less time on the ship regular cook 6 months managment 4 months, but with all that said and done i would recomend that you put on all your hats in the culinary field and use then wisely and pase your self because it is a very bumpy ride anything else i could help you with get back to me ! regarding foods cooking tips staffing ordering purchasing shceduling exct!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Michi in Ranchi, India

55 months ago

I have been in the restaurant industry for approx. 13 years, 6 + years as an employee and 6 + years as an chef entrepreneur. I want to get into a 5 star property as a sous chef, please help me to know whether i am suited for it or not. I will be using the best of the sources and reference but would like to prepare good for the interview too. How should i prepare and what should i expect in the interview.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Gerhait in Union City, New Jersey

54 months ago

Daniel in Portland, Oregon said: They will ask you about percentages for food, and labor costs. How you controlled those costs at previous jobs. If it is your first time applying for a Sous Chef position make yourself familar with the average food cost percentages that most restaurants require (30-32%) Labor costs can vary depending upon if they lump service staff with kitchen. Kitchen should be under 23% in most situations, 19-20% is great in kitchen labor costs. The best way to cut these costs is to increase sales, waste is decreased significantly when inventory is being used, labor costs dramatically decrease when employees are kept busy. Remember, your position as Sous Chef is to relieve the Chef or Executive Chef, it is your duty to step into his shoes and enforce his policies while he is away. Be loyal, and trusted to act in his behalf during his absence. Many times you are a liason between the Exective Chef, and kitchen staff, be ready to be caught in the middle sometimes as this is very common. The Sous Chef is usually alot closer to the general kitchen staff, because the Executive Chef is busy with the administrative/bookkeeping end of the business. Be able to be diplomatic, and support your supervisors, and subbordinates alike.
I have never heard the term lump service staff can ypu explain what that is please. Thank you

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

54 months ago

I was refering to most establishments separate labor costs of the front of the house, and back of the house, others even break it down farther then that with banquets, and catering. Some lump all these costs together. Labor & food costs will change depending upon how your operation breaks these numbers down.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

54 months ago

Hello Michi in India.
Here in the United States we study the culinary arts, we study the masters from around the world, both present and from the past. We use the Library, and purchase books from the local book store, even the media has jumped on board with TV shows 24 hours a day here showing cooking from master chef's. They have become some of the most popular shows on TV. For a 5 star establishment you need to have the education. Is there a culinary arts school close to you? Make sure they are internationally recognized before you enroll. This is your first step to landing the job of your dreams!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Michi in Ranchi, India

54 months ago

Thanks you, sir. I have already done a diploma in hotel management and catering technology with applied nutrition, from a recognized institution at least nationally. Preparing to appear for Radisson's interview one the property opens in my town. I have already worked for 5 year plus in TGI FRIDAYS Kithen, and 6 year plus as a chef entrepreneur having my own food joints (a couple), but i want to work abroad that's why opting to get into hotel kitchen job asap.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

54 months ago

Host said: Do you have any tips to help prepare for an upcoming sous chef interview?

Are there common interview questions that come up again and again?

I have talked about this earlier, but from some of the posts things get confused. It is not necessary to know everything about our profession to become a good Sous Chef, or to land that position even in the best Hotels and Restaurants. You must remember you are a leader, that is your most importantant function. You don't need to know everything about cooking, but you need a good foundation and experience. Don't be afraid to tell the truth in an interview, just say I'm lacking in that area, instead of trying to B.S your way through the question, because we spot that right away. We didn't become Executive Chef's by being stupid. Be honest to yourselves, don't be afraid to say you don't know everything. This will not loose you the job, but deception will. The number one thing you can do during any interview is to express the importance of the Chain of Command. As a Sous Chef you are the support system for the Executive Chef, he needs you to be loyal more then any other skill you may have. A great Sous Chef makes his Executive Chef shine, and follows his lead and vision. In return the Executive Chef rewards you 10 times over in the future when you are ready to run your own kitchen.

You must also have the respect of the personnel you lead. They have more power then you do, and always remember that. You are one, and they are many. They can get rid of you easily if you don't treat them right. You must find a way to support your subbordinates and supervisors alike.

One of the biggest abuses of our industry is breaks, especially in high volume situations. We must be willing to step in and releive each and everyone of our line personnel when nessesary for their breaks. Not only is it the law, but it's nessesary for a consistent top notch product. Your line personnel are key personnel.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (19) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

54 months ago

You want to be a great Sous Chef, first you must have a command presence. When everyone else is panicing, you step up and take control, and are not afraid to jump in. This is the time for you to shine, throw your crew members a lifevest and make them respect you. Don't let them flounder, you are their leader. You must be there for them at all times. This is one of the most important priorities you have. If you are unwilling to work the line you should work in the front of the house!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (16) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

ken in Sioux City, Iowa

53 months ago

i appreciated the commets,especially on being yourself and not knowing everything,i think knowing how to work well with the cooks is one of the biggest assets

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

53 months ago

ken in Sioux City, Iowa said: i appreciated the commets,especially on being yourself and not knowing everything,i think knowing how to work well with the cooks is one of the biggest assets

This advice is not only for Sous Chef's, but for Executive Chef's and every management position on up to General Manager, and especially the owner.

Your #1 asset is your employees. Each and everyone of them are important to your establishment. From the dishwasher to the busboy on up to the highest personnel of your company. Each and every position is vital to your operation. As a BOH manager, a great dishwasher, is more valuable to me then an average line cook!! If the line cook doesn't have clean plates upon demand what good are his/her talents? One of my pet peeves is the line many times abuses the dishwasher!! Especially at the end of the night, they make him/her clean up their mess. This is laziness and should not be tolerated.

The arguement is why should I pay a higher wage for the line cooks to clean when I can pay the dishwasher a lower wage to do the same thing. The simple answer is it's not his/her job!! It's the person that makes the mess. When line cooks have to clean up after themselves they soon learn to hit that trash can, they soon learn to clean as they go.

I am also a very big supporter of everyone leaving at the same time. Many times the line burries the dishwasher at closing. Everyone should pitch in and help at the end of the night. It's called team work. When you start this, at first you will loose a few bucks in labor, but as your crew gets used to it they will save you money because they start to do the prebreakdowns of the line that allows your dishwasher to not get swamped at the end of the night.

You want to save your company money, cut your food and labor costs!! Start from the bottom and work with each and every station. My first day in the kitchen is always spent with the dishwasher.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (14) / No Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

53 months ago

You want your kitchen personnel to work as a team, have their boss doing dishes all night, and at the end of the night watch what they ask me to do for them. Am I going to mop the floor for their area, or clean their grill. You must hold each individual responsible for their area. Do not let any individual pass thier responsibilities onto somebody else. Define each job description in writing and detail. All personnel must have written job descriptions and expectations.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

53 months ago

K. Orvolli in Portland, Oregon said: Well, obviously.

This is not obvious to many personnel. Do not give a 2 word answer, this does not help anybody. It may be obvious to you, but not to the beginners in our field. Next, do not put me down for trying to help others in our field.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

53 months ago

You gave a 2 word answer (k.Orvolli) Kind of like Dah!! You didn't mean to sound bitchy. What the hell, are you kidding me!! I am trying to tell these people the truth and give them advise that will help them, meanwhile your trying to tear me down. What is your agenda!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

K. Orvolli in Portland, Oregon

53 months ago

Well, I'm sorry you feel that way, but you need to calm down a bit, we all have an opinion and I didn't mean to make mine sound offensive. You aren't the only one who can give advice. Why all the exclamation marks? I'm calm, collected, just trying to discuss....same as you I'd thought. No reason to get upset, and I REALLY didn't mean to sound like bitchy. I just thought that information like that you had given should be obvious to anyone starting out working in ANY profession. You should look back over what I had said, I was agreeing with you....not trying to bring you down.
Calm....down. Also, at what point did I "tear you down"?
Everything in my response was just agreeing with what you had said and trying to explain my two word answer.
No agendas here.

-K

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

K. Orvolli in Portland, Oregon

53 months ago

Also....my whole response was meant to be an apology to a two word reply.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

montuckyp

50 months ago

i thought they would want real world skills but turns out they just want book knowledge.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

rgthth in Perkasie, Pennsylvania

49 months ago

Ricardo in Fort Worth, Texas said: yes , they will ask you about the mother sauces

If you don't already know the MOTHER SAUCES as a COOK then go back to Mc Donalds

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

B in LV in Las Vegas, Nevada

46 months ago

Daniel I would work for you anyday

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

HC in Omaha, Nebraska

42 months ago

@Daniel in Portland: Thank you for all of the advice you gave in this forum! I am applying for a Sous Chef/Assistant Chef position with my job and needed some sample questions. Most of what you said is what I had already planned to cover in my interview (the most important asset is the team, info about dishwasher, which is how we currently treat ours-all as a team!, and how the Sous Chef is ultimately the middle person). It helped me to reinvent my answers. I enjoyed the reading.

-HC

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

checks in Calgary, Alberta

40 months ago

Thats great, we are trying to develop ourselves in our profession and all we hear is back stabbing and and fighting from two as they call them selves executive chefs. I thought this was a team working enviroment. No I in teams is there gentlemen?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Jonathan in Saint Cloud, Florida

36 months ago

cateringpro in Waterlooville, United Kingdom said: Great answer i have been a head chef for 12 years and i remember being promoted above my friend, we were all chef de partie's and then i was sous chef and taking control of the kitchen on the head chefs days off, catering profiles online has the mosted asked interview questions in their profiles and help with costings, it's not every chefs dream to do the books, when cooking is most important, catering profiles online also have a gross profit calculator that is fast and simple and makes you look good in front of a new head chef.

I agree that learning about food cost is an important aspect in reaching executive chef status but to be a first time sous chef I feel it is more important to understand multiple cooking techniques new and classical and be very knowledgeable at maintaining a well executed haccp program. It is also very important to have outstanding leadership skills and earn the respect of the hourly team members then demand it. At most places there is an executive sous chef that will handle the food cost and administrative duties in the executive chefs absence.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No Reply - Report abuse

Alex in Ypsilanti, Michigan

27 months ago

I have a job interview for sues chef position tomorrow and everyone's comments have been very helpful. Thank you all!.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Strawstine in Dallas, Texas

24 months ago

How do I apply to a cruise ship.?I have exeperience in various parts of Cooking and baking.

pedro diaz in Brooklyn, New York said: well by junior sou chef i would have to believe that you mean chef tournant that's what ship board culinary positions goe by anyhoo i would say get ready for a very very bussy contract i hold a possition on the norwegian crusie line in Hawaii my contrack is 4 months on 2 months off vacation paid, i work 7 days a week 12 to 14 hour shift unlike regular cooks they have a day off chef tournants or soue chef ar recognised as managerial staff holding a higher pay with vacation pay involved and less time on the ship regular cook 6 months managment 4 months, but with all that said and done i would recomend that you put on all your hats in the culinary field and use then wisely and pase your self because it is a very bumpy ride anything else i could help you with get back to me ! regarding foods cooking tips staffing ordering purchasing shceduling exct!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

donna waters-richardson in Houston, Texas

24 months ago

Daniel in Beaverton, Oregon said: Dave,I ran out of space during my last post so I had to start another, sorry. Anyway, if you would like to get some more questions to ask of perspective Chef 's, or if anyone else needs questions answered I would be happy to respond. Email me at dtkangiser@aol.com.

Do you hav a new email address DT?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Mcminnville, Oregon

21 months ago

donna waters-richardson in Houston, Texas said: Do you hav a new email address DT?

Yes, my new address is dtkangiser@yahoo.com

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

etastella in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

12 months ago

hi, Daniel I'm Marilyn and I will have an assessment interview for a sous chef position in the next 5 days. I will be facing a group of people to question me. As someone ho has experience on this field, what do you think is the common questions they would give me and how to answer them. I have been working as a CDP for 5 yrs. now but I'm not used to this interview thing. Pls. help!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Daniel in Portland, Oregon

12 months ago

Hi Marlyn,
Some of the first questions they will ask is the food and labor cost percentage parameters of your last position/establishment. How did you adjust when you fell out of those parameters; what actions did you take to bring your food and labor costs in line. They almost always ask a future goals question. What are your plans for the future? Don't be afraid to tell them your ambitions even if it isn't a permanent position within the company you are applying with. Give them a 5 year plan that includes them, a 10 year plan that may, or may not, include them, and so forth. Be brief and concise with your plan. They will most likely ask you a situational question that will require you to evaluate and respond with a solution to a complex problem. Example - There is a grease fire under the Char-broiler that has the potential of getting out of control, how would you respond? Don't forget to start out the answer with a preventative solution, before you direct your answer toward the immediate solution to the problem. Well, in that instance proper cleaning and maintenance of the Char-broiler will normally prevent such an occurrence, but that being said, first take away the oxygen from the flame with either a box baking soda, if that doesn't work know the locations of the nearest fire extinguisher and use it, last resort pull the hood pin, exit kitchen, call 911 and evacuate the establishment. If I can be of any other help please feel free to ask....... Daniel

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

etastella in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

12 months ago

Daniel in Portland, Oregon said: Hi Marlyn,
Some of the first questions they will ask is the food and labor cost percentage parameters of your last position/establishment. How did you adjust when you fell out of those parameters; what actions did you take to bring your food and labor costs in line. They almost always ask a future goals question. What are your plans for the future? Don't be afraid to tell them your ambitions even if it isn't a permanent position within the company you are applying with. Give them a 5 year plan that includes them, a 10 year plan that may, or may not, include them, and so forth. Be brief and concise with your plan. They will most likely ask you a situational question that will require you to evaluate and respond with a solution to a complex problem. Example - There is a grease fire under the Char-broiler that has the potential of getting out of control, how would you respond? Don't forget to start out the answer with a preventative solution, before you direct your answer toward the immediate solution to the problem. Well, in that instance proper cleaning and maintenance of the Char-broiler will normally prevent such an occurrence, but that being said, first take away the oxygen from the flame with either a box baking soda, if that doesn't work know the locations of the nearest fire extinguisher and use it, last resort pull the hood pin, exit kitchen, call 911 and evacuate the establishment. If I can be of any other help please feel free to ask....... Daniel

Thank you Daniel for replying to my question. Can I send you a mail on yahoo?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

etastella in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

12 months ago

To all, pls help me as well, do you know any situational questions for a sous chef position.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.