Certificate or Degree for Technical Writing

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Katie in New Hill, North Carolina

78 months ago

I also received by BA in English. I now have my MA in Technical and Professional Communication from East Carolina University. It's a great online program. I highly recommend it! See core.ecu.edu/engl/tpc/tekkom/tpc.htm for more info.

I even had a classmate who was stationed in Korea the entire time she was in the program.

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kelly in Yorktown Heights, New York

78 months ago

Thank you for your advice and program recommendation. I'll look into their program as a possibility. Can you give me a sense regarding the typical salary for a beginning technical writer?

Thanks.

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Katie in New Hill, North Carolina

78 months ago

I made about 30K but that was about 10 years ago. I'm sure it all depends on where you are, your education, experience and the company. Some positions in my area (Raleigh, NC) start in the mid 30s +. Many writing jobs, especially in the pharmacuetical industry, often have higher salaries.

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kelly in Yorktown Heights, New York

78 months ago

Thanks for taking the time to respond to my question. After getting a certificate, I would need to find part time work since I still have my little ones running around.

Hopefully, technical writing can be a way for me to use my writing skills for income. I'm thinking about researching blogging but I'm not sure how that goes.
Thanks again.

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Techone in Portland, Oregon

71 months ago

Possible technical writer in Yorktown Heights, New York said: I am exploring the possibility of taking some online courses in technical writing. I have a Bachelor Degree in English and enjoy writing. Can I obtain an entry level technical writer position with a technical writing certificate? If so, can anyone recommend a reputable program? I would like to work from home if possible. Thank you.

Schooling and a degree in English doesn't make a good tech writer, I don't care what college told you that. The interest in your subject. The ability to write to the user of a product clearly and concisely. The ability to understand technology quickly and to write to the correct audience.

Working from home is great but not without experience. Unless you're just reformatting. And then you need work connections.

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Teresa M in San Diego, California

71 months ago

Technical writing requires many skills including the ability to change horses in mid-stream. Working from home is not something I recommend to a novice writer, even if you could find such a position for part-time work. An understanding of the requirements of the ocmpany you work for and the abillity to know your audience is essential. A degree in English has little to do with the requirements of technical writing! You will also want to decide what area of technical writing you are qualified for, do you have any background in software, hardware, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing, training, health care, or the military? Sorry to sound so negative but technical writing is a demanding career that will require you to approach it as a dedicated professional.

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Teresa M in San Diego, California

71 months ago

James Barakaat in Chicago, Illinois said: I encourage anyone who wants to break into Technical Writing to take at least one course in Technical Writing. This is where the methodology of technical communication is taught. Many believe that a degree in English and/or knowing how to string words, sentences, and paragraphs together is enough. It is not enough if one doesn't learn the methodology of creating technical documents.

I have been a technical writer for many years with business and technology degrees that includes a Masters degree in Technical and Scientific Communication. I presently consult and teach for an online university. I believe that anyone with a good command of English can be a good technical writer if they learn to do the following:

1. You do front-end analysis, You know the purpose and the audience for the documentation.

2. You research to provide the information that satisfies the purpose for the intended audience.

3. You organize the information and present it in a form suitable for the purpose of the intended audience.

4. You do usability testing. You use reader(s) as representative sample(s) of the audience to test the documentation. You monitor and take notes to determine where the documentation works and where it doesn't work. You must make it clear to participants that you are testing the documentation and not them participants. (Use search engine to learn more about usability testing. No matter how good you may be, usability testing is the key to determining good documentation).

5. You revise until the documentation works as intended.

I have seen

James, I too have been a technical writer for many years,this is one the finest descriptions of what it takes to be a technical writer...thank you!

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Techone in Portland, Oregon

69 months ago

Schooling is wonderful but don't be deterred. The best schooling is still on the job.

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Mydia in San Diego, California

68 months ago

Thank you James for such amazing information. I am will keep all in mind. To everyone, I would like to break into technical writing. It seems wise for me to go into "PHARMACEUTICAL"/MEDICAL. What type of classes would I need to take to break into this specific nitch???? then after some classes, To put my foot in the door after trianing, I suppose I can simply contact the companies, or a technical writing agency? I know these questions don't seem to bright, but I am a fish out of water in this department. Technical writing branches into all departments, beauty, make-up , body products" is my second area of interest. Software's my thrd choice.

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Mydia in San Diego, California

68 months ago

Sorry everyone for the typohhs!, but it is almost 2am in the morning and I am very tired.

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possible technical writer in Yorktown Heights, New York

64 months ago

Marilyn,

Thanks so much for all this great information and guidance.

I appreciate your taking the time to respond to my request.

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Nat Palm in Corona, California

62 months ago

I have a strong background in medical curricula writing, mostly ghost writing for physicians for JAMA. 20 years experience as a medical professional and now looking for something less physical. Unfortunately colleges laugh at my military education which was supposed to be equivalent to an associates degree. My patients never laughed...they always requested me personally...just as physicians did. I just find it hard to swallow that my 20 years of experience is "worthless" so I am trying to transition into a field where my experience as well as my writing skills would be an asset.

My concerns are that there are so many fly-by-night online places to get a "certificate" and I am more than prepared to earn my way BUT I just don't want to get ripped off. I am already the proud owner of several other hard-earned "certificates" (HR and Management) which aren't worth the paper they are printed on. Seems if you don't have a "degree" that you can't get your foot in the door. How do you move past that little issue? I am looking at 50 right around the corner, three teenagers headed toward college, and I need more than a shiny certificate to get a job.

This woman is not a stranger to hard work and I am more than willing to do what needs to be done---I just can't afford to be ripped off again. Are there apprentice positions in the technical writing field?

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missaugustina in Seattle, Washington

62 months ago

@Nat Palm -

You don't necessarily need a technical writing certificate but taking a course or two could be useful. I am working on my certificate through a local community college that offers continuing education courses. I would recommend looking for something like that in your area.

Career-wise I am in a similar place. My experience is as a Systems Engineer doing everything from web and database development to general IT support for several years. I wrote documentation as a secondary role. I've been feeling pretty burned out and unfocused and after my last layoff due to a restructuring of the IT department, I decided I wanted to focus on Technical Writing. I landed my first technical writing gig before even finishing my certificate (it's listed on my resume with an expected completion date). I took enough courses to build up enough samples for my portfolio so that I could apply for tech writing work.

Because you have experience and expertise in a subject area, like I do, you are a stronger candidate regardless of your certificate status. To gain experience, I volunteered my technical writing skills to open source software projects and put that experience on my resume as a job. I would recommend looking for a non-profit or community project where you can volunteer your writing skills. I would also recommend taking a few technical writing courses just for the experience (if you can find one on writing white papers in particular, that would be valuable in your given field of expertise).

Your previous experience is not worthless, nor is a technical writing certificate! It's a tough economy out there so you have to be extra resourceful :) Good Luck!

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sr tech writer/editor in Vestal, New York

62 months ago

Nat Palm in Corona, California said: I have a strong background in medical curricula writing, mostly ghost writing for physicians for JAMA. 20 years experience as a medical professional and now looking for something less physical. Unfortunately colleges laugh at my military education which was supposed to be equivalent to an associates degree. My patients never laughed...they always requested me personally...just as physicians did. I just find it hard to swallow that my 20 years of experience is "worthless" so I am trying to transition into a field where my experience as well as my writing skills would be an asset.

My concerns are that there are so many fly-by-night online places to get a "certificate" and I am more than prepared to earn my way BUT I just don't want to get ripped off. I am already the proud owner of several other hard-earned "certificates" (HR and Management) which aren't worth the paper they are printed on. Seems if you don't have a "degree" that you can't get your foot in the door. How do you move past that little issue? I am looking at 50 right around the corner, three teenagers headed toward college, and I need more than a shiny certificate to get a job.

This woman is not a stranger to hard work and I am more than willing to do what needs to be done---I just can't afford to be ripped off again. Are there apprentice positions in the technical writing field?

As a Technical Writer with over 25 years experience, I'm happy to tell you that certificates and degrees don't cut it. If I applied for a writer position within the medical field I wouldn’t even get a response because all my experience has nothing to do with the that particular industry related field. It’s much easier to train someone to use the software required to publish the documentation than to train someone of what information the end user needs. Because of your experience you know what information the end user is looking for and how it relates to the industry,

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Mariana in El Paso, Texas

53 months ago

I started my career in translation and technical writing, then branched off into training design and delivery, and training administgration. I was recently laid off and am looking to get back to technical writing. Many of the job postings I've applied for, however, ask for knowledge of FrameMaker and RoboHelp. Can anyone recommend an online-course on some of these programs?

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JE in Des Moines, Iowa

49 months ago

Mariana in El Paso, Texas said: Many of the job postings I've applied for, however, ask for knowledge of FrameMaker and RoboHelp. Can anyone recommend an online-course on some of these programs?

You can download free 30-day demos of both programs. The great thing about documentation programs is that they come with excellent documentation. :)

FrameMaker I admittedly found confusing and unfriendly, but I was able to teach myself RoboHelp in two days. If you have a basic background in desktop publishing and Web design, RoboHelp is very easy to use and the video tutorials are very helpful. The same goes for its main competitor, MadCap Flare (which also has a 30-day free trial).

If anyone is out there looking for work as a tech writer, I cannot say this loud and often enough: DOWNLOAD THE DEMOS. LEARN THESE PROGRAMS. I'm in a two-year contract and I get phone calls from recruiters every other week because nobody else in my 500K-population city knows how to use Flare or RoboHelp - and they're really easy to learn.

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jen in Houston, Texas

43 months ago

Thank you all for the informative questions & answers. I am curious - is it foolish to think that I could begin a career in technical writing with a background in education? I am interested in the profession but do not have a technical background. It sounds like obtaining some education, writing some samples, volunteering time, etc. all help, but is my education degree a huge mark against me?

Thanks for your insight!

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jen in Houston, Texas

43 months ago

Hello all, and thank you for your insight and informative posts. I am curious - how difficult would it be to enter into the field of technical writing with a background in education? I see that it would be good to take a few classes, download the demo, write some samples, volunteer time, etc., but will my education degree be a huge mark against me?

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Centaurita in Columbus, Ohio

43 months ago

Hi Jen in Houston,
I am also looking to get into technical writing and I can only give an opinion on your question, but I just wanted to say that I would think that an education degree would be a mark in your favor since teaching is part of technical writing. I mean it is taking something complicated and putting it in a manner that a user can easily understand. In other words you are writing instructions, which is the same thing as instructing. Here is a link that should prove helpful: www.bls.gov/oco/ocos319.htm

Good Luck to you!

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lclay in Strasburg, Virginia

42 months ago

I am journalist who has worked in print media for about 15 years, with experience in writing, editing and pagination. I am interested in getting into technical writing, because the newspaper business is sinking fast. I see many jobs for technical writers in the Northern Virginia area, but I don't even get responses when I apply. It seems like technical writing should be a logical step for me - as well as a relatively stable field - but from things I've read, maybe this isn't the case? I see conflicting advice on here, and really would like to know what I should do to make this transition. Why won't someone give me a chance? Experienced technical writers - can you help?

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abarlow in Jonesboro, Georgia

42 months ago

I just recently obtained my B.A in English and minor in professional writing. I am interested in breaking into technical woriting, although I have only had one tech writing class. Is it necessary that I obtain an MA in a specific tech communication area? I am just interested to know what my next step should be.

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techwriter in Sunnyvale, California

41 months ago

The best place to start getting trained in technical writing is to get basics about the sector that you want to apply for. It does not harm to get the knowledge of application programming (like Java or ASP.Net)
just the basics of it.. so that you know what the developers are talking about. Another great book for API documentation is this:
"Read Me first". I refer to the standards and conventions used in this book.

I was completely new to the technical writing domain.. and yes it is a very demanding field and to be a successful technical writer you must be very good at understanding the requirements, great at interpersonal skills, and ofcourse great at time-management.

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JACO in Orlando, Florida

41 months ago

University of Central Florida has a program B.A. English:Technical Communication and also an online M.A. though a bit harder to get into about 40% of applications get in. Instructional Design is another program that makes a nice fit with a B.A. in Technical Writing.

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Jay Tyler in Augusta, Georgia

40 months ago

I have a question about salary. I'd like to get into technical writing; I've been in networking for the last few years, and I'm a published writer, but I'm making enough now that I'm not sure I'd be losing serious income by changing careers (I make roughly $50k/yr). Not that I expect to make this at an intro technical writer job, but I couldn't go too low under this. Someone in this forum stated that intro TW jobs are about $30k/yr? Is this accurate?

Thanks.

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E in Washington, District of Columbia

40 months ago

Technical writing is still writing, however, and requires proper grammar. Your first paragraph contains a multiplicity of basic errors.

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Jlamb in Athens, West Virginia

39 months ago

You obviously have no idea what your talking about. I have a BA in English and just started a position in tech writing with no experience and only an English degree and I start out at way more than 30K. Maybe your just ignorant. Peace

Techone in Portland, Oregon said: Schooling and a degree in English doesn't make a good tech writer, I don't care what college told you that. The interest in your subject. The ability to write to the user of a product clearly and concisely. The ability to understand technology quickly and to write to the correct audience.

Working from home is great but not without experience. Unless you're just reformatting. And then you need work connections.

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Jules in Oviedo, Florida

39 months ago

I'm in college now and majoring in English (emphasis in CW) and considering a minor in tech. comm. Will this minor be helpful in making a career in tech. writing? I'm also not sure what area to specialize in, so if there's anyone who would like to recommend some areas with higher demand please feel free. ;)

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Apostrophe in Turlock, California

39 months ago

Jlamb in Athens, West Virginia said: You obviously have no idea what your talking about. I have a BA in English and just started a position in tech writing with no experience and only an English degree and I start out at way more than 30K. Maybe your just ignorant. Peace

You really have a degree in English? Yet you don't seem to know the difference between "your" and "you're." I don't have any degree at all, yet I've mastered that one. ;-) Perhaps you should be a bit more gracious with your judgments. Peace.

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Marina in Mesa, Arizona

39 months ago

jen in Houston, Texas said: Thank you all for the informative questions & answers. I am curious - is it foolish to think that I could begin a career in technical writing with a background in education? I am interested in the profession but do not have a technical background. It sounds like obtaining some education, writing some samples, volunteering time, etc. all help, but is my education degree a huge mark against me?

Thanks for your insight!

Jen, I currently do technical writing for an educational software company. There is a great deal of remote work for ex-educators in this industry, and not not only technical writing. If you look up the terms "subject specialist" or "curriculum specialist" you will find many opportunities. About 5 years ago I was a project manager for a leading educational software company and managed 15+ ex-teachers who all worked from home, writing content and aligning content to educational standards. Good luck to you.

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jen in Houston, Texas

39 months ago

Thank you so much! I will look into it~!

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Brittany in Upper Sandusky, Ohio

39 months ago

Techone in Portland, Oregon said: Schooling and a degree in English doesn't make a good tech writer, I don't care what college told you that. The interest in your subject. The ability to write to the user of a product clearly and concisely. The ability to understand technology quickly and to write to the correct audience.

Working from home is great but not without experience. Unless you're just reformatting. And then you need work connections.

I'm sorry. This might seem a little rude but I wouldn't be willing to take advice about a writing career from someone who can't properly write.

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amber in Wayne, New Jersey

37 months ago

i need some info and tips on technical writing. i havent gone to school yet and would like to know what the courses are for technical writing, how long the training is, what the work envoirment and work pace is like. is it a demanding job? what common knowledge is best for this type of career? what are good feilds to specialize in. i know i sound ill of the subject but id just like some advice before i go to school. i like to write. but i dont think journalism is for me. any info on this would be much appreciated.

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olm in Houston, Texas

37 months ago

I have a BA in English Language and Literature. I have extensive experience in publishing, editing and proofreading skills and liaison with subject matter experts, website design, and some coding. I write shorthand at 120 wpm, type at 80wpm and have extensive DTP skills. I use Visio, CorelDraw, Photoshop, FrameMaker and RoboHelp very well. I worked as a technical writer for several years before I decided to go to nursing school. I am now a Registered Nurse and since my graduation, have worked as a QA Nurse, working as a subject matter expert for an agency in the development of a software for remote field nurses. I was also responsible for training the field nurses in the use of the software. I find out that my interest is more in working as a technical writer using my skills as a documentation specialist and a nurse and marrying both. I wonder if anyone on this forum knows of opportunities that can use my diverse skills.

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olm in Houston, Texas

37 months ago

I have a BA in English Language. I have extensive experience in publishing, editing and proofreading skills and liaison with subject matter experts, website design, and some coding. I write shorthand at 120 wpm, type at 80wpm and have extensive DTP skills. I use Visio, CorelDraw, Photoshop, FrameMaker and RoboHelp very well. I worked as a technical writer for several years before I decided to go to nursing school. I am now a Registered Nurse and since my graduation, have worked as a QA Nurse, working as a subject matter expert for an agency in the development of a software for remote field nurses. I was also responsible for training the field nurses in the use of the software. I find out that my interest is more in working as a technical writer using my skills as a documentation specialist and a nurse and marrying both. I wonder if anyone on this forum knows of opportunities that can use my diverse skills.

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Jakareh in Cocoa Beach, Florida

34 months ago

Techone in Portland, Oregon said: Schooling and a degree in English doesn't make a good tech writer, I don't care what college told you that. The interest in your subject. The ability to write to the user of a product clearly and concisely. The ability to understand technology quickly and to write to the correct audience.

Working from home is great but not without experience. Unless you're just reformatting. And then you need work connections.

The ability to find the comma in the keyboard is also a significant advantage for a technical writer.

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jane jon in Wellington, New Zealand

34 months ago

Apostrophe in Turlock, California said: You really have a degree in English? Yet you don't seem to know the difference between "your" and "you're." I don't have any degree at all, yet I've mastered that one. ;-) Perhaps you should be a bit more gracious with your judgments. Peace.

Good one..hehehe
janet new zealand

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readytowrite in Treasure Coast, Florida

33 months ago

All, I have an engineering degree and have always gravitated more towards the documentation aspect of the job. My background is design development in the medical device industry which includes tons of project management experience. I enjoy writing and am presently considering acquiring a certificate and/or masters in technical communication. What types of job opportunities might this open up for me? I'm not quite sure where to begin to look for work. I thought the MS Tech Comm degree or certificate at NJIT looked interesting and also the International Writing School perhaps for a quick and practical, hands on route to enter the profession. Marcomm opportunities immediately come to mind as well, but then would I need a Marketing degree? I've have researched many potential careers that I might switch to as a 2nd career at this point in life and I keep coming back to writing. I have the technical background along with a detailed oriented nature. I am happiest when I am interviewing SMEs, researching and writing. It's time to figure out where/how to make a living doing what I do and love best. Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

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Engineer2TechWriter in San Jose, California

33 months ago

Just a comment for English majors wanting to do technical writing. There are jobs out there for you, I wouldn't be totally discouraged by some of the comments here. But if you want high pay it IS important to understand the subject matter. I am currently an engineer in the Silicon Valley. There is great demand for technical writers but only those who understand the subject matter are getting the high pays, > $100/hour! Very often, these are engineers-turned-tech-writers. Those who don't understand the subject matter can make as little as $25/hour after the agency gets its cut. We had the hardest time finding someone to write our documents (user manuals, datasheets) for a price that my start-up can afford. Engineers generally hate to and already have too much work on their plate to write. But in the end, I still had to generate the documents myself, and our technical writing consultant (English major) basically could only help me format it. Most competent engineers already have enough writing skills generate technical documents, it's just that they rather not do it. So if all you have is writing and formatting skills, you will still get jobs but just won't get paid as well.

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Sophie in Stuttgart, Germany

33 months ago

Check this out: www.tc-train.net/

TCTrainNet is the new international training and certification program for technical writing / communication. It is founded on a worldwide network of professionals and experts in technical documentation / communication and information development.

Cheers!

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Wilson in Washington, District of Columbia

31 months ago

amber in Wayne, New Jersey said: i need some info and tips on technical writing. i havent gone to school yet and would like to know what the courses are for technical writing, how long the training is, what the work envoirment and work pace is like. is it a demanding job? what common knowledge is best for this type of career? what are good feilds to specialize in. i know i sound ill of the subject but id just like some advice before i go to school. i like to write. but i dont think journalism is for me. any info on this would be much appreciated.

You dont want to go into journalism - no money in that. I got my degree in English and fell into technical writing for the gov't. I am thinking about getting my MA in Technical and Professional Communication from ECU, but really do NOT want to take the GRE. If you want to be a tech writer and you have an english degree, just take some basic courses and get a tech writer certificate. Or work your way into being a tech writer by first becoming a Correspondence Analysist. Once you grasp who your audience is, what the document needs to portray and finalizing the document - you should be fine.

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duderino in California

31 months ago

I'm a technical writer in the northern Los Angeles area. I was settling into a nice position when my company collapsed and terminated its staff. Now I'm out of work and seeking the next technical writing opportunity. I think specialization in as many "hot" industries is the key--although still no guarantee--in today's especially volatile job market.

I started out with a bachelors degree in journalism and a foundation in science coursework. I worked for my first couple years in regulatory compliance (environmental/EPA) and air pollution control standards. I went back to school for my teaching certificate and wanted to get into science curriculum design, but I got derailed. I worked for the next few years in medical services writing lab/diagnostic/pharmaceutical documents and procedures. I also completed a couple technical programs in wind turbine technology and geographic information systems, and I have been working these angles lately.

I joined a start-up and knew the risks, but job loss is still no fun. I was enjoying the documentation responsibilities; assembly manuals; reference materials and quality analysis activities as the prototype was being built. It was a major disappointment leaving all my work (under confidentiality agreement) behind when the company locked us out.

One of the challenges I have found in this field is finding your niche in the "team environment" if that matters to you. As a technical writer you really don't belong anywhere but straddle many departments. And when all the departments--management, engineering, production and the support staff--all go out for their lunch parties, the technical writer will be sitting alone in his/her cubicle. Yet, there's something to be said about solitude. I think five months went by before the engineers realized that I wasn't the guy who took out their trash! (I added to their confusion while diligently attempting to preserve a recycling program I had started.)

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Lu F. in Irvine, California

30 months ago

I am a fresh Chemistry Ph.D. with no industrial experience, but I always have a strong passion for writing. I took an academic writing class and am going to take an engineering communication class (undergrad level). I am not interested in R&D positions anymore and am ready to say goodbye to bench works. Technical writing is a good direction to branch out from my academic background. When I went through those job openings, however, most of them don’t require a degree higher than Bachelor, but heavily emphasize EXPERIENCE. I wonder if my educational background would be an overkill, while at the same time my lack of related experience will set me back. I write a lot in graduate school, but don’t use professional softwares other than Microsoft Word. How should I put up my resume and plan accordingly? Do I need to take more writing classes or learn a software like RoboHelp? Your opinions and advises are welcome.

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gabutterfly82 in Conyers, Georgia

26 months ago

Jlamb in Athens, West Virginia said: You obviously have no idea what your talking about. I have a BA in English and just started a position in tech writing with no experience and only an English degree and I start out at way more than 30K. Maybe your just ignorant. Peace

<sarcasm>Wow, what HELPFUL comment.</sarcasm> It seems that your BA in English was a bad investment since your grasp of the English language seems lacking.

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Bailre in Kingston, New York

25 months ago

Hello, All!

I'm currently attending school to get my second bachelor's degree in English with a minor in Creative Writing (the first bachelor's is in Advertising). I'm considering going into technical writing, and wondering if I should take online courses, or campus-based? Go for my master's, or find a certificate program? Are there any recommendations for schools that offer technical writing programs?

What specific fields in technical writing are taking off, these days? I know what I'd like to do regarding technical writing (edit and write manuals for commonly used electronics and appliances, such as cameras, televisions, vacuums, etc.), but I'm just not sure of the best way to get there.

Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks :)

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Alissa in Plano, Texas

25 months ago

Hi Bailre,

Campus-based courses allow you to engage with other students socially as well as in the class room. Also many schools have local STC (Society for Technical Communicator) chapters on site. These groups normally have regular meetings, guest speakers and also student competition to test your skills.

If you are researching which school to go to the STC has a database of schools. Also if there are people in the industry who you admire, reach out to them and undertake a informational interview to find out their opinion on schools.

Also, look at who spoke at different industry events such as: LavaCon (lavacon.org/2012/) or Writers UA (www.writersua.com/)

Technical writing spans all industries from software to non-profit. If there are companies you would like to work for, start by registering on their job/career page. Also research who currently holds positions similar in the company and see if you could become an intern.

Good luck.

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Bailre in Kingston, New York

25 months ago

Thank you, Alissa! You've given me some great ideas and great places to check out. Especially the STC! And it didn't even occur to me that technical writing applied to the non-profit industry.

Thank you again, and good luck to you, too! :)

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Tennickly in Los Angeles, California

24 months ago

Apostrophe in Turlock, California said: You really have a degree in English? Yet you don't seem to know the difference between "your" and "you're." I don't have any degree at all, yet I've mastered that one. ;-) Perhaps you should be a bit more gracious with your judgments. Peace.

That was a pretty great response.

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Jakareh in Orlando, Florida

24 months ago

[QUOTE]You obviously have no idea what your talking about. I have a BA in English and just started a position in tech writing with no experience and only an English degree and I start out at way more than 30K. Maybe your just ignorant. Peace

Techone in Portland, Oregon said: Schooling and a degree in English doesn't make a good tech writer, I don't care what college told you that. The interest in your subject. The ability to write to the user of a product clearly and concisely. The ability to understand technology quickly and to write to the correct audience.
Working from home is great but not without experience. Unless you're just reformatting. And then you need work connections.

This is amazingly funny! It’s the duel of the semiliterates! On one side, we have the irritable Mr. Too-Dumb-to-Differentiate-Between-Common-Homophones-Peace, on the other the equally snappy King. Of Sentence. Fragments.

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dfperson in Orlando, Florida

23 months ago

Jlamb in Athens, West Virginia said: You obviously have no idea what your talking about. I have a BA in English and just started a position in tech writing with no experience and only an English degree and I start out at way more than 30K. Maybe your just ignorant. Peace

Jlamb - how did you find your job? I'm an English major and I have had difficulty finding a tech writing job. Many of the jobs I've seen have required some technical writing experience. Please let me know. I'd love to find out how you did it.

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MWilson33 in Woodbridge, Virginia

23 months ago

dfperson in Orlando, Florida said: Jlamb - how did you find your job? I'm an English major and I have had difficulty finding a tech writing job. Many of the jobs I've seen have required some technical writing experience. Please let me know. I'd love to find out how you did it.

I also got my undergrad degree in English and had no experience within technical writing when I got my first gig. My first job was a Correspondence Analyst. Look into those job titles..its a leyway into technical writing because it is the same thing so to speak, except you are moreso writing letters and responses to people about the services your company does instead of writing manuals, process guides, etc. but this will help you gain technical knowledge and give you that experience. This lead me into my technical writing positions and now 3 years after receiving my undergrad I am a Senior Technical Writer with the gov't. Every job you get make sure it is aiding in the experience of the technical side of the house since you already have a background in writing.

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