What are typical tow truck driver salaries?

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Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

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bobbyphenom in Lady Lake, Florida

68 months ago

rickwrecker is absolutely right..we dont get paid right..for the amount of responsibility we have and the amount of work we have to do. plus if you get paid commission you dont get paid for any time you spend maintaining your truck or if your trucks down for a few hours...or if they want you at the shop at 7am and you dont get a call till 10:30 you dont get paid for those 3 1/2 hours..it sucks especailly when you could be doing somethin meaningful like spending some time with the family you never see...and like rick said he's been in the business for 35 years. ive been for 8. no one wants to pay for your experience..the dude that walks in from the street and has never towed a car gets the same 30% commission that i we get...WTF is that..and dont even get me started on loyalty to your worker that gives you 140 hours a week and then says no when your asked to work your 1 day off..the next week your fired..hate to even say this but>>>we need a union<<<

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TowTow in Albuquerque, New Mexico

62 months ago

I have been in the business for 7 yrs myself and have to agree with all the comments above especially "once you have the towing bug its hard to get it out of system" I do have one question though, in reference to the truckers bible and paper work . ARE THERE ANY OTHER DRIVERS REQUIRED TO KEEP A LOG BOOK OF DRIVING HOURS WHEN DRIVING LONG DISTANCE TOWS (IE: 400 MILES ONE WAY) ?

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craig condrey in montgomery, Alabama

62 months ago

TowTow in Albuquerque, New Mexico said: I have been in the business for 7 yrs myself and have to agree with all the comments above especially "once you have the towing bug its hard to get it out of system" I do have one question though, in reference to the truckers bible and paper work . ARE THERE ANY OTHER DRIVERS REQUIRED TO KEEP A LOG BOOK OF DRIVING HOURS WHEN DRIVING LONG DISTANCE TOWS (IE: 400 MILES ONE WAY) ?

if you travel over a 150 mile radius in a cmv then yes you are supposed to log your time you can pick up the latest copy of jj keller dot regulations at your nearest book store cost about a buck fifty but well worth the money

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magic in Manassas, Virginia

61 months ago

rickwrecker in Pompano Beach, Florida said: as a 35 year vet of towing, i feel that that wrecker operators are paid less today than when i started ,for the responsibility and training nessasary to be a qualified operator. that towing company owners today take advatage of drivers by not having to pay overtime for the long hours you have to work to keep your job, this industry is long over due for a major ivestigation of the long hours you are forced to work witch is against all dot rules and regulations, 25,000 to 36,000 dollars a year to be a supposed profesional operator is a joke. companies will chew you up and and spit you out when you complain and wont even remember your name. unfortunatly once tou have the towing bug its hard to get it out of system trust me i know.

AMEN BROTHER!! It is funny how they will run you in the dirt, cost you your license, then simply place an ad - "Driver Wanted, must have good driving record"

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BRAD in Beaverton, Oregon

39 months ago

rickwrecker in Pompano Beach, Florida said: as a 35 year vet of towing, i feel that that wrecker operators are paid less today than when i started ,for the responsibility and training nessasary to be a qualified operator. that towing company owners today take advatage of drivers by not having to pay overtime for the long hours you have to work to keep your job, this industry is long over due for a major ivestigation of the long hours you are forced to work witch is against all dot rules and regulations, 25,000 to 36,000 dollars a year to be a supposed profesional operator is a joke. companies will chew you up and and spit you out when you complain and wont even remember your name. unfortunatly once tou have the towing bug its hard to get it out of system trust me i know.

As an owner, I have not taken a wage from the company for 2 years. The equipment is expensive, fuel is expensive and payroll is expensive, leaving no room for profit or even a reasonable wage for myself. I have been an employee myself in the past and viewed management the same way you do, but now sitting on the other side of the fence I can see clearly how wrong I was as an employee. If you still have a job in towing you should be thankful to your owner as we are all in a no profit industry right now. I'm sure you can figure out that when a tow ticket is $30 from an autoclub there is no room for profit.

Good Luck and If you dont believe me start a tow company. It only takes a truck, oh and insurance, and a yard, and office staff, plus gear for the truck, and fuel Plus maintenance and a new transmission every now an then, now go hire someone and if they dont receive any tows for the day you are still on the hook because you have to pay a base wage. Its a tough market.

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Symbiont in San Rafael, California

38 months ago

Can anyone explain Piece Rate to me and how it might affect rate of pay?

Is this a scam to favor the employer or is it just another way to avoid overtime and limit your exposure to Workman's Comp or both?

We are paid an hourly wage and a commission yet I don't see any of the hours or commissions adding up. I have yet to get a real explanation of how it works and what I have found on the Internet doesn't jive with what's actually happening here. Any insight anyone??

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tiffany in Pinellas Park, Florida

36 months ago

ok im in florida my husbands boss clames hes not making anything off the guys i have a aunt working in his office and she can hear things from her office and its a huge lie hes making it good enough that he just had a house built for two of his kids and bought tree new tow trucks and much more tell me hes hurting too yeah right and here in florida the AAA is crap they pay the company $24 a call and my hubby gets $7 for the call and he gets 25% of the tow wow not crap if the call dosent go but 3 miles and his hours shouldnt be aloud this is his hours a week he has to be in his truck at 7 am and its a free for all till 5pm meaning all the drivers just grab the calls as they come in that time fram but even if you are not busy you have to stay in your truck and you dont make any money unless you are running calls then from 5pm to 7am you have it set to you are in line to be called out if needed so if thee is 5 drivers it is the 1st driver is oncall meaning that guy is running 7am to 7am the 2nd driver is backup meaning he also is normaly 7am to 7am then you have 3rd he is from 7am to anywhere but mostly hes done by midnight but still can be called out till 7am same with 4th but 5th he is the guy who will be on the next day for the 24 hr shift and he still can get called out but that oncall driver knows what hes going to have to do the next day and trys not to call him out but there are those times you just cant help it and you have to call him out oh and all the drivers but that 1st one have to be back in to work at 7am the next day no matter what time you was out to the night before and even tho you worked a 24hr shift and was stuck to that truck all day you may may have only ran 18 calls wich comes out to $126 for the 24hrs with no sleep or food cause you can forget getting food cause your truck cant go threw drivetrus and there job is not the safes they can get hit by a car while working

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Symbiont in San Rafael, California

36 months ago

Wow - thanks Jeb for making the school system out in Florida the model from which the rest of the country is to follow. It sounds like Tiffiny isn't happy with the average towing industry model - suffice to say I wouldn't either in those circumstances. And yet, Hanneyjorat is on the flip side of the coin - making good money, working decent hours, although I would say that being one driver on call 24-7 is no picnic either, but it seems to work for them.

One thing that I have found is that the louder an owner whines about lack of money, the less likelihood it ends up being true in many cases - not all mind you as there are plenty of tow bosses out there hurting. My advice to those that talk to employees about how bad life is for them - don't talk - all you're doing is making morale worse and giving an employee that much more incentive to leave in fear that they may not have a job next week. It isn't professional anyway.

Forums like these and the wealth of information available through the Internet and various organizations geared towards the industry give us more than enough channels to explore different ways of making money. While times are hard to be sure, persistence, determination and a little creativity are the basic necessities of getting through the hard times. It's unfortunate that there are some owners that don't want to do the legwork and forge the alliances often needed to get through the critical times, to remain profitable and to keep food on the table. To those I would suggest *quit yer bitchin* and git with the program!

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MrsTower in Liberty, Texas

36 months ago

BRAD in Beaverton, Oregon said: As an owner, I have not taken a wage from the company for 2 years. The equipment is expensive, fuel is expensive and payroll is expensive, leaving no room for profit or even a reasonable wage for myself. I have been an employee myself in the past and viewed management the same way you do, but now sitting on the other side of the fence I can see clearly how wrong I was as an employee. If you still have a job in towing you should be thankful to your owner as we are all in a no profit industry right now. I'm sure you can figure out that when a tow ticket is $30 from an autoclub there is no room for profit.

Good Luck and If you dont believe me start a tow company. It only takes a truck, oh and insurance, and a yard, and office staff, plus gear for the truck, and fuel Plus maintenance and a new transmission every now an then, now go hire someone and if they dont receive any tows for the day you are still on the hook because you have to pay a base wage. Its a tough market.

Amen to that, I have an issue keeping drivers because they are greedy. We allow our drivers to take our trucks home, ride around in our trucks to run their personal errands and stay home until called - and still they complain on a busy day. What about all the days that we had no calls and you stayed at home collecting a paycheck? I am so tired of the greed that I see in people. They think we are making all this money and have no idea the expense involved. I have heard that some companies pay 45% but you are reasponsible for fuel and maintenance and some parts - Maybe then we would make a profit.

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Simon in Beaverton, Oregon

36 months ago

I concur with the other owners. I have not taken a pay check from the business since the market tanked, 3 years now. I do believe many tow drivers work hard for what they receive. The work is enjoyable but the tow paying market does not value our services enough to pay a higher wage. If you have a job and are still being paid the same wages you were, if not more, then three years ago you are very fortunate. Yes there are other occupations that pay more (dentistry) and some that pay less (Telemarketing) but I dont think there are many that are more enjoyable (except professional Motocross). Owners respect your employees, Employees respect your owners. If we all work together in a workmanlike manner we will survive these poor economic times. Good Luck To All, Cheers

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Symbiont in San Rafael, California

36 months ago

Lets not also forget that hard times can often increase business on some levels. Some people are not always on top of the basics, like paying their bills on time, maintenance, staying current insofar as legalities surrounding their vehicles, etc. In our market more and more people are simply leaving their vehicles behind through amnesty and lien sales. Some can't afford their vehicles and they get impounded and/or repossessed. Some simply abandon their vehicles. And then of course the *illegals*.

I have found that employees will often whine no matter what the conditions are, often more to do with frustrations in the lives in general over their socio-economic status or otherwise. It's certainly not ownership's responsibility to provide counseling for those that need it, including for ownership themselves often times, but creating the right work climate is paramount. Simon has it right, when all respect each other and work together, to not only get the job done but develop business through courteous and professional service, in the end all *should* be happier and make sufficient money to live their lives accordingly - within their means. The alternative is community college and expanding your skills to pursue a better paying job elsewhere. No one likes being stuck, and certainly no one likes working with those that feel stuck.

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Symbiont in San Rafael, California

36 months ago

A person's outlook on life has much more power than availability. Don't let the market wear you down my friend - allow it to strengthen your resolved to succeed, which in turn will make you appreciate the end result more. However, we totally agree on your second point H.

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Prolific11 in Lyman, South Carolina

33 months ago

I run a tire shop in a small town just outside of a larger metro area and I am wanting to hire someone that has their own tow truck that cannot afford his own shop, and just lease him or her the property and let them operate out of the extra space that is located in the back of my business.

My question is how should I structure my lease agreement and what do you guys think is a fair to charge in this type of lease? They will simply be using my property to build their business.

Should there be a combination of Rent and Business transaction? I don't think it would be unethical or rude to ask to check out their books on a month by month basis just to get an idea of the monthly revenue and I would take a percentage of that. Very reasonable, of course.

Thanks, Seth in South Carolina

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MrsTower in Houston, Texas

33 months ago

Prolific11 in Lyman, South Carolina said: I run a tire shop in a small town just outside of a larger metro area and I am wanting to hire someone that has their own tow truck that cannot afford his own shop, and just lease him or her the property and let them operate out of the extra space that is located in the back of my business.

My question is how should I structure my lease agreement and what do you guys think is a fair to charge in this type of lease? They will simply be using my property to build their business.

Should there be a combination of Rent and Business transaction? I don't think it would be unethical or rude to ask to check out their books on a month by month basis just to get an idea of the monthly revenue and I would take a percentage of that. Very reasonable, of course.

Thanks, Seth in South Carolina

The first question i would ask is - are you planning on being a business partner? Rent doesn't constitute a percentage of what the business is taking in - it should be a fixed cost so that the company knows is exactly what is expected. Also, unless you were putting equity into my company you would not be looking at my books for any reason what so ever. In fact, i have shown my tax returns to three people - 10ksb for scholarship reasons, and two certification entities that can help me get business, but i first have to prove that i meet their qualifications. You should look around, see what other properties are going for and then realize, being jointly connected to your landlord is a drawback - unless you can gaurantee them tows because of this connection. But also, what if they start a service truck that goes out and changes tires - isn't that in direct competition with you - I would choose someone that has nothing to do with my industry, unless it's someone you trust with your livelyhood.

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Prolific11 in Lyman, South Carolina

33 months ago

Thanks Mrs Tower.

In response to your question, no I am not seeking a business partner as I own the tire biz aleady. I am merely looking to expand my clientele and have another type of income as a result of the tow business running services from my shop.

The reason I would want to see the operators books is because I want to have an idea as to whatwould be fair to charge on a commision type basis. I know this sounds a bit unreasonable, but I am essentially protecting my investment in allowing someone to use my space. I'm sure I can find another way to do this as I get acquainted with the tow business a bit more.

I see this as a win win for the operator and myself. I am a subcontractor that gives the operator a chance to own their own biz and they dont have to purchase property.

The scenario I am seeing is that I charge a monthly rent of $1000 for the 1st month and then $500 thereafter. On top of that I will get a 2% stake in their monthly gross.

Also what are the qualifications that you speak of when referring to certification entities and 10 ksb?

Thanks again
Seth in SC

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MrsTower in Houston, Texas

33 months ago

There is a new movement running through our great country right now. It is called Goldman Sachs 10,000 small businesses. Also, I am applying for my womens certifications.

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Symbiont in San Rafael, California

33 months ago

Seth,

MT's points are very well advised. I would personally keep the relationship as clean as possible - charge your rent - that's it! Turf each other some business as a courtesy or convenience. However, once you start asking to inspect the books of someone who may or may not be a partner of sorts can get complicated, and ultimately your *investment* can easily be protected with a security deposit. From my seat your *investment* is simply unused space. I would ask myself why this happened. Are you experiencing a contraction in your business?

On the issue of inspecting books, are you willing to give up a small percentage back to the operator of any business generated by his attracting new business to you?? Are you willing to have your books inspected monthly?? If you're going to ask for a piece of my pie I would hope that my asking in turn wouldn't be viewed as unreasonable, or rude.

There are better ways to research the towing industry without having to use a back door approach. True, it *can* be a win-win, but the potential complications may overshadow any positives - unless you get lucky and find someone who you can build a VERY trusting relationship with - and it has to work both ways. You might be better off just buying a used tow truck and paying someone to operate it if your ultimate goal is to get into the towing business. Another option? You could send an idle employee or yourself to a class at CTTA, Wreckmasters, or whatever is certifiable in your area. This approach could maximize the productivity of your existing labor force. If buying a tow truck is out of your reach, perhaps leasing one might be better. Of course that would entail taking on risk and additional liability - could get expensive - sounds like an *investment*. Your approach, while creative assumes no real exposure, thus no real investment.

Rent or lease the space to another entity and keep life simple. MT's suggestions are well though-out. Good Luck.

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Glenn Goryl in Mammoth Lakes, California

30 months ago

Hi Seth!

I've been involved with leasing commercial property for almost 30 years, and I can tell you emphatically that if you structure the rent as a percentage of your tenant's gross income, he'll lie to you as to how much gross revenue he's making. He'll have 2 books - one for you, and the "real" numbers. It's much, much cleaner if you just agree on a fair market rent. Perhaps give him some free rent up front to get started. I typically use one month of free rent/year of lease. The 2 things you much do are to communicate with him every couple of weeks as to how his business is doing, and remain flexible. If you see signs his business has slowed, and he's struggling with bills - but has been an excellent tenant, you could adjust the rent so he pays less now (when it's slow) and more later (to make-up for the lower rent).

I hope this helps!

Glenn

In response to your question, no I am not seeking a business partner as I own the tire biz aleady. I am merely looking to expand my clientele and have another type of income as a result of the tow business running services from my shop.

The reason I would want to see the operators books is because I want to have an idea as to whatwould be fair to charge on a commision type basis. I know this sounds a bit unreasonable, but I am essentially protecting my investment in allowing someone to use my space. I'm sure I can find another way to do this as I get acquainted with the tow business a bit more.

I see this as a win win for the operator and myself. I am a subcontractor that gives the operator a chance to own their own biz and they dont have to purchase property.

The scenario I am seeing is that I charge a monthly rent of $1000 for the 1st month and then $500 thereafter. On top of that I will get a 2% stake in their monthly gross.

Also what are the qualifications that you speak of when referring to certification entities and 10 ksb?

Thanks again
Seth in SC

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TimberMain in Edgewood, Washington

30 months ago

Hi, I was reading you're comment and was hoping you could give me some pointers with you being a seasoned vet in the towing industry. I just Separated from the Army after 8 years and got hired on with Gene's Towing in WA State, I start training on monday and I'm both excited and nervous, not because of driving the trucks but mainly operating the equipment, responding to police calls, and pretty much getting close enough to the vehicle and not hitting it.. This is something I've wanted to do for a while and I consider it the 2nd happiest moment in my life (1st would be getting married), so any piece of advise would help me, I just don't wanna mess up within the 90 day probationary period and get terminated. thank.

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mrkeith in NEWARK, New Jersey

24 months ago

MrsTower in Houston, Texas said: The first question i would ask is - are you planning on being a business partner? Rent doesn't constitute a percentage of what the business is taking in - it should be a fixed cost so that the company knows is exactly what is expected. Also, unless you were putting equity into my company you would not be looking at my books for any reason what so ever. In fact, i have shown my tax returns to three people - 10ksb for scholarship reasons, and two certification entities that can help me get business, but i first have to prove that i meet their qualifications. You should look around, see what other properties are going for and then realize, being jointly connected to your landlord is a drawback - unless you can gaurantee them tows because of this connection. But also, what if they start a service truck that goes out and changes tires - isn't that in direct competition with you - I would choose someone that has nothing to do with my industry, unless it's someone you trust with your livelyhood.

Thats the same thing I was thinking..lol. How are you going to ask to see someone's books to determine how much money they made and decide to take a cut of that and you didn't put not 1 dime into that man's business. All he did was provide a place for him to tow. LOL, some people have to think before they write anything. You are only a landlord, not a business partner. A fixed monthly rent is the ONLY option.

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dburke in Hesperia, California

21 months ago

Jose in Hollywood, Florida said: How can you guys unionize?? Im not in this business but DAMN!! How the hell does the law allow you to drive around for some many hours. Obviously its no secret the long hours you guys put in.

About the 'long hours' situation. The law does have regulations as to how many hours a driver can work or be on duty. That is why you have to fill out a daily log book. If you have to stop at the scales the CHP can ask you for that log book and if it shows too many hours they will shut you down right there at the scales. "Messy" The big problem is that everybody knows that even, the employer and they don't care. Having to sets of log books is common.....a real one and another one that looks like you're driving legal. That is a 'FELONY'!!! You can go to prison for that. So can you imagine going to prison for working hard not just to provide for your family but also for your employer's business. Then the employer will have the attitude like "I'm sorry but I never asked him/her to do that". Come on...they run the business they know how long you are out there....it doesn't take a genius to see you've been out there for 72 hours straight. And then they'll hire someone to replace you and life goes on.

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dburke in Hesperia, California

21 months ago

mrkeith in NEWARK, New Jersey said: Thats the same thing I was thinking..lol. How are you going to ask to see someone's books to determine how much money they made and decide to take a cut of that and you didn't put not 1 dime into that man's business. All he did was provide a place for him to tow. LOL, some people have to think before they write anything. You are only a landlord, not a business partner. A fixed monthly rent is the ONLY option.

OMG That is so funny. If the tow truck person already has his own truck and customers what are you hiring him to do? If anything he would be hiring you. Tow trucks pick up vehicles that can't be driven for whatever reason. So wouldn't it stand to reason that he/she could recommend you and your business if you aren't degrading him by looking at his books. Just collect reasonable rent for that location, require the area is kept clean and put all expectations on BOTH sides in writing and that's it.

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dburke in Hesperia, California

21 months ago

Simon in Beaverton, Oregon said: I concur with the other owners. I have not taken a pay check from the business since the market tanked, 3 years now. I do believe many tow drivers work hard for what they receive. The work is enjoyable but the tow paying market does not value our services enough to pay a higher wage. If you have a job and are still being paid the same wages you were, if not more, then three years ago you are very fortunate. Yes there are other occupations that pay more (dentistry) and some that pay less (Telemarketing) but I dont think there are many that are more enjoyable (except professional Motocross). Owners respect your employees, Employees respect your owners. If we all work together in a workmanlike manner we will survive these poor economic times. Good Luck To All, Cheers

If you haven't gotten paid in three years how are you paying for rent, groceries, utilities, health care, clothing, car note, recreation etc?

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Don in Waynesville, Missouri

16 months ago

BRAD in Beaverton, Oregon said: As an owner, I have not taken a wage from the company for 2 years. The equipment is expensive, fuel is expensive and payroll is expensive, leaving no room for profit or even a reasonable wage for myself. I have been an employee myself in the past and viewed management the same way you do, but now sitting on the other side of the fence I can see clearly how wrong I was as an employee. If you still have a job in towing you should be thankful to your owner as we are all in a no profit industry right now. I'm sure you can figure out that when a tow ticket is $30 from an autoclub there is no room for profit.

Good Luck and If you dont believe me start a tow company. It only takes a truck, oh and insurance , and a yard, and office staff, plus gear for the truck, and fuel Plus maintenance and a new transmission every now an then, now go hire someone and if they dont receive any tows for the day you are still on the hook because you have to pay a base wage. Its a tough market.

You are 100% correct. I am expected to allow drivers to just hang around and do nothing, not generating any income whatsoever, and pay them. That's ridiculous, do you see that any other productive areas of business? Don't mention law enforcement, I said business, not government- When you hear government-Think- Waste-Fraud-and Abuse. Government creates nothing. But me, and my towing company, we provide an actual service and when we provide that service customers pay us. Why should I be expected to pay a driver for not providing service?

If we had a true free market where I was allowed to charge customers a fee that was reasonable--one that would not only reimburse me for my expenses- ALL EXPENSES- and provide me with a small profit as well-- Then maybe we could stomach a little down time or increase the percentage of commission.

If you don't like the towing business- Then get out and let the motorists fend for themselves-

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Don in Waynesville, Missouri

16 months ago

MrsTower in Liberty, Texas said: Amen to that, I have an issue keeping drivers because they are greedy. We allow our drivers to take our trucks home, ride around in our trucks to run their personal errands and stay home until called - and still they complain on a busy day. What about all the days that we had no calls and you stayed at home collecting a paycheck? I am so tired of the greed that I see in people. They think we are making all this money and have no idea the expense involved. I have heard that some companies pay 45% but you are reasponsible for fuel and maintenance and some parts - Maybe then we would make a profit.

Ignorance and envy- You hit the nail on the head. From all sides you get ignorance and envy and it's a horrible combination. Customers and employees alike are ignorant of the income and expenses involved in a towing business but they see a lot of movement and big trucks so they assume you're raking it in. Then their envious side starts to question why we should be so lucky when they're just scraping by.

Get out while you still can.

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Don in Waynesville, Missouri

16 months ago

Symbiont in San Rafael, California said: Wow - thanks Jeb for making the school system out in Florida the model from which the rest of the country is to follow. It sounds like Tiffiny isn't happy with the average towing industry model - suffice to say I wouldn't either in those circumstances. And yet, Hanneyjorat is on the flip side of the coin - making good money, working decent hours, although I would say that being one driver on call 24-7 is no picnic either, but it seems to work for them.

One thing that I have found is that the louder an owner whines about lack of money, the less likelihood it ends up being true in many cases - not all mind you as there are plenty of tow bosses out there hurting. My advice to those that talk to employees about how bad life is for them - don't talk - all you're doing is making morale worse and giving an employee that much more incentive to leave in fear that they may not have a job next week. It isn't professional anyway.

Forums like these and the wealth of information available through the Internet and various organizations geared towards the industry give us more than enough channels to explore different ways of making money. While times are hard to be sure, persistence, determination and a little creativity are the basic necessities of getting through the hard times. It's unfortunate that there are some owners that don't want to do the legwork and forge the alliances often needed to get through the critical times, to remain profitable and to keep food on the table. To those I would suggest *quit yer bitchin* and git with the program!

If by stating "forge alliances" you mean tow company owners should engage in collusion and price fixing that's illegal and something only afforded to the motor club mafia. But what if we could start our own mafia of sorts- of course without the leg breaking and murder- that's just a little too messy. What I'm talking about is a motor club by towers for towers.

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Don in Waynesville, Missouri

16 months ago

There are 3 devils in the towing business-
First one is Government involvement- From cities that regulate the rates we charge to worker's comp laws that squeeze us for every last dime to cash paying customers who don't know the TRUE value of a dollar (and it ain't much)- Government is bad for all businesses.

Second is Motor Clubs- They use tired-out evil tow truck driver scare tactics and lies and promises of something for nothing to coerce motorists into using their (services). Then commoditize our services down to pennies above operating costs by allowing one-truck-Chucks with no insurance and no idea what they're doing to masquerade as professionals making the true professional look bad.

Third is Insurance companies themselves- More insidious than the other two combined... insurance companies are lobbying, as we speak, to weave towing services into local and state run services. Do you follow me? They want our services to be paid for by tax payers. We all know what that does to compensation- NOT TO MENTION SERVICE. Look at other government employees and how they're paid and treated. Do you think a cope gives a s... if you are speeding or not? They're just doing their job until it's time to go home.

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dolly bar in North Vancouver, British Columbia

9 months ago

maybe if we all worked together instead of undercutting and pimping each other over we could form a union or a international governing body to get our rates (and wages)up where they belong ,violating labour and safety regs is no way to stay in business...pick a new one

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Don in California, Missouri

9 months ago

Unionized labor is the biggest joke on the planet aye.
If you force me to pay to be part of a union so I can have the privilege of towing a customer's car, and one of the stipulations of participation in the union is to charge a set rate for my services you're forgetting one thing-- Everybody loses.

Customers will choose a different route because rates will be too high. Then I guess you'll use the power of your quazi-governmental body "the union" to force motorists to use your services?
Then will come a lot of new and regulations designed to keep out motivated up-starts from injecting fresh blood and enthusiasm into the industry.

Yea sounds great.

No unions will only strangle the towing industry. Keep thinking.

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