Over the road trucking

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FJC626KW in Littleton, Colorado

70 months ago

I am considering becoming an over-the-road driver for one of the national trucking companies. I don't have any particular company in mind at this time, but I would really like to hear from you professional drivers with any advice you can give me.I have been driving a concrete mixer truck for ten years but due very slow buisness, was recently laid off.

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anonymous in Chatham, New York

70 months ago

I was just accepted to Cr England training school and after reading this I am curious to know why CR England has such a bad rep with drivers, should I just do the training and leave after I get one year of over the road driving or would it be best to find some other training school?

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user5000

63 months ago

DUDE RUN LIKE HELL..do not goto cr england instead goto ANY P.T.D.I. certfied school school just dont goto england i work there now and as soon as i get a check (been here 4 weeks and only 1 check for 324.00)with some decent miles my ass is GONE. they're motto is "service,safety,performance" they preach the bible of safety but could care less if yuo fall over dead from lak of sleep. 55-60k is a load crap unless you own your own truck leasing from ANY company is like the old saying a lawyer who represents himself has a fool for a client. also i ahve found that these so called starter companies when you quit its pretty hard to find decent work after just 1-3 years these days.

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sweetser_michael@yahoo.com in Spokane, Washington

63 months ago

FJC626KW in Littleton, Colorado said: I am considering becoming an over-the-road driver for one of the national trucking companies. I don't have any particular company in mind at this time, but I would really like to hear from you professional drivers with any advice you can give me.I have been driving a concrete mixer truck for ten years but due very slow buisness, was recently laid off.

one rule of thumb if u r looking for a company for an otr position, make sure the company can give you enough miles and work to keep you moving and not sitting between loads. the problem in today's economic climate is not in finding an otr job, but to find one that you dont have to sit too long between runs that will enable you to make a decent paycheck. another thing to consider is local/regional jobs. in the long run, in this economic climate, you'll probably end up making about the same amount. if you have children/family, I would not be looking for an otr job;stay home and with your family. hope this has been helpful. best of luck

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dmg4x4 in Redford, Michigan

59 months ago

im getting ready too start my truck driving school... i really want too be a owner/ operater...what are the benefits and over head of being a owner......thanks, dave

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Ironeagle @ truckingsolutionsllc in Peoria, Arizona

59 months ago

In response to your e-mail I woud ask that you drop me at line (via) US mail at J.Walker 11301 N. 99th Avenue, Peoria, AZ 85345 Apt # 144 and include your phone number so that we can talk as it will take me a few minutes to explain the advantages and disadvantages of being an Owner/Operator.

Looking forward to hearing from you soon

Joseph Walker
11301 N. 99th Avenue
Apt # 144
Peoria, AZ 85345

Peoria, AZ.

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only me in Overland Park, Kansas

57 months ago

I am considering commiting to driver solutions. I am an unemployed land surveyor with no hope for any future employment.I think I would like OTR driving because I like to travel. Can anyone tell me what that first year on the road is like? Thanks

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mercera in Henderson, Nevada

55 months ago

I have been recently divorced and am thinking about looking into OTR turcking jobs. I don't have my training yet but have always enjoyed driving and seeing the open road. I have always wanted to be a truck driver but never made the move. I have been in sales most of my life but am looking to make a career change.

My question is how do I start, what are the demands, the pay, the whole nine yards of trucking?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

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Walter in Newark, New Jersey

54 months ago

When you drive a truck,you are the first to get up,and the last to get home.Iam 56 years old and have drove most of my life,and have owned 5 trucks.If i could do it over again,i would have at least an under grad degree,mabe computer software design,not trucking.most people believe that truck drivers are stupid.if you want to make money in the trucking buiness,become a broker,very little over head,and very good income. Plummer,electrician,carpenter,anything but a truck driver, good luck.

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NO1CASPER in Hudson, New Hampshire

54 months ago

I am looking for an otr position as a company driver. I was involved in an accident in Oct '07, with no injuries and as a result was let go. Since then I have gone to work for several smaller companies that have, in short, screwed me out of pay. Can anyone tell me of a company that might be willing to employ me? I have 14+ yrs experience.

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stephen in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts

51 months ago

If OTR Trucking seems intimidating try ADS Logistics, they are a direct line supply chain management services company that is looking for new drivers for their team. Check out some of their leading benefits and apply online here.. www.adslogistics.com/driver-resources/career-opportunities/

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gregory wucherpfennig in Minneapolis, Minnesota

49 months ago

Walter in Newark, New Jersey said: When you drive a truck,you are the first to get up,and the last to get home.Iam 56 years old and have drove most of my life,and have owned 5 trucks.If i could do it over again,i would have at least an under grad degree,mabe computer software design,not trucking.most people believe that truck drivers are stupid.if you want to make money in the trucking buiness,become a broker,very little over head,and very good income. Plummer,electrician,carpenter,anything but a truck driver, good luck.

what do you mean by broker I too am looking at getting into this business

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johnprt

48 months ago

I'm starting my class a cdl with passenger training soon, and I'm also getting certified with all types of fork lifts. I live in northern new jersey so after I get my cdl with my fork lift certification, how do I go about finding a job without any experience driving a comercial vehicle? My driving record is clean and this is a new career path for me so I don't even know where to look for a job with no experience. Any guidence would be a big help. Thank you

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spaceace in Buna, Texas

48 months ago

have a question for evryone;
I'm doing a paper " why drivers quit " can i get some feed back on it plz

thx

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Dan Dan Da Truckin man in Port Clinton, Ohio

48 months ago

CSA 2010 will punish companies who hire drivers with bad records. Insurance companies will refuse to insure you in a company truck. This often happens just from two speeding tickets in 3-4 years. A DUI will black ball you. No chance of ever landing a job.

And for people who have thoughts of getting a license without going to an ACCREDITED CDL SCHOOL; you should be aware, a new law coming through the US Congress will make it a requirement to obtain a certificate or degree from an ACCREDITED CDL SCHOOL (Not your Roadmaster type school) the kind found at colleges and universities. This is the FMCSA's (US Government) attempt to get rid of company schools and other CDL mills.

For those not aware, several companies have already been shut down and drivers who had completed those courses found themselves without a license.

Don't be the victim of truck driving. Go find another career.

Sorry...

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Dan Dan Da Truckin man in Port Clinton, Ohio

48 months ago

johnprt said: I'm starting my class a cdl with passenger training soon, and I'm also getting certified with all types of fork lifts. I live in northern new jersey so after I get my cdl with my fork lift certification, how do I go about finding a job without any experience driving a comercial vehicle? My driving record is clean and this is a new career path for me so I don't even know where to look for a job with no experience. Any guidence would be a big help. Thank you

If your driving record is FLAWLESS. NO TICKETS AT ALL, try Swift. They will start you at just .25 a mile, but pay climbs fairly fast. Also, you are inexperienced and they WILL put you with a driving mentor for 6 weeks to teach you the ropes.

If you have 2 or more tickets in past 3 years, go to Schneider, Werner, Stevens, Artic, JB Hunt, US Express.

If you are a speed demon,slow the hell down and go drive fork lift until your record cleans up.

Companies that will not hire off the street even though they advertise as though they will: UPS and FedEx. I know trainers at both companies here and they say that they only hire off their docks.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Please note: If you have not always acted like a professional driver, even when you were not, this is not the career path you want to pursue. CSA 2010 will become your nightmare.

Fact: Habits are hard to change, bad habits are impossible to break.

............................................................................

Good News: Loading docks pay the same as drivers pay and you will be home every night... Wish I had stayed on the dock 15 years ago.

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Dan Dan Da Truckin man in Port Clinton, Ohio

48 months ago

spaceace in Buna, Texas said: have a question for evryone;
I'm doing a paper " why drivers quit " can i get some feed back on it plz

thx

Drivers quit because they come to trucking chasing a myth: "Truckers make a ton of money." Fact is, we don't.

Most drivers I know qualify for food stamps, some trucking families qualify for ADC as well.

Trucking is a great Career for retired military who have a retirement paycheck every month and benefits. If you are a young single person who does not want to ever have a family it may be a good career for you too.

If you are a family person, forget it. Truckers are always gone. Plus, medical problems from sitting 11 hours a day.

Also, many people get into trucking because they think "All I have to do is drive." B_ _ _ S _ _ _ !! You will never work as long or as hard or with as much stress or be so disrespected or be taken more advantage of then you will in trucking.

Think about all the negative stereo types you have heard about truck drivers, Do you have it in your mind, okay those are all wrong...

Drivers leave because the myths and stereo types are all wrong and they can't deal with it.

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Dan Dan Da Truckin man in Port Clinton, Ohio

48 months ago

johnprt said: I'm starting my class a cdl with passenger training soon, and I'm also getting certified with all types of fork lifts. I live in northern new jersey so after I get my cdl with my fork lift certification, how do I go about finding a job without any experience driving a comercial vehicle? My driving record is clean and this is a new career path for me so I don't even know where to look for a job with no experience. Any guidence would be a big help. Thank you

Also, forget wasting your time with the fork lift stuff if you are going to drive.

NO LOADING DOCK IS EVER GOING TO LET YOU ON ONE, NEVER, EVER, EVER..

Also, most companies do not want their drivers unloading trucks at docks as that is where drivers used to get hurt most of the time. An injured driver goes to hospital then the company has to figure out how to get their truck that is now blocking a customers dock. Not a good situation.

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tim in Uhrichsville, Ohio

48 months ago

spaceace in Buna, Texas said: have a question for evryone;
I'm doing a paper " why drivers quit " can i get some feed back on it plz

thx

Low pay, long hours, csa 2010, D.O.T, time away from home and family, job related health problems, etc..

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johnprt

48 months ago

Yea you are right about drivers never unloading their product off of their own trucks. Besides, I obtained my forklift certification threw the carpenters union anyway. And I am getting my class a cdl just so I can work steady. Like I said, I was in the union where I worked on average 5 months a year the last 7 years. So I just want something steady. I know I'm not gonna get rich by driving. I'm just looking for a stable job

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Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia

48 months ago

dmg4x4 in Redford, Michigan said: im getting ready too start my truck driving school... i really want too be a owner/ operater...what are the benefits and over head of being a owner......thanks, dave

DON"T buy your own truck!! I drove for companies and owned my own truck. I have 2 million miles over the road and don't drive anymore. Personal reasons and the D.O.T. took the "fun" out of the job. I loved it! It IS a lifestyle not a job. You either love it or hate it.
Anyway, owning your own truck is a bad gamble in today's economics and the competition keeping the freight rates down will almost gauruntee your failure. That is unless you're one of the lucky ones to lease to someone where your average mileage rate is OVER $1.50/mile, including EMPTY miles. From my experience that is about impossible. Your overhead owning a truck with all the hidden costs that a company fails to tell you about will catch you by surprise. Being a "rookie" it's best to start with a good company, and they're hard to find. The recruiters tell you whatever you want to hear to get you on board, then you find out most of it was bull. This practice has been common since I started driving in 1988. But consider this, at a company where you run 2500 to 3000 miles a week making say .35 cents/mile ($875./$1050.)per week, PLUS your hospitalization insurance, 401k with some sort of company match you will come out far more financially ahead, with a LOT less headaches, than you will owning your own truck! Trust me, I've done both and KNOW the difference. I was lucky enough to pull for a broker that didn't haul CHEAP freight and did OK. That's kind of like hitting the lottery. Also I had to break every rule out there to do it running about 4000 miles a week alone and being home on the weekends. It was tough, but the money was right. The D.O.T. in every state has made running like that a thing of the past. If you want to talk to me email me at johnson.pete77@yahoo.com HAPPY 2 HELP U!

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spaceace in Fairfax, Virginia

48 months ago

i want to thank all of you that have respond to my questions it helps a lot. if there anymore responders out there plz feel free to respond to my question i can always use more help. and again thx for you input

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Looking for work?? in Menominee, Michigan

48 months ago

If anyone that is in the midwest areas to focus on are WI, IL , MN areas we would be happy to help you get some miles. email at jhanner@joytransport.com we look forward to hearing from you, we can walk you through what we have to offer.

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Bob T in Cleveland, Ohio

48 months ago

All i hear is truckers complaining on this site. I know a few truckers and they love it. One is an owner/op and he says he is making alot of money, he works for fed ex. Another guy is local about 21 hr and he says he loves it. So what gives?

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Bob T in Cleveland, Ohio

48 months ago

Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia said: DON"T buy your own truck!! I drove for companies and owned my own truck. I have 2 million miles over the road and don't drive anymore. Personal reasons and the D.O.T. took the "fun" out of the job. I loved it! It IS a lifestyle not a job. You either love it or hate it.
Anyway, owning your own truck is a bad gamble in today's economics and the competition keeping the freight rates down will almost gauruntee your failure. That is unless you're one of the lucky ones to lease to someone where your average mileage rate is OVER $1.50/mile, including EMPTY miles. From my experience that is about impossible. Your overhead owning a truck with all the hidden costs that a company fails to tell you about will catch you by surprise. Being a "rookie" it's best to start with a good company, and they're hard to find. The recruiters tell you whatever you want to hear to get you on board, then you find out most of it was bull. This practice has been common since I started driving in 1988. But consider this, at a company where you run 2500 to 3000 miles a week making say .35 cents/mile ($875./$1050.)per week, PLUS your hospitalization insurance, 401k with some sort of company match you will come out far more financially ahead, with a LOT less headaches, than you will owning your own truck! Trust me, I've done both and KNOW the difference. I was lucky enough to pull for a broker that didn't haul CHEAP freight and did OK. That's kind of like hitting the lottery. Also I had to break every rule out there to do it running about 4000 miles a week alone and being home on the weekends. It was tough, but the money was right. The D.O.T. in every state has made running like that a thing of the past. If you want to talk to me email me at johnson.pete77@yahoo.com HAPPY 2 HELP U!

low pay $875to 1050 is not a low paying job --- and 2500 to 3000 miles is possible for everyone

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Bob T in Cleveland, Ohio

48 months ago

right now i am stuck in a factory job making on a good week 400-- usu bout 300---i do get to go home every night but i am wondering if making 800 or higher is worth not being home--- or 300andbeing home but broke-- what u think everybody? i know new drivers prob dont get 800 but from what i hear after awhile its very attainable--thanks

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Richard in Springfield, Missouri

48 months ago

I agree with Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia and his post above.

With thirty-three years experience and enough of it being OTR to know, I can tell you that your on the road expenses for your food, phone, laundry, showers, etc. go on seven days a week. $1050.00 per week sounds doable but you will feel like you are fighting under water.

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Mankato in Mankato, Minnesota

48 months ago

been to school at dctc truck driving school 2 month program passed the course,i can back up etc. traffic does not bother me,have 2 kids can be gone 3 nights a week,not looking to get rich just a cdl job,no exp kills a guy, i have 2 minor speeds in last 3 years,no DUI or felony convictions,just finished driving school about a week ago,any ideas,thanks again

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Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia

46 months ago

Bob T in Cleveland, Ohio said: low pay $875to 1050 is not a low paying job --- and 2500 to 3000 miles is possible for everyone

I NEVER said $875 to $1050/week was low! You need to read and COMPREHEND what you read. And 2500 to 3000 miles/week is a GOOD average and about ALL you can do a week legally. If you read my posting you'd see I ran over 4000 miles a week and was home every weekend! Try that with one log book, can't be done.
Something about Cleveland, and I thought it was just their football team. Sorry, I'm a die hard STEELER'S FAN, had to put that in there.
Happy truckin' everyone!! I'll go back to my 4 ten hour days a week in my machine shop, (yes I'm a machinist now) and make the same money as working 24 hrs. a day while sleeping at work and waking up in a different city everyday! It's nice to quit work EVERY week at 2am Friday Morning and not go back to work until Monday at 3:30pm!!
Don't get me wrong, I LOVED trucking, but now I have a home and family and 2 million miles later along with all the new rules and the EVER PRESENT DOT up your ass, well let's just say it's NOT fun anymore. For those of you rookies, the "old timer" stories you hear about, I lived them, and it was a good time. Now trucking is just another JOB!! Good luck to all who decide to do it. The money's OK if you don't waste it on the road and BRING HOME a full paycheck, but the hours are FOREVER!! Remember one thing, IT'S A LIFESTYLE NOT A JOB! You'll either love it or hate it!!

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tc3265

46 months ago

Congratulations on moving on from trucking, I hope to be escaping soon myself.

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N7MWH in Tucson, Arizona

44 months ago

My experience in thirty seven years, has generally they want but to two years OTR experience, and at least one year in the last two. I suggest you do a little networking through your friends. My personal opinion is stay away from CR England, Swift, JB Hunt, for starters, friends have got with them, and normally they charge you some ridiculous fee for the training, then team you up with a trainer, then they offer you a chance to lease to own. These are ideas your far better to stay away from. You get this abused truck that they can't get a good price for, and pay double the book value. They give you enough miles to pay the payment 500-$700 a week and the fuel. If you don't jump through the hoops, you will find your miles getting shorter, which causes you to loose your truck for not being able to keep up the payments. I am not trying to paint a totally negative picture, but most major trucking company's are on par with your average used car salesman or Politician. If your married, make sure that it is secure, when you go out at first, you will end up spending 3-7 weeks out there, which turns your wife into a single parent, which is not a good thing if things go south around your home or car.
Best of luck with whatever you do, but I would give OTR work some serious thought before i made any rash decisions.
Russ

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Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia

44 months ago

N7MWH in Tucson, Arizona said: My experience in thirty seven years, has generally they want but to two years OTR experience, and at least one year in the last two. I suggest you do a little networking through your friends. My personal opinion is stay away from CR England, Swift, JB Hunt, for starters, friends have got with them, and normally they charge you some ridiculous fee for the training, then team you up with a trainer, then they offer you a chance to lease to own. These are ideas your far better to stay away from. You get this abused truck that they can't get a good price for, and pay double the book value. They give you enough miles to pay the payment 500-$700 a week and the fuel. If you don't jump through the hoops, you will find your miles getting shorter, which causes you to loose your truck for not being able to keep up the payments. I am not trying to paint a totally negative picture, but most major trucking company's are on par with your average used car salesman or Politician. If your married, make sure that it is secure, when you go out at first, you will end up spending 3-7 weeks out there, which turns your wife into a single parent, which is not a good thing if things go south around your home or car.
Best of luck with whatever you do, but I would give OTR work some serious thought before i made any rash decisions.
Russ

You got that right!! Recruiters are salesmen. And we know salesmen lie, especially when they're paid to. They work for the "company" and it's financial interests.
Also this job's for the single guy or one who doesn't mind who his wife runs around with while he's gone. Think about it, what would a lot of people do when their other half is NEVER home??
You can make as much money along with benefits driving a "company truck." Why can't people understand that? The government has been pushing the owner-operator off the road for many years now. They want the big, "compliant" companies out there, not the small guy.

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Dani leone in Sarasota, Florida

44 months ago

To those wondering about buying a truck and becoming an O/O, or just becoming an OTR driver...
Being OTR might be great for those who are single, but if you have family it is very difficult on them. Fortunately, I was a single mom long before I met my other half so I can deal with being alone and keeping our house from falling apart. However, I know lots of trucker's wives and husbands, and many will tell you that they hate the lifestyle.

Hate to say this but another problem that I have seen many truckers run in to is a lack of respect. If you think driving 80,000+ lbs will garner you respect..think again. Most truckers are (wrongly I might add)thought of as unprofessional, unintelligent rednecks that are not smart enough to understand much of anything. They regularly run into this type of attitude from everywhere. Brokers, other drivers, businesses, DOT...you name it. Oh and don't forget that although they are "stupid", another falicy is that truckers are walking ATM machines.
If you are looking to buy your own truck...good luck. We purchased a truck in March of this year, and the only reason we have not gone bankrupt is due to lots and lots of preplanning. Go to multiple forums and see what kinds of issues drivers are running into, because if you think that running your own business is easy...HAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHA! You are totally responsible for anything and every thing that goes wrong. Light Control Module dead? $1200...Batteries not charging?...$180 each....What's your fuel mileage? What's your total cost per mile for the truck? Your household? Where to go for a PM? $200 -$300 right there. Don't forget that there are taxes to be paid every year, and on average it costs appoximately $8000-$10,000 to just get the truck up and running. Not to mention that if you want to switch companies after a while you need to project having $3000 -$5000 in the bank before hand.

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Niya in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

43 months ago

Walter in Newark, New Jersey said: When you drive a truck,you are the first to get up,and the last to get home.Iam 56 years old and have drove most of my life,and have owned 5 trucks.If i could do it over again,i would have at least an under grad degree,mabe computer software design,not trucking.most people believe that truck drivers are stupid.if you want to make money in the trucking buiness,become a broker,very little over head,and very good income. Plummer,electrician,carpenter,anything but a truck driver, good luck.

What do you do now? are you a broker? are you working under your own lic. or working as a agent?

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Niya in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

43 months ago

Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia said: I NEVER said $875 to $1050/week was low! You need to read and COMPREHEND what you read. And 2500 to 3000 miles/week is a GOOD average and about ALL you can do a week legally. If you read my posting you'd see I ran over 4000 miles a week and was home every weekend! Try that with one log book, can't be done.
Something about Cleveland, and I thought it was just their football team. Sorry, I'm a die hard STEELER'S FAN, had to put that in there.
Happy truckin' everyone!! I'll go back to my 4 ten hour days a week in my machine shop, (yes I'm a machinist now) and make the same money as working 24 hrs. a day while sleeping at work and waking up in a different city everyday! It's nice to quit work EVERY week at 2am Friday Morning and not go back to work until Monday at 3:30pm!!
Don't get me wrong, I LOVED trucking, but now I have a home and family and 2 million miles later along with all the new rules and the EVER PRESENT DOT up your ass, well let's just say it's NOT fun anymore. For those of you rookies, the "old timer" stories you hear about, I lived them, and it was a good time. Now trucking is just another JOB!! Good luck to all who decide to do it. The money's OK if you don't waste it on the road and BRING HOME a full paycheck, but the hours are FOREVER!! Remember one thing, IT'S A LIFESTYLE NOT A JOB! You'll either love it or hate it!!

I really enjoyed reading your blog. If only my man could see what you have already experienced. I'm trying to make him see that it's not much to it at all. I'm home alone all the time. The money is not much at all with all the expenses you have to pay in order to keep the truck(s) running. Is there anything out there that can replace the otr truck driving? I'm about ready to hit the road my self......not in a truck

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Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia

43 months ago

Niya in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I really enjoyed reading your blog. If only my man could see what you have already experienced. I'm trying to make him see that it's not much to it at all. I'm home alone all the time. The money is not much at all with all the expenses you have to pay in order to keep the truck(s) running. Is there anything out there that can replace the otr truck driving? I'm about ready to hit the road my self......not in a truck

As the old trucker's joke goes;
You get a boyfriend, make sure he's gone before your "trucker" gets home, and MOST IMPORTANT, make sure he replaces your man's beer in the refrigirator!! Spend his money, live comfortable, and get what you "need" darling. You wouldn't be the first nor the last.

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Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia

43 months ago

OK NEW DRIVERS!!
KEEP THESE COMPANIES IN MIND;
SWIFT, CR ENGLAND, STEVENS TRANSPORT, JB HUNT, BOYD BROTHERS;
STAY AWAY FROM EVERY ONE OF THEM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
BELIEVE ME, YOU'LL REGRET EVER GOING TO WORK FOR ANY OF THEM!!!

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benlomand in Saint Petersburg, Florida

43 months ago

But C.R. England has such snazzy promo's!

Just kidding, thanks for the input folks. I'm a close to retirement dude looking for something to do afterward. Trucking? Maybe. I think I can live the lifestyle as long as I don't think I'm getting screwed doing it.

I will be around seeking your wise consul.

Yours truly,
benlomand, St. Pete, Fla

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warzone07 in Madera, California

35 months ago

i was terminated by werner enterprises(why i went with them...desperate to get on the road)for a non-perventable accident on dec 2010.my trainer has only been with them 4 months,great guy ,but not enough experiance i think,well nuttin was put on my dac mvr is clean,no points put towards my lincese,not cited,charged,clean right until u call werner.ok i have 5 yrs driving tractor-trailer for the military was deployed for 2 yrs in kuwait/iraq...not 1 single incident are accident(a freakin warzone ..ied rpgs ak'z).so why wont any1 hire me.my thing is dont go with werner,cr england,entral refrig.

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snapper in Marion, Arkansas

35 months ago

I am fixing to graduate a driving school.....I like what you all say on here...but no one recommendst any company..you just bash the so called bad ones...I'm green ar can be, anyone recommend any company to a new driver? I was leaning to Stevens...but why are they bad? I'm also looking at Squire, maybe Maverick...any help would be appreciated. Email me if ya want ainsworth600@gmail.com

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kiki in Lincoln, Illinois

34 months ago

My experience with OTR began with central tx college truck driving school, then 6 weeks with a company trainer who chased women at every trk stop, drove over hours constantly. I made nearly nothing during this time. 4 1/2 months with the company running reefer waiting for sometimes days for cattle to be processed in a town where nothing to do except be miserable in your truck. then switched companies went from .22 cpm to .29 cpm made better $ and the company kept me in detroit, jersey and ny city (i lived in tx). 2 months with that company had an accident with injury, company disowned me, faced with a lawsuit from the accident and no job i filed bankruptcy. Once cleared drove with a different company for 2 more years without incident. It paid the bills. now 10 yrs later facing layoff from my state job considering once again to drive, but so far have been told the trk driving school would have to be repeated and 3 yrs experience (bronx, long island , manhatten and quite a few other horrible places) irrelevant. note: i only talked to us express so far depends on weather i get laid off. just venting thnx

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Richard in Springfield, Missouri

34 months ago

JB Hunt (Lowell, Ak) gave me 33 CPM in July '08. I then had 33 years experience. Last job I had was Union in Calif. 2004, at 54 CPM total package. JB had me run Central and NE. By speaking with other operators, I found JB was attempting to delete their more expensive NE labor. JB was relatively decent in words an gave me good DAC but watched me like I was a criminal. After 17 days and $800, I quit, took my pension and waited another year to get SS at age 62. I too have no use for labor criminals. Be careful out there!

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trying to be a trucker in Columbus, Mississippi

33 months ago

Bob T in Cleveland, Ohio said: low pay $875to 1050 is not a low paying job --- and 2500 to 3000 miles is possible for everyone

Its not low pay if thats after taxes. Is it?

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Richard in Springfield, Missouri

33 months ago

[QUOTE who="Bob T in Cleveland, Ohio said: low pay $875to 1050 is not a low paying job --- and 2500 to 3000 miles is possible for everyone.
trying to be a trucker in Columbus, Mississippi"]Its not low pay if thats after taxes. Is it?

In my opinion, That is fine "after tax" pay and miles too if you are refering to Weekly. Just remember, your on-the-road expenses are now higher than ever.

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Robert in Santa Rosa, California

33 months ago

dmg4x4 in Redford, Michigan said: im getting ready too start my truck driving school... i really want too be a owner/ operater...what are the benefits and over head of being a owner......thanks, dave

really. you need to be a company driver for about a year before you can make a realistic and educated decision to be an owner operator. the pitfals are everywhere and you will not succeed if you plunge in that fast.

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Randy in Pulaski, Virginia

33 months ago

Trucking is a great way of life but as I said it is a way of life. I am a truck driver who has been around the block more than a few times. I can tell you that it is not for everyone but for those who love being away from home and always being alone its a great living. If you want to become a trucker think long and hard then talk to some drivers at your local truck stop as well as a good Truck Driving School. Future Truckers in Asheboro Nc. is a great school to answer most of your questions. Please do not think that driving is an easy way of life it is very demanding and takes away from your life it is hard on your mind and body as well as any relationship you may have. I love Trucking but most just love the thought of it.

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jmb23 in Riverside, California

33 months ago

Richard Luisi in Wheeling, West Virginia said: You got that right!! Recruiters are salesmen. And we know salesmen lie, especially when they're paid to. They work for the "company" and it's financial interests.
Also this job's for the single guy or one who doesn't mind who his wife runs around with while he's gone. Think about it, what would a lot of people do when their other half is NEVER home??
You can make as much money along with benefits driving a "company truck." Why can't people understand that? The government has been pushing the owner-operator off the road for many years now. They want the big, "compliant" companies out there, not the small guy.

I agree with a lot of this but one issue is I am a new recruiter in the trucking industry I came from career counseling for teens going to college. I've been in this industry for about 9 months and its hard on both sides. I hate the liar recruiters out there and it's BS and gives good companies looking for good employees a bad name. I also hate getting to know a lot of really great drivers but because of little things my job is impossible. 99% of applications are rejected. I just wish more companies were honest so when their drivers worked there they stayed! It's so frustrating! I'm on here just to learn more about driver frustration...I've seen and heard it all and agree with the drivers. It takes a very strong individual to be a trucker and it is a truly respectable position that too many people take for granted and I will always appreciate it.

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TIGERSHARK3060 in San Leandro, California

33 months ago

You can always tell when a recruiter is lying or they dont wont to lie but they don't want too tell the truth so say hesitate, there are pauses and they things like" I think" and "i'm pretty sure"
they will tell you about fuel bonuses ect. but when you ask detailed question they are not clear on it. it means it's a lie.

when I ask a concise question , but get a foggy answer, I become apprehensive about working for the company for whom which I am speaking to thier recruiter.

the biggest lie is miles per week. If you want to know the truth about how many miles your going to get. go to usdot.gov and search the company, you will find the info you need to do the math .
# of total miles logged divided by # of trucks divided by 52= the real company average miles per week per truck. go check it out.

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Benlomand in Saint Petersburg, Florida

33 months ago

I'm not a truck driver but know many who do drive for a living. The common compliant I hear is how the owners entice people to work for them that are new to the business which is a way to drive the "tenured," i.e. high paying driver out. Often as a result the newer drivers end up making "McWages" while simultaneously being away from home for long periods and under constant duress about what's going on on the home front.

The economic side of my comment falls in line with the standard corporate modus operandi of the past 30 years, namely to DRIVE DOWN WAGES IN AMERICA.

Get your exoerience with a company then go on your own if you can. Working for "the man" is modern day slavery.

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Richard in Springfield, Missouri

33 months ago

Benlomand in Saint Petersburg, Florida said: I'm not a truck driver but know many who do drive for a living. The common compliant I hear is how the owners entice people to work for them that are new to the business which is a way to drive the "tenured," i.e. high paying driver out. Often as a result the newer drivers end up making "McWages" while simultaneously being away from home for long periods and under constant duress about what's going on on the home front.

The economic side of my comment falls in line with the standard corporate modus operandi of the past 30 years, namely to DRIVE DOWN WAGES IN AMERICA.

Get your exoerience with a company then go on your own if you can. Working for "the man" is modern day slavery.

I commend you for your keen observation.

It never ceases to amaze me how I can look at documentaries circa the 1920's showing young, destitute immigrants hired as strikebreakers and then see the modern version as you describe. Young workers are enticed by their egos to prove they can "one-up" a senior operator all the while believing their brown-nosing puts them in line as being special.

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