Do Employers Care About the Program, or Just That You're Registered?

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Comments (6)

Ryan in Hicksville, New York

14 months ago

Hello,

I already have a Bachelor's Degree in an unrelated field (Biology), and am planning on going to Sanford Brown in Garden City to become a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer. The accredited DMS program at SB in Garden City focuses on Abdominal and Pelvic, but I really like Cardiac and Vascular. They also have a Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Technology program, but it is NOT accredited.

Being as I already have a Bachelor's degree, I am able to sit for the ARDMS registry exams immediately upon completion of the externship. I don't need to acquire a year of work experience first. I plan on becoming RDCS (Adult Echocardiography) and RVT, both of which I can sit for immediately after completion of the Cardiovascular Technology program. I would not be able to sit for either after completing the general DMS program because it doesn't touch on cardiac or vascular at all.

My concern is, will graduation from a non-accredited program hurt my employment chances? I'm hoping that an ARDMS credential is an ARDMS credential, regardless of the program that prepared you for the registry exams. Any insight is appreciated.

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Pete in Irvington, New Jersey

14 months ago

The answer to your question is not a simple one. Over my 15 years in the field I have learned that there are very few consistencies in ultrasound. That being said it has been my experience that the most important thing has been experience followed very closely by having a license and then the program you went to. I have seen many good new techs with registries get overlooked because of a lack of experience, however I have also seen someone's inexperience be a huge attraction because they can be easily trained to a specific workflow without combating poor habits learned elsewhere. While I am sure you were hoping for a more straight forward answer the truth is every situation is very unique. For instance a place that has time to train a new tech or place looking to grow may love to have you while an established lab may want someone who can get up and go day 1. So what do you do??? Scan scan and scan some more get all the experience you can. I have seen techs with multiple registries who can't scan at all and techs with no license that can scan like they were born to do so. Having your ARDMS immediately post grad will be a big help because many public facilities (hospitals, clinics, etc) won't even acknowledge someone without it so it will be one less hurdle, however in the end the experience is what matters. My advice to you stay hungry keep pushing and don't let yourself be discouraged. Ultrasound is a tough field to get into, but it is definitely worth it.

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Erica U in New Jersey

14 months ago

Pete in Irvington, New Jersey said: The answer to your question is not a simple one. Over my 15 years in the field I have learned that there are very few consistencies in ultrasound.

You are absolutely correct, Pete. We were encouraged to get registered as soon as possible after graduating, and that is exactly what I did. Sometimes I wonder if that were the right thing to so. I have 3 registries and still no job after 10 months post graduation. Each interview resulted in, "I"m sorry, but we need someone with more experience." So we sit and wait and lose what little scanning skills we'd obtained in school. Along with those skills, go our confidence in our ability to scan and likely hood of getting a job.

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Roger in Oakland, California

13 months ago

From experience, if you are registered, it shouldnt matter. I did have a couple interviews where they wanted to know if it was from an accredited program.

If your program has a great reputation for putting out techs and they are non accredited (and you stay in that area where the course is known)it shouldnt matter.

I do say it doesnt matter as that is what I've seen here in the Bay area. I've heard of a few places that wont hire, even it you are Registered, based on the school you came from. But if you have alteast 1yr experience, I think that helps!

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jen67 in Mobile, Alabama

12 months ago

Ryan in Hicksville, New York said: Hello,

I already have a Bachelor's Degree in an unrelated field ( Biology ), and am planning on going to Sanford Brown in Garden City to become a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer. The accredited DMS program at SB in Garden City focuses on Abdominal and Pelvic, but I really like Cardiac and Vascular. They also have a Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Technology program, but it is NOT accredited.

Being as I already have a Bachelor's degree, I am able to sit for the ARDMS registry exams immediately upon completion of the externship. I don't need to acquire a year of work experience first. I plan on becoming RDCS (Adult Echocardiography) and RVT, both of which I can sit for immediately after completion of the Cardiovascular Technology program. I would not be able to sit for either after completing the general DMS program because it doesn't touch on cardiac or vascular at all.

My concern is, will graduation from a non-accredited program hurt my employment chances? I'm hoping that an ARDMS credential is an ARDMS credential, regardless of the program that prepared you for the registry exams. Any insight is appreciated.

I agree with"Pete in Irvington, NJ". There is no simple answer to your question. According to the sonographers (Vascular, Cardiac, and General) I have discussed this with, they have all agreed that their interviewers have placed most emphasis on how they can scan as well as whether they were certified. In addition to scanning ability and certification, the potential employer was also concerned about whether candidate was not only registered in at least one modality; but also whether dual certified or willing/able to train in additional modality.

Of course, experience is always a plus.

www.academyofultrasound.com

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Fatima in Fallon, Nevada

12 months ago

Ryan in Hicksville, New York said: Hello,

I already have a Bachelor's Degree in an unrelated field ( Biology ), and am planning on going to Sanford Brown in Garden City to become a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer. The accredited DMS program at SB in Garden City focuses on Abdominal and Pelvic, but I really like Cardiac and Vascular. They also have a Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Technology program, but it is NOT accredited.

Being as I already have a Bachelor's degree, I am able to sit for the ARDMS registry exams immediately upon completion of the externship. I don't need to acquire a year of work experience first. I plan on becoming RDCS (Adult Echocardiography) and RVT, both of which I can sit for immediately after completion of the Cardiovascular Technology program. I would not be able to sit for either after completing the general DMS program because it doesn't touch on cardiac or vascular at all.

My concern is, will graduation from a non-accredited program hurt my employment chances? I'm hoping that an ARDMS credential is an ARDMS credential, regardless of the program that prepared you for the registry exams. Any insight is appreciated.

Mostly care about being credentialed sonographer either from ARDMS, ARRT, or CCI. As long as your program was equivalent to a credentialed program. Most of the Ultrasound vets didn't go to a formal school, they where crossed trained on the job and/or took a brief program but have since established the experience to teach us all.

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