A career in Medical Sonography, your thoughts?

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nicki in Madrid, Spain

49 months ago

Hi there! Here's a directory of Sonography Schools, organized by state and degree level: www.medicalandnursing-training.com/medical-technician-schools/sonography/

Here's a terriffic article on What to Look for When Choosing a Sonography School:
www.medicalandnursing-training.com/a/sonography-schools-what-to-look-for-when-choosing.html

... as well as a Sonographer Career Guide: www.medicalandnursing-training.com/a/sonographer/

Good Luck!

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Should I? in Austin, Texas

48 months ago

Hi All,

I'm planning on applying for the Sonography program here in Austin, TX. The school says they have a pretty high job placement rate but after reading this forum and talking to a couple friends, I'm kind of nervous about getting into this field. Does anyone know how hard it is to find a job in Austin or the surrounding areas? At this point, I'm not sure what other health career choice I'm even interested in or would be good for me. Any suggestions?

Thanks for your help.

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JBankston in Mandeville, Louisiana

48 months ago

Should I? in Austin, Texas said: Hi All,

I'm planning on applying for the Sonography program here in Austin, TX. The school says they have a pretty high job placement rate but after reading this forum and talking to a couple friends, I'm kind of nervous about getting into this field. Does anyone know how hard it is to find a job in Austin or the surrounding areas? At this point, I'm not sure what other health career choice I'm even interested in or would be good for me. Any suggestions?

Thanks for your help.

I've been going back and forth on whether I should get into the program also but just decided to take the plunge. As it is now, I haven't been able to find a job for the last year after being laid off that will pay decent money so it really can't get much worse. I figure with my Sonography certification, it can only get better or at least a little better.

I think it depends on your circumstances and how far you are willing to go, what are you willing to put up with and how marketable you make yourself, as with any job in this economy right now. I'm hearing the same thing from my friends about nursing, they can't find jobs. First off, CAAHEP accredited school is a must. Excelling in school can only help, high GPA. Being able to relocate would definitely increase your chances. Also, multiple specialties would make you more attractive.

All of these are steps that I am taking to help put me in the more likely to get a job column. I'm not saying it will be easy but I can be unemployed for a while since my husband has a steady job. His company has offices saturated throughout the states that he can transfer to if I need to relocate. If I have to accept only part time employment at first until I become more experienced to gain full time employment, then I will. Honestly, if I was a single parent, then I would more than likely not go into this field due to the unsteadiness. Thankfully I have the luxury of not depending on my income.

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VnessNva in Virginia Beach, Virginia

47 months ago

Please I need advice. I have all the classes I need to get into this program. However, I am hearing that finding a job is very hard to do after graduating. The bls site and one* net online said the Diagnostic medical sonographer program is expected to grow. I would like an RDMS or someone that graduated from an accredited program to tell me the truth because the many schools and instuctors are about money and would tell you anything.

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Maria in Woodside, New York

46 months ago

Right now this field is over-saturated. Schools like IAMP and Sanford Brown are pumping out graduates but there are no jobs. I was lucky to get a 3 day per diem in CT. Some of my classmates have moved down south. 4 have full time jobs. 2 that I know have registry but never found anything. the more registries you have the more opportunities. i am studying for a second registry now. i also have an interview for another per diem this coming week. hopefully I can get another day's worth to make some sort of respectable income. do not go into ultrasound. try a PA instead. wish someone would've told me how difficult it is to find a job when i first started school.

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Shelly32 in Round Rock, Texas

45 months ago

I was talked into going to a school by the name of Virginia College of Austin. I was coaxed into going into the MA program until the new class started for the sonography program. I have found out recently that the Sonography Program is not accredited and they say they are working on it but I heard from a student who graduated 4 years ago that they told her the same thing. She said that it is almost impossible to get a job in sonography in the Austin texas area because there are so many graduates coming out of the accredited program at the local community college. I am so pissed because I feel totally dooped. I don't even know if it is worth it for me to even attempt the program, especially because the price is about 45,000.00!!!!! Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Thanks!

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jrthao02 in Gresham, Oregon

45 months ago

Shelly32: I've been searching around and before I signed up for anything I made sure if the school was accredited. Some school are accredited, but not nationally. Here is a list of school in Texas that you can check out and there are accredited:

Angelina College - Lufkin, TX
Austin Community College - Austin, TX
Del Mar College - Corpus Christi, TX
El Centro College - Dallas, TX
El Paso Community College - El Paso, TX
Harris County Hospital District - Houston, TX
Houston Community College System - Houston, TX
Lamar Institute of Technology-Beaumont - Beaumont, TX
Lone Star College System-Cy Fair - Cypress, TX
Midland College - Midland, TX
Sanford Brown College-Houston - Houston, TX
Sanford Brown Institute-Dallas - Dallas , TX
Tyler Junior College - Tyler, TX
University of Texas-Brownsville
Texas Southmost College - Brownsville, TX

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Sam in Houston, Texas

45 months ago

Hi M. Cowan,

I just came to houston 5 months ago from Toronto, Canada and I have an Associates Degree in Biotechnology Technologist-Industrial Microbiology from Centennial College in Canada. I really want to get a job, but cannot seem to find anything with the education that I have.
I am thinking of pursuing DMS from Lone Star College Cyfair. I want to get a quick education that will lead to a job soon after. Do you think some of my credits from my Associates degree will be transferrable towards the sonography program at lone star college Cyfair.
Can you suggest anyother programs that may do me good. I really need a job.

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M.Cowan, BHSc,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas

45 months ago

Sam,
I have no idea what any college will or will not accept. You will need to check with them. You can find a complete list of accredited programs on the CAAHEP website.

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MC in Beaumont, Texas

44 months ago

A carrer in ultrasound is a good paying job and it has many benefits. I graduated from ultrasound from lamar institute of technology december 2009 and so far have not been able to find a job. If you are planning to relocate their should be a good amount of jobs in the Houston area or Dallas area, even south texas. But any one living in Beaumont texas not trying to relocate, is going to have a very tough time finding a job, even if they have their credentials. LIT is a very good school, will get you prepared for the job, but they do not help you find a job, and it is a good idea to get registered right out of college so that the information is not forgotten. Ultrasound is a practice that is very saturated in the beaumont area. It is risky to waste all time and money and don't get a job.

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KB in Katy, Texas

43 months ago

I'm interested in going to Sonography school. I have my Bachelor's in Business from Texas A&M. I have looked into Lone Star Cy Fair, Houston Community College, Harris County Hospital District. My grades from my first degree are average. I have a GPA around 2.4. Does anyone know if I can even get into a program with a GPA of 2.4? My prereqs that I have recently taken at Lone Star are A's and B's so I'm wondering if my past grades from the undergraduate degree will hurt my chances. I was interested in applying to Harris County Hospital District's program until I read that the applicant must have a cumulative 2.5 GPA. I have a prereq GPA of 3.5 but a cumulative 2.4. I am so frustrated that my grades from classes more than 10 years ago are going to ruin my chances to apply. Anyone else in this situation?

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M.Cowan, MBA, RT, RDMS, RVT, RDCS in Houston, Texas

43 months ago

KB,
Go to hchdonline.com under the about us tab to access the sonography program webpage. At the bottom of that page there is an e-mail. Send me an e-mail with your questions, I will be happy to provide some assistance.

M

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echo in Mobile, Alabama

43 months ago

M.Cowan, MBA, RT, RDMS, RVT, RDCS in Houston, Texas said: KB,
Go to hchdonline.com under the about us tab to access the sonography program webpage. At the bottom of that page there is an e-mail. Send me an e-mail with your questions, I will be happy to provide some assistance.

M

K,
I would like to get a bit more information on your situation in order to make the best suggestion. Feel free to contact me info@academyofultrasound.com

I look forward to discussing your possibilities.
www.academyofultrasound.com

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Disappointed in Austin, Texas

43 months ago

Does any one know what Austin Community College is looking for when selecting students to sonography program? I spent two years doing all prerequisites and other requirements, only to be not selected for the program despite a GPA of 3.9
Any information will help. Thanks.

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Another ACC Student in Austin, Texas

43 months ago

I am also an ACC student, currently finishing up prereqs. I think the sonography program and the RN program are the two most competitive programs. I often hear of nursing students applying several times and the way they assign points actually helps you the more times you apply. I don't know how different the process is for the sonography program, but I went to an info session for that program a few years ago and I was in a room full of people that were radiology techs, lVNs with experience, etc so I am sure the competition is tough. Maybe you can talk to the coordinator for that program to see what you can improve or maybe just applying again would do the trick.

I cannot help but think that ACC makes it difficult to get into their two year health science programs so that people end up waiting around taking more courses or completing other certificates in the meantime (like surgical tech, LVN, etc). That just pockets them a little more money. I have seriously been thinking about completing either the surgical tech or MLT program they have just so I can do something while finishing the prereqs and then start working in case I don't get into nursing. I hate to have to take that long route, but sometimes you have to play the game to get to where you want to be.

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Brewski in Longview, Washington

43 months ago

A report I did when I went to ultrasoundschool at 40 years of age was about the affects of the baby boomers on the ultrasound community. As the baby boomers are now entering the health care industry, a large portion of sonographers are reaching retirement age. The job market for sonographers should be good for many years to come. There will always be highs and lows with regard to supply and demand, but what job market is exempt from that? Personally, I work in a hospital, and enjoy it. We do take call, and we do cover weekends and holidays. But if you spread it out between everybody in the lab, it's not much of a problem. I don't think you will get as good of benefits from a private office as you will in a hospital setting. Especially if you have a family. But if you need a M-F 8-5 then the doctor's office is the place to be.

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Logic in Hacienda Heights, California

42 months ago

Christ....why on earth even bother studying for this field? I was actually looking into the program at Cypress College, but it just seems like a MAJOR dead-end. I will NOT be pursuing education or employment in this field.

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bcgirl in Duncan, British Columbia

39 months ago

Hi, I'm reading oversaturation. I looked at dental hygiene forums and I read oversaturation.

Now sonography has the same problem? Really? This was my second choice.

I just moved back to B.C. (Canada) from Austin Texas.

I have some questions for you that I've numbered:

1) Does anyone know if Canada still has a healthy market for Sonographers?

I was going to go to an accredited school here in B.C. for that but I want to see how the market is in the US and Canada first.

2) As well, when I read that sonograpers in New Zealand and Australia have 4 day work weeks, is that getting popular in North America as well?

DSM really looked like a great career until I read this.

Can anybody answer my questions?

Thanks ahead of time.

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Jess K. in Austin, Texas

33 months ago

Hello all,
I am currently taking my pre-req classes that are required for the DMS program at ACC. After reading this forum I am a bit nervous about moving forward with the program. I noticed that most of the entries are close to a year old. So I have two questions. 1- are DMS jobs still incredibly hard to find, and 2-is the DMS program at ACC really that challenging to get into for a person with no medical background?

Thanks for any and all help!

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Karry in Lenoir, North Carolina

33 months ago

Hi, I guess it depends where you go. My school does a waiting list after you finish the required classes. Prereqs were not that bad. Just needed C or higher. Waiting was the hard part. Took me 4 years but I finally am accepted. We didnt need a medical background, besides the anatomy classes. At our orientation they mentioned a few of their students already having jobs so I am hopeful. I think with the right program, we will be fine. If you notice many of the negative posts and unworking people are from unaccredited programs.

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stayathomemom in Wilmington, North Carolina

29 months ago

I am currently unemployed and have done research for medical sonographer and I totally want this SO bad. Any GREAT and USEFUL info would be wonderful please/!!

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Robin Pollard in Lake Worth, Florida

28 months ago

So what are the other people in your class doing now, still working in healthcare or something different?

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6870NYC in New York

28 months ago

Jess K. in Austin, Texas said: Hello all,
I am currently taking my pre-req classes that are required for the DMS program at ACC. After reading this forum I am a bit nervous about moving forward with the program. I noticed that most of the entries are close to a year old. So I have two questions. 1- are DMS jobs still incredibly hard to find, and 2-is the DMS program at ACC really that challenging to get into for a person with no medical background?

Thanks for any and all help!

Hi Jess,
This is my second career. I applied to ACC (twice!!) , schools in Houston, Dallas, Washington D.C. and New York. LIke many of you I hated my previous job, shadowed a friend that did this, and fell in love. After years of jumping through hoops with pre-reqs, I finally got accepted at a school in the NYC area and it was TOUGH. I graduated in May of this year, took my registries (take them right out of school before you forget!) and am STILL looking for a job. We had a class of 27 and 3 have jobs right now. =( I'm finding out it's all about who you know. I can't tell you how many times I've applied and IMMEDIATELY gotten a rejection email back. Nobody wants to hire new grads because we have no experience! How are we supposed to get experience when you won't give us a chance?! So, so frustrated!!! I might have a lead for a job but it would be lots and lots of on-call but at this point I feel like I just need to get my foot in the door. =)

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D_G in Scarborough, Ontario

25 months ago

Sam in Houston, Texas said: Hi M. Cowan,

I just came to houston 5 months ago from Toronto, Canada and I have an Associates Degree in Biotechnology Technologist- Industrial Microbiology from Centennial College in Canada. I really want to get a job, but cannot seem to find anything with the education that I have.
I am thinking of pursuing DMS from Lone Star College Cyfair. I want to get a quick education that will lead to a job soon after. Do you think some of my credits from my Associates degree will be transferrable towards the sonography program at lone star college Cyfair.
Can you suggest anyother programs that may do me good. I really need a job.

Hi I an also from Toronto and want to move to the U.S. How did you do it?

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Anthony in Millbrook, Ontario

25 months ago

Stuck in Retail in Wilmington, Delaware said: Hello,

I'm stuck in a job I currently hate (retail) and am looking for a new career field that I can achieve with a 2 year degree. I'm 36 years old and afraid that I'm too old to start in a new field but I truly feel I am losing my mind in the crappy job I have. Can you tell me if there are a lot of people who start this field later in life and how hard is it to find a job after graduation. I'm looking at an accredited program at Delaware Technical Community College , has any one ever attended this school? If so what do you think? Also I was hoping to working either in a doctor's office or imaging center as oppose to a hospital because of scheduling (i.e. day work vs overnight shifts) is the pay significantly lower working in a doctor's office? I could work overnight or weekends but after 20 years in retail it would be nice for a 8-5 or 9-5 job but it is not a necessity. I would really appreciate anyone's input or response. Thank you.

Wow! It really looks like you've had enough of your dead end retail life. I can sympathize with you there.
I the past 3 months I've been doing an amazing amount of research into the sonographer/ultrasound technician career path. I gathered it all up (and continue to) and put up a website for exactly your type of person. I would suggest you take a peek. You'll find the answers to most of your questions, and probably a few leads to enable you to answer the others. It is at ultrasoundtechnicianschoolshq.weebly.com

I hope you find success.
Cheers and good luck
AL

PS: If the url is stripped out from this post just type into your browser, ultrasoundtechnicianschoolshq.weebly.com

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novemberrain103 in Spring, Texas

25 months ago

M.Cowan, BHSc,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas said: Hi Shelly32,

You fell for the DMS bait and switch with the MA program. This is a deceitful practice perpetrated by many career schools. SBI is the worst of the offenders. Austin is rather saturated with sonographers at this time. If you want to have any chance at DMS employment you will need to attend a CAAHEP accredited program. ACC is the only one in the area. Just cut you losses with the career school and don't throw good money after bad.

I am the director of the CAAHEP accredited Harris County Hospital District program in Houston. My best advice is to focus on accredited education .


HI,
My name is Amanda and my husband and I just move to Spring in May. I have been wanting to go into DMS for YEARS but had to wait til hubby got out of the USMC and we settled down in one place. Anyway I am kinda getting the idea that this isn't a very good thing to go into right now due to the lack of jobs. What does that look like for our area and would you still recommend me going for it? I worry because I have anxiety about going back to school and am very scared to waste the money and fail or not be able to get a job. THANKS SO MUCH:)

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Karry in Massachusetts

25 months ago

I can only speak for my school. I know the 2012 class has 6/7 working. Many we're hired at their clinical sites. I think we will be ok as long as we are in accredited programs.

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M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas

25 months ago

For those of you wondering which credits will transfer, you simply need to contact the prospective schools. Sometimes it is how long ago you took a science course that ends up being the hang up.

For those of you worried about the job market. There are no sure things in life. You can spend $100k getting a degree from Yale, this does not mean that you will get what you want. Our economy has had a negative impact on the job markets. And thanks to healthcare reform the heathcare industry is in a state of uncertainty. Be that as it may, there are some truths in this industry that are self evident.

1. People will always need healthcare.
2. Healthcare will always need qualified providers.
3. Our popuation is growing and the baby boomers are retiring (10k/day)
4. More people = more healthcare = more providers

So sure the economy sux, but the forcasted trends in healthcare services indicate we will need more not less providers.

Sooooo if you want to be in healthcare, put your best foot forward, work hard, and EARN your place in the industry. Nobody can predict the future nor say what the job market will be like in 2,5,10 years.
BTW, my last graduating call (May 2012) we have almost 80% working in the field.
Ciao, Cowan

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M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas

25 months ago

BTW, Karry in MA is correct. Accreditation matters.

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madblood14 in Rialto, California

24 months ago

Okay give it to me straight! I am 59yrs old and thinking of DMS as a line of work. I have no college education to speak of but I am only interested in taking a 14 month program and will only work part time. The only thing that gives me pause is I cannot take the test for certification even if I go to an accredited school. And now I hear all the tales of woe about people who are younger, smarter, and may even look better than me who have been out of work for what reads like years. Am I on a fools errand?

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Karry in Massachusetts

24 months ago

I don't think you can find work without being registered these days. All jobs need you registered to get paid by ins! No idea how age would play a factor. I think they'd choose younger over older.

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mommy175 in Haddam, Connecticut

24 months ago

Those of you who have been out of work for a couple of years, besides maintaining your cme's how are you keeping you skills up

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M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas

24 months ago

Madblood,

I have a couple of factors for you to consider.

1. Ultrasound is a rather physically demanding occupation especially in the hospitals. It is hard on your right shoulder, lower back, right wrist and hand, neck, and knees.

2. Mastery of the craft is a multi-year process. The learning curves continues for several years post graduation.

3. School choice does matter. The wrong school can cost you a whole bunch of time and money.

4. Credentialing is important. Uncredentialed sonographers are challenged in penetrating the market and maintaining employment.

5. Health care is changing. The true impact of the change on the sonography world is yet to be seen, but we will take some hits as a profession.

6. Ultrasound is a time consuming occupation. Nights, weekends, and holidays are no exception. The on-call requirements are brutal, and can be challenging for anyone.

As an educator and program director I push every potential applicant to examine their motives and to drill down into the nitty gritty of the profession. Many people I meet are often disillusioned by what sonographers actually do and what it takes to learned the craft.

Ciao,
Cowan

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dhscorpio72@hotmail.com in Saint Louis, Missouri

22 months ago

M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas said: Madblood,

I have a couple of factors for you to consider.

1. Ultrasound is a rather physically demanding occupation especially in the hospitals. It is hard on your right shoulder, lower back, right wrist and hand, neck, and knees.

2. Mastery of the craft is a multi-year process. The learning curves continues for several years post graduation.

3. School choice does matter. The wrong school can cost you a whole bunch of time and money.

4. Credentialing is important. Uncredentialed sonographers are challenged in penetrating the market and maintaining employment.

5. Health care is changing. The true impact of the change on the sonography world is yet to be seen, but we will take some hits as a profession.

6. Ultrasound is a time consuming occupation. Nights, weekends, and holidays are no exception. The on-call requirements are brutal, and can be challenging for anyone.

As an educator and program director I push every potential applicant to examine their motives and to drill down into the nitty gritty of the profession. Many people I meet are often disillusioned by what sonographers actually do and what it takes to learned the craft.

Ciao,
Cowan

Can you or anyone in the field tell me exactly what it is that people are "disillusioned" about this field? I too am considering going into this field. What exactly it takes to learn and do this job, as I wonder is this something that I can really do?

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california girl1 in San Francisco, California

22 months ago

I think the "disillusioned" statement is referring to the fact that most people think they will go into sonography so they can scan babies. In reality, that is very small part of a sonographers job duty...

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M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas

22 months ago

Good Question...."disillusioned"?

Many people are attracted to the field of sonography based on their mis-perception of what sonographers do. Also, I find that most people do not understand the rigors and difficulty of the training. Afterall, a skilled sonographer makes scanning look easy.

So to better answer your question "what it takes to learn and do this job"...?
1. An informed understanding of the academic demands and a commitment to the process
2. An informed understanding of the time commitment and a solid plan to put that time in
3. A good work ethic
4. Perseverance and drive
5. A humble commitment to "earning" the respect of the profession

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M Davidson

21 months ago

M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas said: Good Question...."disillusioned"?

Many people are attracted to the field of sonography based on their mis-perception of what sonographers do. Also, I find that most people do not understand the rigors and difficulty of the training. Afterall, a skilled sonographer makes scanning look easy.

So to better answer your question "what it takes to learn and do this job"...?
1. An informed understanding of the academic demands and a commitment to the process
2. An informed understanding of the time commitment and a solid plan to put that time in
3. A good work ethic
4. Perseverance and drive
5. A humble commitment to "earning" the respect of the profession

M.Cowan,
I am in Houston and am considering a change of career from business to medical. I do have a BS in Business, but no medical background. As I work FT right now and have no other source of income, I am looking for a part time or evening DMS program. Does this exist?

M Davidson

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M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas

21 months ago

M Davidson,

I get this question frequently. Here is what you need to know about allied health care education. Which includes dozens of different types of health care jobs (nursing, DMS, RAD, PT, etc....)

Fulltime: Almost all programs are what we call "fulltime cohort". Meaning that you enter into a class with a bunch of fello students and everbody progresses through the program together....fulltime. Much different then enrolling at the local university and working on a degree.

Daytime: Although health care is 24/7 366 in a leap year, the majority of clinical education takes place during the day. Because this is when the lions share of health care work is being done. This is when the appts. are being scheduled, and the procedures are being performed, and health care is kicking.

Subsequently, unless you can taylor your schedule to the "fulltime-daytime" requirements of the training, you may want to consider an alternative. Its just the nature of the beast.

I understand about kids, bills, and life. It can be hard to make it happen....BUT with a good support system, solid critical thinking, and good rational decision making, you can make it happen for yourself.

Ciao, MC

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M Davidson

21 months ago

M.Cowan,MBA,RT,RDMS,RVT,RDCS in Houston, Texas said: M Davidson,

I get this question frequently. Here is what you need to know about allied health care education . Which includes dozens of different types of health care jobs (nursing, DMS, RAD, PT, etc....)

Fulltime: Almost all programs are what we call "fulltime cohort". Meaning that you enter into a class with a bunch of fello students and everbody progresses through the program together....fulltime. Much different then enrolling at the local university and working on a degree.

Daytime: Although health care is 24/7 366 in a leap year, the majority of clinical education takes place during the day. Because this is when the lions share of health care work is being done. This is when the appts. are being scheduled, and the procedures are being performed, and health care is kicking.

Subsequently, unless you can taylor your schedule to the "fulltime-daytime" requirements of the training, you may want to consider an alternative. Its just the nature of the beast.

I understand about kids, bills, and life. It can be hard to make it happen....BUT with a good support system, solid critical thinking, and good rational decision making, you can make it happen for yourself.

Ciao, MC

Thank you for your reply. I appreciate the feedback. I was really hoping you'd tell me there was an evening program somewhere haha. But thank you anyway. I work a day job (high end salary) and it just wouldn't be possible for me to take a night job somewhere and even come close to paying the bills while I did a daytime program. I suppose it isn't meant for me, right now anyway. Maybe one day if I ever have a 2nd income, it would be more feasible.

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Frustrated in Butler, New Jersey

20 months ago

Maria in Woodside, New York said: Right now this field is over-saturated. Schools like IAMP and Sanford Brown are pumping out graduates but there are no jobs. I was lucky to get a 3 day per diem in CT. Some of my classmates have moved down south. 4 have full time jobs. 2 that I know have registry but never found anything. the more registries you have the more opportunities. i am studying for a second registry now. i also have an interview for another per diem this coming week. hopefully I can get another day's worth to make some sort of respectable income. do not go into ultrasound. try a PA instead. wish someone would've told me how difficult it is to find a job when i first started school.

This is all very true. Another field which seems to have a shortage is Registered Nurses. If you check the career sites of most hospitals, there are hundreds of these jobs available.

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Frustrated in Butler, New Jersey

20 months ago

Logic in Hacienda Heights, California said: Christ....why on earth even bother studying for this field? I was actually looking into the program at Cypress College , but it just seems like a MAJOR dead-end. I will NOT be pursuing education or employment in this field.

This may be a good choice. Its a lot of money and time for a field with no jobs.

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Frustrated in Butler, New Jersey

20 months ago

dhscorpio72@hotmail.com in Saint Louis, Missouri said: Can you or anyone in the field tell me exactly what it is that people are "disillusioned" about this field? I too am considering going into this field. What exactly it takes to learn and do this job, as I wonder is this something that I can really do?

dhscorpio,

Let me see if I can help clear up what is "disillusioned" about this field. Yes, many people go in thinking, "I will see babies". This is part of it. I did a clinical rotation in a high risk OB office and I will tell you, if this was a thought about getting into the field, you will quickly change your view when you see a baby with all of its organs on the outside of its body, as well as its lower half missing.

A lot of people do not research what is actually involved physically in the occupation.

Another aspect may be is that people do not know how operator-dependent ultrasound is. Modalities such as CAT Scan and MRI depend on the machine to produce the images. For ultrasound, you are the "eyes" of the radiologist. He or she can only depend on the tech to find the pathology depending on chief complaint, or prior reports/images. The radiologist also will depend on you to produce images free from artifact, and images that are clear and not blurry.

Until you have your first Ultrasound physics course, will you realize how much sound interacts with interfaces such as bone and simple things such as gas. You can also make a cyst look like it has debris in it by not having the proper adjustments on your machine.

Now of course some of these thing you will not realize until you get into school or clinicals. So a skilled Tech will make it look very easy based on their eye-hand coordination with the settings and the probe on the patient. Some of these things make the field look very impressive. I hope this helped.

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Roger in Oakland, California

20 months ago

Each modality of ultrasound is interesting and there are positions open in many places.

As mentioned above, it is not as easy as people think. You have to think on many levels, hand eye coordination, ultrasound machine buttons and physics, finding better views to work with.
look at ARDMS.org and they list of credentials.

I work in pediatric echo full time and I will say that pathology is intense and interesting, but also knowing what to look for before and after the repairs.

I am also registered in adult and vascular. Learning fetal and cath lab this year.
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my opinion on the career.. definitely when you start is always hard.. finding the job, the pressure is on and making sure you do things properly and follow protocols...

but once you get the hang of it, it becomes second nature. Working in a pediatric setting, you will always seeing interesting disease and understanding pathophysiology is important. Having other techs with experience and MDs that are willing to teach as well.... helps tremendously.

I know people that only wanted to do sonography for the money and not for the job and they didnt go to far, either in our program or finding a position.

Some cant past registry.
Some were given a patient to scan as part of the interview.
Some built themselves up too much, and when it came time to perform, didnt do well.
Some are too choosy ( I only want to work with this machine)

Some people want to do pediatric echo, but dont want to deal with screaming babies or kids with mental disorders... you cant have either or... you scan everyone they bring in.
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To get ahead, you have to be willing to do all aspects of the the job and willing to learn. I tried to touch every machine during my internships, because i did know where I was gonna land and what I would have to use.

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kmhbeauty in Murrieta, California

20 months ago

Hello, I am 27 years old and I live in southern California. I am thinking of getting into DMS. In a year I will be done with the prereqs for Loma Linda University program. They are an accredited program, but they only accept 12 people a year. When I am done in a year, I will have an associates degree in science and business. If I by chance get into the program, I will spend the next 2 years in the program full time. I am just a little worried that the market is saturated in California. I am worried that even though the school is excellent, employers will want more experience or a Bachelors degree. I have been hearing lately that things will move away from invasive CT scans and more into DMS. This makes sense to me because CT scans are damaging and expensive. I think the technology will change in time and DMS will grow. I just wanted to get some input. I am very scaired of taking the 2 years out of my life and not have a job in the end. My cousin who lives in NY, went to one of those rip off, unaccredited, trade schools. She ended up getting hired on from the place she did her internship and now she is studying to take her ARMDS exam. She is making around 30 and hour also. She is one who really lucked out. She also had no prior schooling besides high school and not a lot of prior work experience besides working at a spa. Not sure how she did it. I can only hope to have a little of that luck

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Rainie in Butler, New Jersey

20 months ago

Hello,
Yes this is scary; however you are still two years away and things may change. Its very easy to look into these forums when we are looking for answers or cannot make a decision. Remember this, most of the time, people will post when they are in need of an answer and when things are not good. When things are good or when people get a job, they never got back to the forum to repost.

Follow your heart. If this is something you have researched and really want to do, then do it. Especially if you attend a CAAHEP accredited school and sit for your registry with the ARDMS.

I took a gamble and it was worth it. I waited until the last minute to decide if I wanted my position in class because I come from a computer science field and I was so unsure if this would work out. All I can say is I'm glad I did because I feel I am where I belong. Good Luck

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kmhbeauty in Murrieta, California

20 months ago

Yeah, that is a good point! I keep thinking if my cousin did it, with all odds against her, in a saturated location, then I can do it. I think Im going to go for it no matter what! Thanks for the advice!

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Roger in Oakland, California

20 months ago

kmhbeauty in Murrieta, California said: Hello, I am 27 years old and I live in southern California. I am thinking of getting into DMS. In a year I will be done with the prereqs for Loma Linda University program. They are an accredited program, but they only accept 12 people a year. When I am done in a year, I will have an associates degree in science and business. If I by chance get into the program, I will spend the next 2 years in the program full time. I am just a little worried that the market is saturated in California. I am worried that even though the school is excellent, employers will want more experience or a Bachelors degree. I have been hearing lately that things will move away from invasive CT scans and more into DMS. This makes sense to me because CT scans are damaging and expensive. I think the technology will change in time and DMS will grow. I just wanted to get some input. I am very scaired of taking the 2 years out of my life and not have a job in the end. My cousin who lives in NY, went to one of those rip off, unaccredited, trade schools. She ended up getting hired on from the place she did her internship and now she is studying to take her ARMDS exam. She is making around 30 and hour also. She is one who really lucked out. She also had no prior schooling besides high school and not a lot of prior work experience besides working at a spa. Not sure how she did it. I can only hope to have a little of that luck

People are gonna say all kinds of things. Everyone is afraid of not getting a job.

Let me say this. Just because you go to school for anything like business or ultrasound or any other thing... you are NEVER GUARANTEED a job. What you will have is a skill and eventually you will find something. People expect jobs right away, and maybe before it was like that.. nowadays it is not.

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kmhbeauty in Murrieta, California

20 months ago

Yeah I do agree. I was thinking about it and really everything is saturated because the state of the economy. Every career nowadays is going to want experience first because of the way times have changed with the economy. There just is not the jobs in really anything. Hopefully things get better but I believe its going to be a long road ahead. I remember 10 years ago when I would pick a place I wanted to work, walked in, if they were hiring, I got the job! The good old days!

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Roger in Oakland, California

20 months ago

kmhbeauty in Murrieta, California said: Yeah I do agree. I was thinking about it and really everything is saturated because the state of the economy. Every career nowadays is going to want experience first because of the way times have changed with the economy. There just is not the jobs in really anything. Hopefully things get better but I believe its going to be a long road ahead. I remember 10 years ago when I would pick a place I wanted to work, walked in, if they were hiring, I got the job! The good old days!

I said in another post, things change. If you have everything taken cared of (school, registry) even working for a staffing agency or registry, you will gain experience, but eventually, you will find something. I know people who are not putting in effort and expect things to fall in their lap.. it doesnt happen like that anymore.

You might even catch a break. Some places dont mind training someone "their" protocol and want someone new they can build from the ground up. Dont let these small obstacles deter you from learning a good skill.

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Hobo2012 in California

20 months ago

kmhbeauty in Murrieta, California said: Yeah, that is a good point! I keep thinking if my cousin did it, with all odds against her, in a saturated location, then I can do it. I think Im going to go for it no matter what! Thanks for the advice!

If this is your dream go for it. If you're old then I would skip it and keep the money in your pocket. Loma Linda is one of the pricey ones at 30k a year + everything else you have to buy and drive and gas and your current job you have to give up.
$30 an hour isn't that much take that subtract 25-50 percent for taxes. Then you will probably start as part time. Then you have to pay whatever else you pay. It's not easy to save 30 k. Then, you may not be able to live where you want. You will have to move where the jobs are.

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