Tips for unit secretary interviews.

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Do you have any tips to help prepare for an upcoming unit secretary interview?

Are there common interview questions that come up again and again?

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amanda in Louisville, Kentucky

91 months ago

usually you need to have knowledge of cna work or medical termonology

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ladychijo@yahoo.com in Jefferson, Georgia

64 months ago

amanda in Louisville, Kentucky said: usually you need to have knowledge of cna work or medical termonology

You do not have to know a CNA's work but it would would help tremendously to know medical termiolgy, you will have to know how to transcribe.

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Tammy in Detroit, Michigan

38 months ago

Medical Administrative Assisting and Healthcare Management are good course you should take, but medical office experience is what you should do to get the experience. They only require you to have worked at least 3to 5years in a medical office setting. You must know medical terminology for this position if you want to survive in that field.

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cackyjack52 in Dongola, Illinois

38 months ago

ladychijo@yahoo.com in Jefferson, Georgia said: You do not have to know a CNA's work but it would would help tremendously to know medical termiolgy, you will have to know how to transcribe.

A lot of the hospitals in my area require you to have a CNA license for this position, or you must be enrolled in a Nursing Assistant course. They combine the two, and make it one position, Unit Secretary/CNA. Medical Terminology is not always required, but it is preferred, and it helps if you have some experience. I had to take the class to get my Office Assistant Certificate, but experience working as a Medical Records Clerk was the best teacher. In my area, Unit Secretary's/Ward Clerks do not transcribe. You do enter all the patients required information into a database, such as physician orders, or prescriptions but it's typed, not transcribed. You actually have to have a degree to be a Medical Transcriptionist. Transcribing physicians dictated reports from a dictaphone into a database is a big responsibility, and there is no room for error. A report that has just even one typo can read differently, and have dire consequences for all those involved. My favorite thing about this career of choice is, a lot of companies have work from home positions if you choose, and the pay is good.

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