Are urban planner job opportunities growing or declining?

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Are jobs in this industry on the rise? Are there any sub-sectors that are growing?

Where are the jobs? Which places have the most urban planner opportunities?

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Joe Evans in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

76 months ago

I'm glad all is well on the west coast. Things here in Michigan and the midwest in general are at a standstill. The profession is growing generally, but seems to be limited to certain geographical regions due to a poor economy.

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M in Rockville, Maryland

75 months ago

Entry-level jobs are definitely hard to come buy. I graduated from my Masters program in May and still do not have a job. It's definitely not looking good. I heard that in the Washington, DC area in particular it is diffcult to break into the profession. The few people I know who do have a planning job are all out west.

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needsuggestion in Modesto, California

68 months ago

Has anyone taken LEED GA exam? What kind of questions do they ask? Please let me know which books to study. Thanks

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DB2 in San Francisco, California

58 months ago

Eddie Benote in Seattle, Washington said: This job field is growning fast. New requirements by cities and agencies to be certified or go through a formal program place the market in a high growth area for the next 30 years (so says the department of labor and my professors).

The field will be expanding not only due to the increased growth in cities; transforming exsisting space, finding ways to reform cities, need to "green" the cities, deacreased space for increased people, etc., but also because land is shrinking, coastlines will lose approximately 10,000 ft. over then next 20 years moving people back and needed to find places to go or redesign the exsiting space to hold the move.

I am specializing in Disaster & Hazard Mitigation and getting my CAD certificate. I will also be getting the LEEDS certificate, authorizing me to plan for and help design Green Spaces and Buildings.

This was posted 33 months ago-- what a difference 33 months makes! Urban planning jobs are now scarce and seem to be getting scarcer. This is mostly because of continuing troubles in the real estate market (without projects being proposed, there's no need for planners) and fiscal problems at public agencies (keep in mind it can take years for tax revenues to filter down to the local level-- in many places, the full force of the recession is only beginning to be felt by local governments).

If there's federal funding, the job prospects are slightly better for urban planners. Most of the federal projects involve transportation, so these jobs tend to be limited to transportation planning or environmental planning, and most of the positions are at large engineering firms.

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SQ in Ann Arbor, Michigan

58 months ago

The field for urban planners is looking bleak to say the least. There are hardly ANY new job openings in a given day so what does that mean for the thousands of students coming out of grad school with a masters in urban planning? Not good news to say the least!

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Bill999 in Whitby, Ontario

51 months ago

I cant speak for the U.S, but things are Canada seem slow. I have a bachelor's degree in Geography and a diploma as a Planning Technician. This taught me about all the legislation, application process and urban design. In retrospect, I would have switched my major to Planning in university.

I find that Planning is an industry that relies heavily on networking. It won’t be so easy as to submit a resume in some municipal database, sit back and wait for the phone to ring. It can happen, but I wouldn't bank on it. I remember meeting with a planner from the city of Toronto and he said that for a given entry-level position, they can get up to 500 resume’s from all over the world! Eek !

I started cold-calling private firms and managed to talk my way into an interview for an opening that was posted. They liked my drive and enthusiasm, and I got the job. The setting was just me and one of the associates in an office. He was not very good at giving direction and not very approachable, which made for a very tense atmosphere. In fairness to him, I was lost from day 1 which was understandably frustrating. After 2 months they let me go citing that I wasn't getting the scope of what I was doing and that's something that would only come with a year or two of municipal experience under my belt.

So in order to get an entry-level position you need experience, or to know someone. As evidenced above, cold-calling works but is also tiring hard work. I feel I now have all the required experience and education and it’s a matter of timing and seizing any opportunities presented. I learned from my past experience and will apply it to the future job I get. As far as networking goes, planners are actually very spoiled because planners are available to the public; especially ones working for municipalities. Attend public notice meetings and say hello.

Another piece of advice I’ve gotten was you have to look outside of your backyard. Even if you’re offered a planning position in Fa

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Mike in Plainfield, New Jersey

51 months ago

I was thinking about going for an education in urban planning but now I don't know. I'm in my second year of school right now and it would most likely take me another 5 years before I graduated with my masters. Will it pick back up by then? This profession can't just be dead, can it?

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Duane in Grand Prairie, Texas

49 months ago

I wouldn't recommend the field to anyone at this time, because of the glut of new graduates without jobs in the field. IMO, the growth of the field is not going to be enough over the next 10 years to warrant the investment of time and money into a degree with questionable returns.

BUT if you are convinced you want to be an urban planner, do a lot of research into the school you choose. Make sure you will graduate with solid technical skills, research capabilities, and a decent portfolio for the rare occasion you actually get an interview.

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Jason in Etobicoke, Ontario

49 months ago

I absolutely do NOT recommend anybody to go into this profession right now. Entry level planning jobs are extremely hard to find in North America, at this particular time. Most jobs are with municipalities so the private sector is pretty much a no-go. Planning staff in many places are being cut down due to the economy so not much new hiring is going on, and many planners seem to not want to retire and stay in their jobs for decades.

From my experience there is a glut of boomers who occupy most of the senior and intermediate level planning jobs, and they have still yet to retire. Perhaps in 10 years this will change. But right now you have thousands of students across North American graduating with bachelor's and master's in urban planning that are finding absolutely no jobs out there. I have a master's in urban planning from a good university and 2 very solid internships yet I have not even received an interview in anything related to planning since I've graduated. Luckily I have some other skills in IT and computer programming that are earning me money. I regret ever having wasted my time and money on such a useless degree, in hindsight I would have been much better off in an environmental science/engineering related program or something to do with computer science.

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Mike in London, United Kingdom

48 months ago

I would like to say it's better in the UK but it isn't, the recovery hasn't really happened in the building sector, and the local government is getting prepared for a lot of job losses due to the country's debt.

I am on a masters degree but luckily the government are paying for it. I used to work in transportation planning so I might try returning to that. It's not great to hear that it isn't any better in the U.S. or Canada. It's going to be all about being creative!

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tony in Toronto, Ontario

48 months ago

"Mike in London, United Kingdom"

Wow ...the government is paying for your masters???. Must be nice

Wow ..ultra welfare state. People who work with governments get a lot

I've recently heard that one one towns near us here that somehow payed for their Assistant Town Clerk or the some similar field...for his MBA...it was leaked to the media...and the **** sure hit the fan. Its great to have a boss that would pull string for you

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Mike Ar in London, United Kingdom

48 months ago

Yep it was a lucky freebie although it will only be as good as the job that (hopefully) comes from it. My subsidised course is definitely the exception not the rule. Course fees in the UK have been trebled twice in the last 6 years because the government have realised that they can't keep the system affordable.

In terms of my sector the government identified a skills shortage in planning, so enticed people into it with the payment. It was the same with the teaching profession too. However I think those days are quickly coming to an end.

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Jude84 in Houston, Texas

45 months ago

Why is the US BLS and every other Labor report gushing about the Urban Planning sector and it's prospects?

Everytime I read about Urban Planners in NewsWeek or Forbes, it's always positive, but everytime I speak to planners, they see the market is dead.

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Karl in Fort Myers, Florida

45 months ago

I ended up with a masters in real estate development/urban planning after dropping out of law school, I've been on the job hunt for about a year now with no luck, theres a new glut of graduates hitting the job market and I'm worried that I've already forgotten what little they actually taught me (mostly spreadsheets and statistical analysis).

It seemed like a promising field at the time, but to be honest I'm a little disenchanted and am not sure I should keep beating a dead horse. I haven't had an interview since January and now have trouble finding leads. I do occassionally see a job posted that I have already applied to but other than that nothing.

Does anyone have any suggestions? Apart from the major job boards, my school career page, and government agencies where else should I be looking? What geographic locations are in need of planners?.

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LANDY@ UGA in Clarkston, Georgia

44 months ago

Jason in Etobicoke, Ontario said: I absolutely do NOT recommend anybody to go into this profession right now. Entry level planning jobs are extremely hard to find in North America, at this particular time. Most jobs are with municipalities so the private sector is pretty much a no-go. Planning staff in many places are being cut down due to the economy so not much new hiring is going on, and many planners seem to not want to retire and stay in their jobs for decades.

From my experience there is a glut of boomers who occupy most of the senior and intermediate level planning jobs, and they have still yet to retire. Perhaps in 10 years this will change. But right now you have thousands of students across North American graduating with bachelor's and master's in urban planning that are finding absolutely no jobs out there. I have a master's in urban planning from a good university and 2 very solid internships yet I have not even received an interview in anything related to planning since I've graduated. Luckily I have some other skills in IT and computer programming that are earning me money. I regret ever having wasted my time and money on such a useless degree, in hindsight I would have been much better off in an environmental science/engineering related program or something to do with computer science.


This is the answer i've been searching for all day! I thought I would get a masters in environmental planning after college b/c my undergrad degree is Landscape architecture. I thought having this masters would better my chances at getting a job. What am I to do in an economy like this?

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SQ in Gilroy, California

44 months ago

Jason in Etobicoke, Ontario said: I absolutely do NOT recommend anybody to go into this profession right now. Entry level planning jobs are extremely hard to find in North America, at this particular time. Most jobs are with municipalities so the private sector is pretty much a no-go. Planning staff in many places are being cut down due to the economy so not much new hiring is going on, and many planners seem to not want to retire and stay in their jobs for decades.

From my experience there is a glut of boomers who occupy most of the senior and intermediate level planning jobs, and they have still yet to retire. Perhaps in 10 years this will change. But right now you have thousands of students across North American graduating with bachelor's and master's in urban planning that are finding absolutely no jobs out there. I have a master's in urban planning from a good university and 2 very solid internships yet I have not even received an interview in anything related to planning since I've graduated. Luckily I have some other skills in IT and computer programming that are earning me money. I regret ever having wasted my time and money on such a useless degree, in hindsight I would have been much better off in an environmental science/engineering related program or something to do with computer science.

Wow....I couldn't agree with you more. Perfect description of the state of urban planning jobs.

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Manoverder84 in Houston, Texas

44 months ago

SQ in Gilroy, California said: Wow....I couldn't agree with you more. Perfect description of the state of urban planning jobs.

I really the situation is not that bad. I was just accepted into both an MCP (Masters in City Planning) at a good school and a MPA (Masters in Public Administration) also at a good school. Should I just take the MPA offer and forget about city Planning?

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SQ in Gilroy, California

44 months ago

To be brutally honest with you, both of those degrees are basically a huge waste of time. If you want to be a bureaucratic paper pusher for the rest of your life, then maybe the MPA or MCP are for you. But you want to learn useful, critical skills that are and will be in demand when you graduate, go into a science based program like statistics, computer science, or engineering. I made the mistake of getting my masters in urban planning from a very reputable university and it hasn't gotten me anywhere.

Moreover, anyone with half a brain can do what people with planning degrees and MPA degrees do. It's a fallacy and a shame to think that you need an undergrad degree and a masters to do that kind of grunt work. Choose a science based program that you're interested. It'll be a heck of a lot more challenging but worth it in the long run. If you like planning, then you might be interested in transportation engineering for example. There are a few schools that have masters programs in transportation engineering in which you don't need a bachelors in the same field. Send me your email if you could like to discuss this some further.

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SQ in Gilroy, California

44 months ago

Manoverder84 in Houston, Texas said: I really the situation is not that bad. I was just accepted into both an MCP (Masters in City Planning) at a good school and a MPA (Masters in Public Administration) also at a good school. Should I just take the MPA offer and forget about city Planning?

To be brutally honest with you, both of those degrees are basically a waste of time. If you want to be a bureaucratic paper pusher for the rest of your life, then maybe the MPA or MCP are for you. But you want to learn useful, critical skills that are and will be in demand when you graduate, go into a science based program like statistics, computer science, or engineering. I made the mistake of getting my masters in urban planning from a very reputable university and it hasn't gotten me anywhere.

Moreover, anyone with half a brain can do what people with planning degrees and MPA degrees do. It's a fallacy and a shame to think that you need an undergrad degree and a masters to do that kind of work. Choose a science based program that you're interested. It'll be a heck of a lot more challenging but worth it in the long run. If you like planning, then you might be interested in transportation engineering for example. There are a few schools have masters programs in transportation engineering and you need a bachelors in the same field. Send me your email if you could like to discuss this some more.

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Manoverder84 in Houston, Texas

44 months ago

Hi thanks so much for the advice. my email is cantino.james@yahoo.com

I was also accepted into an Environmental Studies program at a top school. I was going to focus in Environmental Planning, but there was also the option to concentrate in a more science based major; straight environmental science. I would learn everything from environmental chemistry to geology. The only downside is financial aid is pitiful and I would be in some serious debt, which is why I chose to not defer.

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DB2 in Fort Knox, Kentucky

44 months ago

It's a tough time to be a planner but there are jobs out there. Two months after I wrote the post above, I found work. It's an unusual position but it pays very well (and it's federally funded).

SQ, there's some truth to what you say but there are certain skills associated with urban planning that require diverse skills. The "paper pusher" jobs, for instance, often require

- technical writing skills
- attention to detail
- presentation skills
- the ability to deal with a huge amount of stress
- the ability to juggle a lot of different jobs at once, i.e. project management skills
- an understanding of land use law at a local, state and federal level
- an understanding of environmental criteria used for EIRs etc

If a planner can do well in all these areas, he or she will do well in the profession. If a planner sees his entire role as a "paper pusher" or "grunt worker" and is bitter about it, he probably be stuck in one place or might never even make it into the profession in the current environment.

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PlansforPlanning in San Diego, California

42 months ago

It is really difficult out in this economy right now and if the government defaults there will be no chance. I would not look at this occupation as a "pencil pusher" job. Cities are struggling right now for sure, and "baby boomers" are being retired at a faster rate, especially people with high salaries.

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kboyd9 in Columbus, Ohio

42 months ago

I graduated in March of 2011 with a Masters degree in City and Regional Planning from The Ohio State University. Currently, I am working to obtain a Certificate in GIS at Columbus State Community College. What advise can any of you give on where or what strategies to use to find a planning job. Thanks.

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ykazal in Singapore, Singapore

42 months ago

The job market for urban planner is declining in all over the world and it will stay so at least for the next 10 years. So just forget to be an urban planner, go find another degree such as in business or economics. Or be a medical doctor. The world situation is depressing!!

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Mike in London in Newport, United Kingdom

42 months ago

I have posted to this wall before. I have just got a local government planning job in the UK. It is on quite low pay but was fiercely competitive due to the lack of jobs out here. I kept persevering and got something just when I was thinking of having to do something different.

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PC EH in Bristol, United Kingdom

42 months ago

ykazal in Singapore, Singapore said: The job market for urban planner is declining in all over the world and it will stay so at least for the next 10 years. So just forget to be an urban planner, go find another degree such as in business or economics. Or be a medical doctor. The world situation is depressing!!

Are you a graduate from urban planning and net yet being able to secure a job in this field in singapore?

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Mike in Toronto, Ontario

42 months ago

Having observed numerous planners during the practical component of my program, I realize they live a dull, monotonous existence that is only momentarily interrupted by the perpetual meetings and coffee breaks they miserably slink off to.

Every once in a while when they get around to hiring somebody new, the young planner is brought in like a lamb to slaughter, injecting energy and youthful exuberance into the office, to which his colleagues shake their heads in a knowing manner.

Perplexed, the young planner is undeterred. He laughs and rollicks, unaware of his impending doom. Days go by, then weeks, months. Years. By now some of the life energy has left our not-so-young friend. His belly has started protruding from the menial lifestyle and cheap coffee. His hairline has started a strategic retreat on its way to losing the war.

Soon his eyes glaze over and he begins to coast through meetings and site visits. He gets married and takes his wife to town halls. More years pass by, and they have a child. When his daughter reaches school age and asks for a Wii, he instead gives her a book by Jane Jacobs. He realizes now he is trapped, of course, but it is too late. He has become a planning zombie. True to his zombie nature, he visits high schools and colleges and tells young impressionable minds that urban planning is the career of the future.

Soon his office hires a young graduate, fresh out of school and full of youthful optimism. The graduate cracks jokes and speaks about his expectations for the future, to which his colleagues shake their heads in a knowing manner. Perplexed the young planner is undeterred....

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Bubba in Kitchener, Ontario

41 months ago

@Mike in Toronto..
You're already feeling that jaded? and you're just finishing school? Maybe urban planning wasnt for you!! You should of gone into engineering or became a doctor
@ 4 years you must of enjoyed it...why else did you stuck around????

My non planning degree gave me nothing was heartache and hardly seen a decent satisfying job, but I like what I was studying or else I would of fled the program early on...that I now know.
...Planning which I was thinking about, because I have a another related diploma..but no way now in this climate, competing with you guys

You have to look to other areas where you can transfer your skills.

What about people that went into visually related arts (I know...engineers just wouldn't understand) , and cant, couldn't find a decent job to save their life....especially when technology and software keeps changing every 6 months

Had a friend who graduated with a masters in social work 8 years ago and couldn't find a job anywhere. Happens in other fields too.
young ans should thank your luck stars! Guests at your high school that talked about a specific careers, guidance Councillors who actually gave some career counseling???, cushy, lucky. And yes I went to a Toronto high school. I guess some schools already thought that some students knew what they wanted to do ...without asking or giving advise.

Remember that everyone and their cat has a degree these days. Comments are not geared towards Engineers and technical people. Most of the technical people *itching should of gotten into Civil engineering...dah!!

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Babak in Vancouver, British Columbia

40 months ago

The planning market in Canada is not the best it could be, but jobs do come by.
I actually got a job offer a couple of months ago from a small town in AB, and had to turn it down due my thesis work not being finished yet, and the pay wasn't as good as I wanted.
It seems that a lot of people apply for jobs in the big cities, and not everyone can or wants to move to a small town in Canada with less than 10000 people living there.
If you can change your lifestyle for a few years and stick it with small town folks, then maybe you should apply for those positions instead of big cities like Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.
I also feel that the planning professionals are pretty much all 'established' and not much diversity of ethnicity and cultures so far in my knowledge. I also think that my name does not help me get noticed by people who check my application, or maybe I'm being paranoid!

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shruti in New Delhi, India

40 months ago

Jason in Etobicoke, Ontario said: I absolutely do NOT recommend anybody to go into this profession right now. Entry level planning jobs are extremely hard to find in North America, at this particular time. Most jobs are with municipalities so the private sector is pretty much a no-go. Planning staff in many places are being cut down due to the economy so not much new hiring is going on, and many planners seem to not want to retire and stay in their jobs for decades.

From my experience there is a glut of boomers who occupy most of the senior and intermediate level planning jobs, and they have still yet to retire. Perhaps in 10 years this will change. But right now you have thousands of students across North American graduating with bachelor's and master's in urban planning that are finding absolutely no jobs out there. I have a master's in urban planning from a good university and 2 very solid internships yet I have not even received an interview in anything related to planning since I've graduated. Luckily I have some other skills in IT and computer programming that are earning me money. I regret ever having wasted my time and money on such a useless degree, in hindsight I would have been much better off in an environmental science/engineering related program or something to do with computer science.

hey: i am graduating in geography.. last year. and am keen to get into this field. so considering the current scenario, should i go ahead into this field.

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not joking in Gatineau, Quebec

40 months ago

Wow...lots of cynics. I'm a non-planner, but I actually like urban planning issues very much. I'm a regular participant of the Jane Jacobs Walk in Ottawa (Canada), and subscriber to Spacing Magazine.

As much as I like it, 8 years ago, I decided to do a Masters of Public Administration (MPA), did my dissertation on an urban policy related area, and somehow, landed a Federal Government Policy Analyst position 8 months before I even graduated.

At the time I felt on top of the world. Loved the program and landed what was suppose to be a "dream job" as a policy analyst in the highest level of Government.

Its been 6 years, and I am extremely bored. Its not that I don't have enough to do, I'm actually busier than ever. I worked in the private sector for 4 years before... despite public perception, my colleagues and I here work a lot harder than I ever did in the private sector (a tech firm and at a major Canadian bank).

What I'm complaining about is that the actual work is boring me. Federal government doesn't do anything I'm interested in. Its getting to the point where I'm not interested in doing what I do.

Since I already have a Masters, I wouldn't want to spent more than 1 year studying, therefore I'm thinking of applying to a one-year Urban Planning Masters degree in Australia. The program is recognized by the Planning Institute of Australia.

I'm thinking of doing this in a few years once my finances are in order. That is, I don't want to take out a loan, I wanna pay the tuition and cost of living in full.

However, based on the comments I've seen on this particular forum... you guys must think I'm crazy!

Am I being silly? Stupid? Or just plain crazy?

(In case your wondering, the Government Pension I get alone is no longer enough of an incentive for me to stay. Unless of course, they double my salary over night, which ain't gonna happen. Nearly all my friends in the Public Service are starting to feel this way).

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DB2 from Above in Jakarta, Indonesia

40 months ago

not joking, i think you are not being silly, but you need to consider what kind of planning you want to do-- I read the first part of your post and thought "wow, that pretty much is how I felt after awhile working for government." I have come to learn that I can feel that way about any job... so maybe it's me. But the things you describe about government apply to planning jobs in government too. I mean, you are not really in control of what kinds of projects you are reviewing or processing or writing reports about or presenting. A LOT of planners get disillusioned by this because you basically need to let go of your idealism. There's a thankless aspect to it, too. There are other options with planning of course.

Add to that the bleak economic picture and you might want to, I don't know, combine your degree with something more marketable.

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not joking in Montreal, Quebec

40 months ago

Its easier said than done, but I'm trying to establish, the source of my discontent. Part of it is the work. People are incredibly friendly, but there is a culture of complacency in improving work environment... Utilizing technologies. Maybe its the baby boomer syndrome.

Room for innovation is narrow in any public organizations, but cities in general appear to provide more room for this... Especially in the west coast, which leads me to another point, mobility.

the longer I'm in my department or the feds, the more I'm type casted into the policy I work in, which is federal issues. This means more,and more, I'm stuck in Ottawa, the capital.

City policy making and urban planning is more mobile. So I'm not stuck in one city, province or even country.

My interest is urban and regional transport planning. This includes sustainable city building, mixed use communities that promote walking, transit and cycling.

even tho I'm not in an urban planning type of work, I'm hoping I can use the policy and public sector management experience, as a competitive advantage over fresh MUP graduates.

The fact I understand the machinery of public organizations, government procurement etc... would put me in better position, at least in terms of government work.

How this translate into job market is difficult to measure.

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Bubba in Toronto, Ontario

40 months ago

sorry i'm rolling my eyes...
"Jane Jacobs Walk in Ottawa (Canada), and subscriber to Spacing Magazine". I think every man on the street now in Canada now want to a planner because of this.

Spacing magazine gets on my nerves. When did these douche bags some become planning authority/ planners. None of them probably dont even have a related planning degree

As someone earlier said about the planning area...anyone can do planning...well it seems spacing magazine thinks so

hey they are called city jobs!!!!. Did you look into them before you applied to the Federal government. Urban policy...city...sorta make sense.

I have a College Public Admin Diploma (city focus)...at the masters level it all becomes down to drawing up reports on policy!!...I was afraid of getting into Public Admin/ Urban Planning/ Urban studies/ because I didn't want to sit in a gray government cubicle writing essays. I have an undergrad in Communications/ Art. Its the same in local government, ...boomers that dont/ wont be leaving any time soon!!!

stupid probably ...about the the Australia planning Masters/degreee
I thought about Australia option...but Australia ...is another planet, when compared to Canada/US.

How does their credentials translate over here. I looked into doing it online. There like in England a university degree can be had is 3 measly years....in Ontario all you can get is a college Diploma with 3 years.

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Bubba in Toronto, Ontario

40 months ago

@not joking

In Canada and the United Stated...planning rarely concerns the Federal level. Especially in Canada all the Feds do is Provincial tranfers...transfer the money to the provinces. I'm guessing its similar with states too.

Planning is a local/region/issue with money and policies and guidelines and more like "interference" from provinces.

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not joking in Woodbridge, Ontario

39 months ago

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: sorry i'm rolling my eyes... I think every man on the street now in Canada now want to a planner because of this.

Thanks for the helpful advice *tongue in cheek

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: I have a College Public Admin Diploma (city focus)...at the masters level it all becomes down to drawing up reports on policy!!.

I'm rolling my eyes too. You mentioned that your Diploma gave you nothing but heartache, and that you can't find a job. I wish you the best of luck in finding a job.

Just offering you the same helpful advice you gave me. In what world, do you think a COMMUNITY COLLEGE DIPLOMA can compete with a MASTERS DEGREE? Their are like a stratosphere apart!

I'm sorry, but I gotta be honest with you, the fact you think the ONLY difference between a Diploma and a Masters of Public Admin is that we "draw up reports on policy" demonstrates the extent of your knowledge.

Having worked several years in the Federal Government, I'll tell you that a Masters degree is the minimum requirement for any entry level Policy Analyst position. Your diploma won't get you anywhere, cause your simply not qualified.

During my Masters, I had the opportunity to teach Public Admin Diploma students at Humber College. Let me tell you, the quality of the co-hort was poor. No way in hell will these kids EVER work in a Real Policy environment. They had no research skills, and many didn't even have the basic knowledge of Government machinery

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not joking in Woodbridge, Ontario

39 months ago

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: stupid probably ...about the the Australia planning Masters/degreee. How does their credentials translate over here

All Australian University planning programs that is recognized by the Planning Institute of Australia (PIA) is automatically recognized for credentials by the Canadian Institute of PLanners (CIP).

CIP is the official credential recognition body in Canada. Guess I'm not stupid afterall, just a little crazy, eh Bubba ;)

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: In Canada and the United Stated...planning rarely concerns the Federal level.

You are correct to an extent. The Federal Government has jurisdiction over the Ottawa-Gatineau Region, because its a region that crosses Provincial lines.

So the Fed's have the same power over Ottawa as the Ontario Government has over Toronto. They have Policy and Urban Planning positions with the National Capital Commission, a Crown Corporation (runs like a private company, which might be good for me, given how jaded I am with the Government Bureaucracy)

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Zee in Brisbane, Australia

38 months ago

The general situation for Planning in Australia is actually ok. There are numerous jobs here with the mining industry booming and if you have experience in engineering you will find a job very easily. I have just finished my Urban and Regional Planning degree and have an offers already, especially in regional Queensland. Good luck!

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not joking in Toronto, Ontario

38 months ago

Thanks for the helpful comments zee, I underdogs that plenty of, jobs are available in Australia

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Bubba in Toronto, Ontario

38 months ago

@Joking You asked question I answered it!. Like degrees MAs in Canada/ U.S, blowing in the wind, seems you can pick em off the trees when ma and pa will pay the ridiculous fees.

Please stop rephrasing my ideas in to what you want them to be.
You conveniently left out the part where I said I already have a degree from years ago when a degree meant something. When I originally graduated it was hard to find a job it usually is for any arts related program. check out the history/ english graduates.

I said I did not want to work in a GRAY CUBICLE writing essays for the federal government. I never compared a College diploma with a Masters.DOWN BOY!!!...stay!

Im not like most of the young people funneling into Toronto escaping their "small white town/cities" (new planning term), I am from here, and In ontario we know there is a huge difference between a College Diploma and a MA so stop being bitchy.or head to Abercrombie/fitch and do some shopping to cool off.

I never compared my diploma to your high and mighty MA. I'm creative, I couldn't last a day in a grey federal cubicle. I'm over educated even by Canadian Standards

Usually at the MA level in Public Admin that's what it research reports and more reports. Did you work on any anything GIS, paper map maps, plan or anything visual at your job, did you map out areas, do charretts, probably not I'm guessing.

JK that you think education is everything, take that nose out of the air!, and start working on you PHd..Did you hear the one about the hight school graduates who is millionaire....many baby boomers...most of them dont have degrees!

I never trusted colleges because of exactly what you said...THEY EMPLOY PEOPLE LIKE YOU AS T.E.A.C.H..E.RS WITHOUT ENOUGH EXPERIENCE. U just got out of school, worked a few years and you are already teaching
...PS..they are suppose to have a degree before they can get in.
still roll my eyes every time the dudes from SPACING magazine show up on very effing panel

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Bubba in Toronto, Ontario

38 months ago

Just saying Australia is just not for me...its another world. I have my issues with Australia. If I wanted the Uk I would go there, not one in 3 days away trying to be a hybrid Canada/U.S. I wold probably like the nature, and the Aborigines. No need for Sidney, Just visit Toronto/Chicago then Boston or Halifax in a day or two...takes less time too

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not joking in Ottawa, Ontario

38 months ago

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: You conveniently left out the part where I said I already have a degree from years ago when a degree meant something. When I originally graduated it was hard to find a job it usually is for any arts related program. check out the history/ english graduates.

@ Bubba: I see you point regarding your undergrad… yet, considering the number of people holding a Masters degree or higher in Canada represents only 3% of all Canadians that hold a University degree, your making a HUGE assumption that a Masters isn’t worth as much as before.

So you have ONE anecdotal example of a MA holder that cant find a job. If we’re gonna go with one-off examples, I know retired people, that have MA’s that struggled in the 1960s to find a job, so what? And stop blaming your degree for your past failures. It’s embarrassing. If we’re gonna use anecdotal evidence here, I know plenty of successful English Majors that do well.

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: I’m not like most of the young people funneling into Toronto escaping their "small white town/cities" (new planning term), I am from here, and In ontario we know there is a huge difference between a College Diploma and a MA so stop being bitchy.or head to Abercrombie/fitch and do some shopping to cool off.

ANOTHER HUGE ASSUMPTION. 1) I’m not WHITE. Not an ounce of my DNA is white. My parents are from the Caribbean. I’m not gonna bother explaining my race to you, I owe you nothing. Just because I can put together an argument better than you, doesn’t make me a spoiled Suburban white boy.

2) I spent most my upbringing in Toronto. This ain’t New York, or Shanghai, or London we’re talking about. It’s a city were the majority of residents still own a car. It’s a City that has been largely immune from the most economic down-turn. Stop playing the victim card.

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: Usually at the MA level in Public Admin that's what it research

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not joking in Ottawa, Ontario

38 months ago

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: You conveniently left out the part where I said I already have a degree from years ago when a degree meant something. When I originally graduated it was hard to find a job it usually is for any arts related program. check out the history/ english graduates.

@ Bubba: I see you point regarding your undergrad… yet, considering the number of people holding a Masters degree or higher in Canada represents only 3% of all Canadians that hold a University degree, your making a HUGE assumption that a Masters isn’t worth as much as before.

So you have ONE anecdotal example of a MA holder that cant find a job. If we’re gonna go with one-off examples, I know retired people, that have MA’s that struggled in the 1960s to find a job, so what? And stop blaming your degree for your past failures. It’s embarrassing. If we’re gonna use anecdotal evidence here, I know plenty of successful English Majors that do well.

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: I’m not like most of the young people funneling into Toronto escaping their "small white town/cities" (new planning term), I am from here, and In ontario we know there is a huge difference between a College Diploma and a MA so stop being bitchy.or head to Abercrombie/fitch and do some shopping to cool off.

ANOTHER HUGE ASSUMPTION. 1) I’m not WHITE. Not an ounce of my DNA is white. My parents are from the Caribbean. I’m not gonna bother explaining my race to you, I owe you nothing. Just because I can put together an argument better than you, doesn’t make me a spoiled Suburban white boy.

2) I spent most my upbringing in Toronto. This ain’t New York, or Shanghai, or London we’re talking about. It’s a city were the majority of residents still own a car. It’s a City that has been largely immune from the most economic down-turn. Stop playing the victim card.

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: Usually at the MA level in Public Admin that's what it research

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not joking in Ottawa, Ontario

38 months ago

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: Usually at the MA level in Public Admin that's what it research reports and more reports.

An MA aint no glorified Undergrad. You cant just quote a few big name philosophers and be done with it. Its called Empirical research, as in primary research. Most MA’s, even HISTORY majors are comfortable with Statistical Analysis, something that’s important, even in the urban planning world. That’s the difference between an undergrad and an MA. Empirical research implies getting your arms dirty and going into the field, not sitting in an office “researching”. It also implies some degree of advanced statistical analysis.

Again, your beliefs, does not = reality.

Your dismissive tone implies somebody who would never make it at an MA level, even if they tried. I don’t know a single MA holder that does not value the experience they gained in the real world. Obviously, those that don’t make it, would be dismissive about it to justify their own failures in life.

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: Did you hear the one about the hight school graduates who is millionaire....many baby boomers...most of them dont have degrees!

Yes, I heard about Gates and Zuckerberg. University drop-outs that became one of the most successful minds of our generation. Yet, these individuals accomplished more than me or you can ever dream of. For the rest of us, Education is #1. When you launched the next Facebook or Microsoft, come back and tell me how little education is worth.

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: I never trusted colleges because of exactly what you said...THEY EMPLOY PEOPLE LIKE YOU AS T.E.A.C.H..E.RS WITHOUT ENOUGH EXPERIENCE.

I was a TA at a College affiliated with a University (Guelph-Humber), I never taught. A professor with 10 years of education and 17 years of experience did the teaching. I just did the grading, and led tutorials. In other words, I turned his jargon-laded lecture in

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not joking in Ottawa, Ontario

38 months ago

Bubba in Toronto, Ontario said: I never trusted colleges because of exactly what you said...THEY EMPLOY PEOPLE LIKE YOU AS T.E.A.C.H..E.RS WITHOUT ENOUGH EXPERIENCE.

I was a TA at a College affiliated with a University (Guelph-Humber), I never taught. A professor with 10 years of education and 17 years of experience did the teaching. I just did the grading, and led tutorials. In other words, I turned his jargon-laded lecture into plain English for confused Undergrads. Make no mistake, if I had 20 years experience teaching the same thing over and over, I’d either be too jaded to care about the students, or too embedded into my field to speak in plain English.

That’s why they want “fresh blood” to conduct tutorials. We’re suppose to create a less intimidating learning environment from students. Students like to think that the TA is somebody they can approach, as opposed to a grumpy old PhD. Some TA’s do it better than others, some are just god awful, considering the feed back I had, its safe to say I did a good job.

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TDG in Montreal, Quebec

38 months ago

I don't understand what the huge issues are with finding work in Urban Planning, it's certainly there if you want it (as far as Ontario is concerned). I would highly recommend that anyone who doesn't already have a degree (or someone who is in the process of getting one) look for Student summer jobs in the Urban Planning field, Ontario gets about 5-10 openings per year, they tend to hire right out of the chute (meaning after first year) their ultimate goal being by the time you're working there for your last summer they're getting an Urban Planner on the cheap. I'll admit I lucked out in getting one, but I'm not connected, didn't even come from the town that I got hired to work for, all I got was an interview just like several other applicants. It's all about savvy and dealing with people, if they see you're personable and professional and you know a little about Planning and are enthusiastic, you'll have no problems getting a job like this. The vast majority of entry level jobs in Ontario for Planning require a Bachelor's degree minimum and experience in the field, without the experience you are hopeless even if you have a Masters, and I sense that's where many of these complaints are coming from. I feel badly for those who are past the schooling stage because it WILL be difficult to get experience, for those in the process of getting their degrees, LOOK FOR THOSE SUMMER JOBS, they are out there, you just have to hunt them down and be dedicated to the process.

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perla in Lima, Peru

38 months ago

Host said: Are jobs in this industry on the rise? Are there any sub-sectors that are growing?

Where are the jobs? Which places have the most urban planner opportunities?

Urban Planners, Urban designers, architects... we all got plenty work to do, we need to reinvent the world... create new policies, new styles or approaches for design.... do not expect to find a job position .. create your job by proposing what you think should be done! I studied cities design and Urban Cultures in London plus architecture in Peru... and at the very beginning thought it was a waste of time.. until realizing that those skills need to be apply to create a better world not merely to find a good salary into a prestigious firm.. I started preparing ideas upon critical situations in cities like natural desasters, environmental issues, social conflicts... scarse resources.. unemployment ect... and propose some ideas to local goverments so that get finance to make strategies, design, research and fulfilling my soul with such a freedom ..... urban planners or cities designers we got not only the task to develop complex work for firms also to create new better places and that is constant worldwide issue! dont miss out !

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Oh dear in Cork, Ireland

38 months ago

Got my masters in Urban Planning this September, out of the 30 odd people who did the Mrups with me I think maybe three have jobs? the rest are Canada or New Zealand borne. Not the most encouraging situation

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Bubba in Toronto, Ontario

38 months ago

not joking in Ottawa, Ontario said: I was a TA at a College affiliated with a University (Guelph-Humber), I never taught. A professor with 10 years of education and 17 years of experience did the teaching. I just did the grading, and led tutorials. In other words, I turned his jargon-laded lecture into plain English for confused Undergrads. Make no mistake, if I had 20 years experience teaching the same thing over and over, I’d either be too jaded to care about the students, or too embedded into my field to speak in plain English.

That’s why they want “fresh blood” to conduct tutorials. We’re suppose to create a less intimidating learning environment from students. Students like to think that the TA is somebody they can approach, as opposed to a grumpy old PhD. Some TA’s do it better than others, some are just god awful, considering the feed back I had, its safe to say I did a good job.

You are the God not Joking
Good for you..you know so much..all theses people all know what you know.

For anyone who need to know the Humber college Public Admin program runs out of humber college and not Humber-Guelp University but what ever

and
Indeed Marketing person/ Forum looker oner...please dont remove my comments for no reason. its discussion and not abuse

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