Concerns about being a vet assistant

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (2)

Bill OLeary in Chatsworth, California

42 months ago

First let me say I think its great you want to work in Veterinary Medicine. As far as your questions:
1. You probably do know more then the average person. You probably don’t know near as much as you think you do in comparison to a seasoned assistant. Being a good veterinary assistant is a lot more then sub q fluids and vaccinations. In the interviewing process make sure your humble and let them know you know how much you have to learn and your thirst to learn more then how much you know. There are a lot of books you can read but none compare to hands on. If I remember I will ask my interns what books they are reading in school now.
2. When they ask about finances I would say you just want to get your foot in the door and you understand that this will be an entry level position. But as long as the opportunity to learn and advance is their your interested.
3. I don’t know much about your social disorder but. Yes I assume it will be a problem. In most hospitals you will have to deal with co workers and customers in stressful situations.

Good luck
[this comment has been edited by a forum moderator]

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

VT Student in Long Beach, California

42 months ago

Hi blu87,

I am taking online courses with an AVMA-accredited school in New Mexico that offers an AAS degree in Veterinary Technology. The main textbook we use in the first level is McCurnin's "Clinical Textbook for Veterinary Technicians" 7th Edition by Joanna M. Bassert and Dennis M. McCurnin. You can buy it along with the workbook through amazon.com (about $90), or you may be able to check out the textbook through a library. The book covers a wide range of fundamental concepts and info -and it has photos, too.

There are many topics studied in a VT program, and the ultimate goal is to finish with the degree in order to sit for the VTNE and become credentialed (certified, licensed, or registered) in one's state of practice.

The job market everywhere is sad, and if you have an opportunity to gain hands-on experience, then go fo it! I wish you the best of luck helping critters in your area.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.