Veterinary Receptionist - Interview Attire

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (13)

terryjojake in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania

56 months ago

I'm coming from a corporate environment and am trying to get a foot into
a veterinary receptionist/assistant position. Can anyone advise me as to the correct attire to wear for an upcoming interview in this position? Do I still stick to a business suit or would black pants, nice top and shoes be acceptable -I am a female. Thanks!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

56 months ago

You can stick to a suit, but slacks and a nice blouse would also be acceptable. Veterinary receptionists can help to make or break the professional appearance of a veterinary facility, so showing that you take the job seriously by professional attire and attitude can really help you in an interview.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Cimawr in Baltimore, Maryland

55 months ago

I have to disagree with Cindy. The rule of thumb for job inteviews is to dress as if you are ready to start work, or to be ONE step more dressed up than the job would require.
Since most veterinary receptionists wear a uniform of company shirt or scrub top and khaki-type pants, or scrubs both top and bottom, abusiness suit is WAAAAAY overdressing. IMO it would be likely to count against you since it gives the impression you don't understand what the job is like.
I can tell you that where I work, we recently interviewed several people for a front desk position, and the person who showed up in a skirt and heels had an instant black mark against her.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

Terryjojake in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania

55 months ago

I agree Cimawr, I went on that interview in black pants, heels, and a nice work top and felt sooooo out of place. The other girls there for the interview came in jeans and a scrub top. Thanks, the next interview I go on will be way less dressed down!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Veronica in Los Angeles, California

37 months ago

It's really hit or miss on the attire part. I know when I interview people I like to see them dressed nicely. If they are in scrubs I like for them to not be wrinkled. It also depends on what kind of clinic your applying to. If it's a corporate clinic like VCA or Banfield, I would recommend slacks and a nice blouse. If it's your regular mom/pop clinic some nice scrubs would work too.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Sue in Alpharetta, Georgia

18 months ago

As a practice manager, I would suggest avoiding jeans or a scrub top. The front desk is the first impression of the hospital. Dress business casual, not a suit, and avoid high heels. Be more conservative but professional. I agree with Veronica that slacks and a nice blouse work, even at a mom/pop clinic.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Cimawr in Elkton, Maryland

9 months ago

Adding to my previous comment - I agree with Sue that jeans and a scrub top aren't appropriate attire either! Business suit, any kind of skirt, any sort of heels are over-dressing, but jeans are absolutely UNDER-dressing and in the places I've worked/am working would also count against you.
I would recommend a nice pair of slacks (dress khakis are what I've worn), nice FLAT shoes, a professional-looking top (non-fussy short-sleeved sweater or top, or a nice polo shirt), with perhaps a simple blazer-type jacket to finish it off. Jewelry should be minimal (nothing big or dangly), as should makeup.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

eagertofly in Belfast, United Kingdom

9 months ago

Jeans and a Scrub top with boots. I am a Vet and I also am trained in HR. I just hired someone earlier today in fact and in all her interviews she came dressed in attire ready for work. In fact she found out ahead of time the colour of the scrub tops and wore that. Her hair was long and up in a pony tail and she wore a hat that matched the scrub top as well. She was clean and presentable with light make up. Her qualifications where impeccable as well. In fact she was so ready to go she is currently at the clinic right now going through her induction and 1st day training today.

As far as jewelery if you where any make it short errings and no necklaces or anything else. Be weary of wearing perfume at a vet clinic or anything like that. Light make up please do not look like it comes on with trowl and shovel and no false eyelashes.

This is so very important to follow regardless of the vet clinic you are interviewing at. Do not wear skirt and heals this is not a typical office job. This is a job where animals are at. This is a job even if it involves paperwork is still about animals. Do not wear anything flashy or intense either.

I could write a book on this. It depends on the vet clinic but some times office staff is also expected to muck in if they are short staffed. You could find yourself answering phones while cleaning cages and feeding and watering. So best look the part be prepared for what is expected.

Do you love animals and do not care if they shyt or vomit on you, also you said receptionist/Assistant? Does it say about handling animals. Can you handle the stress of dealing with owners who are in a true flap over their animals? Can you be sensitive and kind no matter how rude someone is and understand why they are? Can you handle blood, mucus and intense smells? Think long and carefully? This is not a glamorous job at all far from it and any other questions I am here for a bit. Good luck and do not forget to smile this is a people animal job.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

eagertofly in Belfast, United Kingdom

9 months ago

If you feel jeans are not good enough then fine wear slacks with a scrub top. But seriously remember all I said above. If you can you could go in to said vet clinic and see what the staff is wearing ahead of time and then emulate it. When I interview someone I always hand them a small animal and see what their reaction is. This could be a cat, dog, rabbit, turtle etc whatever is handy and available that is reasonably tame and wont hurt them. Be prepared Be prepared Be prepared!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

eagertofly in Belfast, United Kingdom

9 months ago

just realized how old this well whatever lol. Maybe our comments will help someone else.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Cimawr in Elkton, Maryland

9 months ago

Yep, it's an old thread, but people still search for subjects and read them. :-) My advice on what to wear is intended for situations where the person being interviewed doesn't know what the dress code for the clinic's front desk is.

In all 3 clinics where I've worked, the front desk is expected to dress "business casual", which for those clinics means khaki pants, non-flashy athletic shoes, and a polo shirt (two places provided company polos, the place where I currently work expects us to supply our own in a plain style and one of two colors). It looks professional, but does allows for the constant movement, cleaning, and occasional assist with animal restraint that comes with the territory.

If you've actually BEEN to the clinic and have seen what the front desk wears, then wearing something as close as possible to it, but slightly dressier, would be the appropriate thing to to do.
However, I would NEVER recommend wearing jeans even you saw someone wearing them at the desk; in the US, jeans are nearly always considered inappropriate for a job interview, even if it's a job where you would *wear* jeans.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Cimawr in Elkton, Maryland

9 months ago

BTW I like your idea of handing over an animal and seeing the reaction.
Where I work, after the the initial office interview we have candidates come in for "working interviews" where they "shadow" someone at the front desk. If that someone is me, I make VERY sure to let them know the job requires keeping the office clean, and that means not just routine use of vacuum, mop, and broom but cleaning windows and cleaning up animal waste, blood, and vomit.
I also make VERY sure they know not to expect to go home at official closing time every day.

On my previous job, the manager hired a mature individual who quit after one week because she wasn't willing to clean up blood, vomit, and poop when accidents happened in the waiting room. On my current job, a young lady was hired while I was away on vacation; on her first day of work, she asked me how soon after closing time we could leave. I replied "Anywhere from 20 minutes to 3 hours, depending on what walks through that door." She quit two days later, after having to stay 35 minutes after close.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

eagertofly in Belfast, United Kingdom

9 months ago

Cimawr in Elkton, Maryland said: BTW I like your idea of handing over an animal and seeing the reaction.

I am from the USA specifically Alaska. My point about Jeans was that if all else fails it is better then too dressy and wearing a dress and heals. I started the practice of handing an animal to some one to see their reaction. If I feel they can not handle it or they refuse which has happened then the interview is concluded and they fail. I tell them why and give them another chance. I use Small Dogs, Cats, bunnies not exotic animals as that is too much I agree.

I have 0 tolerance for those who can not handle blood, spit, vomit, shyt and every thing else that comes from handling animals. In the final interview the person has to clean cages and clean cat poop or a horse stall and also deal with cleaning up some thing like blood and/or vomit. It is not timed to a point it is more to see their reactions. I am a people person and love helping people. But this is a point that has to be done first. They must be able to handle hard work and also your right about staying after hours. That is the reality and it is a fact. However their are moments when it becomes crystal clear why one does this. I look for that special some thing that can not be trained/taught and it is what it is.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.